America and West Indies
August 1708, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1922

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64-83

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'America and West Indies: August 1708, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 64-83. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73786 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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August 1708, 16-31

Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
89. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Boyle. Reply to Aug. 11. Capt. Vetch's proposal is still under our consideration, in order to our laying the same, with our opinion upon it before H.M., which we shall do with as great a dispatch as the nature and weight of such a matter will allow. In the mean time, from what we have hitherto been able to observe upon it, we think Capt. Vetch's proposal of such use as to deserve incouragement. Wherefore, in regard it is necessary that it be duly examined and considered, and that in the doing thereof, it may be proper from time to time to confer with the proposer (of whom we have heard a good character), as well while the same is before us, as when it shall fall under H.M. further consideration, we are of opinion that he be directed and incouraged to attend H.M. commands here in relation to his said proposal. And having discoursed him as to his stay here, we find that his attendance here will oblige him to some charge, he having a wife and family at New York, whither his occasions call him, and would be going thither in company with the Lord Lovelace, if not required to attend here. Nevertheless, if H.M. will graciously please to allow him after the rate of 10/- day, so long as it shall be found necessary to continue him here, he will rest satisfied therewith, he proposing it only to enable him to subsist, and not to capitulate any thing for himself. Autograph signatures. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1084. No. 38; and 324, 9. pp. 253, 254.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
90. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend the appointment of Wm. Bird to the Council of Virginia. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 300, 301.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
91. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Since our letter of June 25, we have received none from you, however we cannot omit this oppertunity of acquainting you according to your desire with such complaints as have been laid before us. We are informed that at Antego the Gentlemen Officers and soldiers are ill used; that strangers are made officers over the heads of Gentlemen who had served many years; that the soldiers are sent in private sloops to trade without the officer's knowledge or consent; that the Assembly upon three days sitting was dissolved only for addressing in behalf of a poor woman, who had soldiers put into her house to take possession of the same without law or reason. This being the substance of what we have been informed of, we shall expect from you a full and clear answer thereunto, with such affidavits as you shall find necessary in your own justification, and as it will be for your interest, that nothing of this kind may remain unclear'd, we are of opinion this our letter be communicated to the Councill, and accordingly we advise you to it, that if there be no grounds for the said complaint, you may publickly make the same appear. And if there be any persons who think they are aggriev'd or have reason to complain, and are willing to make out the same, you are to permit them to do it before the Councill, and to take such affidavits relating thereto as they shall judge necessary, whereby you will have an oppertunity of answering such complaint, and of transmitting the same to us. This we look upon to be so much for your advantage and service, that we cannot doubt of your ready complyance herewith. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 189, 190.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
92. W. Popple to Col. Romer. Encloses copy of stores of war demanded for New Hampshire. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you to give them an account of what stores there were remaining there when you came from thence; as likewise of what you think necessary to be sent. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 4, 5.]
Aug. 17.
Whitehall.
93. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Board of Ordnance. We desire you to let us have an account of what Ordnance stores were last sent to New Hampshire. [C.O. 5, 913. p. 5.]
Aug. 17.
Barbados.
94. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In obedience to your Lordships' commands of Aprill 15th, I have made as strict an examination as I can into the Affrican trade since June 24, 1698, and am sorry to tell yr. Lordshipps that I can get but an imperfect acct. thereof, by reason severall merchants, who had negroes consigned them are either dead, or gon off with their books, and Messrs. Heyshams ffactors has sent theirs home; so the inclosd paper is the best that I could procure from those Gentlemen that remain, by wch. your Lordships will perceive that negroes has been since an open trade very dear here, the best from £30 to £40 each, and in an average amounts to about £23.8. per head, there is little or no difference in the prices betwene what the Company and private traders sold at the same time. By the Navall Office list (wch. is the most correct), yr. Lordshipps will perceive there has been 34,583 imported from June 24th, 1698–1708, of wch. 9006 by the Affrican Compa., wch. is above ¼, and the whole makes but 3458 per annum. Whereas to keep up the present stock of this Isld. computed at 52,000, and 7 per cent. per annum the common decreas amounts to 3640, so that if there is not a greater supply, negroes will rather advance than lower their prices; the want whereof occasions above ¼ of the lands lying uncultivated, and there is not ten plantations fully handed. When the Company had the sole trade to Affrica, negroes indeed were much cheaper here, and I find these reasons for it. (1) They could slave on the coast on their own terms, whereas the separate traders goeing there, advanced the price from £4 to £10 per head. (2) The produce of this Island' was then more advantagious in returns, bills of exchange goeing at parr, but rarely above 10 p.c., whereas now they pay 30 to 35 (3) The high premio on insurance and loss by the warr, many shipps haveing miscarryed. (4) As the Collonies increas so doth the demand for negroes, wch. has drain'd the coast, so that now they are forced to be supply'd at a greater charge from the inland countries.
By the accompt of the 10 p.c. yr. Lordships will find whatt trade has been drove from hence to Affrica, and that of 111 vessells loaden here since Dec. 9, 1698, only 18 has been on the Companies account, and those in the late years when the Compa. perceiv'd the separate traders began to neglect it. I find only Messrs. Carter and Harbin amongst the traders here that still continew it on their own acct., and that so little that 'tis not worth mentioning. I have consulted wth. severall of the principall planters and antient inhabitants, and find they are of opinion the plantations can never be well supply'd but by a united stock, for any little discouragemt. to private traders may occasion their desisting, and then the Collonies must suffer, as is evident in these two last years; only one small shipp and two sloops has arriv'd on the private traders' account with 350 negros, whereas to keep up the number now on the Island, and supply what are wanting we should have at least 5000 per annum, but except a Compa. have a sufficient stock, and oblidg'd to transport such a number yearly to the Collonies, it may prove of very dangerous consequence. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read Nov. 23rd, 1708. 2 pp. Enclosed,
94. i. Account of negroes imported into Barbados, since June 24, 1698, (a) by private traders, 7218, sold for £159, 138. 6. 8., + 1362 negroes consigned to John Grove, who "would give noe acct. of ye sales, being a Quaker." (b) imported by the Royal African Company 1700–1708, 5982 negroes sold for £156,425. 7. 6. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 19, 1708. 2 pp.
