America and West Indies
November 1729, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

Year published

1937

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515-527

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'America and West Indies: November 1729, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 36: 1728-1729 (1937), pp. 515-527. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72482 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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November 1729, 1-15

Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
957. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. Enclose warrant for using new seal (v. Oct. 1st). You are immediately to return to us the old seal etc. [C.O. 138, 17. p. 282].
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
958. Same to Governor Worsley. Similar to preceding. [C.O. 29, 15. p. 117].
Nov. 6.
Squirrel,
Lisbon.
959. Governor Osborn to Mr. Popple. The season of the year requireing me to sail with the Trade bound to Portugal, I had no oppertunity of makeing any further progress in settling the civil magistracy then I gave an acct. of 11th Oct., but I thought it was necessary to leave some Instructions (founded upon those I had the honour to receive) with Lt. Col. Gledhill for his conduct while he remains at Placentia, and in his absence to the Commanding Officer etc. Refers to enclosures. What has been received from the Office of Ordinance, expended, or sold, I could get no acct. of, (notwithstanding I gave an order to the Storekeeper for that purpose) etc. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Endorsed, Recd. 6th Dec, 1729, Read 8th April, 1730. 2 pp. Enclosed,
959. i. Warrant by Henry Osborn, "Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the Island of New- foundland in America, the fort and garrison at Placentia, and all other forts and garrisons erected or to be erected in that Island," to William Keen, William Weston and Alyn Southmayd, Justices of the Peace, in St. Johns, directing them to build a prison and make an estimate of a rate for that purpose. St. Johns Harbour, 23rd Aug., 1729. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Copy. 1 p.
959. ii. Messrs. Keen, Weston and Southmayd to Governor Osborn. St. John's, Aug. 25th, 1729. Propose rates, as described Nov. 12th, encl. i, to raise £150 sterl. Signed, W. Keen, Wm. Weston, Alyn Southmayd. Copy. 1 p.
959. iii. Warrant by Governor Osborn, directing same to raise levy proposed. St. John's, 26th Aug., 1729. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Copy. 1 p.
959. iv. Proclamation imposing above rate. St. John's, 5th Oct., 1729. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Copy. 1 p.
959. v. Warrant to Mr. Justice Weston, Roger Dench and John Degrave for collecting above rate etc. 11th Oct., 1729. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Copy. 1¾ pp.
959. vi. Specification of proposed prison. ½ p. Nos. i–vi, endorsed as covering letter.
959. vii. Instructions given by Governor Osborn to Lt. Gov. Gledhill and the Commanding Officer for the time being. 6th Sept., 1729. (i) You are to obey the instructions you have received, or shall receive from me. (ii) You and the garrison are not to concern yourselves in the Fishery, interrupt the fishermen, or take any beaches, stages or cook rooms, (iii) You are to use your utmost endeavours to prevent illegal trade etc. (iv) To require obligations from New England masters not to carry away seamen and handicraftmen belonging to Newfoundland, and to see that such are properly witnessed, (v) To secure delinquents in the fort, (vi) Report proceedings. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp.
959. viii. Account of Stores of War in Fort Frederick. Placentia, Sept. 9th, 1729. Signed, Charles Trowe. Same endorsement. 4 pp. [C.O. 194, 8. ff. 250– 252v., 253v.–257v., 259–260v., 261v.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
960. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses copies of papers relating to the suspension of Lewis Morris, for their report. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 9th Nov., Read 17th Dec, 1729. 1 p. Enclosed,
960. i. Copy of No. 827. Endorsed, Read 17th Dec, 1729. 11½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1055. ff. 48, 49v–56v., 57v.]
Nov. 6.
Barbados.
