America and West Indies
August 1731, 21-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor) Arthur Percival Newton (introduction)

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1938

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238-250

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'America and West Indies: August 1731, 21-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 38: 1731 (1938), pp. 238-250. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=72583 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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August 1731, 21-31

Aug. 21.
Boston.
379. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding, mutatis mutandis. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed, Recd. 28th Sept., Read 19th Oct., 1731. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 217, 218—219v.]
Aug. 21.
Boston.
380. Governor Belcher to the Duke of Newcastle. I am now to confirm what I wrote your Grace 26 of last month, respecting the supply of the Treasury. The Assembly have now been sitting upwards 12 weeks, and seem resolved to provide no money for the defence of the Government, and the protection of the inhabitants, unless I wou'd sign a bill for it in open violation of H.M. commands, and upon a motion the House of Representatives made to me for a recess, I immediately ordered all the members of H.M. Council, to attend their duty in the General Court, and then demanded of them, upon the oath they had taken, answers to the questions your Grace will find in my message to the House of Representatives of 28 July (as by their Journals inclos'd). Upon this they summon'd their absent members to attend, and when they came together, the result was, to make a declaration, and send it to every town in the Province, in order to call the inhabitants of each town together, to have their orders or instructions about the supply of the Treasury, and I have no reason to believe but their answer will be just as the Representatives wou'd have it, vizt. That the Treasury shou'd not be supply'd in conformity to the King's Instruction. Upon the whole, my Lord Duke, I think it my duty seasonably to represent to you the great difficulty and hazard this matter must necessarily (and very soon) bring upon H.M. Government here, and all his good subjects. For your Grace must be sensible, it's impossible for a Government to subsist long without money. For my own part, I am fully in opinion that H.M. Instruction to me in this matter is exactly agreeable to the Royal Charter, as well as to the best safety and happiness of this Government and people. Yet as I have no reason to believe the House of Representatives will comply with it, it is absolutely necessary for the preservation of H.M. Government and people here, that your Grace transmit me as soon as possible the King's special order upon this head. For altho' the Assembly have been sitting now near 13 weeks, yet I believe they will go on to sit, till I have an answer from your Grace, and their so doing will be a vast burden to the Province, and no service, for they have done nothing of any significancy for several weeks past. P.S. I had almost forgot to acquaint your Grace that notwithstanding the royal explanatory Charter says that "it shall be lawful for the Representatives etc. to adjourn themselves from day to day (and if occasion shall require for the space of two days) but not for any longer time without leave from the Governor etc," yet the Representatives did on Saturday 10th July adjourn themselves to Tuesday, 13th. On which day I sent a message to them on that subject, which they so little regarded as to repeat such an adjournment the 24th of July. Their pretence for this is the intervention of the Lord's Day, which I think can by no means support such an unwarrantable practice. For I believe the maxim of dies dominicus non est dies jucundus, was the reason of that saving for 'em in the explanatory charter (and if occasion shall require for the space of two days) that they might not be oblig'd to sit on the Lord's Day. I hope your Grace will let me know H.M. pleasure on this head. Signed, J. Belcher. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 94.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
381. Mr. Wheelock to Lt. Governor Gooch. Transmits Order in Council repealing act laying a duty on liquors etc. (v. 6th July), and duplicate of letter of 27th May. [C.O. 5, 1366. pp. 78, 79.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
382. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. An act was pass'd in your Majesty's Colony in Virginia in Oct., 1705, against importing tobacco from Carolina and other parts without the Capes of Virginia; and in 1726, another act was pass'd for the more effectual preventing the bringing tobacco from North Carolina and the bounds in controversy; We have lately received a memorial on the part of the inhabitants of Albemarle County in North Carolina, setting forth the great hardships they labour under, from being denyed the liberty of exporting their tobacco to Great Britain from the ports in Virginia. Where- upon we beg leave to represent to your Majesty that the only commodious port in North Carolina is at Cape Fear, scituated near the southern boundary of that county, so that if those planters who are settled to the northward near the borders of Virginia, are cut off from all communication with that Province both by land and water, as these acts import, they will lye under very great difficulties in exporting their tobacco to Great Britain, therefore will probably desist from planting that commodity, and turn their industry to other manufactures, which