94. ii. Naval Officer's List of negroes imported into Barbados, June 24, 1698—Dec. 1707, 34,583. Same endorsement. 1¼ pp.
94. iii. Account of the 10 p.c. duty on negroes imported into Barbados, Dec. 9, 1698—June 30, 1708. Total, £7443. 2. 9. The African Company paid no duty, but the total includes what the duty would have amounted to. Names of ships given. Same endorsement. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 11. Nos. 23, 23. i–iii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 11. pp. 319–323.]
Aug. 17.
Barbados.
95. Governor Crowe to the Earl of Sunderland. Encloses copy of following. Unlesse there be two convoys yearely from England, and new Orders to H.M. men of warr, this place cannot subsiste. I hope Mr. Coxes letter has fully satisfied your Lordship etc. Signed, M. Crowe. Holograph. 1 p. Enclosed,
95. i. Duplicate of part of following letter. [C.O. 28, 38. Nos. 71, 71. i.]
Aug 18.
Barbados.
96. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of May 14 and June 25. The last Assembly was not dissolved, but fell in cource, their year being expired, neither had I any difference with them, it was the Members of the Councell and they, that could not agree about the bill of excise, so that I perceive your Lordships misapprehended that matter. I have not only often recommended to them the necessity of raising money to compleat Fort St. Ann, and dischargeing the debts and accrueing charges of the Island, but put them into a method of raising funds for the same, wch. is now under their consideration, and most of the publick accompts stated. The Fleete arriv'd here on the 8th past, it's allmost loaden and will be ready to sail in 20 days, their passing the Maderas is a great disappointment, not only to the publick (for the Customes commonly amounted from 5 to £7000) but wine, wch. is the common drink here, and used to be sold for 15 is now 35 per pipe. Except two convoys be allow'd annually as was appointed, the planters will not be able to hold their estates, for the shipps per last will not be able to carry off the crop, wch. makes ye masters stand on high ffraights, now demand 12s. 6d. p.c. and good sugar may be bought at that rate, above 3000 hhds. will be left in the store-houses. I cannot but observe to your Lordshipps the inconveniencie that may happen by the Parliament's takeing away the Governor's power of pressing men for H.M. shipps. The Prince has given orders to the men of warr yt. attend this Island (notwithstanding any former orders) to return to England when the shipp's company by sickness or otherwise shall be so far reduc'd, that there remains but men enough to carry them home, (wch. is left to the Capt.'s discretion), so that if they should happen in a cruice to meet wth. an enemie that destroys them any number of men, or by sickness or by any other accident disabled, the Isld. will be left without anything to guard it; so that two French sloops will take all our Northern trade and starve us. Neither has the country money or credit to fitt out vessells, it now pays to Mr. Roberts 20 p.ct. for the intrest of whatt he disburst on the three sloops that were sent to look after Ducass.
A list of Pattent Offices:—The Attorney Generall has not been in one year, so can give no annual vallew theirof; The Register in Chancery, £500; the Provost Marshall, £400; Navall Office, £300; Clarke of the Crown, £70; Clarke of the Market, £80. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, Read Dec. 3, 1708. 2 pp. Enclosed,
96. i. Copy of Address of the Assembly of Barbados, to Governor Crowe, Sept. 4, 1708. Reply to complaints of three Members of Council as to his male-administration in detail. There has not been so general a satesfaction and so much quiet in this Island for 4 years. The principall grounds for dissatisfaction remaining are, (1) Poverty owing to the paper bills, and the late arbitrary government of Sir B. Granville, wch. has made several hundreds of the inhabitants leave. (2) A full inquiry has not yet been made into the bribery and corruption by wch. that paper money was forced upon us, (3) or into the villainous treatment of Major Lillington and Col. Downes. (4) The grievous extortions in the Register's Office of the Court of Chancery are not yet reformed. (5) The simonaicall disposall of Church liveings in the time of Sir B. Granville are not yet enquired into. Signed, William Grace, Clk. of Assembly. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp.
96. ii. List of Baptisms and Burials.
Parishes.Baptisms.Burials.
St. Michaels from May 23, 1707 to Aug. 1708110146
St. Josephs  "  May,   1707 "256
Christ Church "  June 24, 1707 "6539
St. Peters  "  June, 1707 "3238
St. Lucys   "  Jan., 1708 "5112
St. Georges  "  June, 1707 "1235
St. Thomas  "  May, 1708 "35
St. James   "  May, 1707 "2521
St. Andrews  "  Aug., 1707 "2010
St. Philips   "  May, 1707 "10629
St. Johns   "  Sept., 1707 "1922
Same endorsement. ¾ p.
96. iii. Abstracts of causes determined in Courts of Common Pleas, April-Aug. 1708. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, 1708. 58 pp. [C.O. 28, 11. Nos. 40, 40. i–iii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 11. pp. 343–347.]
Aug. 18.
Kensington.
97. Order of Queen in Council. Alexander Skeen is dismissed from the post of Secretary of Barbados. Cf. July 8. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 15th, Read Oct. 25, 1708. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 11. No. 13; and 29, 11. pp. 298–299.]
Aug. 18.
Kensington.
98. Order of Queen in Council. Appointing Wm. Bird to the Council of Virginia. A warrant to be prepared accordingly. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 15, Read Oct. 25, 1708. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 4; and 5, 1362. pp. 301–303.]
Aug. 18.99. Mr. Solicitor General to Mr. Popple. Reply to Aug. 11. I am of opinion that the Repeal of ye Antego Act dos not make void the Nevis Act. For the Act wch. passed ye Generall Assembly at Nevis subsist by the authority of that Assembly, and is not to be look'd upon to be dependent on the Antego Act. When ye authority that made it to be a Law in the Leeward Islands, or the Queen shall think fit expressly to repeal it, it will determine. But till then I shall looke upon it to be in force. Signed, Jas. Mountague. Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 20th Aug., 1708. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 7. No. 53; and 153, 10. pp. 192, 193.]