961. Governor Worsley to the Duke of Newcastle. Encloses duplicate of Sept. 27th, since which he has issued writs for a new Assembly etc. Continues:—They were accordingly chosen the 3d, and mett together the 4 instant etc. Repeats part of 27th Sept. Continues:—As I have not as yet had the honour to receive H.M. commands in relation to the law, the people mett together and have chosen the same representatives as were in, the last year, so that I presume they will still persist in their opinion, that the law is determined, at least till H.M. shall be pleased to signifie to the contrary by his order in Council etc. Othniel Haggatt Esq. died in his passage to Bermuda, where he intended to go, for the recovery of his health etc. Recommends, to fill his place in the Council, Thomas Maxwell Esqr., son of the late Thomas Maxwell Esq., who was many years a member of Council. "Mr. Maxwell is extreamely well affected to the Crown in the House of Hanover, and is a gentleman of a very good and clear estate," etc. Signed, Henry Worsley. Endorsed, R. Jan. 23. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 45. ff. 75–76v.]
Nov. 7.
O.S. 1729.
962. Governor Osborn to the Duke of Newcastle. Duplicate of No. 959, mutatis mutandis. Signed, Hen. Osborn. Endorsed, R. 6th Dec. Holograph. 2¼ pp. Enclosed,
962 iviii. Duplicates of Nos. 959 i–viii. [C.O. 194, 24. Nos. 16, 16 i–viii].
Nov. 10.
London.
963. Thomas Coram to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Pursuant to your commands I here present to your Lordships' consideration, two or three hints which I most humbly conceive are necessary to be observed in the settlement to be made in the King's Country of Nova Scotia, by a proposed colony of German families under the care of Mr. Daniel Hintze. (i) A tract of land ten miles square to be laid out etc. (ii) All high- ways and principal streets not to be less than 70 feet wide, streight and convenient, to be laid out by H.M. order and recorded in their books of the township, before any division of land be made of 100 acres to every person who shall transport himself thither under Mr. Hintze, and to their heirs, if they do not forsake it etc. For their better security against the Frenchified Indians, and [to] prevent the evil consequences which the inhabitants of New England have allwayes suffered under, by settleing in an irregular stragling and unsafe manner at first, according to every one his particular averice or fancey, there should not be lesse than sixty of the German families to settle contiguously at first in each and every village to be by them made and settled, and not to exceed three English miles from one village to another where the land will admit of it. (iii) In laying out all lands, whether it be for townships or privat persons, strict and due regard to be had for the encourage- ment and conveniency of industry and commerce on all occasions etc., always leaving land sufficient free all along by the side of all the sea-coast, and by the sides of all navigable rivers; and creeks, and by all other waters which may be navigable for a space of 100 feet in breadth, from all and every part of the sea and other navigable water etc., to remain free and common for the general conveniency of keys, wharfes, common passage, and other occasions of the inhabitants. P.S. That all fishing be free to them and their heirs forever on the sea coasts and on all navigable rivers and other waters. Signed, Thomas Coram. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 11th Nov., 1729. 2 1/8 pp. [C.O. 217, 5. ff. 123–124v.]
Nov. 12.
New
Providence.
964. Governor Rogers to the Duke of Newcastle. Duplicate, mutatis mutandis, of following letter to Council of Trade. Signed, Woodes Rogers. Endorsed, R. Jan. 25th. 2 pp. Enclosed,
964. i. Journal of Assembly of the Bahama Islands, 29th Sept.—8th Dec, 1730. 55 pp. [C.O. 23, 14. ff. 145, 145v., 146v., 148–175.]
Nov. 12.
New
Providence.