may be attended with very bad consequences to the trade of this Kingdom, from whence the inhabitants of North Carolina have hitherto taken considerable quantities of British manufactures, which they have been enabled to pay for by their tobacco. These laws are therefore manifestly disadvantageous to the trade of this Kingdom, and it would seem to us, highly unreasonable, that any of your Majesty's subjects should be debar'd from the liberty of making use of any ports belonging to your Majesty, or from carrying on any legal trade not prohibited by the laws of Great Britain in any part of your Majesty's Dominions; We likewise conceive that these laws are inconsistent with an Act of Parliament, 25th of K. Charles II, for the encouragement of the Greenland and Eastland trades etc. By this last act, the productions of the British Colonies in America are allowed to be exported from one English Province to another, under certain duties etc. For these reasons we humbly beg leave to lay these laws before your Majesty for your disallowance. [C.O. 5, 1366. pp. 76—78.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
383. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Committee of the privy Council. In obedience to orders of 7th July, have heard the merchants of London, Bristol and Liverpool in support of their petition against the Act of Jamaica for raising several sums of money etc., and likewise Mr. Sharp in defence of it. This act lays a duty of 15s. on negroes imported and 30s. on negroes exported, and 100l. on convicts imported etc. This act so far as it relates to duties on negroes is a burthen upon the British trade and navigation and contrary to Governor Hunter's additional Instruction, 13th Nov., 1727 etc. Altho' H.M. was graciously pleased by his said instruction to allow that the Assembly might lay such a tax on the negroes of the said island bought there as they should think fit, yet this indulgence was never designed to be extended to the present case, where duties of import are laid upon all slaves imported, whether the property be changed or not, during their stay in the island, and a duty of export also laid without any exception for such slaves as should be imported only for refreshment, which must necessarily affect all slaves brought thither on account of the Assiento contract, etc. The duty upon convicts is a strong infringement of the Act of Parliament etc. for the further preventing robbery etc., and for the more effectual transportation of felons, which extends to all H.M. Plantations in general; but by this exorbitant duty is now become impracticable with relation to Jamaica. For these reasons therefore we should propose to your Lordps., that this act might be laid before H.M. for his disallowance. But forasmuch as the same is only a temporary law; that it will expire in Feb. next, that it would be some time before H.M. disallowance could reach Jamaica, and that the duties raised by this law are in part applicable to the additional subsistence of the two regiments now in that island; considering also that we have lately proposed to H.M. that the soldiers of the said two regiments after filling up the independant companies their to their full complement may be disbanded and left in Jamaica for the defence of that island provided the Assembly will settle them to their entire satisfaction, which must be a considerable expence to the Colony, we would submit to your Lordps. in the present situation whether it may not be adviseable to suffer this act even bad as it is to have its effect. But at the same time, lest the Assembly should be thereby encouraged to make any attempts of the like nature on the Trade and Navigation of Great Britain for the future, we would humbly propose that your Lordps. should advise H.M. to signify his dissatisfaction of this proceeding to Major General Hunter, and to command him upon pain of his royal displeasure to adhere more strictly to his instruction for the future. And since the Assembly of Jamaica have made so bad an use of H.M. indulgence to them in his abovementioned Instruction, we would further propose that the Governor should be absolutely forbid for the future to give his assent to any law imposing duties upon slaves imported payable by the importer and upon slaves exported, that have not been sold in the island and continued there for the space of twelve months: But ye merchants are willing and we have no objection to their laying duties upon the purchase of slaves in Jamaica, to be paid by the purchaser, and not by the importer, provided the South Sea Company and their Factors be exempted from paying any duties for such slaves as shall be consigned to them, or which they may purchase there from the traders to the coast of Africa in order to fulfill the Assiento contract. And should your Lordps. concur with us in opinion with respect to the future regulation of these duties, we would take leave to propose that the same might be made a general rule for all the Plantations, and that Instructions may be prepared accordingly for H.M. Govrs. of the several Colonies in America. [C.O. 138, 17. pp. 344–349.]
Aug. 26.
Hampton
Court.
383. John Coureand to Governor Belcher. Encloses following by order of the Duke of Newcastle. Signed, Jno. Coureand. Annexed,
383. i. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Belcher. Hampton Court, 13th Aug. 1731. As proposed Aug. 10, supra. Copy. Signed, G. R. [C.O. 324, 36. pp. 282–284.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
384. Mr. Wheelock to Robert Lowther, late Governor of Barbados. Enquires what the value of the perquisites of a Governor of Barbados may be, one year with another. [C.O. 29, 15. p. 231.]
