America and West Indies
May 1709, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1922

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300-322

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'America and West Indies: May 1709, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 300-322. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73800 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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Contents

May 1709, 16-31

May 16.
Montserrat.
505. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I tooke the opertunity of the Weymouth being in my Govern ment to viset Nevis and the other Islands. As I was returning to Antigua, I met this packet. Acknowledges Order in Council re Mrs. Bowden's petition, and thanks for report. I am well assured I shall clear myselfe of all manner of crimes laid to my charge etc. All the best people of my Government will justifie me, but tis hard contending with a man worth £100,000, etc. Refers to enclosures May 4. etc. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read Nov. 15, 1709. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 36; and 153, 10. pp. 396, 397.]
May 16.506. E. Jones to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays that there may be no further proceedings in his case till there be a full Board. (See Journal of Council, May 9 and 16.) Signed, Ed. Jones. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 16, 1709. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 8. No. 79; and 38, 6. pp. 447–450.]
May 16.507. Mr. Eyre to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, R. Eyre. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 17th May, 1709. Recd. from Mr. Jones. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
507. i. Proposed alterations in the draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland relating to Mr. Jones. See Journal of Council, May 12, 1709. 4 pp. [C.O. 37, 8. Nos. 80, 80.i.; and (without enclosure) 38, 6. p. 455.]
May 163.508. Alterations in same proposed by Sir Thomas Parker and Sir Peter King. Endorsed, Recd. (from Sir John Bennet 16th, Read May 17th, 1709. 6½ pp. [C.O. 37, 8. Nos. 891, 81.i.]
May 16.
Claven House.
509. Commission from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Fortescue Turberville, for taking probate of wills in South Carolina. Signed, Craven, Palatine; Beaufort, Craven for ye Lord Carteret; M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson, M. Ashley for Jos. Blake. [C.O. 5, 289. p. 217.]
[May 16?]510. Receipt for Lady Granville by the Lords Proprietors of Carolina for the discharge of liabilities of Lord Granville, late Palatine. [C.O. 5, 289. p. 218.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
511. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Reply to letter of May 15, etc. Finding great difficulties in proposing a method to employ the poor Germans in such manner as they may be able to support themselves, we pray the favour your Lodship would give us an opportunity of conferring with your Lordship upon that affair. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 404, 405.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
512. Mr. Secretary Boyal to the Council of Trade and Plantations. It is H.M. pleasure that you should make out and report to her a true state of the pretensions. of the Crown of England to any Colonys or places in the West Indies which are now in the hands of the French. And you are like wise to give an account of what towns, places or territorys they have taken from us in those parts during this present warr, or we from them. Signed, H. Boyle. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 18, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 76; and, 324, 9. pp. 292, 293.]
May 18.
Barbados.
513. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since the inclosed coppy of my last, there is another packet arrived, but I am not honoured with any letters from your Lordps. thereby. Refers to Minutes of Council, May 12, and the reasons for suspending the admitting of Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford into the Council (see supra May 14), in which I have followed the advice of the majority of the present Council as well as the Assembly. These three Gentlemen are so unacceptable to the majority of the People here, as your Lordships will perceive by the Addresses sent home to their Agents, that I was afraid it would have occasioned some tumult especially when I perceived by their hott Address they were for having the sword bore no longer in vain, and here are many needy Gentn., who having spent their estates, would embrace the least occasion to hurry us into civill commotions. Another reason I had for suspending the swearing of said Gentlemen was, the aversion they have for the Members of the present Assembly, who have such interest in their country that it's impossible by any dissolution to alter, and in admitting the three Members, they with Mr. Cox and Mr. Pilgrim would have had a majority in Council, so have stopt all publick business, and infallibly ruined the Island. Hopes for H.M. approbation. Refers to enclosure. So soon as the Representation H.M. orders the affidavits are to be taken to comes, it shall be punctually obeyed. I cannot but take notice, your Lordps. had all these papers under your consideration, but does not advise any particular that my answer was short in. Your Lordps. cannot forgett what distraction this place was in before my arrival, occasioned by the male administration of these very Gentln., which was the reason. I had directions in my Instructions to turn them out, which was done accordingly. And I am confident their proceedings since have not any wayes lessened their former crimes. Indeed their private peek against me was only occasioned by obeying that Order. Encloses Act for appointing of Agents. On the Assembly's petition to stop the packet for their papers, I gave directions accordingly, which is the first time that any of them has been detained a minute here. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 29 June, Read July 6, 1709. 2 pp. Enclosed,
513. i. (a) Speech of Governor Crowe to the Assembly of Barbados, March, 22, 170 8/9.