965. Governor Rogers to the Council of Trade and Plantations. This is the first opportunity I have had directly from hence to do myself the honour of writing your Lordships since my arrival which was on the 25th of August after a very severe passage. The inhabitants of these islands expressed a a general satisfaction at the hearing my commission read to find that H.M. has been pleased to appoint an Assembly, which I have thought it was very necessary to call together as soon as possible, that we might begin to make some laws, in order to encourage people from our neighbouring Colonies to come and settle amongst us, and therefore I gave the usual notice for calling an Assembly, which was chosen as well as could be expected out of the present few inhabitants and some of the Gentlemen that came over with me, and met for the first time on the 30th Sept.; but by reason of the disorders the place was in, occasioned by a violent hurricane three weeks before my arrival which had blown down the greatest part of the houses on the island, and an ague and feaver reigning ever since, the Assembly has not been able to sit and do so much buisness as was wanted in a new Colony, there are twelve acts passed (v. encl. i) etc. I purposed to have transmitted them home by this conveyance, but at this time there are not good hands in health fit to engrosse them in time etc. I am obliged to deferr sending them till H.M.S. Alborough and Happy who are now in this harbour return to S. Carolina, which will be in a few days to careen there and provide such necessaries as they may want to continue amongst these islands to survey them, with the Gulph and Windward passage according to their orders. I have thought it more proper on account of the condition I found the island in to deferr sending for the Independent Company from Bermudas till the fort, guardrooms and other places which are either blown down or very much out of repair are fitted up for their reception, which I hope will be in a month's time when I intend to send for them, having already hired a vessell for that purpose, and I hope by that time we shall be in a better state of health and have some conveniencies for receiveing new inhabitants, which I am informed we shall soon have from Bermudas and the Leeward Islands. I don't doubt when we get industrious people, such as the Bermudians generally are and who are well aquainted with these islands, but we shall be able to raise a sufficient quantity of provisions (which now we are in want of as much or more than we were ten years ago) and many comodities necessary for trade which is now at a very low ebb. My predecessor and his spouse are still on the island but will depart for South Carolina in few days. Your Lordships shall have a particular account of the state of these islands and the condition of the fortifications here, with the proposed improvements, this winter and spring with an exact account of the number of the inhabitants etc. Signed, Woodes Rogers. Endorsed, Recd. 27th Jan., Read 22nd April, 1730. 2 pp. Enclosed,
965. i. List of Acts of Bahamas passed 1729. (i) For the encouragement of strangers and foreigners settling in these islands; (ii) for settling of claims and paying of quit-rents; (iii) for laying out and regulating preserving and clearing publick common highways throughout the island of New Providence; (iv) to prevent the destroying by fire all timber trees growing on these islands; (v) for the better regulating and governing negroes and other slaves; (vi) to prevent the exportation of timber, plank and other materials fit for building of vessels to any American Colony; (vii) for levying divers sums of money for defraying the publick charges; (viii) for the better laying out the town of Nassau and regulating the building of the same; (ix) to prevent damages done by cattle running loose; (x) to encourage the stocking of keys and islands with cattle and to punish such as destroy the same; (xi) to encourage the planting of cotton on these islands; (xii) to prevent the stealing and destroying of fruits and other provisions being the the produce of these islands. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 23, 2. ff. 210–212v.]
Nov. 12.
Treasury
Chambers.
966. Mr. Scrope to Mr. Popple. Encloses following for the opinion of the Council of Trade thereon. Signed, J. Scrope. Endorsed, Recd., Read Nov. 13th, 1729. Addressed. 2/3rds p. Enclosed,
966. i. Representation of Governor, Council and Assembly of New York to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. The inhabitants of this Colony having generally applyed themselves to tillage and husbandry and bread and flower being their staple commoditys which at present by the great quantity's thereof manufactured in this and the neighbouring colonys, are both here and in the West Indies reduced to so low a price as that neither the merchant or farmer can find his account therein, and we having no means so open to view for the enlargement of our trade and commerce, as by applying ourselves to the establish- ment of a Fishery being most commodiously scituated for the same which nevertheless we cannot presume to attempt least the statute of K. Charles II. etc. for the encouragement of trade confineing the importation of salt to Newfoundland and New England should at any time be construed to our disadvantage. Pray for their mediation with the Legislature for the same privilege to be granted to them as to the Colonies abovementioned, and to Pennsylvania by a statute of the first year of his present Majesty. Connecticut, admitted to be a part of New England, enjoys the free importation of salt from Europe, whereas New York is supposed to be excluded, although Nassau or Long Island entirely forms the southern shore of that arm of the sea, whereof Connecticut does not wholly compose the northern shore etc. Granting this request will soon appear a general benefit to Great Britain "by an additional strength to the navigation thereof and the greater consumption of the wollen manufactures as this priviledge will enable us to make more direct and advantageous returns for the same." Signed, J. Montgomerie; and 9 Councillors; Ad. Philipse, Speaker, and 25 members of Assembly. Endorsed as preceding. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1055. 33–35v.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