Aug. 26.385. Mr. Yeamans to Mr. Wheelock. Submits a book containing the collection of the general Acts of the Leeward Islands and of the Acts of Antigua, which was returned to Antigua for a public attestation at the request of the Board. A law is now subjoined confirming and establishing this collection, but relates only to the acts of Antigua, as it was concieved that the general laws could not be attested by the Legislature of Antigua etc. Continues :—"It was purely owing to recommendation of my Lords Commissioners signified to the Councill and Assembly, I think, by the late Governor Hart, and the assurances that were given them that the collection when compleated should be printed at H.M. expence, that the island was at first induc'd to undertake this troublesome and chargeable work." Prays that the matter may be considered, and the law subjoined recommended for confirmation. Signed, John Yeamans. Endorsed, Recd., Read 26th Aug., 1731. 2½ pp. [C.O. 152, 19. ff. 64–65v.]
Aug. 27.386. Representation of the General Assembly of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The said Island has for many years past been a very profitable colony to G. Britain, as well by its produce and import of sugar, rum, molosses, cotton, ginger and aloes, as by its taking off from thence great quantities of woollen and other manufactures and goods that pay duties to the Crown, (which by means of ye Barbados trade, are part consumed among the inhabitants of the said island, and other part thereof are exported from Great Britain to Africa and Madera and the Northern British Colonies, for the purchase of negroes, wine, fish and other goods for the use of this Island, and thereby numberless hands have been employ'd in H.M. Kingdoms and Territories, and great revenues have accrued to the Crown) and has also been a great support to H.M. Northern Colonies, and given a very great and profitable vent to their fishery and other produce as also to the produce of Ireland: Besides employing in those several trades great numbers of shipping and seamen etc., and after all has used to leave a considerable ballance in England to the benefit of the national stock. The intrest of this Island and all other H.M. Sugar Colonies is closely united with that of Great Britain, and all those Sugar Colonies must ever be dependent on it, and be supply'd from thence, because they have no trade or manufactures which can interfere with those of Great Britain. Within these few years great improvements have been made by the French and Dutch in their Sugar Colonies, and great and extraordinary encouragements have been given to them, not only from their Mother-countrys, but also from a pernicious trade carried on to and from Ireland and the British Northern Colonies, and have to spare for Holland, Germany, Italy and other parts of Europe, and the French and Dutch Sugar Colonies have lately supply'd the Northern British Colonies with very large quantities of melosses, for the making of rum and other uses ; and even with rum of their own manufacture, to the vast prejudice of H.M. Sugar Colonies, as rum is a commodity on which next to sugar they mostly depend, and have had in return for such sugar, rum and molosses, shipping, horses, boards, staves, hoops, lumber, timber for building, fish, bread, bacon, corn, flower and other Plantation necessaries, at as easy rates as H.M. subjects of the Sugar Colonies have. And the continual supplies received by the French and Dutch from the Northern British Colonies, have enabled them to put on and maintain a great number of slaves on their plantations, and to enlarge their sugar works and make new settlements in new fertile soils, and at the same time cost little, being now purchased chiefly with molosses, which before the late intercourse between the foreign Colonies and the Northern British Colonies, were flung away, as of no value. And thus the French and Dutch Colonies are daily improving, while H.M. Sugar Colonies are apparently declining, and instead of supplying, as they used to do, France and Holland, and many other parts of Europe with sugar, are now almost confined to the home consumption in Great Britain, and are in a great measure excluded from the Kingdom of Ireland, and the Northern British Colonies, who, instead of sending their produce as usual, to H.M. Sugar Colonies, and taking rum and sugar in return, do now often send it directly to the foreign Sugar Colonies in exchange for the produce of those foreign colonies: and whenever they do send their produce to the British Sugar Colonies, they insist upon being paid for it in cash, which they export to, and lay out among the foreign Sugar Colonies, in the purchase of the very same goods that they formerly used to supply themselves with from H.M. Sugar Colonies, to the enriching the foreign Sugar Colonies, and impoverishing His Majesty's. The mischiefs arising to H.M. Sugar Colonies from this commerce (which is apparently in derogation and evasion of the 5th and 6th Articles of the Treaty of Peace in America etc., 1686), are very many and evident, and will increase more and more, if some effectual stop be not put to it. Martinico is now arrived to a