(b) Reply of Assembly to preceding. The elections have been made with more liberty under your Excellency than for some years before. Such persons as did zealously and violently concurr with Sir B. Granville in ye oppression of ye honble. George Lillington and others are very unfitt to sitt as Justices for tryall for their own accomplices, etc. The different senti ments of some former Assemblys were only occasioned by forced elections, etc., Copy. Endorsed, Recd, June 29, 1709. 3½ pp.
513. ii. Minutes of Council of Barbados, May 12. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
513. iii. Certificate by 4 Members of the Council of Barbados that they approve of the Assembly's address concerning the suspending of the swearing of Messrs. Walker, Sharpe, and Beresford. May 12, 1709. Signed, Geo. Lillington, John Milles, John Hallett, John Frere. Same endorsement. ½ p.
513. iv. Address of the Assembly of Barbados to the Queen, May 17. The people are under a very great consternation and dissatisfaction on the report of Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford being restored to the Council, by bringing fresh into their memories the oppressions and miseries they had so greivously suffer'd under in Sir B. Granville's governmt. by their ill designs, etc. Endorsed, Recd. June 29, 1709. Copy. 2 large pp.
513. v. Duplicate of May 14. No. iii.
513. vi. Address of the Assembly of Barbados to Governor Crowe, thanking him for not admitting Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford to the Council, etc. May 16, 1709. Same endorsement. Copy 2. pp.
513. vii. Deposition of Isabella, widow of Benjamin Cryer. May 9, 1709. On Dec. 14, 1708, Wm. Walker desired her to offer Governor Crowe £1000 to stop the proceedings at the Grand Sessions against him, which H.E. refused. Signed, Isabella Cryer. 1 p.
513. viii. Deposition of Mrs. Cryer. In Dec, 1708 Alexander Walker approached Governor Crowe through her, offering to withdraw the charges against him and to pay him £800 sterl. down and a very handsome present every six months, as they had done Sir B. Granville, if he would join there party in the Assembly. etc. H.E. refused. Signed, Isabella Cryer. Endorsed, Recd. June 9, 1709. 1½ pp.
513. ix. Deposition of Rev. G. Ramsay, May 16, 1709. In Jan. 1706, the Rev. Samuel Beresford proposed to offer the Governor £100 for the living of Bridge Parish. Signed, Gilbert Ramsay. Same endorsement. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 26, 26.i.–ix.; and (duplicate of No. 1) 28, 12. No. 22; and (without.enclosures) 29, 11. pp. 469–473.]
May 19.
Craven, House.
514. Commission from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina for John Danson to be Receiver General for North Carolina. Signed, Craven, Palatine; Beaufort, Craven for ye Lord Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson, M. Ashley for Jos. Blake. [C.O. 5, 289. p. 213.]
May 19.
Craven House.
515. Instructions for John Danson, (supra). Signed us preceding. Signed, Craven, Palatine; Beaufort, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 289. pp. 214–216.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
516. W. Popple to Mr. Rowland Tryon. Asks for an account of French encroachments in the West Indies, as following. [C.O. 324, 9. p. 293.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
517. Mr. Popple to Col. Lodwick. The Council of Trade and Plantations having under consideration some matters relating to the French incroachments upon H.M. Dominions in America, desire that you will let them have as soon as possible you can, an acct. of such incroachments as the French have made in New York. [C.O. 5, 1121. p. 367.]