967. Order of Committee of Council. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to report, by the 19th, on the Acts of New York complained of in following petition, and any others they may have since received in relation thereto. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd., Read Nov. 13th, 1729. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
967. i. Petition of Merchants of London trading to New York in behalf of themselves and merchants and factors in New York, and of the several manufacturers concerned in the fur trade, to the King. Complain that several Acts passed there prohibiting trade with the French in goods proper for the Indian commerce have tended to the ruin of trade with the remote Indians, are destructive to the interest of British traders in general and of New York in particular, and are a breach of the Governor's positive instructions. Quote procedure on the Acts in 1724, 1725 etc. Explain effect of the Acts, and request their repeal and remission of all fines and forfeitures made by virtue of them. 74 signatures, v. A.P.C. III. No. 165. Copy. 47 pp. [C.O. 5, 1055. ff. 3–27, 28v.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
968. Duke of Newcastle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I herewith send you, by H.M. command, a copy of a letter I have received from Major-General Hunter etc. H.M. would have you examine the Acts of Assembly lying before you, for encouraging the new settlement at Port Antonio, and make your report upon them assoon as conveniently you can, that no time may be lost in the carrying on of a work which the Governor represents to be of such consequence to the security and improvement of that Colony. H.M. has also commanded me to send you the inclosed copys of letters to me from Sir Richard Everard Govr. of N. Carolina, and from Mr. Porter Judge of the Admiralty there, relating to the disputes between the Governor and the Secretary and some other-officers of that Plantation, into which you will be pleased to examine and report the state of the case as it shall appear to you, with your opinion what is proper for H.M. to order upon it. The letter from Capt. Osborne Govr. of Newfoundland, of which I herewith transmit to you a copy, having also been laid before the King, H.M. ordered me to refer it to your con- sideration how far that Gentn. has exercised the powers and instructions entrusted to him, and what further directions are proper to be given upon the several points mentioned in his letter. Signed, Holles Newcastle. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 26th Nov., 1729. 1 2/3 pp. Enclosed,
968. i. Copy of No. 896. Endorsed as covering letter. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 18. ff. 47, 47v., 48v.–50v.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
969. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of Privy Council. In obedience to your Lordships' directions, 23rd Oct., we have prepared an Instruction for William Dummer Esq., Lt. Govr. of the Massachusets Bay, relating to the new method of raising money by resolves, instead of Acts, of Assembly, and to the exacting of unusual fees for registring, and letpasses for ships. We have likewise in pursuance of your Lordships' orders, inquired of the Agents for the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay, wt. steps have been taken by the said Assembly in complyance with H.M. Instruction, relating to the settlement of a salary on his Governor, or are intended to be taken by them, for that purpose, whereunto ye sd. Agents answer'd, that they desir'd to be referr'd to the last resolutions of their Assembly, for their intentions upon that subject, for they had nothing new, to offer upon that head. Whereupon the Board considering the importance of this matter, and being very desirous, if possible, that H.M. Instructions so evidently calculated for the interest of Great Britain, and for ye service of that Province, might obtain its proper effect, and appre- hending that the death of Mr. Burnet might possibly produce some alteration in the state of this affair, did adventure to offer to the consideration of ye sd. Agents that since it was agreed on all hands, that their Assembly were by the terms of their Charter oblig'd to make a provision for their Governor, since £1,000 per annum sterling had been thought by their own Assembly, to be a reasonable provision for that purpose; and since fix'd salaries have at several times been provided by Acts of Assembly, for the Council and Assembly-men of that Province; that their Assembly should pass one genl. act, whereby a future provision should be made for their Govr., Council and Assembly. Upon the first starting of this proposition, the Agents seem'd to embrace the same wth. great readyness; but upon further discourse, and explanation, it appeared to the Board, that some of the acts for providing for the Council and Assembly-men were about to expire, and