America and West Indies
January 1709

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1922

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193-214

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'America and West Indies: January 1709', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 193-214. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73794 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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Contents

January 1709

Jan-June.280. Permits for 24 ships to sail without convoy and not to be embargoed in the West Indies. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 126, 127, 131, 132, 134, 142, 152.]
Jan. 1st.
(N.S.)
Rio Essequebo.
Fort Kykoveral.
281. P. Vanderheyden Reze to the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Pr. Vanderheyden Reze. Endorsed, Read May 28 (N.S.), 1709. Dutch. 39 pp. Enclosed,
281. i. Same to same. Jan. 17 (N.S.)
281. ii.-lv. Copies of letters, inventories, accounts etc. 1707 ff. Dutch. [C.O. 116, 20. Nos. 15, 15.i.-lv.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
282. Mr. Popple to Mr. Thurston. Major Lloyd (Oct. 22, 1708), having transmitted to you an account of the men listed by him in Newfoundland, the Council of Trade and Plantations desire a copy as soon as possible. [C.O. 194, 4. p. 70.]
Jan. 4.
Custom-house, Sandwich.
283. Custom-house Officers, Sandwich, to Mr. Popple. Enclose following. Signed, Jeff. Haford, Benj. Fisher. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 19, 1708/9 Addressed. Postmark. ½ p. Enclosed,
283. i. Masters of Fishing ships and by-boats trading from this Port and members to Newfoundland, Dec. 25, 1707—1708,=Nil. Signed as preceding. ¼ p. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 81, 81.i.; and (without enclosure) 195, 5. pp. 75, 76.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
284. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Quote Mr. Lloyd [Dec. 30, 1708] on illegal trade between Carolina and Portugal. This trade being contrary to the Act of Parliament for granting a further subsidy on wines, etc., by which rice is declared one of the enumerated commodities, and therefore not to be exported from the Plantations to any place in Europe but to Great Britain or Ireland, we are of opinion that H.M. pleasure be signify'd to Col. Dudley that he make enquiry into this matter, and prosecute the offenders, if there be sufficient proof, for the merchants at Oporto being themselves concerned, are unwilling to give the necessary information therein. We are apprehensive such illegal trade will hardly be prevented unless a power be given to H.M. Consul in Portugal to examine all ships coming from the Plantations, and to seize such ships as shall bring any of the prohibited commodities in breach of the Acts of Trade and Navigation. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 73, 74.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
285. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Report upon the Boundary disputes between Carolina and Virginia. Propose that a Commission be appointed on the part of each Government, and that the old method of granting lands be resumed in Virginia, according to the Charter, notwithstanding the late Instruction (1705, 1707.) Set out, Acts of Privy Council, II. pp. 584–588. q.v. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 329–335.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
286. W. Popple to Thomas Pilgrim. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to speake with you and Mr. Fullerton. on Thursday, when they do expect that you should bring with you such proofs as you may have to make good the allegations in your petition, etc. [Dec. 30, 1708.] [C.O. 29, 11. p. 370:]
Jan. 8.
St. James's.
287. H.M. Warrant for John Frere to be one of the Council at Barbados.[C.O. 5, 210. p. 136.]
Jan. 9.
St. James's.
288. Order of Queen in Council. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to consider what stores are necessary for Newfoundland etc. Set out, A.P.C. II., No. 1078. q.v. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 13th Jan., 1708/9 ¾ p. Enclosed,
288. i. Mr. Burchett to the Clerk of the Council in Wayting, The convoy for Newfoundland being now getting ready, I acquaint you therewith to the end my Lord High, Admirall may receive an Order of Councill for sending provisions, etc. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 79, 79.i.; and 195, 5. pp. 70, 71.]
Jan. 9.
St. James's.
289. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 13, 1708/9. Dismist by an Order of Jan. 27. ½ p. Enclosed,
289. i. Petition of Charles, Lord Baltimore to the Queen. Prays that the Order of Nov. 7, 1685 may be revoked, having been surreptitiously got by William Penn, falsely suggesting that petitioner by his grant was to have noe land but what was cultivated by savages. Prays that the boundaries of Maryland and Pennsylvania may be ascertain'd pursuant to H.M. letter of April 2, 1681. Signed, C. Baltemore. Copy. 3 pp.
289. ii. Duplicate of H.M. Letter to Lord Baltimore, April 2, 1681. C.S.P. 1681. No. 62.
289. iii. Duplicate of Letter from Wm. Penn to Lord Baltimore, April 2, 1681. C.S.P. Feb. 5, 1708. [C.O. 5, 716. Nos. 59, 59.i.-iii.; and (Order only) 5, 720. No. 2.]
Jan. 10.
Maryland.
