America and West Indies
October 1729, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

Year published

1937

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500-511

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'America and West Indies: October 1729, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 500-511. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72480 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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October 1729, 11-20

Oct. 11.
Boston,
New
England.
932. Col. Dunbar to the Duke of Newcastle. I landed here the 23rd of last month, since wch. onely one vessel sailed hence the next day, by wch. your Grace had an account of the death of Mr. Burnet, wch. happened in an unlucky time for the instruction he was charged with from England, tho' the Lt. Governour has pritty much insisted on ye same, but no prospect of success, nothing less than a new form of Government will bring this people to reason. Many of them heartily wish for it, those yt. do not are the lower class of people influenced by a few obstinate cunning men, among whom Dr. Cook is ye chief. Your Grace is sensible of the proposal and reports upon it from the Board of Trade for a new settlement and separate Government between New England and Nova Scotia; at my arrival here many hundred familys applyed to me, some of them haveing been petitioners to H.M. for leave to settle to the eastward of ye River of Kennebeck on ye aforementioned tract of land. At my leavcing England matters were not quite settled etc., but I was encouraged from the Lords for Trade to encourage such as would go upon ye immediate settlement and improvement of that wast land upon ye conditions mentioned in the report, which being much approved, I have been so importuned to go and begin the settlement yt. to refuse or delay it, the people would go to Pensilvania, where I am assured at least six thousand souls from ye north of Ireland have arrived in a short time, and even there, haveing heard of the design of this new settlement, some of their friends waited to know ye truth, all this together has forced me under a necessity of complying with the importunity of goeing away in 3 or 4 days with 3 sloops and about 300 men mostly with their own armes and provisions to begin ye settlement at a place called Pemequid some few miles to ye eastward of ye river of Kennebeck, I intend to call it St. George's, it is the best scituation for trade and a fine country round it. I propose to view the woods thereabouts and to return in a month thro' the province of Main and New Hampshire where I hope now to be able to secure what masts etc. are left fitt for H.M. use. In the spring at least 1,000 familys will go from this country to the new settlements, and as soon as they can open the ground, they will try all sorts of grain and hemp and flax ; every family promises a little, so yt. in a year I hope to send some small quantity home in perfection for the approbation of the Navy ; the people who go downe now will be imployed this winter in building hutts, clearing land, and makeing staves, and cutting timber for small vessels. I brought over with me a quantity of tools for these purposes and I carry with me provisions for such as had no fund to provide for themselves until they can repay it out of their labour; it can scarce be believed wt. a spirit there is among them to carry on this affair, the short time I have been here, a continual crowd has been about me, and some Gentlemen of this country who had old claims and titles, some of them Indian deeds, others from the Council at Plymouth in 1629, others from K. Charles the first, have come to me to shew their claims, no settlemts. or improvements were ever made on any of these claimes. One of them is for 30 miles square from 30 Gentlemen who have associated themselves by the name of a company and ye famous Dr. Cook at their head, this gentleman's character is so well known at the Council Board yt. I need say little of him, but when I told him and ye rest yt. I understood yt. all that country was upon examination before the King in Council 5 or 6 years agoe declared to be absolutely in H.M. disposal, without any reserve to any person, and yt. now H.M. being desireous to have it settled and made usefull to England would give the encouragement of granting lands from 50 to 100 acres pr. head in each family, or more in proportion to their ability to improve, reserveing onely one penny pr. acre quit rent or acknowledgment to ye Crowne, the Doctor answered that they were in possession, would not give one farthing, would as soon go to law with the King as any other man, and would see who dispossess them. I could not help being a good deal ruffled at this declaration and the manner of delivering it, but for reasons wch. I have taken ye freedome to mention in my letter to the Lords Commissioners for Trade, I onely sayd they had better apply at home to have H.M. answer or confirmation of their claims, and I assured them that no one with me should settle on any part of it until I heard from home ; I must do that justice to some of the gentlemen as to own that they have come to me since and blamed ye Doctor and seem pleased with the King's termes, they now apply home, but leave the Doctor out of their list, fearing it might hurt them, they call themselves the Moscongos Company. There are two other companys one of 58, the other of 32 in number associated and claim a great many thousand acres on Shepscott River not farr from Kennebeck, and one single Minister whose name is Toppan claims above 300,000 acres by an Indian deed, wch. he tells me is now before the Board of Trade, several of these gentlemen are pleased with the termes proposed, if they might have 2, 3 or 4 thousand acres each, and would immediately improve and oblige themselves in particular to raise hemp, others are of Mr. Cook's temper; there are many other like claimes, and all now sett a higher vallue on the lands, tho' they have for the most part ever yet layn waste, and wd. continue so but that they imagine that they might now make some advantage of them by sale or lease, and upon some of these lands, thus claimed, stands the best woods for H.M. use etc. Continues:-Tho' in the report from the Lords Commissioners for Trade, this new province, wch. is called Georgia, is sayd to be part of, and devided from the Governmt. of Nova Scotia, yet the Lt. Governor here told me in the presence of the Secretary of this Province that it is part of this Governmt. and they insist upon it, I told him I never heard they had any claim to it etc. Continues:-There are some small tribes of Indians in the neighbourhood of the place I propose to settle first, but doubt not to make them friends, if they were to be allowed some small presents as at New York, the expence would be well layd out, this and a few guns, small armes and ammunition in the spring is all the charge I would propose to the publique, and if I am to be honourd with the management of the undertakeing, I am satisfyed to be upon my good behaviour etc. Refers to his letter to the Board of Trade. Signed, David Dunbar. Endorsed, Reed., R. 19th Nov. 6 pp. [CO. 5, 898. No. 61.]