the Agents apprehended that they would not for the future be renew'd, but annually, so that in effect, the intention of the sd. Agents upon this head, appeared to the Board, to be, that the Assembly would for the future provide for the Council and Assembly, as they had done for their Governor annually, and not for their Governor, as they had heretofore done for the Council and Assembly. Whereupon in order to bring this matter to a clear and certain issue, ye board desir'd to know of the said Agents, whether they believed the Assembly of ye Massachusets Bay would come into any such provision for their Governor, as would render him independant of ye said Assembly; to which they answer'd possitively, No; for that to their certain knowledge, Mr. Burnet had attempted to engage the Assembly to a three years provision only, in private discourse wth. ye Members; but that the same had been absolutely refus'd. This being the result of our first conversation with ye said Agents, we were about to prepare a report to your Lordships, upon the obstinate behaviour of ye said Assembly, on the great consequence of this dispute to ye trade and interest of Great Britain, as well as to the authority of the Crown, and on the repeated attempts the Assemblies of this Province have made towards ye shaking off their obedience to the Crown, and their dependence on their mother countrey, when the said Agents did once more apply to us to ye following effect; that having reflected upon what pass'd the last time they attended this Board; having reconsider'd their letters, and apprehending that ye death of Mr. Burnet might have abated the animosity of this dispute, and have made some alteration in the temper of this Province; they were ready to transmit any propositions to the Assembly, that this Board should make to them, and would, as far as was compatible with their stations, enforce the success thereof. Upon which the Board acquainted them, that they would apply to H.M. for leave to make them a proposition in writing, and would humbly entreat H.M. to suspend his just resentment against the Province, until such time, as ye effect of ye sd. proposition should be known. We have accordingly drawn up a proposal, which is hereunto annexed, and if the same shall prove agreeable to yor. Lordships' sentiments, your Lordships will be pleased to obtain H.M. Commission that we may deliver the said proposal to the Agents of the Massachusets Bay, with directions to transmit it to the Speaker of their Assembly. Annexed,
969. i. Proposal submitted by the Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of Council for trans- mission by the Agents of the Massachusetts Bay. The Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations have perused the several speeches, votes, messages, and answers, that have pass'd between Wm. Burnet Esq., late H.M. Governor etc. and the Assembly, upon the subject matter of H.M. 23rd Instruction to Mr. Burnet, wherein it is recommended to the sd. Assembly to settle a fix'd salary upon their Governor, and their Lordships are sorry to observe that the Assembly have not only hitherto refused to comply in any sort, with ye tenour of that Instruction, but that they seem likewise, in some of their answers upon that subject, to have forgotten that decency and respect, which is always due to their Govr. who has the honour to represent H.M. person in that Colony. The conse- quence of wch. proceedings, if matters shou'd continue in this state, must naturally be, that H.M. will find himself under a necessity of laying the undutifull behaviour of this Province, before the Legislature of Great Britain, not only in this single instance, but in many others of the same nature and tendency, whereby it manifestly appears, that their Assembly, for some years last past, have attempted by unwarrantable practices, to weaken, if not intirely to cast off, the obedience they owe to ye Crown, and ye dependence, which all Colonies ought to have upon their mother country. However as their Lordships do conceive it is not improbable that the frequent disputes between the Assembly and their late Governor, were carryed to a great height, and were become almost intirely personal, might have had some influence upon their conduct, and have given a wrong byass to their determination in this particular, and as their Lordships are not without hopes, that upon cooler reflection, the people of the Massachusets Bay, may be brought to a juster sence of their duty, and interest; they are for this time willing to interpose with H.M. in behalf of the Province, that he may be graciously pleas'd to suspend his just resentment, till their Assembly shall have had one more opportunity of debating ye weight of his royal Instruction, and the consequence that may attend their refusal to comply with so reasonable a recommendation, wherein the trade and interest of Great Britain are more concern'd, than the authority of the Crown. And in the mean time, their Lordps. do propose to the Assembly of ye Massachusets Bay, that they do pass a law whereby it shall be declared that ye salary of their Governor for ye time being, shall be one thousand pounds pr. annum sterling, clear of all deductions, and that the said salary be constantly paid out of such monies as shall from time to time be raised for the support of the Government, and defence of ye inhabitants of the said Province. Their Lord- ships have directed their Secretary to deliver this proposal to Francis Wilks and Jonathan Belcher Esqrs., Agents for the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay, that they transmit the same to the Speaker of the said Assembly.