very great pitch of prosperity and power, and affords new supplies of people for settling the neighbouring islands of Dominico, St. Vincents and Sta. Lucia; and Guardaloupe, Grand-Terre, Marygalante, Granada and Cayene encrease and flourish in proportion: and on Hispaniola, the French spread so fast as to become formidable to their neighbours, whilst many of the planters in the British Sugar Colonies and particularly in this Island, have been and daily are necessitated to forsake their ancient well built estates and shelter themselves in Pennsylvania, New York and other Northern British Colonies. This apparent increase of the riches and power of the French Sugar Colonies is in great measure owing to the commerce aforesaid, which is destructive to the British Sugar Colonies, but highly advantageous to the French, who thereby find a vent not only for their sugar, but also for their rum and molosses etc., and have those supplies of lumber, horses and plantation stores, without which they never could have enlarged or supported, nor can support their sugar plantations etc. Other causes contribute to make H.M. Sugar Colonies decline and the French Sugar Colonies flourish. The French Sugar Colonies receive the greatest encouragement from their Mother Country, and their duties are less than ours. The French King is daily sending men to his Sugar Colonies, and pays their passage thither, and maintains them there a year after their arrival. He encourages their trade to Guinea by giving a prœmium for every negro imported thither from Africa. He remits one half of the duty upon such goods of the produce of his Sugar Colonies as are brought home in return for such negroes. He maintains the fortifications in his Sugar Colonies. He permits Spanish ships to trade with them, and particularly for pieces of 8/8 in exchange for flower and other goods, wch. they get from the British Northern Colonies in return for their sugar, rum and molosses. He permits them to trade to the Spanish Islands of Margaritta, Trinidado and Porto Rico, and he allows them to send directly to the ports of Spain sugars of all sorts (except raw or muscovado sugars) and also all other goods of the product of the French Islds. in America, paying a duty of one pr. cent, only on exportation, without first importing them into France. Whilst on the other hand H.M. Sugar Colonies have no such encouragements. The inhabitants of this and all other H.M. Sugar Colonies are obliged to carry their sugars and all other enumerated goods first into Great Britain, after paying in the Colonies where they are produced (Jamaica excepted) a duty of 4½ p.c. in specie on exportation, before they can carry them anywhere else (except to the other British Colonies) and are obliged upon exporting them afterwards from Great Britain, to leave in England a duty of near 2 p.c, and are put to the risque of a double voyage, besides the charge of it, which amounts to not less than 20 p.c. more. H.M. subjects of this and other his Sugar Colonies pay upwards of 10 p.c. more than the French and Dutch do, for what sugar is carried to H.M. Northern Colonies and consumed there, by which means those Colonies are mostly supply'd with foreign sugar, to the prejudice of the Plantation duties (being part of the aggragate fund, which might otherwise be greatly increased) and altho' the French and Dutch subjects of the Sugar Colonies do so send their sugar as well as their rum and molosses to the Northern British Colonies, yet the subjects of H.M. Sugar Colonies are restrained from vending their produce to the French or Dutch Colonies, and at the same time H.M. subjects of the Northern British Colonies and Ireland have that advantage. And the French are at liberty to send their sugars directly to Ireland, without first importing them into Great Britain, and paying a duty there to H.M., which H.M. subjects of the Sugar Colonies are obliged to do, and they are supply'd with beef and other provisions directly from Ireland on as easy terms as H.M. subjects are. Those and many other advantages the foreign Sugar Colonies, and especially the French have over H.M. Sugar Colonies, and particularly this Island, whom it has pleased the Almighty God in his good Providence to afflict lately in a more especial manner by a most violent tempest and hurricane, which began on the 13th day of this instant August, and lasted all that and the succeeding day, with the utmost fury, to the inexpressible terror and immense damage of the inhabitants, who have had not only a great many of their cornfields, plaintain-watks, fruit and timber trees blown down, broken or torn up by the roots, and their canes damaged, but their dwelling-houses, windmills, boyling-houses and other their best and most substantial buildings, some of them wholly demolished, and others overset, rent, uncover'd or otherwise greatly damnify'd; and so general has the calamity been, that there is scarce a person throughout the whole Island but who has received a considerable loss by this dreadful storm, the consequences of which are still more grievous, for that there is not in this Island (nor has been here for some years since that pernicious trade