May 19.
St. James's.
518. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. Read June 1, 1709. ¾ p. Enclosed,
518. i. Address of the Assembly of Barbados to the Queen. Allege obstruction of justice and evasion of tarial of Wm. Walker for prosecuting George Lillington on a pretended charge of high treason, etc. See A.P.C., II. No. 1088. Signed, William Grace, Clk. of Assembly. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 12. Nos. 21, 21. i., and 29, 11. pp. 454–457.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
519. Mr. Popple to Mr. Campbell. The Council of Trade and Plantations having under consideration some matters relating to the French incrochments upon H.M. Dominions in America, desire that you will consult with the rest of the merchants trading to Newfoundland, and let them have as soon as possible you can an acct. of such incroachments as the French have made there. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 90.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
520. Mr. Popple to the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company. The Council of Trade and Plantations, having under consideration some matters relating to the French incroachments upon H.M. Dominions in America, they desire that you will let them have as soon as possible you can, an account of such incroachments as the French have made upon the territories within the limits of the said Company's Charter. [C.O. 135, 3. p. 108.]
May 19.
St. James's.
521. Order of Queen in Council. Petition of Lord Baltimore, for relief from the Order of Nov. 7, 1685, granting to Wm. Penn half an isthmus of petitioner's land in Maryland, is to be heard on June 9. Cf. A. P.C., ii., No. 1077. Signed, John Povey. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 720. No. 5.]
[May 23.]522. Petition of the Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson's Bay to the Queen. Repeats the Company's case against the French as given in previous Volumes of this Calendar 1699–1701 and Jan. 19, 1702. Notwithstanding the losses and discouragements they have laboured under, and during the war, the Company have brought from thence between 30 and 40,000 skins per annum, and doubt not, if they were reinstated in their right according to their Charter to bring the importation to 100,000 skins per annum. The Country doth abound with several other commodities, of which Petitioners have not been able to begin a trade by reason of the interruption from the French, as with whale-oyl, whalebone, of which last your subjects purchase from Holland and Germany to the value of above £26,000 per annum. If the French come once to be entirely possessed of Hudson's Bay, they will undoubtedly set up a whale-fishing in those parts, which will greatly tend to the increase of their navigation and to their breed of seamen. There is carried thither and consumed there nothing but of the product and manufacture of England, Petitioners encouraging and daily bringing the Indians to wear coarse cloth instead of skins, which in process of time will considerably advance the woollen trade at home. It must needs reflect upon the honour of Britain to relinquish to the French territory of which their violent usurpation in a time of Peace was alledged as a main Article in the first Declaration of War against that Kingdom. If the French could pretend to any right to the said Territories by the Peace of Ryswick, this right must needs be determined by their notorious infraction of the said Treaty. When your Majesty in your high wisdom shall think fit to give Peace to those Enemies whom your victorious arms have so reduced and humbled, Petitioners pray that the French King be obliged by such Treaty to renounce all right or pretentions to the Bay and Streights of Hudson, to quit and surrender all Forts and Settlements erected by the French or which are now in their possession, as likewise not to sail any ship or vessel within the limit of the Company's Charter, and to make restitution of the £108, 514. 19. 8. of which they robbed and dispoiled your Petitioners in times of perfect amity between the two Kingdoms. [See C.S.P. 1699. No. 150 etc.] Annexed,
522. i. Report of the English Commissioners, 1687, and His Majesty's Resolution thereupon. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read May 23, 1709. 4 large pp. [C.O. 134, 2. Nos. 31, 31.i.]
[?May 23.]523. Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay to the Queen. A deduction of the right and title of the Crown and Company to the lands within Hudson's Bay and Streights etc. 1497–1689. Contrary to the Treaty of Ryswick, the French still keep possession of the greatest part, etc. Cf. C.S.P., 1699. No. 150. 2½ printed pp. No date, signature or endorsement. Cf. May 19. [C.O. 134, 3. Nos. 16, and (duplicates) 17, 18.]