969. ii. Draught of H.M. Additional Instructions to William Dummer, Lt. Governor of the Massachusets Bay, and to the Commander in Chief of the said Province for the time being. Whereas an unwarrantable practice hath of late years been introduced into the proceedings of the Assembly of Our Province of the Massachusets Bay, of raising money, and supplying the current service of the year, by a vote or resolve, instead of an Act of Assembly, and of reserving thereby to the said Assembly a power of determining what accompts shall, or shall not be paid even after the services per- formed, expressly contrary to ye tenour of the Charter granted to this Province by Our royal predecessors King William and Queen Mary, whereby they are impower'd to raise monies for the support of Our Government, and for ye defence of ye inhabitants, by act, or acts of Assembly only; and the issuing of the said money, when rais'd, is expressly reserv'd to Our Governour for the time being, with the advice and consent of Our Council, of the said Province. Now Our will and pleasure is, and We do hereby require you to take care for the future, that no mony be raised, or bills of credit issued in that Our Province of ye Massachusets Bay, but by act, or acts of Assembly; in wch. act, or acts, one or more clauses of appro- priation may be inserted, but that the issuing of all monies so raised, or bills of credit, be left to Our Governour or Commander in Chief of Our said Province, with the advice and consent of Our Council, according to their Charter, subject nevertheless to a future inquiry of the then present, or any other Assembly, as to ye application of such monies. And whereas complaint hath been made to us, that Our trusty and well-beloved William Burnet Esq. late Governor of Our said Province, did exact certain illegal, and unaccustomed fees on shipping; Our further will and pleasure is, and We do hereby strictly command, that neither you, Our sd. Lieutenant Governor, nor any succeeding Governor, or Commander in Chief, of Our said Province, do presume to exact or demand, any other fees, than what are legal, and have been customarily taken by the Governors, or Commanders in Chief for registring of ships, and for lettpasses, on any pretence, or account whatsoever. [C.O. 5, 916. pp. 210–220; and, copy of end. i. only, 5,752. No. 40.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
970. Mr. Popple to John Oxenford, Asst. Inspector General of H.M. Customs. Requests returns of annual imports and exports to and from New York since Xtmas, 1723, by Tuesday morning. [C.O. 5, 1125. p. 131.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
971. Same to Mr. Fane. Encloses 12 Acts of New York for his opinion in point of law and requests report by Monday on that for continuing acts for discharging the present demand? on the trading house at Oswego. [C.O. 5, 1125. pp. 132–135.]
Nov. 14.
Jamoa.
972. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. This is only to acquaint you with the death of Mr. Forbes one of the Council. This is a sensible losse to this Island and more particularly to me. I have formerly recommended to their Losps. in case of vacaneys there, Wm. Nedham Esq., Mr. Charlton and Mr. Henderson, but must know men better before I make any addition to my recommendation. You can not imagine the difficulty's I lye under by the non-attendance of ye Gentlemen of the Council, wt. much a do I gett together a Quorum once in half a year perhaps, and ev'n then I can not keep them in town above a day. I beg that their Losps. may at least gett the vacaneys supply'd as they fall out and add a supernumerary as in other Provinces etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. ——— Read, 17th Feb., 1729/30. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 18. ff. 63, 63v.]
Nov. 14.
St. George's
River.