between the Northern British Colonies and the foreign Sugar Colonies began) lumber sufficient to repair a tenth part of the buildings damaged by this tempest. This scarcity of lumber is one of the many mischievous effects of that trade, and great is the number of our poor inhabitants, who now have no place to lay their heads in, and ly exposed to all the injuries of the approaching rainy season for want of those northern supplies which our neighbours the French are plentifully furnished with. So great is our present desolation that many of the poorer inhabitants, unable to rebuild their ruined houses, will be driven to quit the Island; and thus our strength decays, and at the same time the exorbitant power of the French at our very doors, threatens us with instant destruction in case of a war. For their isles are full of men and arms, whilst the inhabitants of this Island grow every day thinner, and want allmost everything necessary for their defence. But should a war not happen, yet the British Sugar Colonies will still be in danger of being lost to the British Nation, unless some speedy care be taken to save them from the ruin now impending over them: and if they are lost, Great Britain will lose the export of all the British manufactures now taken off by the Sugar Colonies, and the whole benefit arising from the importation of their product. Our Navigation and seamen must necessarily fall off and diminish, the African trade as chiefly depending on the Sugar Colonies must decay: and our sugar-works and other plantation stock and utensils become of no use, and thereby so much wealth will be sunk and lost to the British Nation. And in that case too, such of the Northern British Colonies as now court a French trade and French dependance, will soon be reduced to a condition too wretched to be named, and an end be put to the British Empire in America; But may God avert those evils ! Nor are we without hopes that the British Sugar Colonies may still be preserved, and even restored to their former flourishing condition, if timely measures be yet taken for removing the many and great disadvantages they now ly under in point of trade; and proper encouragement be given them. Whether a prohibition of the importation of all sugar, rum and melosses of the growth, product or manufacture of any of the Plantations in America, which are not in the possession of or under the dominion of His Majesty, into the Kingdoms of Great Britain or Ireland, or any of H.M. Colonies or Plantations in America, or any other H.M. British Dominions, or a total prohibition of trade between the Northern British Colonies and the foreign Sugar Colonies, or of any particular branches of trade, as namely those of horses and lumber, or the granting H.M. subjects of the Sugar Colonies the like advantages in their trade, as the subjects of the foreign Sugar Colonies now actually have, whether all or any of these, or what other measures in particular may be proper and sufficient to attain the good ends desired etc., we presume not to say ; but humbly hope that your Lordships will be pleased to take the premises into consideration and thereupon do what to your Lordships in your great wisdom shall seem fitting. Read and agreed to nemine contradicente 27th Aug., 1731. Signed, Robt. Warren, Clk. of the Assembly. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Foster) 25th, Read 28th Oct., 1731. 3½ large pp. Torn. [C.O. 28, 22. ff. 132–133v.]
Aug. 27.
Boston.
387. Governor Belcher to the Duke of Newcastle. Since the closing my last I have by the advice of H.M. Council adjourned the General Assembly for a month, altho' there's no money in the Treasury for the defence of H.M. Government and the protection of the inhabitants. I now inclose the Representation mentioned to be made to the several towns, and I earnestly pray for H.M. especial order in this important affair. Signed, J. Belcher. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 95.]
Aug. 27.
Boston.
388. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 19th Oct., 1731. 1 p. Enclosed,
388. i. Journal of House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay, Aug. 18, 1731. Printed, by Thomas Fleet. Endorsed as covering letter. 14 pp. [C.O. 5, 873. ff. 220, 221v.—228v., 229v.]
Aug. 28.
Hampton
Court.
389. Lord Harrington to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report. Signed, Harrington. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 31st Aug., 1731. 1 p. Enclosed,
389. i. Extract of letter from Mr. Finch, H.M. Envoy Extraordinary at Stockholm to Lord Harrington. Stockholm 5th May, 1731. There is a project to carry on at Gottenburg a trade directly to the West Indies, in order to buy raw sugar and tobacco at first hand which are to be refined and manufactured here, a ship is actually bought for this trade, but so great a mistery is made of it, that I cannot give your Lordship any distinct account about it, tho' I am told that it is grounded on a grant of some place in America made formerly by the Dutch to a Prince of the House of Hanau, an account of which is to be found in Dr. John Becker's Political Discourses in Dutch p. 1032 etc. Same endorsement. Copy, ¾ p.