Aug. 18.100. Memorial from Mr. Dummer concerning the Act for encourageing Trade to America. The limmiting clause is, No molestation whatsoever between Rio de la Hatch and River Chagre, or within 5 leagues at sea of any part of that shore—to any sloop, etc.—Coleby's expedition is a breach of this Law, the effect whereof has broaken the private trade of Jamaica to that part of the Continent in a very great degree, and if not remedied will preclud it wholly. The remedy to retrieve the said trade is, that all privateers who shall cruize to leward of River de la Hatch, be charged with instructions annex'd to their Commissions of the conditions underwritten upon securityes unquestionable (1) That they shall attack and take no other ship, on that coast, but such as shall be mann'd and sailed with French men; preserving the ship's company to evidence the lawfullness of the capture. (2) That in case they take or destroy any Spanish coasting vessell mann'd with Spanyards on the said shore, carrying coastwise the manufactures of Europe, that then they shall be subject to the penalty of paying to the Spanyard the double value in the same species they shall so take or destroy. And the coppyes of such instructions being sent to the Spanyard will revive the trade. Subscribed in another hand:—N.B. Add another instruction viz., That no goods of the growth, product or manufacture [? of H.M. Dominions. Ed.] brought in by any privateer, shall be accounted lawfull prize. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug 18, 1708. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 16; and 138, 12. pp. 318, 319.]
Aug. 18.
Kensington.
101. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 27, Read Nov. 12, 1708. ¾ p. Enclosed,
101. i. Edward Jones to the Queen. Charges against Lt. Governor Bennett, as supra. Copy. 30½ pp. [C.O. 37, 8. Nos. 71, 71. i.; and 38, 6. pp. 424–431.]
Aug. 18.
Kensington.
102. Order of Queen in Council. John Peek is appointed to the Council of Jamaica. A warrant to be prepared accordingly. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 25th Oct., 1708. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 19; and 138, 12. pp. 327, 328.]
Aug 18.
Kensington.
103. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Additional Instruction to Governor Handasyd relating to escheats (See July 30). Signed and endorsed as preceding. ¾ p. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 20; and 138, 12. pp. 328, 329.]
Aug. 18.
Kensington.
104. Order of Queen in Council. Mr. Lewis Morris is appointed to the Council of New Jersey, instead of John Harrison (See July 1). Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Sept.. Read 25th Oct., 1708. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 970. No. 79; and 5, 994. p. 464.]
Aug. 19.
Kensington.
105. H.M. Additional Instruction to Governor Lord Lovelace. You are to admit Lewis Morris to Our Council of New Jersey, and also to cause him to resume his former place therein. etc. [C.O 5, 210. p. 113.]
Aug. 19.
Tunbridge Wells.
106. Mr. Way to Mr. Popple. Recommends Mr. Hotchkyn to supply a vacancy in the Council of Jamaica. Signed, Benj. Way. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 21, 1708. Holograph. Addressed. Postmark. ½ p. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 17.]
Aug. 20.
New York.
107. Governor Lord Cornbury to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since I wrote to your Lordshippes by the Elisabeth gally, one Sylvanus Grevill Master, bound from this port to Bristol, by which I acknowledged the receit of your letters of June, 1707, I have not been favoured with any letters from your Lordshipps. Since that ship sailed, I have been up at Albany in the hottest season of the year, which made my voyage very uneasy as well as dangerous for health, but having been informed by the Commissioners for Indian affairs that the Sachems of the Five Nations had sent them word that they would be at Albany by July 15, and that they desired I would meet them at that time, I immediately ordered a sloop to be got ready, and notwithstanding the heat of the weather which was excessive (it being the hottest summer I have yet felt since I came into America), I got to Albany on July 16. None of the Sachems were then come, but the next day one Kunasore, who is the chief Sachem of the Onondagos, and Cagnaquinny, one of the chief Sachems of the Oneides, with three other Indians came to towne, and hearing that I was there, they came to me and told me that they came to bid me welcome to Albany, that they had noe businesse, but came only to trade, I asked them where the rest of the Sachems were; they told me they were busy in making canoes, at a place which they named, and is 160 miles from the first of the Mohacks' Castles, consequently 200 miles from the towne of Albany, I asked them if they knew when the Sachems intended to be at Albany, and if they knew of a message the Sachems had sent to the Commissioners for the Indian Affairs, they said they did believe the Sachems did intend to be at Albany in a month's time, but they were not sure; that they had heard that the Mohacks had sent a message to the Com missioners, but that they did not know of any time appointed for their coming. I desired them to send one of their young men to the Sachems to know when they would come, which they did, and he being returned told me that the Sachems were at work upon their canoes, and that they could not come till they had finished them, which would be about a month, upon that I resolved to return to New York, where the Assembly were to meet upon August 18, but I must acquaint your Lordshipps that during my stay at Albany, twelve of the farr Nations of Indians came to trade with our people, there are two Nations of them who are called Twigtwicks and Dionondadees, the nearest of their Castles is 800 miles from Albany, I have been these five years endeavouring to get those Nations to trade with our people, but the french have always dissuaded them from coming till this year, and this year, goods being very scarce, they came to Albany, where our people have suplyed them with goods much cheaper than ever the french did, and they have promised me to return in spring with a much greater number of their Nations, which will be a very great advantage to this Province; I