290. Governor Seymour to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On Sept. 27 last the Generall Assembly mett and pursuant to H.M. commands I laid before them H.M. Order in Councill, expressing her disassent to the two Laws lately pass'd here concerning tobacco hhds., and H.M. commands to reenact a Law for the guage of hhds. conformable to those in Virginia; also H.M. commands in favour of Sir T. Laurence; and likewise proposed a Law to be made to punish such persons who should maliciously invent and disperse false news of transactions in Europe tending to the discouraging and dispiritting H.M. good subjects here, with severall other things H.M. Councill and myself thought proper for H.M. service and the good of the countrey; but not being able to win their complyance to any the least of H.M. just and reasonable commands, and finding that instead thereof they disputed what they had no cognizance of, vizt. the legality of a charter I granted to the Citty of Annapolis (by the advice of H.M. Councill) and ran into heats and divisions, proceeding so irregularly that notwithstanding a Commission prepared to swear them, and four Gentm. of the Councill ready to attend them in order thereto, they had made severall votes, and adjourn'd their house, resolv'd to acquaint them they were dissolv'd; and accordingly issued new writts of election returnable to Nov. 29, hoping the severall Countys would take better care who they sent to represent them, but contrary to expectation found the most of the persons, return'd to the last convention, appear as Delegates of this Assembly, so that there could be but little hopes, unless a more moderate Speaker were chosen, which being happily effected, I once more laid H.M. commands before them, tho' I am sorry to acquaint your Lordships without any success. But tho' they would not agree to the Law proposed for the guage of tobacco hhds., yet have humbly addrest H.M. to give leave to lay their reasons before her why they could not, which will be transmitted to your Lordships with the Journalls of the Assembly and Councill so soon as transcribed; notwithstanding which I am humbly of opinion it would be to the generall advantage of trade a small Act of Parliament were made in Great Brittaine to ascertain the guage of the same size both in Virginia and Maryland, that the merchants may know how to build their shipps for stowage suitable to either country. As to H.M. commands in favour of Sir T. Laurence, altho' the Councill and myself used our utmost endeavours to persuade their complyance, wee could not percieve the least inclination in the Delegates thereto; but on the contrary have addrest H.M. in opposition to Sir Thomas's claime, in which I advised the Councill not to agree with them, so that I have not any reason to alter my opinion, which I heretofore presumed to offer to your Lordships, that it would be adviseable Sir T. Laurence should procure the fines of the ordnary lycences to be setled on his office by an Act of Parliament or some other legall power in Great Brittaine; for let me do what I can to enforce H.M. commands on the Country, he seems to be the last person they are willing to oblige, for on my proposall they should make an ordnance to leavy those Fines to lye in the Sherriffs' hands and be left to H.M. gracious disposall, they would not concurr least Sir T. Laurence should obtaine her favour therein. The Assembly have referr'd untill the next Sessions the making a necessary and reasonable provision to supporte and enable the four Justices of the Provinciall Court to hold their Courts, and go the circuits twice yearly; and tho the reduceing the number of the Provinciall Justices seems to grate on some whose integrity and understanding allow them noe title thereto, and yet are desireous to be eminently distinguished from their neighbours, yet in generall and especially the people on the Eastern shoare, seem to be much obliged with this institution. The Assembly sate untill Dec. 17, and made severall laws, amongst the rest, revived those for the supporte of the Government, and being sencible of the continuall desertion of many of the inhabitants, whose misfortunes with the lowe vallue of tobacco in Europe, and losses by the enemy this last warr, gave them great dread of long and tedious imprisonment, have made an Act of Bankruptcy for the enlargement of the persons of such debtors who shall deliver up to their creditors all their estates, reall and personall, and that concealments in such case shall be Felony. They also made an Act to lessen the dammage on protested Bills of Exchange, making it only 10 p.c., whereas it was 20. And tho' the merchants may not approove thereof, yet since it is manifest the too much creditt given the people of this Province, being a careless unthinking sort of folke, has helpt to bring them into their present ill circumstances, the methods now propos'd will not only be a means to encourage the planters to abide on their plantations, but prevent their having too large a creditt, which is only in summe but not in intrinsick vallue of the comodity, and generally falls heavy at the last by the many protests of their bills. On the 17th inst. by way of New Yorke have receiv'd severall duplicates of letters from your Honoble. Board enumerated, and letters of May 14, July 13, Aug. 4, 1708. There are not in this Province any stores of arms and ammunition sent from H.M. Office of Ordnance. As for your Lordships' letter of March 26, 1707, you referr me to in yours of Sept. 2, I have neither received the originall or duplicate thereof, so am wholly at a loss what answer to make thereto. Since my last another Gentleman of H.M. Councill is dead, vizt. Mr. Kenchin Cheseldyne, which will lay me under a necessity of swearing another in his roome, Coll. Jenkins being so aged and at so remote a distance, and Col. Ennalls so often indisposed that they are seldom able to attend their dutys. When the Journalls of the Councill and Assembly are transcribed, I shall endeavour to give your Lordships a true light, how the Delegates are chosen, and influenced by the Roman Catholique party, whose cheife aime is to make everybody uneasy, who are willing to serve the Queen and Government, and doubt not but they will use their utmost efforts to put another gloss on their actions here, but as I have ever endeavoured to discharge my duty, faithfully, I shall while I have the honour to be abroade do what in me lyes to serve the Queen like an honest servant, and to obey your Lordships' commands with all integrity and dilligence. Signed, Jo. Seymour. Duplicate. Endorsed, Recd. May 11th, Read Dec. 6, 1709. 6 pp. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 68; and 5, 727. pp. 143–149.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
291. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Proprietors of the Bahama Islands. Give notice that parties will be heard on 28th Jan. to the petition of the merchants etc. for the resumption of the Islands to the Crown. (v. Dec. 30, 1708). [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 83, 84.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
292. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Dudley. Acknowledge letters of May 27, June 10, July 10, and Aug. 7, 1708. We are sensible of your care in endeavouring to promote the production of Naval Stores, and you will do well to continue to do your utmost therein; when the Act which you mentioned to be past in New Hampshire shall be transmitted to us in due form, we will consider the same. In the meantime we cannot but take notice of the proceedings of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay in refusing to pass a law to the same purpose. Their assertion that the clause in the Massachusetts Charter relating to masts is not binding to them, are groundless, for if that Charter do bind, and is as a law to H.M. in relation to their rights and priviledges, it does also bind and is as a law to the inhabitants of that Colony; this you will do well to communicate to the Assembly, and also to inform them that their refusal to pass such an Act, considering what priviledges has been allowed them by the Crown, will be looked upon as a great disrespect to H.M., and a disregard to the interest and service of this Kingdom. However, we commend your zeal in this matter, and desire you to continue your further endeavours therein. We shall lay before H.M. what you write in relation to Mr. Waldron, Hilton, and Smith, and propose others to supply their places in the Council of New Hampshire. We are glad to perceive the enemy has made so little impression upon your frontiers, and we hope that your care and diligence will effectually prevent their doing anything of moment. We have laid before H.M. our opinion in relation to stores of war etc. wanting for the security of New Hampshire, and that matter is in a way of being dispatched. Since the writing of what is above, we have received two letters of Oct. 1st and 10th, which we shall make use of as there shall be occasion; We take notice that you say the Assembly of the Massachusets Bay have, by an Act passed about three years ago, laid a duty of £4 per head on negroes, you ought to have acquainted us with the year the said Act was passed in, and have given us the title of the Act, for we can find none such among those we have; and therefore we expect that you transmit it to us by the first opportunity. One of the reasons you give why negroes are not desired in New England, is because it being on the Continent, the negroes have thereby an opportunity of running away: the same reason will hold in Carolina, Virginia and Maryland, which are also upon the Continent where negroes are so valuable. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 44–46.]