Oct. 11.
Bermuda.
933. Lt. Governor Pitt to Charles Cholmunly. Hears that Capt. Rogers has obtained an order to take off his company to Providence etc. Continues:—The Company was settled by King William heere at ye request of ye inhabitants in time of peace and by Act of Parlmt.: being ye onely security to the magazines and ye towne of St. Georges and if occasion to surpress ye negroes who are very numerous and stand in great aw off ye soldiers. Wee have above 150 sayle of sloopes bee longing to this iland but are three parts of ye yeare abroad that wee cannot upon allmost any emergency raise 500 men and onely are at home the two hurricane monthes and that ye company is ye whole supporte of the iland ten months in ye yeare etc. My Lord Goodolphin was the onely man who procur'd mee this Government but cannot now trobe (? trouble) him on this subject, etc. Desires his services etc. Continues:— Our Councill and Assembly meet in a few dayes and they designe to draw up a representation and petition to be laid before his Majesty in Councill to get the order for the Company revoaked, and likewise that ye King would grant yt. there may bee a small man of war station'd heere and will likewise write to ye Duke of Newcastle and to ye Lords of Trade who know best what condition these islands are in and how they ought to be supported as Bermuda is ye key of America on whose safety depends all ye West India trade. I can say noe more to you on this affayer for just now came a sloope from St. Christophers ye most surprising and unwelcome newes of my poore Lord Londonderry's death hee had been three weeke on his voyage hither and he sayes hee was buried ye weeke before hee came away hee tells mee yt Generll Mathews and Smith are together by the eares yt as soone as my Lord was dead they went to work in ye Secretaries Office tearing the papers and fighting that they were not fit to shew their faces in three or fower dayes and Mathews was turning out all those officers his Lordsp. had made. He say noe more on this malancholy subject but our most humble sarvice to yr. good Lady and little famyly. Signed, John Pitt. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 8.]
Oct. 11.934. Thomas Lowndes to Mr. Popple. The Palatins sent to view Carolina etc. (v. 7th Aug.) have been at Port Royal etc., approve very much of the country, and have made an advantagious report of the country to those that sent them. Signed, Tho. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 31st Oct., 1729. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 361. ff. 30, 31v.]
Oct. 12.
London.
935. Thomas Burnett to the Duke of Newcastle. As the Board of Trade have directed me, as Agent to my brother, to transmit to him a petition from the Agents for the House of Representatives etc., and as the miscarriage of such a packet may be greatly prejudicial to the interest of the Province and perhaps it may be questioned whether I ever did transmit such a petition etc., prays that "it may go under the protection of your cover. P.S. The packets for New England are taken in at the New England Coffeehouse near the Exchange and the next ships go on Tuesday next." Signed, T. Burnett. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 752. No. 42.]
Oct. 13.
Council
Office.
936. Minutes of Privy Council. To peruse the accounts of the tryal of the ship att Jamaica wch. has been tryed and cleared. To write to Governor Hunter to express ye King's surprise yt. the ship had been tried when ye orders were to keep them till further order. To consider what method can be taken to enforce ye execution of these orders to ye Capts. of ye ships in ye W. Indies. Send to ye Board of Trade about punishments etc. 1 1/8 pp. [C.O. 5, 36. ff. 3, 3v.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
937. Order of Committee of Privy Council. Referring back the representation of 29th Nov. last to the Council of Trade and Plantations to consider the value of the lands in the Bahamas, and what sum may be proper to be given for them, and to enquire who are the present Proprietors thereof, and what methods are most proper to be taken, towards making their said proposal effectual etc. Signed Ja. Vernon. En-, dorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 31st Oct., 1729. 1 p. [C.O. 23, 2. ff. 206, 207v.]