did, in a letter of June 25, inform your Lordshipps that three french souldiers, who had deserted from the french at a place called by them Le Destroit, were come to Albany, while I was at Albany, another deserter came from the same place, whom I examined my self, and I send here inclosed a copy of his examination, by which your Lordshipps will perceive how easily the french may be beaten out of Canada, I did send a proposall for that purpose to the late Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations in 1702. The better I am acquainted with this country, and the more I enquire into matters, soe much the more I am confirmed in my opinion of the facillity of effecting that conquest, and by the method I then proposed, to which I refer; the advantages that would attend that matter are very many, and perticularly this, that Newfoundland will be a very easy conquest after Canada is reduced, what an advantage the having all Newfoundland would be to England I believe everybody sensible of, and that that would be the certain consequence of reducing Canada, is most true; besides this deserter, there is come to Albany one Montour, who is the son of a french Gentleman, who came above 40 years agoe to settle in Canada, he had to doe with an Indian woman, by whom he had a son and two daughters, the man I mention is the son, he has lived all along like an Indian, some time agoe he left the french, and has lived among the farr Indians, and it is chiefly by his means that I have prevailed with those farr Nations to come to Albany, he has given me the same account of Canada that the deserter did; the regular forces in Canada consist of 28 companys of foot, at their first coming they were fiftys, but now by death and desertion the strongest of them is but 22, some 16, most of them 12 or 14, Canada is now governed by one Monsieur de Vaudreuil, under him one Monsieur de Ramsay commands at Montreal, which is the upper part of Canada, in which the whole number of men does not exceed 800, Quebec, which is the lower part and much the larger part of Canada, has near 3000 men in all, soe that the whole strength of Canada does not amount to 5000 men including the Regular forces, Quebec is fortify'd with sodd work, but now they have begun to fortify with stone, they doe it by degrees, every year some, soe that if they are not disturbed, in four or five years they will have finished their work, which will make the reducing that place much more difficult then it is now. I have often by letters informed the late Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations of the necessity of having presents sent over from England for the five Nations of Indians; without which it is impossible to keep them firm to the Crowne of England, they have had noe presents since the first year that I came hither, which is above six years agoe; I have proposed it to the Assembly, which is now sitting, to raise a fund for presents for them this fall, I can't yet tell if I shall prevail with them or not, but if they doe not raise such a fund, I am afraid we shall loose the Indians before next summer. I have endeavoured to convince them of the necessity of the thing, therefore I am in hopes they will doe it. About £400 sterling, well laid out every other year in England, would furnish presents enough to keep the Indians firm to the interest of England, and I don't at all question but if that were allowed, I could debauch a great many of the French Indians from them. I intreat your Lordshipps will please to recommend this matter soe effectually to my Lord High Treasurer that it may be obtained. I was in hopes to have sent you by this conveyance the Minutes of Councill and Assembly from the time of my arrivall in this Province, but the Clerks have not been able to get them ready, the Virginia fleet sailing much sooner then was expected, but as soon as possibly they can be done, they shall be transmitted etc. Signed, Cornbury. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 9, 1708. Holograph. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 97; and 5, 1121. pp. 349–355.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
108. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend that John Hallett be appointed to the Council of Barbadoes. [C.O. 29, 11. p. 297.]
Aug. 23.
Antigua.
109. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have obeyed yr. Lpps. orders to the utmost of my power and have sent the best acctt. I can gett of what negroes have been imported into my Government so far back as could be procured. The Agent for Antigua before Feb. 170½ is dead, and Sr Tho. Cook in London is his Executer. Inclosed is an acctt from Mr. Chester who has acted as Agent ever since. There has no negroes been imported from the Company to Nevis since I came, and their Agent before my time is dead, and his widdow has, or pretends has, lost the books when the French took the Island. The private traders are either dead or gone of the Island that were before my time, since my time there has been a smal vessell wth. abt. 180, but the master yt. sold them was lost in returning home. I can't learn that the Compa. ever had an Agent at St. Christophers, there has not any been imported in my time, and those merchants that imported any before are eighther dead or gone off the Island, and their books lost by the invasion or hurricane. Col. Fry is the Comp.'s Agent at Montserat. I sent to him the first opertunity I had after I had yr. Ldpps. Orders, but as yet have no answer, nor have I any from the Lt. Governor what has been imported by private trade, the number I am informed is inconsiderable on eighther side. There has been since my time but three ships and one briganteen fitted from my Governmt. for that trade, two by the Compa.'s Agent, and two by private traders, two of wch. arrived safe, the other two 'tis fear'd are lost. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, Read Dec. 7, 1708. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
109. i. Negroes imported from Africa to Antigua, by private traders June 24, 1698–Dec. 25, 1707,—4945. Details given. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 23, 1708. 1 p.
109. ii. Negroes imported into Antigua by the Royal African Company, June 24, 1698-Dec. 25, 1707.—1805. Details given. Endorsed as preceding. ½ p.