[Jan. 12.]293. The case of James, Duke of York, against Lord Balti, more, relating to the bounds of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The land claimed by him was purchased and seated by authority of a sovereign and Christian State of Europe many years before the date of his patent. Historical summary 1609—1674, when the King gave all to the Duke, who kept New York and disposed of the Jerseys and Pennsylvania. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 12, 1708/9. Reced. from Mr. Penn. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 56.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
294. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. There being several Representations which we sent to your Lordship, upon which we have not yet been informed of H.M pleasure; and whereas we are in expectation of being called upon by the Parliamt. for an account of our proceedings since our last Report, Nov. 1707, and that it will be necessary that we give an account of what has been done upon our said Representations, that our Report may be the more perfect, we desire your Lordship will please to give directions that we may be informed thereof. Annexed,
294. i. List of Representations referred to in preceding:—Dec. 4 and 19, 1707; June 23, July 19, Oct. 26, Nov. 9, Dec. 3 and 6, 1708. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 290–292.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
295. Council of Trade and Plantations to Col. Jenings. We have received yours of June 24 and Sept. 20, 1708. We have transmitted what you write about a guardship to the Lord High Admiral, and have been informed by his Lordship that the Garland is appointed for that service and is accordingly preparing to sail to your Government. We likewise acquainted the merchants with our proceedings therein, that they might sollicit at the Admiralty the appointing a sloop for the service you desire. As to the incroachments made by the Government of Carolina upon the boundaries of Virginia, we have considered the same and laid before H.M. our opinion thereupon. But we must acquaint you that you wou'd have done well to have given us an estimate of the charge and ye method and manner you propose of settling the boundaries between the two Provinces, which wou'd have enabled us to have been more exact in what we have proposed. However we hope this matter is now in a way of being soon determined. We have laid before H.M. what you write in relation to the Indian condemned for a murder in Kent County, and when H.M. pleasure shall be declared, we shall not fail of giving you notice thereof. In the mean time that Indian's case being as you have stated, you will do well to suspend his execution till further order. We have communicated to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina what you writ in relation to the goods seized by that Government from the Virginia Indian traders, and the said Proprietors have promised us an answer thereunto, which, when we receive, we shall communicate unto you. Whatever their answer be, we shall be glad to know what the Governor of Carolina writes to you upon that head. We are glad you have received H.M. Instructions impowering you to act as Lt. Governor during the absence of a Governor, and we will not doubt but you will take such care that all things will be managed to the best advantage of the Colony and for H.M. service. Though the letters you mention to have received were directed to Col. Hunter, yet you being in his absence Commander in Cheif, ought to answer the same, and therefore we shall expect it from you. We doubt not but the money raised for building a house for H.M. Governor has been so prudently laid out that the Assembly will readily comply with your desire of giving a further supply for the finishing of that work. We have reason to beleive that the incouragement given by H.M. and the Parliament here to the tobacco trade (of which you will have received accounts from the merchants) will have a good effect. However, if anything occurr to your thoughts that may further promote the said trade, you will do well to communicate the same to us. Upon this occasion we think it necessary to recommend to you that you discourage the inhabitants as much as possible from applying themselvs to the linnen and woollen manufactures, which we hope they will not need to do, when they come to be regularly supplyed with those commodities by the merchants from hence, who have inform'd us that in August, 1707, they had shipp'd to the value of £200,000 in cloathing and other necessaries, but that fleet, being detained here till March following, did occasion a great want and scarcity in Virginia. This evill we hope will be remedyed for the future. The liberty given for the importation of tobacco from this Kingdom to France on board neutral vessells, and that H.M. Navy be supplyed with tobacco bought here are considerable advantages, and the planters will find the benefit thereof. We are glad the difference with the Tuscaruro Indians is in a fair way of accomodation, as also that the nation of Saponees are returned to your Government. You have done well to grant them lands. We doubt not but the good treatment they will meet with from you will incline them to stay and to be of service in case of need. Notwithstanding the reasons you say the Councill give for not calling the Assembly, yet whenever the service of the country does require their meeting, you ought not to delay the calling of an Assembly in expectation of the Governor's arrival, which is uncertain, especially in the case of the present Governor, who is still a prisoner in France. We expect the account of quit-rents and 2/- per hogshd. you promised us, and shall do what in us lies that the fleet from hence may arrive with you in the fall in order to return here in the spring, but we fear it will be difficult to bring the merchants here to be of one mind in this matter. However, we shall do on our part what we think most for H.M. interest and the service of that Colony. [C.O. 5, 1362. pp. 336–340.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
296. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Seymour. Acknowledge letter of June 23, Aug. 16, and Sept. 7 and 10. Refer to representation Dec. 20. We are glad to find the Province in so good a condition, and that the people increase, and we hope by this time what you write of the inhabitants removing to Pensylvania and Carolina is remedied, by reason that the Act passed here, for settling the rates of foreign coines, will have put all the Plantations upon the same foot, in regard to the value of coine, so that there will not be the same incouragement to remove as formerly. If it be necessary that an Act of Bankruptcie be past, you will do well to recommend the passing of such a Law to the Assembly. We hope that the Act which directs that every servant upon his freedom shall have gun etc. provided him by his Master, will, if duly observed, in a little time arm all the inhabitants, so that the Militia may be in a good condition. Your care in preventing illegal trade is very commendable, and your proposal for that purpose has been sent to the Commissioners of H.M. Customs, from whom you will receive directions. We are glad to find the inhabitants of Maryland do not apply themselves to manufactures, which ought to be imported from this Kingdom; and we doubt not but they will be supply'd therewith from hence, that they will not need to turn their thoughts to anything but the culture of tobaccos. We have not received the accounts of publick arms you mention, and therefore you will do well to send them by the first opportunity: however we are glad to perceive by your letters that the stores are in so good a condition. 'Tis well the country is at last releived from the trouble occasioned by Clark, and that he has been brought to condign punishment. We have considered the Law for encouragement of learning etc. past in Sept. 1694, and find that the last clause, "that no person having H.M. Commission to execute any office judicial within this Province, shall be obliged actually to inhabit within this Province, and exercise the same in his proper person, and not by any Deputy" etc., is so penned that it cannot be easily understood, and therefore we think it necessary that the intention of the Law be better explained in that particular, which may be by allowing the patentees in express terms a power to execute their respective offices by their deputy or deputies. Since the new regulation of the Courts has given such satisfaction, and since it appears to be of public advantage, the dislike of a few persons to it, ought not to be regarded. You say you have not received our letter of March 6, 1707/8, we suppose you mean our letter of March 26, 1707, and therefore we send you a copy, for we did not write any of the 6th. As to the Act past in Carolina for encouraging the settlement of that Country, whereof you complain; H.M. has been pleased, upon our Representation, to repeal the same; a copy of H.M. Order in Council is inclosed. But we must inform you that the Proprietors here say, no such Act has been transmitted to them, nor do they know of any such. But if any Act to the like effect be made, they will take care the same shall be repealed. Your reason for sending the list of Roman Catholicks in your Government is good, and we commend your care therein. We have sent to the Lord High Admiral what you write in relation to Commodore Huntington's not giving you timely notice of the sailing of the Fleet: that matter will be inquired into, and we doubt not otherwise regulated for the future. We send you here inclosed some objections that have been made to the Act requiring the Agents of the Lord Baltimore to certify into the Secretary's Office the Instructions and conditions of Plantations, with the fees by them demanded, and obliging his Lordship's Deputy Surveyors to qualify themselves according to law, and desire you to communicate the same to the Councill, that we may have your and their observations thereupon, and that you inform us by the first opportunity of the reasons for passing that Law. As to the Act giving power to the farmers of the Lord Baltimore's rents to recover the arrear thereof after expiration of their lease, H.M. has thought fit to repeal the same, it being grounded upon two mistakes in law quoted. (Cf. Feb. 20, June 7, Nov. 23, 1708). We have communicated to Sir T. Laurence what you write in relation to his affair, as also the account you have transmitted of the Ordinary licences; and Sir Thomas having thereupon made some remarks, we transmit to you copies thereof, for your observation thereon, which you are to dispatch to us by the first conveyance. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 110–117.]