Oct. 14.
Squirrel.
St. Johns,
New-
foundland.
938. Capt. Osborn, Governor of Newfoundland, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate, mutatis mutandis, of following letter to Duke of Newcastle. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Endorsed, Recd. 10th Nov., 1729, Read 8th April, 1730. Holograph. 5¾ pp. Enclosed,
938. i, ii. Duplicates of following enclosures i, ii. Same endorsement. 8 pp. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 240–242v., 243v., 248–249v.]
Oct. 14.
St. Johns,
New-
foundland.
939. Capt. Osborn, to the Duke of Newcastle. In obedience to H.M. Instructions, 31st May, etc., transmits following particulars etc. Continues:—I have divided the Island into convenient districts, and have appointed over each of those, the little time I have been there would admit me to visit, out of the inhabitants and planters of the best characters, such a number of Justices of the Peace, and Constables, according to the bigness of the Fisherys they preside over, as I judged necessary, in case they do their duty, to preserve peace and quietness etc. Encloses further particulars and copy of the Commission given by him to the Justices, "drawn up in the best manner I was capable, not being well acquainted with the forms, nor time to prepare them before I had the honour to receive H.M. commands to be gone" etc. Continues:—As I could set apart no house, that was proper for a prison in the manner H.M. commanded, but in regard that many delinquents escape with impunity for want of places proper to secure them in, I have ordered a rate which the Justices of Peace pre- sented unto me as of little burthen to the people to be raised within the districts of St. Johns and Ferryland for the building a prison in each of those places, and as this rate is no greater than half a quintal of merchantable fish per boat, and half a quintal for every boat's room including the ships rooms fishing on the Banks that have no boats with the like proportionable rate upon such persons in trade as are not concerned in the Fisherys, and only for one fishing season, I humbly presume it will meet with your Grace's approbation. For punishing of petty crimes I have erected several pair of stocks, and with humble submission I make no doubt but all these measures well executed would be sufficient to suppress the great disorders, that have been too frequently committed in this Island, but what yet is to be feared, is that as the best of these Magistrates are but mean people, and not used to be subject to any Govern- ment, that no longer than they have a superior amongst them, will they be obedient to any orders that are given; besides these measures, My Lord Vere and I have done many acts of Justice to the inhabitants and planters, and particularly at Placentia, where we have restored several plantations which Col. Gledhill has unjustly possessed for several years, and as I apprehend we should have taken from him many more which he holds by very unjust tenures, had the proper proprietors been on the spot to have sued for the same. The complaints of the inhabitants against the disorders committed by the great number of Irish Roman Catholicks who remain here in the winter is the only thing further I have to lay before your Grace, hoping by the measures your Grace may be pleased to recom- mend, they may be free from the insults of those people, who very often plunder them, and threaten them with their being superior in number etc. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Endorsed, Rd. 10th Nov. 3½ pp. Enclosed,
939. i. Districts of Newfoundland (v. preceding) and places where the Magistrates preside. (Bonavista, Trinity, Carbonier, St. Johns, Ferryland, Placentia). ¾ p.
939. ii. Commission appointing Justices of the Peace, by Capt. Osborn, Governor and Commander in Chief over Newfoundland etc. (v. preceding). 8 pp. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 223–224v., 225v., 226, 227v.–231v., 233v.; and (enclosures i and ii only) 194, 23. Nos. 37, 38; and (covering letter only) 194, 24. No. 15.]
Oct. 14.
Oxford in
St. John's
Harbour.