389. ii. Extract of letter from Same to Same. Stockholm, 11th August., 1731. Continues: Besides [the above grant] Count Bonde told me that they have their view on the Island of Tabago, which it is said was granted by King Charles II to James, Duke of Courland, the present Duke offering now to make a cession of it for a summ of money to this Crown. Count Bonde desired me in a friendly manner to inform him if I knew any particulars relating to this matter, and whether the Crown of England had still any pretensions to it in order to form the opinion of the Chancery etc. I have sent to Upsala to see if anything is to be found in Rymer's Fœdera relating to it etc. Same endorse- ment. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 388, 30. ff.247.28.]
Aug. 28.
Horringer.
390. Capt. Davers to Mr. Brudenell. I find some people are very solicitous to have my seat in Counsill in the Iland of Barbadoes, insinuating that I never intend to goe there again etc. My interest will oblige me to goe there if my inclinations did not prompt me to it etc. Hopes to be continued in the Council etc. Signed, J. Davers. Endorsed, Recd., Read 31st Aug., 1731 Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 22. ff. 85, 86v.]
Aug. 30.391. Sir W. Keith to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Haveing observed with great attention what was said at the Board on last Wedensday to the Switz petitioners etc. (v. 10th Aug., 1st Sept.), and being myself fully convinced of the many and great advantages which would most certainly accrue to the public interest of this Kingdom by such a settlement, I should be very sory if so noble a design was altogether laid aside etc. Continues: If H.M. could be moved to appoint a fit person with proper authorities to grant those lands to such as should actually come to setle there, under the same conditions which were proposed by the Board to the Switz petitioners, I am perswaded the encouragement could be sufficient to invite forreigners as well as others thankfully to accept of it etc. As the person so appointed must be invested with the necessary powers of governing and directing the first settlement of so important a Colony, he ought to be a man of experience in military as well as civil affairs, possessed of a character in all respects equal to the trust and likeways upon the spot to execute it with effect. Collo. Spotswood whose present situation in Virginia is in a maner contiguous to the proposed settlement seems to be of all others the fittest person etc. His integrity and great abilities are well known to your Lordships etc. Your Lordships will do me the justice to believe, it is my regard for the public service, and not any privat view to myself which has induced me to lay these maters before you etc. Signed, W. Keith. Endorsed, Recd. 30th Aug., Read 21st Sept., 1731. Holograph. 1¾ p p. [C.O. 5, 1322. ff. 177, 177v, 178v.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
392. Mr. Wheelock to Mr. Fane. Encloses, for his opinion in point of law, act of Antigua, 1731, to enable Henry Lyons of Antigua, gent., to dispose of certain lands etc. [C.O. 153, 15. p. 111.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
393. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Storehouses have been lately built at your Majesty's expence, at English Harbour in Antigua, which has been thought a proper place for careening and refitting ships of war on that station etc. The people of Antigua have granted your Majesty a proper tract of land contiguous to the said harbour, upon which they have at their own charge erected a stone fort for the defence of your Majesty's ships and storehouses and they humbly pray that your Majesty will be pleased to grant them twelve peices of cannon, to be mounted in the said fort, six of which they desire may be twelve-pounders and the rest eighteen pounders, with carriages, rammers, sponges, ladles, and all other necessaries requisite. Whereupon having discoursed with Colo. Cosby, considering that it is highly expedient for your Majesty's service, both for the defence of the said store-houses, and the security of the harbour, that the fort should be furnished with proper ordnance and the necessary stores of war, we take leave humbly to propose that your Majesty should be graciously pleased to comply with their request. [C.O. 153, 15. pp. 111–113.]
Aug. 31.
Portsmouth
in New
Hampshire
in New
England in
America.