Jan. 13.
St. James's.
297. Order of Queen in Council. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to propose to the Proprietors of Carolina a Boundary Commission etc., as suggested Jan. 7. q.v. Lands to be granted in Virginia as then proposed. Set out, A.P.C.,II., p. 588. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 21st, Read 24th Jan., 1708/9. 6½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 11; and 5, 1362. pp. 341–349.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
298. Wm. Popple to Wm. Penn. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to speak with you concerning Lord Baltemore's petition at 10 of the clock on Monday morning next. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 85.]
Jan. 17.
St. James's.
299. H.M. Warrant for John Pilgrim to be one of the Council of Barbadoes. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 126.]
[Jan. 17.]300. Mr. Thurston to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Estimate of necessaries for the Company at Newfoundland, 1709. etc. Cf. Jan. 19, 27. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 17, 1708/9. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 80; and 195, 5. p. 72.]
Jan. 17.
London.
301. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Frankland packet-boat. Out and Home 112 days. She was stopt at some of the Islands longer than her stated time by order of the Governours. The Cotton packet-boat, which should have been here the middle of December, has met with desertion of her men, and great sickness among the rest, and north winds between the Capes, by which meanes she lost her passage thro' the Bahamas and put back to Jamaica, after having been supplied with 4 French seamen by Governor Handaside proceeded again; but was overtaken by the Frankland on this side the Windward Passage within hopes of her being at home in a few days. Great complaints come from those parts against the late Act of Parliament for privateers, which tends to ye ruine of all trade with the Spanish West Indies, disabling the men of warr and merchant ships of seamen now; and when Peace shall come, leave to the world a brood of pyrates to infest it, etc. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 17th, Read 19th Jan., 1708/9. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No.74.]
Jan. 18.302. Sir John Cooke and Wm. Farmer to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I beg the favour of the first vacancy that happens in Barbadoes, that you will make Francis Bond one of the Councill there, etc. P.S. He has a very good estate in the Island. Signed, J. Cooke, Wm. Farmer. Endorsed, Recd. 18th Jan., Read 2nd March, 1708/9. 1 p. Enclosed,
302. i. Certificate of Merchants trading to Barbados in favour of Francis Bond, a native of Barbados. Jan. 16, 1708/9. 8 signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 16, 16.i.]
Jan. 18.303. Petty Expenses of the Board of Trade, Michaelmas to Christmas, 1708. See Journal of Council under date. 3½ pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 45–47.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
304. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose above accounts, and request for payment of a quarter's salaries due to the Secretary and under-officers. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 374–376.]
[Jan. 18.]305. Peter Diharce, Merchant of London, to the Queen, Prays, in behalf of Gabriel Bouvy, of Bilboa, permission to load beef in Ireland in a Spanish ship, for the Spanish Plantations in the West Indies, and to return thence to Spain with goods not contraband. Signed, P. Diharce. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 24, 1708/9. 1 p. Annexed,
305. i. H.M. refers above to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Jan. 18, Whitehall. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 388, 11. No. 105; and 389, 20. p. 273.]
Jan. 18.
Office of Ordnance.
306. Board of Ordnance to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Desire a copy of Col. Romer's report upon Ordnance stores remaining in Fort William and Mary, New Hampshire, 1707. Signed, C. Musgrave, Wm. Bridges, Robt. Lowther, Tho. Erle. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 18, 1708/9. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 10; and 5, 913. p. 47.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
307. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Board of Ordnance. Enclose copy of report desired in preceding. [C.O. 5, 913. p. 48.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
308. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Thomas Pilgrim has not made good the allegations of his petition [Dec. 30, 1708], it appearing that the Marshall of Barbadoes only levyed on the estate in question by virtue of a decree obtained in the Court of Chandery for the arrears of the jointure of the Lady Chamberlain, now wife of the Governour. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 372, 373.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
309. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommendation of necessaries etc. for Newfoundland, as ordered Jan. 27. Cf. A.P.C.,II. No. 1078. [C.O. 195, 5. pp. 72–75.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
310. Wm. Popple to Wm. Lowndes. Encloses draught of a bond for sureties on behalf of Major Tynt. (Dec. 30, 1708) for the Lord High Treasurer's approval. Enclosed,
310. i. Draught of a bond in £2000 for sureties proposed by Major Tynt for his observing the Acts of Trade etc. in the Government of Carolina. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 85–89.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
311. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Parke. Since our letter of Dec. 24, we have received none from you, and have therefore only to acquaint you that H.M. has been pleased to repeal the Acts for establishing Courts etc. (Order of Dec. 30), which you are to cause to be published and entred in the Councill books as usual, and that you may get a law passed that shall not be lyable to the like objections, as those for which these Acts have been repealed. Enclose Representation. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 266, 267.]
Jan. 19.
London.
312. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. Gives sailings of the Cotton packet-boat (See Jan. 17). out and home, 162 days. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 20, 170 8/9 ¾ p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 75.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
313. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose Address from St. Kitts in favour of Col. Parke. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 273, 274.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
314. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose copy of Major Lloyd's letter, Nov. 15, 1708, with account of the French force at Placentia. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 78.]
Jan. 20.
St. James's.
315. H.M. Warrant for Philip Lynes to be of the Council in Maryland. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 129.]
Jan. 20.316. Order of House of Commons. The Commrs. of Trade are to lay before this House a state of the African trade, and their observations thereupon. Signed, Paul Jodrell. Cl. Dom. Com. [C.O. 388, 11. No. 104.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
317. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Refer to Representation of Dec. 3, 1708, as to the suspension of Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford, and to letter of Major Jno. Pilgrim, Nov. 2, 1708, relating to Governor Crowe's having sworn Messrs. Berwick and Aynsworth into the Council of Barbados. By our list it appears there were at least 6 Counsellors residing in that Island at the time of the said suspension; so that Mr. Crow was improwred to have sworn in but one person at most, for by his Commission, which authorises him to fill up vacancies that may happen in Council, he is allowed to fill up such vacancies to the number of seven and no more, which Councillors are to continue till H.M. pleasure be known. And we must further observe to your Lordship, that we have not yet received any account from the Governor of his having suspended the foresaid Councillors, notwithstanding he is directed by his Instructions, upon his suspending of any Counsillors to cause his reasons for so doing, together with the charges and proofs against the said persons and their answers thereunto (unless he had some extraordinary reason to the contrary) to be duly entred upon the Councill Books, and to transmit the same to us by the first conveyance. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 381–383.]
Jan. 22.318. Deposition of Dudley Woodbridge, one of the Justices of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Barbados, 1705, that A. Skeen was then farely and legally acquitted. Signed, Dudley Woodbridge. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 14, 1708/9. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 6.]
Jan. 22.
St. James's.
319. H.M. Warrants for Joseph Estridge, John Willet, and John Peters to be of the Council of St. Kitts. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 130.]
Jan. 22.
St. James's.
320. The Queen to Governor Crowe. You are to give an immediate answer to the complaints of Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford, etc. as Dec. 30, 1708. q.v. Countersigned, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 23, 1708/9. 2. pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 9;. and 29, 11. pp. 416–418; and 5, 210. pp. 127–129.]
Jan. 24.
London.
321. Deposition of Owners of estates of Barbados in favour of A. Skene. Signed, Rober[t] Havers, J. Bromley, John Walter, Benj. Alleyne, Richd. Steele, Pat. Mein, Ro. Stewart, Rowld. Tryon, Dudley Woodbridge, Robt. Moore, Robt. Chester, Tho. Forster, Will Tryon, Thomas Pindar, Edwd. Lascelles. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 14, 1708/9. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 7.]
Jan. 24.
Admiralty Office.
322. J. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses Capt. Huntin[g]ton's reply (Cf. Dec. 18, 1708). Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 27th Jan., 1708/9. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
322. i. Capt. Huntinton to Mr. Burchett. H.M.S. Guernsey in the Downs, Jan. 21, 1708/9. I wrote to the Governor of Maryland, July 20 and Aug. 24, and should have writ to him sooner, had I had the benefitt of a tender allowed by the country, as Capt. Stewart had, which I could hardly be allowed to take my powder in for 8 or 10 days, while I shifted my foremast, the old one being made unserviceable by a clap of thunder, and although the time limited by H.R.H. was not longer than Sept. 2, by there request and to oblidge the Trade, stay'd till Oct. 4. Signed, Jno. Huntinton. Copy. 1 p.
322. ii. Capt. Huntinton to Governor Seymour. July 20, 1708. My time will be expired Sept. 2, and do design to saile Sept. 5. I desire all masters of ships now in the Bay would be in readyness, etc. Signed, Jno. Huntinton. Copy. 1 p.
322. iii. Same to same. Aug. 24, 1708. I am sorry that through any mistake I should be thought to forgett my friends, etc. I assure you that this is my third, the first dated a month since, the last inclosed in a letter to the Captain of the Bristoll, which without doubt must have come to hand were not the messengers in those parts very negligent, etc. I was in hopes the President of Virginia had given you an earlier account than this, resolving to saile Sept. 15. etc. Signed, Jno. Huntinton. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 716. Nos. 61, 61.i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 727, p. 119.]
Jan. 24.
New London.