940. Commodore Lord Vere Beauclerk to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Continues:—The Admirals of Bonavista, Trinity and Carbonier harbours have not sent me their accounts, tho' I writt twice for them, this is not the only article wherein they are negligent etc. Hopes he has not been too tedious in his replies etc. Continues:—The merchants of Bristol concern'd in this trade did last winter sign a petition that the Irish Roman Catholicks might not be suffer'd to come over here in such numbers, justly fearing the ill consequences wou'd unavoidably follow such a practise, but the person intrusted with it never deliver'd it, being owner of a ship who constantly every year practises that business etc. Signed, Vere Beauclerk. Endorsed, Recd. 10th Nov., 1729, Read 8th April, 1730. Holograph. 3 pp. Enclosed,
940. i. Commodore Lord V. Beauclerk's Answers to Heads of Enquiry relating to the Newfoundland Fishery. (iii) The Admirals are not so strict as they should have been in taking care that ballast is not thrown overboard in harbour etc., by which means several ports are almost spoil'd. But in those harbours which H.M. ships frequently visitt, they are more carefull etc. (iv–vii) Observed. No complaints, (viii) The byboat keepers seldom cure their fish upon the rooms which belong to the ships, but generally hire rooms from the planters by lease for a certain number of years, (ix) This Article (as to carrying over the correct proportion of fresh men, and the production of certificates to that effect by masters to the Admirals) is generally very ill observ'd. The Admirals indeed tell us they do demand the proper certificates from the masters of the ships, but by what I have been able to observe such only as hope to be Admirals furnish themselves as the Act directs. The others hire upon the spott as many as they find they shall have occasion for, great numbers of Irish Roman Catholics coming over here every year for that purpose, they are already so numerous that in many places there remains during the winter nine of these Irish Roman Catholicks to one English man. I need not observe of how dangerous a consequence this practice in time must be to this countrey, besides the loss to the British Navigation by the hindring so many seamen being brought up. The masters of the ships from Ireland bring them for the lucre of their passages, but att the same time confess they do a prejudice to the countrey, excusing themselves by saying, if I did not bring them another wou'd. They are of so indolent a disposition that they do not earn enough in the summer to pay their passages back again, so some go away to New England, others remain here all the winter, and are the occasion of most of the disorders that then happen. (x) The inhabitants in general employ none but these Irish Roman Catholicks, who will very few of them ever come to be good seamen or fishermen, (xi–xiii) Complied with, (xiv) Very little order is kept till the arrival of H.M. ships, the Admirals in most of the harbours being illeterate, and in this respect very indolent men who regard little else but their own private interests. I hope now that Justices of the Peace are appointed it will be otherwise. I can't find that the Admirals of the harbours have for these many years made any return to H.M. Privy Council of the number of ships, boats etc. (xv) They generally defer bringing their disputes and differences to any trial, till the arrival of H.M. ships, for as the Admirals of the harbours are themselves traders, they must in most cases be directly or indirectly a party concern'd, the people therefore imagine that they will be partial etc. (xvi) In the ports where H.M. ships reside, this Article (as to the Lord's Day) is pretty well observ'd, and I hope the Justices of the Peace will take care the same be done in the other places, (xvii) In some places there are some men from New England who keep by-boats to fish, whether they are esteem'd aliens or strangers by the Law I cou'd not really determine, so wou'd not venture to disturb them, (xix) The meaner sort of the inhabitants subsist entirely upon salt provisions and fish, where the countrey is clear'd of the wood, it produces very good grass, the inhabitants breed a few cattle every year, but are cheifly supply'd from the Plantations in America, (xx) They are supplied with cloth, tackle, cloths and other manu- factures entirely from Great Britain, (xxi) The wages they allow their servants are different, from £4 to £25 sterl., according to their goodness and stations. They supply them whilst in the countrey with what they call necessarys, which is generally rum att an extravagant price, this deducted they give them a bill for the remainder, (xxii) The charge of fitting out and maintaining a fishing boat for the season amounts to £120 sterl. (xxiii) When it is bad weather and on days not proper for curing of fish, the inhabitants employ their servants about any domestick work they may have occasion for. They generally allow four men to each boat, and make no difference in the price of their fish, (xxiv) The inhabitants in the winter employ themselves in repairing their flakes and stages, and in building arid repairing their boats, in cutting wood for fewell and in preparing everything for the ensuing fishing season. Some I apprehend may mispend their time in drinking and debaucherys, especially as till now they had no persons amongst them lawfully impower'd to restrain them from such excesses, (xxv) The furring trade is almost quite lost in this countrey. There was not £500 worth taken last winter, and by their