109. iii. Edward Chester's Account of sales of negroes imported into Antigua by the Royal African Company, Feb. 2, 170½-Aug. 26, 1707. Names of purchasers and prices given in detail. Number of slaves imported:—2178. 11 pp. [C.O. 152, 7. Nos. 64, 64. i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 153, 10. pp. 228–230.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
110. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Propose Valentine Mumby for the Council of Jamaica, in the room of Mr. Ascough, he "having been recommended to us by the merchants here as a person of a considerable estate in that Island, well affected to your Majesty's Government, and long resident there," etc. [C.O. 138, 12. p. 320.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
111. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Since our letter to you of Aug. 13, we have further consider'd your complaint of the great obstruction which our privateers have given to our trade with the Spanish nation in the West Indies, and have received the like complaint from some eminent merchants here who are concerned in that trade. Whereupon we observe that such pernicious practices, contrary to H.M. express Instructions were committed before the Act for the encouragement of the trade to America, sent you May 14, could reach Jamaica, and do hope that since the publication of that Law there the like mischiefs have been and will be prevented for the future. Yet we think it our duty to H.M. once more to let you know how much we were dissatisfy'd with such practises, tending to the prejudice of a trade much more beneficial to this nation then whatever can be gained by privateering in those parts. We therefore strictly recommend it to you that all possible care be taken in the most effectual manner to prevent the like for the time to come. In order whereunto, you are amongst other things to communicate this our letter to the Members of the Councill there, and to such others as you shall judge proper, and exhort them in their severall stations to do what in them ly's to detect, discourage and prevent all such unlawfull privateering contrary to the said Act; in which Act there is a clause whereby all trade with the Spaniards between Rio la Hacha and the River Chagré, and within 5 leagues at sea of any part of that shore, is to be free and unmolested. This you are in the most proper manner to make known to all who are any wise concerned therein, and at the same time to signify to ym. that whoever shall presume to act contrary to the express directions and provisions in that Law (which' has been judg'd necessary to our carrying on so proffitable a trade with the Spaniards on that coast) every such offender will not only incur H.M. highest displeasure, but be further punish'd with the utmost rigour of Law. For notwithstanding the want of an express penalty in that clause, every breach of a Law is punishable at Common Law at the discretion of the Court, upon an information to be exhibitted in the name of the Queen's Attorney Generall. We are sensible that when a prize is brought into Port in order to an adjudication in the Court of Admiralty (as the Law directs) it will be difficult to prove whether such capture was made within the said limmitts or not, without a discovery thereof by some of the captors' crew, or unless the captor be required to preserve and bring into Port some of the ship or vessell's company so made prize to evidence the lawfulness of the capture, which last mentioned method you may lawfully require to be strictly observed by all persons concerned in privateering within your Government, and we do expect that you give such an Instruction to them accordingly. As a further remedy against such unlawfull practices at present we see no objection to the making some provision for an Act to be passed the next Session of Parliament whereby no goods or merchandizes of the growth, product or manufacture of any of H.M. Dominions, brought by any ship of war, privateer or letter of marque, main, into any Port of America, except in the case of recapture, or of a French prize, shall be accounted lawfull prize, which we conceive will effectually put a stop to all illegal and pernitious captures contrary to the said Act. But this we only mention, that in case you have any just objection thereto you may acquaint us with it. It will be convenient that in the best manner you can, timely notice be given to the Spaniards upon that coast of the due care that is taken not to molest them in their trade with the Queen's subjects, and that in case any damage shall at any time be done to them, that upon complaint made to you they will receive due satisfaction, which we hope will remove whatever discouragement in that trade they may at present lye under. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 321–324]
[Aug. 23.]112. Order of Queen in Council, Aug. 17, 1704. Confirming Revenue Act of Jamaica. Signed, William Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. 29th July, Read Aug. 23, 1708. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 18; and 138, 12. pp. 325, 326.]
Aug. 24.
Whitehall.
113. Mr. Popple to Mr. Solicitor General. Encloses for his opinion an Act of Nevis, Feb. 23, 170¾, for the establishing of Courts. The inhabitants and planters in those parts were so well satisfyed of the usefulness of this Law that at a Generall Assembly of all the Leeward Islands held in June, 1705, the same has been enacted to be in force throughout all the said Islands etc. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 193, 194.]
Aug. 24.
Office of Ordnance.
114. Board of Ordnance to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enclose following (cf. Aug. 17). We have sent at severall times stores to New England, from whence supplys might have been sent to New Hampshire, but wee received no account thereof. Signed, C. Musgrave, Wm. Bridges, Ja. Craggs. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 26th Aug., 1708. 1 p. Enclosed,
114. i. List of Stores of War sent to New Hampshire, July 30, 1692. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 864. Nos. 237, 237. i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 913. p. 6.]
Aug. 24.
Whitehall.
115. W. Popple to Lord Baltimore. The Council of Trade and Plantations having long expected that your Lordship and Mr. Penn should have come to some agreement relating to the boundaries between the Provinces of Maryland and Pensilvania, their Lordships have commanded me to acquaint your Lordship, as also Mr. Penn, that unless the said agreement be made and layd before their Lordships on or before Oct. 12, they shall be obliged without delay to make their report to H.M. thereupon, as the same does now lye before them. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 53, 54.]
Aug. 24.
Antigua.
116. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I shall in the best manner possible have the two Laws sent me publish'd in each of the Islands, and take care pursuant to yr. orders, to put them in execution, though I shall have something to doe to make them observe the law for regulateing ye coine, for of late they have brought out all theyr light money and they take some pieces of eight for six shillings, which I believe the intrinsick value is not two, this will exasperate them, soe that I shall despaire of getting anything for house-rent that was due to me before I had your last instructions, the people begin now to be satisfied, the Councill have taken pains to satisfie them ye grievances they pretended in takeing Mrs. Hastings' house, and putting in soldiers was false, they brought severall yt. was told by Codrington's Caball, I had taken the house she lived in, and have show'd them it Hutt, which is litle bigger then a centry box and show'd them it stood on the Towne land, and satisfied them the soldiers could not live on this dear Island except they had quarters, and that the Assembly woud not allow quarters, except I passed Laws, yt. I coud not justifie, show'd them the records, to justifie them that the not swearing Mr. Perry, he being noe freeholder where he was chose, was according to the ancient custome, used from the very first Assembly downe to the late Coll. Coddrington's time, and then they made a law to enable anyone to be chose, which law was rejected at home, soe the same method was to be followed, which was before that Law. The Councill have taken soe much pains to satisfie the people, that they assure me yt. in the next Assembly few or none of Coddrington's party will be chose. They all begin to be satisfied that 'tis only a tricke to gett me out, and Codrington in, they employ one Nivine, an impudent North Brittish lawyer, and he