323. Governor and Council of Connecticut to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordships' letter of May 7th, 1707, we recd. not till July 8th last, immediately upon wch. H.M pleasure for proclaiming that Union was duely attended; and such farther steps taken as were necessary for our rendring ye account required. (1). As to the method used in ye administration of Government and Justice, there is no considerable variation from ye account we formerly gave, July 15, 1680. We have two Genell. Courts, wch. are held on ye 2nd Thursdays of May and October, according to ye time fixed for them in our Charter, consisting of our Governor, D. Govt., Assistants and Representatives from ye severall towns in ye Colony; in wch. Courts such locall Laws as are found needfull are made, and such taxes as are necessary for defraying ye publique charges are granted. There are 2 Superiour Courts held annually for the triall of capital offenders, and for the hearing of appealls. There are also 2 Inferiour Courts held annually in the severall counties in this Colony, which are four in number, in wch. are tried actions in debt, trespass, and of the case, and criminall causses, wch. are not capitall, with liberty of appealls from these to the Superiour Courts. The method observed in the proceedings of these Courts is, (a). The Plaintiff takes out a writt, wherein he makes a declaration of his case, and shews the cause he has of action agt. the Defendt., wch. writt bears the test of the sworn officers, that are appointed to grant them, as the Clerks of the Court where the action is brought. (b). This writt is served upon the Defendt. 6 days before the Session of the Court, where the action is to be tried, and a copy of it given him by the Sheriff or Constable, who are sworn officers appointed for the serving of such writts. (c). The Defendt. appearing is first heard in his pleas for abating ye writt, or in barr of the action, wch. if found insufficient, he then pleads to an issue. The Jury summoned to attend ye Court are sworn; both Plaintiff and Defendt. are heard on their severall pleas, and what they bring in evidence received; and the cause committed to the Jury. (d). The Jury being agreed upon a verdict, give it in to the Court, which being entred, the Court proceeds to give judg [h]ment accordingly. (e). Either party, aggrieved with the judg[h]ment, may review to the same Court, at the next session, or appeall to the Superiour Court, giving in bond to prosecute. (f). Either party aggrieved with ye sentence or judg[h]ment of the Superiour Court, upon such appeall brought, may bring ye action by review to ye next Sessions of such Superiour Court, where it is again heard and determined in the foregoing method. (g). Upon the finall hearing and determining any cause, execution is granted by the Clerk of the Court, according to the judg[h]ment. In all capitall causes we have a Grand Jury. And if they find the bill, a Petty Jury is improved, as in other cases. (2). We are preparing an exact Body of our Laws to send yr. Lordships. The low circumstances of the Colony has kept us without a Press, so that we have been necessitated to make use of Manuscripts for a considerable number of our Laws; but are now endeavouring to put them all in print, which we hope will be accomplish'd in a short time; and shall take the most speedy care to transmitt them. (3). The number of our inhabitants according to the exactest computation we can make of it, is about 4000. And of them, those that upon their desire have been admitted Freemen are about 2000. For servants, we have but few, either white or black, and we judge not above 100. (4). As for the increase for 5 years last past; it has not been much, especially of our servants, some blacks are brought from the West Indies hither, but very rarely. And we have none that trade to Affrica, or bring any white servants to us from Europe. (5). The Militia of the Colony, which consists of all above 16 that are capable to bear arms, amount to 3,500. (6). The commodities exported to Great Brittain are chiefly turpentine, pitch and tarr. But there is little of these wch. go directly from hence; the last fall there was one briganteen, mostly belonging to inhabitants in this Colony, which sailed from hence to Great Brittain laden with such stores. And there was at the same time another briganteen, of Boston, which took in the same kind of loading here, for Great Brittain; but most of these stores were of the growth and production of Massathusetts Bay. These 2 are ye only vessells wch. we know of that took in their lading here for Great Brittain. Those small quantities of such commodities made in this Colony, are sent directly to Boston or New York, for the procuring of such European goods as are consumed in this Government. (7). Our trade with other places is chiefly with Boston, New York, and ye West Indies; to Boston and New York we ship the principall produce of this Colony, which is grain, as wheat and peas, rie, barly and Indian corn; and pork and beef; some small quantities of turpentine and tarr. And it is by this way we are furnished with cloathing and other manufactures brought from England. To the West Indies we send horses, staves, hoops, and some small quantities of pork and beef; and bring in return sugar, malasses and rum, cotton wooll, and these in such small quantities that very seldom any of those commodities, so brought into this Government, are exported.
Your Lordships will see that the trade of this Colony, wch. lies principally in what is produced by the labour of the inhabitants in their tillage of land, is not likely to admitt of any great increase, especially during the warr, wch. takes off many of our labourers from their tillage; European and other commodities being also by reason of the warr sold at so great rates, that all we can raise upon our lands, to procure them with, will afford us but a very slender supply. Nor are there any persons among us of estate sufficient to import such stores of European goods, as produce of the West Indies, into this Colony, as might increase trade here, by inviting the inhabitants of the neighbouring Provinces to supply themselves from hence. (8). There is a carefull inspection had upon the Navall Officers in the severall ports within the Government, that at no time any vessels that trade unlawfully may escape. And tho it is not possible for the best care wholly to prevent such evill practises, yet we believe there is as little of it at any time, practised by any vessels trading into this Government, as can be thought. For our supplies of European goods are from the neighbouring Provinces. No vessels having any trade from Europe, Asia or Affrica directly to this Colony, (excepting a sloop sometimes from Fiall and ye Maderas), nor any ennumerated commodities exported out of the Colony but very rarely. (9). Ships we have none, briganteens 2, and sloops 17; about 100 seamen; all which vessels were built in this Government. (10). The Manufactures in the Colony are but few; there is but one clothier in the Government. So that our people are necessitated to wear the cloth they can make in their own families, without anything more than fulling of it (for ye most part) after it comes out of the loom. All we make is not enough to serve the occasions of the poorer sort. Nor are those few tradesmen we have of other sorts capable to supply the necessities of our inhabitants, who are obliged to buy for their use in ye neighbouring Provinces. We rejoyced in this opportunity to lay the present state of this Colony before yr. Lordships, whose great concerns for the good of the Plantations in generall, and this in particular, expressed in your letter, does both assure us of yr. Lordships' favour, and confirm us in the hope of our future prosperity, to which nothing can contribute more than yr. Lordships' counsel and directions, etc. Signed, by order, Eleazar Kimberly, Secy. Endorsed, Recd. 9th June, Read 12th Dec., 1709. 7 pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 88; and 5, 1292. pp. 178–185.]
Jan 24.
Whitehall.
324. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Since our letter of Jan. 21, we have received a letter from Governor Crow, wherein he acquaints us that upon his suspending Col. Sharp, Mr. Walker and Mr. Beresford, there were then but five of the Council resident, for which reason he had sworn in Messrs. Berwick and Aynsworth, so that in that respect he has pursued his Instructions. By the same packet we have received the Governor's reasons for his suspending the 3 Councillors, which we shall consider. [C.O. 29, 11. p. 391.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
325. W. Popple to Richard Savage. Communicates Governor Crowe's complaints (Nov. 2, 1708) against the Custom House Officers at Barbados. [C.O. 29, 11. p. 392.]
Jan. 25.326. George Gordon to the Queen. Petitioner was appointed by H.M. Provost Marshal of Barbados, 1707. The Provost Marshal formerly appointed a deputy as Marshal to attend the General Assembly, and has also by himself or Deputy been accustomed to serve all processes and execute all executions arising out of the Courts, etc. But the Government of the Island in several new laws have empowered several Committees and Commissioners to make their own Marshals, which they have done. Refers to Act to ascertain the payment of bills, 1707, and the Supplemental Act, 1708, and the Act for settling the public accounts. The Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas and the Judge of the Court of Admiralty have of late taken upon them to appoint their own Marshals, and have refus'd to admit Petitioner's Deputy to execute the duty of Marshal for the said Courts as has been usual. Which proceedings are manifest encroachments on your Majesty's grant, and thereby Petitioner is deprived of the greatest part of the perquisites of his office, and several great complaints are made of the partial and slow execution of Justice, occasioned by the great dependance that these Marshals now have upon the inhabitants, many of which are obnoxious to the law, and new offices are erected to the increasing of the disputes and contentions of the people. Prays to be restored to the due execution of his office. Subscribed,
326. i. Jan. 25, Whitehall. Referred by H.M. to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 1, 1708/9. 3½ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 3; and 29, 11. pp. 393–396.]