constant cruel usage to the Indians wherever they meet them, all traffick with them is entirely cutt off. (xxvi) Their houses etc. are in most places at a convenient distance from the water side, (xxvii) The inhabitants claim a right to all such stages as they have built upon places not possess'd by the fishing ships since 1685, and receive rent for such of them as they do not employ themselves, (xxviii) Five flakes are generally allowed to each of the fishing boats, and they are extended in length from the shore up into the land, (xxix) I cou'd never find in any of the harbours that any regular account had been kept what places belong'd to the fishing ships before nor since 1685. They have indeed a traditional one, which I beleive is pretty exact, there being seldom disputes of this kind. (xxx) The ships that come directly from Great Brittain to Newfound- land are victuall'd and provided with their necessarys of British product, but most of them go first to Ireland where they load with provisions, and take in the Irish passengers that are such an annoyance to this countrey. (xxxi) No ships are allow'd the priviledge of being Admirals in any of the harbours but such as bring proper certificates of their having clear'd out of some port in Great Brittain. (xxxii) The masters of the fishing ships know perfectly what are their priviledges, and are very ready to apply for redress in case they are depriv'd of them either by the Admirals or others. (xxxiii) The boatkeepers generally hire stages, flakes etc. of the planters by lease for a certain term of years, or else they every year build themselves when they come in proper places not belonging to the fishing ships. (xxxiv) The ships from Biddeford and Barnstable are now the only ones that go upon shares with their companys. The charge of fitting out a ship of 100 tons with 50 men and 10 boats is about £100 sterl. (xxxv, xxxvi) I did not convict any persons of carrying on an illegal or contreband trade, and beleive this article is seldom broke, (xxxvii) I am inform'd that every year there is brought to Newfoundland to the value of 10,000 or £12,000 in rum, molosses, sugar, tobacco, bread, and flower from the American Plantations, but none of the other enumerated commodities, nor is any indirect trade carry'd on to Spain, Portugal or any other place that I cou'd find out. (xxxviii) The merchants of New England send their goods to factors residing here, who dispose of them for fish or bills of exchange, if they take fish I am told they chuse the worst sort, which comes att a low price, and which they ship for the Western Islands and the West Indies for the negroes, (xxxix) In St. John's there are 10 taverns or publick houses for entertainment kept by the inhabitants and licens'd by the Justices of the Peace, these often trust the seamen and do many other irregular things, but the greatest mischief is every master of a ship and every by-boatkeeper sells liquors to their own servants att an extravagant rate, and permitt them to run in their debts more than the amount of their wages, (xl) All the inhabitants in general are guilty of this fault (trusting their servants with rum beyond their wages), which is a very great prejudice to the Fishery, (xli) £4 10s. is generally the price they pay for their passages, sometimes in fish, but too often in the manner above-mentioned. (xlii) This method of trusting the fishermen is certainly the occasion of all the faults, disputes and disorders that happen, and of greater prejudice to the Fishery than 'tis possible to express, but I am att a loss how to remedy so general an evill. (xliii) The masters of the fishing ships and by-boats do most certainly encourage their men to stay behind and connive att their going away to New England in order to save the expence of sending them home. I am told about 200 remained last year including the Irish Roman Catholicks. (xliv, xlv) The New England vessells do every year continue to carry away great numbers of seamen etc., when one of H.M. ships is not in the port they sail from. When we are present we oblige them to enter into bonds under penalty of £500 if they carry away one man, but as the masters of the ships, of the by-boats and the inhabitants are all interested and concern'd in it, it is almost impossible to gett any proof of the breach of these obligations. (xlvi) I strictly commanded the Admirals to enjoin the masters of the ships, by-boats and inhabitants to be very carefull and diligent in the curing of their fish, laying before them the bad consequence it would otherwise have, and that they shou'd return me the names of such as they found faulty therein. They allow 10 hhds. or 640 gallons of salt for the curing every 100 quintals of fish. The fish taken near the shore is the most esteem'd. As I hope the cause of complaint from abroad is ceas'd, I don't trouble your Lordships with anything more relating to this Article. (xlvii) I cou'd not gett any positive or satisfactory account of the state of the French Fishery, (xlviii) There is not any of the French inhabitants remaining att Placentia. (xlix) By the best information I cou'd gain, I did not hear that the French who come to this countrey to fish do anything contrary to the Treatys nor do they ever come from Cape Breton to hunt or fur in the winter, (li) The salmon Fishery formerly belonging to George Skeffington is now in the hands of several people, to whom he has dispos'd of the property he had in it, the quantity caught every year is uncertain, this year about 130 tierces, in Great Salmonier, 100, and in Little Salmonier, about 90. 25½ pp.