and this Perry and Tankard makes feasts and getts men drunke, and then getts them to signe a paper they call articles, against me without knowing one word of them, as severall of them have confessed; others that have more sense they tye by giveing them an oath not to divulge them, a deposition relateing thereto I here send you; some of my friends gott one of them drunke and asked him the Articles, he told them one was I had traded wth. the French. Now I can prove by the oaths of each man that ever went with a flagg of truce, that directly nor indirectly, in my owne name nor any others, that ever I had goeing or coming, any more then a hogshead of clarratt for my owne table in each flagg of truce, and that I pay'd for in ready money, the Collector and Wayters will swear that I from my first comeing order'd them to search all flaggs of truce. I have taken all the care possible to prevent it, and I believe that is the true grievance, for my predecessor, Col. Johnson, suffer'd it publickly, and has had himselfe six hoggsheads at a time. I order'd one Peuch to be prosecuted for carryeing 50 barrills of beef, but there came noe evidence against him, the Collector tells me he has search'd them in the harbour, and he has been informed the sloope has gone into another bay, and there they have sent beefe on board in the night, there is noe way to prevent it, but by breakeing the Cartell, and that the Councell tells me will ruine the Island. This Peuch was the man that was used to be sent up before my time, soe I continued him, but since I heard of his carryeing up beefe, I never have sent him nor never will for the future, though he pretends the beefe was in the sloope before she was press'd, and one Montegroe one of theyr richest merchants had sworne it, and that she was designed for Montserratt, and that they never designed to sell it in Martinecoe. I thanke God I can prove my innocency, that I neither had directly, nor indirectly, anything to doe with it, nor knew anything of it untill I had an acctt. from sayd Peuch that a french privateer had robbed him of it goeing to Martinecoe, and that it was not designed to be sold there; I heare another article is, Mr. Chester swears he gave me a bribe of 20 pistoles for a Register. I never had any gold or silver of him on any account in my life, it seems he calls 20 barrells of damnified flower 20 pistoles, the story is this, he has had a briganteen and sloopes registred as by the records will apear at severall times, and I never tooke soe much as my fee, which is two pieces of eight, but some litle time after the Hurricane all provisions being scarce, I sent about the towne to buy some biskett, or flower for my negroes, but cou'd not buy any. Mr. Chester came to me one morneing, and told me he had some flower damnified wth. salt water, the best of which he had disposed of, and perhaps in this scarce time my negroes might make shift with it, and if I pleas'd to trye he would lett me have tenn barrills. I asked him the prise, he told me it was soe bad he could set noe price, he wou'd put it on board my privateer sloope, to carry it to St. Kitts, accordingly he did, and when it came there, it was soe bad it was not worth my lawfull fee for one register, but to my very good fortune there was one Mr. Roache a merchant by; who is ready to depose upon oath what is here set downe is true, and that there was not one word of register, or any thinge like it, and by examineing the Record, I find that Mr. Chester very often registers sloopes and vessells, he had not registred any for severall weekes before or after he made me a compliment of these tenn barrills of flower, which were worth just nothing; An other article as I hear is, that I traded to Curascoa. I doe assure your Ldpps. I have never traded for any kind of thing. I have settled a plantation at St. Kitts. I thinke a shepherd will not be the less carefull for haveing sheepe of his owne in the fflocke, soe that I hope my haveing hired a plantation will not be imputed a crime, if it be, I have been justly punished by loss of negroes and the hurricane, what I have sent for the use of my plantation, I employed one Mr. Rawleigh to deliver out to them, if he has to much of one thing, he disposes of it for some other thing that is wanting as every manager of a plantation does, and this consists only in 5 or 600 yards of cotton, and as much osenbrigs and blew linnen, and hoes, axes and bills and other tools. I hope this cant be called trade, and for sending to Curacoa, this is the story, at the request of the inhabitents, I fitted out a privateer as much to gratifie them as any profit I expected, she never tooke but a briganteen, loaden with ginger and sugar, both vessell and cargoe was sold for £700, since she has taken some negroes of Mary Gallante and Martinecoe, she was soe run out of repaire, she cou'd not be fitted here, I was advised to put some of the prize ginger and sugar on board her and send her to be fitted to Curacoa, which I did, but gave strickt orders to the master to bring noe goods backe. And if the ginger and sugar sold for more then fitted the sloope to bring money backe, and I order'd the Collector to see that nothing was carryed in her or brought backe but what might lawfully be done, it soe happned that the sugar and ginger sold for less then the fitting the sloope came to, soe that she brought neither money nor any other thing, to the truth of this I can have the depositions of the master and all the crew, and the Collector who sent on board; the same sloope has now spranke her mast, and because she must be sent to the northward to get a new one, none being to be had here, I have let her to a merchant, and have nothing to doe with her lading, and when fitted have order'd him to sell her as alsoe another privateer, resolveing for the future not to give the least pretences for sayeing I traded, what the privateers tooke, and what has been seized have been sold, they cant call that trade, all this has been done by others for me, soe that it has taken up noe part of my time, these are what I can learne, except what the Assembly mentioned about Mrs. Hastings, which I thinke suffitiently answerd by the Councill and myselfe as apeares by the minutes, but if your Lordshipps thinks not, I will be at the charge of sending the Towne Platt, and the Law and 40 depositions to justifie me as to that. They may make what articles they please, they may say I have cloven feet and 20 other things, but I am soe very confident of my actions both publicke and private, that I am very sure I can answer to your Lordpps. everything alledged against me, I desire only a faire tryall, after that I have noe doubt but I shall be justified, and that twill be mad apear I have taken more pains to see justice done and in makeing workes for theyr defence then any of my predecessours. And had it not been for this faction, myselfe and the whole Island's had been very happy, if I shou'd be removed, 'twill be the same thing wth. my successour, lett whoe will come. I have defended myselfe much better then Sir William Mathews, he had noe honey-moon, for he was scarce a month before they quarrell'd with him, and perfectly broke his heart. I have with a great deale of care kept myselfe quiet for two year, Coll. Codrington was exasperated more then ordinary because I had orders from my Lord Treasurer to sue him for a great summ paid him for prizes last warr, and had Mr. Parkhurst delivered me the originall papers, I had recover'd it of him before now. I had them sent by this packett, and now he is in Barbados, if he comes downe I don't doubt but recover it, soe that 'tis worth his while be at some expense to remove me. The Councill advised me to gett Gent. of the Countrey to signe an adress in my behalfe, and has engaged for every one that has signed articles against me, three wou'd signe for me, which I refused, for it lookes like apealing to the people. I thought if they themselves gave it me under theyr hands, 'twould not be amiss. The which I here send you. I depend upon my own inocency more then anything else, the Councill have sent a letter to the Agent to the same purpose, a duplicate of which I alsoe send, here is alsoe an Address, which we desire may be presented. Signed, Daniel Parke. 6 pp. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25th, Read Dec. 7, 1708. Enclosed,
116. i. Deposition of Major Samuel Wickham. Edward Perrie, Commissioner of Customs, explained to him, as a Member of the Assembly, that the Articles of complaint against the Generall were being prepared secretly, in order that he might not be able to make too great a defence etc. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, 1708. Copy. 1 p.