Jan. 26.
African House.
327. Royal African Company to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Request for copies of any complaints from the Plantations against them. Signed, John Pery, Secy. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 27, 1708/9. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 11. No. 107.]
Jan. 26.
New London.
328. Governor and Council of Connecticut to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordships' letter of April 15, 1708, came not to our hand till Dec. 22, in obedience to which wee have made strickt enquiry what number of negroes have been imported June 1698—Dec. 1707, and find that their hath not been one vessell either of the Royall Affrican Company's, or of seperate traders, that hath imported any negroes hither in that space of time, nor any since or before, that wee can heare of. Their are but few negroes in this Government, and those wee are supplied with from the neighbouring provinces for the most part, except that sometimes half a dozen in a year may be imported from the West Indies. As to the half yearly accounts of negroes imported from Dec. 25, 1707, their is now a year from that time run out and none imported, nor any like to be in vessells from this Colony, their being none employed in that trade. And for the future wee shall be carefull to transmit the half yearly accounts your Lordships send for, as wee shall to observe what other directions your Lordships may give us. Signed by order, Eleazar Kimberly, Secry. Endorsed, Recd. June 9th, Read Dec. 12, 1709. Addressed. Sealed. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 87; and 5, 1292. pp. 176, 177.]
Jan. 27.
St. James's.
329. Four Orders of Queen in Council, relating to supplies for Newfoundland etc. Set out, A.P.C.,II, No. 1078. q.v. Each signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 9, Read 15, 1708/9. 4¼ pp. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 84–87; and 195, 5. pp. 81–84.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
330. W. Popple to John Pery. In reply to letter of 26th. The Council of Trade and Plantations have consider'd the observations made by the Royal African Company on their Representation of Feb. 3, 1707/8, and have thereupon made such alterations in their report to the House of Commons as appears necessary. They have receiv'd from some of the Plantations lists of negroes imported into the said Plantations, which they have inserted in their report, and they have not receiv'd any complaints, as you intimate in your letter. [C.O. 389, 20. pp 274, 275.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
331. Council of Trade and Plantations to the House of Commons. Report upon the African Trade. Cf. Jan. 20, 1708/9. In 1672 the liberty of trading to Africa was by K. Charles II. granted to the present Company exclusive of all others, etc. Several complaints against the Company, and a general dissatisfaction that so profitable a trade should be confined to an exclusive joynt-stock, soon brought on an interloping trade. During that time several private ships with their cargoes were seiz'd on the coast of Africa, and in the Plantations for trading contrary to the Company's Charter, whereby such private trade was in a manner crushed; but upon the late Revolution it revived again, and was carry'd on for some years to a much greater degree than formerly. In 1697 an Act was passed for settling that trade, whereby liberty is given for the term of 13 years (and to the end of the then next session of Parliament) from June 24, 1698, to any of H.M. subjects to trade within the limits of the Company, paying duties of 10 p.c. ad valorem on all exports and imports for trade between Cape Blanco and Cape Mount, and 10 p.c. upon exports only between Cape Mount and the Cape of Good Hope, with an exemption of duties on negroes, and paying 5 p.c. only on redwood, all which duties are payable to the Company, and (together with the ⅓rd part of all forfeitures) are by them to be wholly apply'd to the maintaining their Forts. Since the passing of that Act, we receiv'd no complaints from the Plantations, either as to the scarcity or excessive prices of negroes, otherwise than as occasioned by the present war till those which have lately been sent from some of the Plantations. The prices of negroes sold by the Company and separate traders have been much the same, and have advanc'd or lessen'd according to the demand, and to the rise and fall of the commodities produced in the several Plantations. The Company does say, that being willing to try if they could carry on the trade under this new regulation, they rais'd an additional stock, but after an experience of so many years have found it attended with insupportable inconveniences, under which they can no longer subsist. For they say that the 10 p.c. amounting to £53, 731 does not near answer the charge of the Forts etc., and show a deficit of £185,707 for the years 1698—1707. The separate traders accuse the Company of extravagance and bad management. Argued in detail with the Company's replies. The separate traders say the Company has raised the price of negroes, which is more than double what it was before the Trade was laid open, in order to outdo and ruin them. The Company further complain that the natives grow insolent, and are encouraged by other traders to insult the Company's Forts, and bring them under difficulties on purpose to obtain bribes to compose differences of their own creating; and particularly, that one of the separate traders having made a bargain for some negroes, carry'd them to Barbadoes without paying for the same, but that the Company, in order to secure peace and a friendly correspondence with the negro Kings, sent to Barbadoes and bought the said negroes and returned them to the King from whom they were so taken. The traders say the Company's differences with the natives were due to their bad treatment of them in trade. The Company desire of Joint-Stock exclusive of all others, or, in case that shall not be thought proper, they would be content to be limited in their trade from Cape Blanco to Cape Lopez, if the separate traders be restrained from coming there. The separate traders propose, on the contrary, that the trade be laid open (like that to Turkey) under a just regulation. Arguments on this point and the financial position of the Company, and their work in Africa. Negroes imported into the Plantations by the Company 1698—1707, Total,=17,760. 'Tis computed that the number of negroes necessary for a yearly supply of the Plantations is (Virginia and Maryland, 4000; Carolina and New York, 1000; Barbadoes, 4000; Leeward Islands, 4000; Jamaica, and what are carry'd by H.M. subjects to the Spanish West Indies, 12000)=25,000. The separate traders add that the greatest part of the negroes furnished to Virginia, Maryland, Carolina and New York has been by the separate traders, and that not above 200 have been carry'd to those parts by the Company since their establishment, which not having been contradicted by the Company, we must observe upon it that those Plantations, so profitable to this Kingdom, ought not to be neglected, for without such a supply by the separate traders, near one half of the tobacco could not have been produced and brought hither; and how much that would have lessen'd H.M. Customs, and the navigation of this Kingdom, we need not mention. Quote returns from the Plantations in reply to letter of April 15, 1708. Upon all which we observe that the number of negroes furnish'd to Jamaica, Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands (which are the principal Plantations) either by the Company or separate traders since the opening the trade, is much less than what were wanting for their necessary supply, and the carrying on the Assiento trade, according to the foregoing computation made on that head; nevertheless we are sensible that in this case an allowance is to