394. Address of Members of Council, Judges, Justices and other officers and inhabitants of New Hampshire to the King. Refer to former address expressing gratitude for continuing a Governor so acceptable to the people. Continue: Notwithstanding which, some restless persons for about three weeks past, have been endeavouring to disquiet the minds of the weaker sort amongst us in order to memorial "the Governour to the Lords of Trade etc. as a person not a friend to the Province, and to pray that New Hamps. may be no longer under the Governour of the Massachusetts Bay; wch. essay gives birth to the present Address etc. For in duty to our Sovereign, in honour to our Governour, in faithfullness to the Province, and in justice to ourselves we cannot be dumb on such an occasion, but most humbly crave leave to bear testimony against an attempt (tho' never so unlikely to succeed), wch. tends to sap the very foundation of our happiness etc. Your Majesty's Councill can witness the Governour's solicitous concern for the settlement of the divisional line between the two Provinces, and his unwearied endeavours to accomplish it with the strictest impartiality; which is what we earnestly supplicate may have as speedy an issue as is consistant with your Majesty's royal pleasure ; for the longer the difference lyes open, the greater are the mischiefs wch. attend it. But to return to His Excellency, What is it that we can't all say, (without a compliment) even the little number of discontented, themselves, in praise of our Governour whose administration is so wise, so just, so equal, and to such universall acceptance, and who will without any question make such unbiased remonstrances to your Majesty upon this unfortunate misunderstanding as may be a means at last to bring it to a happy issue. May it please your Majesty, this your Majesty's Province is so small, the people so few and in general so poor that it makes the settlement of the lines still more necessary, and is no bad argument to enforce our humble request for being continued under the Governour of the Massachusetts Bay, and especially him who at present is, and we hope will long continue in that station. For we have done our utmost already, even to our almost undoing, in fixing so large a sum for the Governour's sallary, pursuant to your Majesty's Instruction, and if more should be required to support the dignity of a resident Governour, we can forsee nothing but inevitable ruin: and besides if we should again be visited with a French or Indian war, or both (as at this juncture we are threatened,) then yet more deplorable would our condition be, for now we can ask succours (as occasion may require) from the common Father of both Provences, with hopes of success ; but how it may be upon a different footing God alone knows. Numberless arguments we humbly concieve might be used to induce yr. Majesty's favour in continuing us under our present Governour, but your Majesty's consummate wisdom, as well as goodness makes them unnecessary, and as we know what has been offered (by any who are the troublers of our Israel) in a way of impeachment of H.E. conduct, can't fail of redounding to his honour (even without a reply) so we shall attempt no particular answer, but leave that to himself if he shall think it worth his while. Pray for H.M. long and glorious reign etc., "and when the period of mortal life expires, that your Majesty may be translated to the mansions of bliss, and there reign with the King Eternal for ever and ever. With humble obeysance we now withdraw from your Majesty's presence" etc. 72 signatures. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 10. ff. [92–93v. old.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
395. Mr. Popple to Robert Jackson, late Minister in Sweden. The Board desires to speak with him concerning some papers referred to them relating to trade from Sweden to the West Indies, and concerning Tobago. [C.O. 389, 28. p. 453.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
396. Mr. Wheelock to Robert Jackson. The Board desire the favour of speaking with you etc., having under consideration some papers referred to them received from Mr. Finch, H.M. Envoy Extraordinary in Sweden relating to the trade between that Kingdom and H.M. Dominions. [C.O. 389, 28. p. 453].
Aug. 31.
Boston.
397. Governor Belcher to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Abstract. He wishes he was rid of Lt. Govr. Dunbar, who, he hears, is representing that he has debarred him of all the perquisites of a Lt. Governor, which he supposes arises from his orders relating to passes for vessels to pass the fort. It is doubtless the Lt. Governor's duty to give them in the manner he directs, but suspecting that he would not do so, he sent passes of his own, that the trade might not suffer. Thereupon, the Lt. Gov. sent (27th Aug.) a paper to the Collector, copy enclosed. Till he refused signing the passes in conformity with these orders, he always gave them and received the perquisites of them. The great difference between them is whether he shall control the Governor, or be subject to him. He will suffer no insult from Col. Dunbar. For 30 years it has been ruled from home, that the Governor of both Provinces was always present in each when in either, and the Lieut. Govr. did everything by the Governor's orders; and the late Lt. Govr. Vaughan was dismist in Govr. Shute's time for presuming to do otherwise. If the present Lt. Govr. will behave with proper respect and good manners, and ask him, as a favour, for what his predecessor enjoyed, he shall have it. He hopes the Board will never countenance the thirst he has to subvert all good order and government. Signed, J. Belcher. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 19th Oct., 1731. 2 pp. Enclosed,
397. i. Copy of Aug. 20 encl. vii. Subscribed, Whereas the chief Governor has sent blank lett passes from Boston for all vessels to pass the port and is pleased to claim all perquisites, he may also send blank registers and all other papers for which there are fees paid etc. for I do not think fit to do any act, whereby to receive any perquisite till the question is decided etc. Signed, David Dunbar. Copy. Endorsed as preceding. 2½ pp. [C. O. 5, 873. ff. 230, 230v., 231v.–233v.]