940. ii. Scheme of the Newfoundland Fishery for 1729. Totals: Fishing ships, 190 (including 42 from America); burthen, 12,280; men belonging thereto, 3011; passengers on British ships, 1680; boats kept, 690; by-boatmen, 1,652; quintals of fish made, 170,220, carried to foreign markets, 163,450, and 199 tierces of salmon; train oil made, 1,234½ tons; prices of fish, from 28 to 25 ryals per quintal, salmon from £3 to £2 5s. pr. tierce; train oil, from £9 to £12 pr. ton. Value of seal oil taken last winter, £1,075, furs, £60; number of stages, 278; of trainfatts, 18; of families, 207; land improved, 2 acres in Trespassy, 3 plantations in Ferryland; number of inhabitants, 1,446; of which remained last winter, 1,241; births, since departure of last convoy, 9; deaths, 8. 4 pp.
940. iii. Names of Justices (17) and Constables (33) appointed for the 4 districts (v. 12th Nov.). 2 pp. Nos. i–iii endorsed as covering letter. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 262– 276v., 278v.–281, 282v.]
Oct. 15.
Councill
Office,
Whitehall.
941. Mr. Vernon to Mr. Popple. The Lords of the Com- mittee desire the Lords Commissioners for Trade etc. to attend them on Thursday next at 6 in the evening, to discourse with them on their reports upon the Memorial of the Agents of Massachusets Bay, and upon the Address of the Council of N. Carolina against their Governor etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 16th Oct., 1729. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 870. ff. 277, 278v.]
Oct. 16.
Bermuda.
942. Lt. Governor Pitt to Charles Delafaye. Entreats his support for following petitions. Signed, John Pitt. Endorsed, pr. penny post Nov. 11th, 1730 [sic]. Addressed. Sealed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 9.]
Oct. 16.
Bermuda.
943. Lt. Governor and Council of Bermuda to the Duke of Newcastle. We etc. on behalf of the inhabitants who are great sufferers by the Spaniards, that have taken and illegally detained our vessels and goods: the account whereof is here- unto annexed, which we humbly conceive is against the Law of Nations, earnestly pray for your Grace's concurrence in such measures as in yor. wisdom, you shall find may best tend to the relief of the sufferers. This case we have desired to be humbly presented to His Majesty etc. Pray for his interest in obtaining their requests in following petition. Signed, John Pitt and 6 Councillors. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
943. i. Account of the masters vessels and cargoes of Bermuda, lately taken by the Spaniards. 13 ships and cargoes valued at £9,100, and several slaves taken at Turks Islands, £400. Endorsed, R. Nov. 11th, 1730. ¾ p. [C.O. 37, 29. Nos. 10, 10 i.]
Oct. 16.
Bermuda.
944. Petition and Representation of the Lt. Governor, Council and Assembly of Bermuda to the King. Several of your Majesty's subjects here who are chiefly supported by trading in their vessels among yor. Majesties Plantations in America have been taken by the Spaniards and carried into Spanish ports, as the Havana St. Domingo and others: their vessels and goods been seized and illegally detained (against the Law of Nations we humbly conceive) the masters and sailors exposed to extreme hardships, and the owners so great sufferers, that the only remedy now left them, is at this distance to cast them- selves at your Majesty's feet imploring relief etc. Pray H.M. to grant a small ship of war to be stationed there, and the Commander to advise with the Governor and Council etc. Pray that the Independent Company of soldiers may be con- tinued there for the better security of the island, "they having upon all occasions exerted themselves, when our coasts have been infested with privateers and pyrates" etc. Signed, by the Governor, 12 members of Council, and 25 members of Assembly. Endorsed, Copy sent to Mr. Keene, Aug. 24th, 1730. 1 large p. Torn. [C.O. 37, 29. No. 11.]
Oct. 16.
Bermuda.
945. Lt. Governor and Council of Bermuda to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enclose above petition and pray for their favourable representation to H.M. etc. Signed, John Pitt and 7 members of Council. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Mitchell) 20th, Read 22nd July, 1730. 1 p. Enclosed,
945. i. Duplicate of No. 943 i. [C.O. 37,12. ff 52, 53, 54v.; and (endorsed Recd. 24th, Read 26th Nov., 1730) 62v.]
Oct. 17.946. Notes for letter to Governor Hunter (v. Oct. 13) and memoranda of other Colonial business transacted at the Privy Council. ? In Mr. Delafaye's hand. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 36. ff 5, 5v.]
Oct. 20.
New York.
947. Governor Montgomerie to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Abstract. Will obey instructions of 8th May as to the Act for the easier partition of lands, and holding courts of Chancery etc. Printed, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. p. 897. Signed, J. Montgomerie. Endorsed, Recd. 21st Nov., 1729, Read 22nd April, 1730. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1055. ff 123–124v.]