116. ii. Address of the Lt. Governor and Council of Antigua to Governor Parke. Express surprize and concern at the many attempts being made to secure signatures to an Address and Articles of complaints against H.E. The particulars are kept secret. But none could know the transactions of H.E. better than the Council, who do not know of any male administration he has committed. The proceedings of these people has much disturbed the Government and divided the Island into factions, etc. St. Johns, Antigua, Aug. 24, 1708. Signed, John Yeamans, Jno. Hamilton, Edw. Byam, Will. Codrington, Thomas Morris, Geo. Gamble, Will. Byam, Law. Crabb. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p.
116. iii. Same to Richd. Carey, Agent for Antigua. Directing him to oppose the Articles intended to be exhibited against Governor Parke as in preceding. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 3 pp.
116. iv. Address of the Governor, Lt. Governor and Council of Antigua to the Queen. Congratulate H.M. on the defeat of the late attempt on H.M. Kingdoms by the French King under the masque of the pretended Prince of Wales. Signed, Daniel Parke and as preceding. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 7. Nos. 65, 65. i.–iv.; and (without enclosures) 153, 10. pp. 230–239.]
Aug. 24.
Antigua.
117. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I herewith send your Ldpps. the remaining Minutes of the Council and Assembly of Antigua, with the coppy of the Law they were so angry I would not pass, by wch. I have lost my last years sallary for house rent. Your Ldpps. will see by their Law for previlege they would both imprison and fine anyone that should reflect on any one of their House, but any of the Council, the Lt. Governor, or myselfe might be reflected on with impunety: I offer'd to pass these laws if amended, provided there might be a clause that they should not take place untill yr. Ldpps.' aprobation were known, wch. is pursuant to my Instructions, for I take this to be a law of an extraornary nature. This has been Col. Codrington's masterpiece, he settled this matter with his friends before he went to Barbados, and by every packett and all other opertunetys they have communicated their thoughts to each other, when they dispaired of getting any advantage off me by my misbehaving myselfe in the Post I am in; they therefore put the Assembly uppon desireing such Laws wch. if I past, I should incurr the Queen and yr. Ldpps. disfavour, and if I did not pass them, I should be paid no House rent, and the people told I was going to take away their previleges: they went so farr as to send me a message that they would pass no law except I would lett their Speaker have the negative voice, wch. if I had granted, I ought to have been hanged. There are but three people are the chief actors, the first is one Mr. Perrie, who is Commissioner for the 4½ p.c., he and his brother John Perrie, who is in London, were raised by Col. Codrington's father, I had also the misfortune to disoblige Mr. Ed. Perrie because I would not displace the Collector, who is an honest man, to put in his kindsman, who has not that charecter. The second is Mr. Tankard, yt. was of the Council, he is to be Lt. Governor if Codrington comes back Genll. The third is Coll. Will. Thomas, who Mr. Baron made his Attorny to sue Coll. Codrington, and had all the encouragement possible from me to do it, he has now accomadated wth. Col. Codrington, and has never so much as sued him, he is to be Treasurer. Your Lordshipps may see by this how hard it is for anyone in England to gett justice done them here. Mr. Baron in allmost six years has not been able to procure any one to sue for him; I shall not trouble your Ldpps. wth. makeing any other observations on the Minuts, when they have been read if your Ldpps. will communicate to me where I have acted amiss, I shall readely obey your Ldpps.' orders in amending for the future what falce stepps your Ldpps. may think I have made; I have allwais according to my Instructions acted no one thing without the Council, not so much as a decree in Chancery but has gone as they have advised me. When I writ to your Ldpps. that I thought vessells ought not to be seized uppon every trifling occasion, I did not think I should be so misunderstood as yt. I would not seize notorious illegall traders; for I have orderd two slupes to be seised for bringing Hollands etc. from Curacoa, both belonging to Mr. Ed. Chester, for wch. he has declaired he would be content to ley seven years in Hell to be revenged on me, therefore I have no doubt but his brother, Mr. Robt. Chester, will at yr. Lordshipps' board appear very zealous against me; Uppon a fair hearing I have no doubt but to appear very innocent as to any crime they or any others can charge me with; 'tis very true that the best of actions may be sett in an ill light, and 'tis an easy matter to rais a claymour against the best of men; I am very sure to make it appear uppon a fair tryall that I have not done any one thing but what I am warranted eighther by my Instructions or the Laws of the Islands. Tho' after the petition of Mrs Bowden (that notorious woman) what may I not expect (?), all that ever I had to do with her was so publickly in the face of the sun that she of all people I thought [she] would have said all manner of good things of me. I had nothing of her but what I bought very dear, being vallued by her own friends at her request and before the best people of the Island; I gave her bills of Exchange and took her receipt in full of all demands, and after this to put up a petetion to the Queen that I had cheated her of a vast sume, four times more than ever she was worth; all that ever I had of her she shall have for the same mony I gave her whenever she pleases. I am told her brother, Coll. Lillingston, was the auther of it, in hopes to gett my post, wch. with his Regiment would have prevailed with him to come to the West Indias, others tell me she did it to make people believe she had an estate here in hopes to draw in some rich widdower, I know not the true reason, but sure I am there never was so scandelous a petition given to a Crownd head that had no truth in it. I have sent to my Agent Mr. Perry all the proceedings I had with her, and the deposetions to the truth of it, wch. he will lay before your Lordshipps, wch. I hope may justifie me before the Queen and Council and your Ldpps. I think myselfe obliged to sett Mr. Crabb right with your Ldpps.; I was myselfe a stranger to him and his charecter was given me by those yt. wished him ill. I find him to be an honest Gent. and one that has a good estate. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, Read Dec. 7, 1708. 4 pp. Enclosed,
117. i. Copy of a Bill of Antigua, for ascertaining the elections and privileges of the Assembly, referred to in preceding. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 25, 1708. 3¼ pp.