be made for losses and other accidents of war, and we believe that the scarcity as well as great rates of negroes at Barbadoes have proceeded from the imposition of their papermoney in payment for negroes, instead of silver or other goods since 1706, tho' it must be allow'd that between 1698—1708, the separate traders have imported into that Island about four times as many, and into Jamaica twice as many, as have during the same time been imported into those Islands by the Company; and that the losses lately sustain'd at Nevis and St. Christophers, when invaded by the French, have occasion'd a like scarcity and excess of price in those last mentioned Islands, where the Planters have little money or effects to buy negroes. It's hard to make a true value of imports either by the Company or separate traders, in regard such imports consist mostly of gold as well as of elephants' teeth and redwood; and it's yet the more difficult to come near the truth thereof on the part of the separate traders, for that most of the masters of their vessels bring home their private adventures in gold. It cannot be doubted but that a trade so very profitable in itself, and so absolutely necessary for the support of the Plantations, ought to be preserv'd and put on such a foot, that it may be carry'd on and improv'd to its full extent. It may reasonably be apprehended, should this trade be confined to a Company by a joynt-stock exclusive of all others, that such a Company will contract the trade within the Gold coast, or such narrow limits in Africa as may best turn to their own profit, without regard to the good of the Plantations, or of the Publick, which may be presum'd from the way of their having carry'd it on for the time past. It will of consequence very much lessen the number of ships now employ'd in the Trade, to the great discouragement of our Navigation; for since there has been an open trade, the separate traders have sent out three ships for one employ'd by the Company. Should so extensive a trade be confined by an exclusive joynt-stock, the Plantations may suffer for want of a sufficient number of able negroes at reasonable rates, those markets being always best supply'd, where there are most sellers; and on this head we observe that by the Company's own accounts of the negro-trade from 1680 to 1688, in 9 years (and in a time of peace) there were but 46, 396 negroes deliver'd in the Plantations; whereas 'tis computed by the separate traders, that, since the opening of the trade, within the like term of years (notwithstanding the present war, there have been imported by the separate traders into those parts, 160950 negroes.) Lastly, we cannot but be sensible how prejudicial it must be to trade in general to have but one buyer of all such woollen and other goods as are annually exported for this trade; but one freighter of so many ships at home, and but one buyer of the Plantation commodities abroad. 'Tis true, that the French, Dutch and Danes, Hamburghers and other nations trade to Africa in a joynt-stock; their trade being not very considerable; whereas had they the benefit of so large and so many improveable Plantations as belong to Great Britain in America, 'tis presum'd they would soon enlarge that profitable trade to a greater extent by laying the same open, and the separate traders do say that the Portuguese never had any except the Cacho Company, which lasted but 5 years, but that the trade remain'd open to all people of that nation, and that they usually carry'd off more negroes yearly (before our trade was open'd by the said Act) than all other nations in Europe; and they say likewise, it can be proved, that there have been about 100 sail of Portuguese vessels in one part of the coast of Africa in one year, when there hath been but one Company's ship (while the trade was exclusive) in 15 months at one of the Company's chief places of trade. Tho' the carrying on of this trade in the way now settled by the Act, is much more advantageous to the publick than that of an exclusive Joynt-stock, yet we find that great inconveniencies have arisen, and will unavoidably arise from it's being carry'd on upon such different and contending interests as those of a Joynt-Stock, and of a separate trade, for while they strive to beat each other out of the trade, the value of our commodities is greatly lessen'd, and those of Africa as much increas'd, and it is reasonable to believe that from such a struggle in trade the disputes and quarrels between the Company and the natives, and the losses of which the Company complains, have in some measure proceeded; for tho' the Company do impute the great lessening of their stock to the extraordinary charges in maintaining the Forts and castles over and above the produce of the 10 p.c., yet if the said 10 p.c. had been well invested in goods, and prudently managed, it might have answer'd that service. In the valuation of the Company's quick-stock (as given by them) all the debts due to the Company, of what kind soever being included, unless we were able to distinguish the good debts from the bad, we cannot positively affirm in what condition the Company now is, with regard to their real stock in trade, but do believe it is reduced so very low that it will be impossible (upon the foot they now stand) for them to carry on that trade, which if duly extended will employ a much greater stock than the Company have hitherto at any time had. Their forts and castles and other their dead stock, the Company did last year value at £141, 450, tho' the separate traders say that (at the time of passing the Act) all their forts and castles then in their possession were valued by some separate traders (well acquainted with their affairs) at no more than £4,100, and if they are of greater value now, by any additional fortifications made to any of them since that time, the separate traders hope it will be thought reasonable that such improvement should be look'd upon as owing to the 10 p.c. by them paid (pursuant to the said Act) in proportion to their duties. [C.O. 389, 20. pp. 275–313.]
Jan. 27.
St. James's.
332. Order of Queen in Council. Stores of war for New Hampshire ordered as Nov. 25, 1708 etc. The Governor to return an account to the Board of Ordnance, etc. See A.P.C. II. pp 571–574. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 9th Feb., 1708/9. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 11; and 5, 913. pp. 49, 50.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
333. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. We desire to know your resolution, as soon as may be, concerning the Boundary Commission, etc. (See Jan. 7, and 13, 1709). [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 91; and 5, 289. p. 154.]
Jan. 27.
St. James's.
334. Order of Queen in Council. Order of Jan. 9 relating to petition of Lord Baltimore revoked, upon petition of William Penn, setting forth that the case had been heard and settled Nov. 7, 1685. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 4th Feb., 1708/9. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 59; and 5, 1292. pp. 97, 98; and 5, 720. No. 3.]
Jan. 28.
St. James's.
335. H.M. Warrant for Robert Eleis to be of the Council in Nevis. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 130.]
Jan. 29.
St. James's.
336. H.M. Warrant for Wm. Byam to be of the Council in Antegoa, in the room of Barry Tankard, etc. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 130.]
Jan. 29.337. H.M. Warrant for Wm. Whittington to be of the Council in Maryland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 130.]
Jan. 29.
Admiralty Office.
338. J. Burchett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recommends to their Lordships Mr. Gordon (cf. Jan. 25), who has been many years in this office, etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 1, 1708/9. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 4; and 29, 11. p. 397.]