973. John Gyles to [? Col. Jeremiah Dunbar]. On ye furst currant Wenogenet ye Chief of ye Panobscut tribe and other princable Indians gave me a visett etc, I reherst sum part of your honourable letter to them and assuered them you did not propose to plant further then St. George's Rivver at present, only ye timbers for mast etc. as far as Pasmaquady etc. (Whereat) they seemed to look with new faces, they being informed before by sum whitts and others that ar enimies to ye plan(t)ing these parts etc. that your honour was com to hinther them of all thier priviliges to Pasmaquady etc. Your honour and others that ar well wishers to ye settling this Continant wth. a Protistant people, will meet wth. sum apposers, it is a great work your honour has unthertaken (but God is all sufficient) and affears look with a fairer prospect for settle- ments etc. Will use his influence to pacifie the Indians etc. Signed, John Gyles. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5,10. No. 23.]
Nov. 15.
St. George's
Fort.
974. Same to Same. Encloses following, "and pray pardon ye pen man he being nin years in captivity and brought up in ye woods when he should have had scool laming" etc. Thinks that some things were misinterpreted to the Indians when they paid him a visit. "The Messengor is return'd from Caneday and Ye Governr. thier advises ye Indians to live in frindship with ye English" etc. Signed, John Gyles. Endorsed, in Col. Dunbar's letter of Dec. 30, 1729. 1 p. Enclosed,
974. i. Chiefs of the Penobscut Indians to Col. Dunbar. St. Georges, Nov. 14, 1729. We heard your letter etc. and like it well and we hear you ar planted at Pema- quid, it was unknown to us but since you ar settling ye old settlements we concent to it, and not to exceed ye old boundarys of Pamaquid. We ar well pleased to hear of your observing the articles of peace made between us and ye Massachusets Bay. Good freind you say you ar imploied by H.M. King George, if you pass St. George's River we shall be uneasy etc. Four Totem marks. Overleaf, we wright to you Colo. Dunbar, the new Gent, man att Pamaquid. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 10. Nos. 24, 25.]
Nov. 15.
Portsmo.
N. England.
975. Lt. Governor Wentworth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Begins with duplicate of 7th Sept. Encloses Minutes of Council and of Assembly to 15th May and account of stores of war. Continues:—I am still complaining for want of stores, our stock being very small. I yet live in hopes a good peice wth. Spain will give us some. I hope our Agent Mr. Newman will apply himself properly to the Ministry at home. Acknowledges letter of 28th May. Continues:—I shall do everything in my power to assist Collo. Dunbar etc. He has gone to the Eastward, and sett down at a place called, Penne- quid, where we formerly had a strong fortification, but the country to save charges gave the command to a scrub fellow, who in the late war (about 1702) had for some years been serjent, and a French man of war of 40 gunns demolished it, and I well remember the reason why it was not rebuilt was, the Massachusets suppos'd it belong'd to the Crown etc. I very well approve of Collo. Dunbar's settling first at Pennequid, and rebuilding that fort, it may be means of keeping the Indians at peace, and thereby giving him an opportunity of settling downward as he sees fitt. This land ten miles or more up the river is fine land, and good harbour. I hear Collo. Dunbar is very expeditious, and in case the season proves moderate, he will soon be strong enough to defend himself from the Indians, it's a very fine country down as far as Mount Desert, or the Bay of Funda, and provided the Collo. settles strong on that coast, the Indians in a few years will be obliged to quitt that country, or come into their living, as the English do, for the settlements will drive all hunting far from them, and I don't know but a just treatment of them in all our trade will bring them to be our friends. I hope Col. Dunbar's coming, and alteration of former act, may pritty well answer, in case the officers do their duty, there has been no complaint as yet; I have by Coll. Dunbar's desire issued forth proclamations forbiding all persons going into the woods, to fell any pine trees untill further orders. The officers have been diligent since their arrival, and I hope things will be founded on a better footing then before, and if I should at any time see any mis- management in respect to the woods, if I cant prevent it, I shall always think it my duty to acquaint your Lordships thereof. Signed, Jno. Wentworth. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Jan., 1729/30, Read 9th June, 1731. 2½ large pp. Enclosed,
975. i, ii. Accounts of stores of war spent and remaining at Fort William and Mary, N.H., 28th May, 1728 and 15th Nov., 1729. Signed, J. Wentworth. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Jan., 1729/30. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 872. ff. 162–163v., 164v.–165v.]