117. ii. Copy of above Bill as amended by the Governor and Council. Same endorsement. 2¼ pp.
117. iii. Amendments of the Governor and Council of Antigua to above Bill. Same endorsement. 2 pp.
117. iv. Copy of an Agreement between Governor Parke and Mrs. Bowden for the purchase of her negroes etc. in St. Kitts, Sept. 5, 1706, with her receipt, and affidavits of Michael Lambert, Hen. Burrell, Stephen Payne, James Rawleigh, and Caleb Rawleigh relating thereto. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 23, Read Dec. 8, 1708. 5 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. Nos. 1, 1.i.–iv.; and (without enclosures) 153, 10. pp. 240–245.]
Aug. 26
Custom-house, London.
118. Mr. Savage to Mr. Popple. Desires copies of letters from Lord Bellomont, 1700, and affidavits by Messrs. Usher, Brid(g)er, and Wiberd (1702–3) relating to Mr. Partridge and the export of timber from New Hampshire to Portugal and Spain. Signed, Richd. Savage. Endorsed, Recd. 27 Aug., Read Oct. 26, 1708. ½ p. Enclosed,
118. i., ii. Memoranda of documents required in above. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 864. Nos. 238, 238. i., ii.]
Aug. 26.
Custom-house, London.
119. Mr. Savage to Mr. Popple. The Commissioner of the Customs have, pursuant to the directions of the Lord High Treasurer, appointed Mr. Archbold Cummings an officer in Newfoundland to prevent illegall trade there. And when a Court of Admiralty shall be erected there, and some fitt and able person impowerd to hear and determine causes on informations of seizure pursuant to the severall Acts of Trade, they will send him their Commission and Instructions. Signed. Richd. Savage. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 27, Read Oct. 26, 1708. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 75: and 195, 5. pp. 59, 60.]
Aug. 28.120. Receipts of Mr. Popple (Aug. 28) and Josuah de Kocherthal for £10, and of Herman Schuneman, Sept. 1st for £20, on account of the German Refugees. (cf. July 4.) etc. Copies. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 94.]
Aug. 28.
Windsor.
121. H.M. Warrant for Wm. Bird to be of the Council of Virginia. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 114.]
Aug. 28.
Windsor.
122. H.M. Warrant for John Peeke to be of the Council of Jamaica. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 114.]
Aug. 30.123. Col. Romer to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to Aug. 17th etc. When I was taken by privateers and carried into France, I flung overboard my draughts, papers and schemes, (of mine above nine years service). I know no new Castle, or a new one to be built, but Fort Wm. and Mary. It's true I once propos'd att Little Harbour a strong stone redoubt, etc. I am humbly of opinion that Fort Wm. and Mary should first be finish'd, because the greatest part of material are to that end left there at hand, and might have been donn then for £100 upon such dispositions as the Assembly had made, wch. was that the Militia was to worck twelve dayes by turnes for their victuals only, and whereas the Governour would by no means give me leave to do it, because I was reliv'd by Capt. Redknap, and likewise by an excuse that there was no money in ye Treasury, neither was there any to be risen, wherefore I offer'd to do it out of my own estate, but could not prevail with the Governour. I realy think it of the highest necessity that Fort William and Mary should be finish'd according to my designs and profils, wch. I sett forth and left behind me, and so donn, they would not be expos'd as they are now, because the fishermen in going with their shalops to sea, and in returning home, lay under the rocks of the Fort, go on shoare, steal the aprons of the guns, so likewise an enemy may come and pin up all the guns, wch. would be of dangerous consequence, they likewise neglect to lay the chevoux de frises order'd in case of surprise, and to finish them as they are begon. There is no regular centinell sett out, haveing only an allowance of four ordnary men for the whole garison, and in my time upon application made to ye Governour there was order'd for a few dayes 16 men in time of some danger, then did the People universaly complain (without consideration) of the hardship, wch. occasion'd their being drawn off, and the fort was againe guarded as before by 4 decrepid men, and those seldom on their duty as they should be, etc. The powder demanded seems to me extraordinary and surprising, unless they intend to merchandize therewith, because I am certain the powder-house will not contain that quantity, and I cannot imagine what use they can make of so much powder, when I consider what quantity they receive yearly from the shippin wch. comes to the Province etc. What further is demanded, I must confess that H.M. Garisons have no occasion for such a quantity etc. Proposes necessary stores. Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. pp. 573, 574. Concerning the money part, I know ye Province is poor, and I belive that without H.M. assistance the fort Wm. and Mary will not be finish'd etc. A boat for H.M. Collector is highly necessary. The fort, barracks, guard-house, officers' house centry boxes and necessary house may be finish'd for £200 sterl. etc. Signed, Wolfgang W. Römer. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 31, Read Oct. 26, 1708. 5 pp. Enclosed,
123. i. List of guns and stores required for New Hampshire. 2 pp.
123. ii. List of Stores of War at Fort William and Mary and Newcastle, Sept. 29, 1707. Signed, Shadrach Walton, Capt. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 864. Nos. 239, 239. i.–ii.]
Aug. 30.
Barbados.
124. Governor Crowe to Tho. Hopkins. I have not been honoured with any of yours since my last of May 19; by the Lucitania Capt. Wentworth I have sent in a casque directed to Mr. Tryon two dozen of citron water, which he will take care to deliver, and I humbly begg your acceptance thereof. I hear there is a long catalogue of complaints to goe home against me this fleet. I hope they will make no impression on my Lord Sunderland, untill I have an oppertunity of vindicateing myself, etc. Signed, M. Crowe. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 72.]
Aug. 30.
Antigua.
125. Col. Jones to [? the Earl of Sunderland]. Returns thanks for recommending him for the command of Col. Lillingston's Regiment, etc. Signed, Ja. Jones. Endorsed, R. Nov. 25. 1 p. [C.O. 7, 1. No. 18.]