May 23.
Antigua.
524. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses Address to H.M. [see May 4] signed by above double the number of those that have sign'd the Articles. This was done by my friends when I was at St. Christophers. They have twice their estates, and noe arts were used. etc. I have alsoe sent an adress signed by the whole Councill and Assembly of Montserrat, and I daresay every inhabitant of that Island (the Governour and nephew excepted) would signe it if desired, etc. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read, Nov. 15, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
524. i. Address from the Council and Assembly of Montserrat to the Queen. Governor Parke has not been guilty of any male administration in this Island, but has been indefatigable for the preservation of H.M. Islands, having visited this Island much oftner than any other Generall ever did in the same compass of time, etc. Signed, Edward Buncombe, Speaker, Jno. Bramby, John Hartt, William Finch, Antho, Ravell, Denis Daly, Joseph Kirwan. Thomas Lee, William Frye, John Daly, Geo. Liddell, W. Gerrish. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 8. Nos. 37, 37. i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 10. pp. 398, 399.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
525. The Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The enclosed Petition having been laid before the Queen, I was commanded by H.M. to transmit it to you for your opinion, etc. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 27th June, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
525. i. Petition of Thomas Onslow, Edward Broughton, Benjamin Way and Thomas Bernard on behalf of themselvs and many other merchants of Jamaica, to the Queen. Your petitioners or those under whom they are intituled were merchants adventures in Jamaica about 1693, and did then contract with Sir James De L' Castillo and Don Francisco Portio, subjects to the King of Spaine and Factors for the Assiento, for introduction and importing Negroes to the Spanish West Indies by grant from his said Catholick Majestie, for monies and Negroes to be delivered at Porto Bello and Carthagena, which were deliver'd accordingly, whereby the petitioners had justly due to them according to their said contracts 86, 014 peices of eight, which money or great part therof was putt on board severall shipps at Carthagena by the Factors of the Assiento there for the use of the petitioners, but by the contrivance of the Spanish Governor and the said Portio was taken out of the said ships and deteyned from the petitioners to their great detriment and damage. Your Petitioners being left without remedy in the ordinary course of bussiness did apply to Sir W. Beeston then Governor of Jamaica, who severall times sent to the Spanish Governors of Panama to demand satisfaction for the petitioners, but not being able to obtaine any redress from them. It on the contrary appearing manifestly that they were privy to, connived at and encourag'd the defrauding the petitioners in the premises, the petitioners on Aprill 2, 1696, apply'd by petition to his late Majesty in Councill, which was referr'd to the then Committee for Trade and Plantations, but by reason of severall accidents that than happen'd, and after the alteration of the Spanish Government and the ensuing warr, the petitioners have hitherto been without releife. In regard the said debt was contracted with those in publick authority, and that the petitioners are ready to make appear that by reason of the artifices, delayes and fraudulent proceedings of the Spanish Governors, your petitioners have not been able or can obtaine their just debts without your Majesty's gracious interposition and favour, by demanding and securing in some Treaty or otherwise that reparation be made your petitioners for their great losses and damages in the premisses, the want whereof will not onely be a very great loss, damage and discouragement to your said petitioners, but if past by with impunity be an inducement to such base practices hereafter. Your petitioners therefore humbly pray your Majesty to give such orders for the obtaining justice and releif to the petitioners, as your Majesty in your great wisdom shall think meet and proper. 1p.
525. ii. iv.–vi. The case, receipts etc. of the Merchant Adven turers in the late Assiento under Don Nicholas Porcio, setled in Jamaica, 1693, 1694. 6pp. [C.O. 137, 8. Nos. 41, 41. i.–vi.; and (without enclosures) 138, 12. pp. 401–405.]
May 23.526. United Societies of London for Mines royal etc. to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Propose to employ the poor Palatine Protestants in the silver and copper mines of Merionethshire etc. Endorsed, Recd, (from Dr. Stringer) Read May 23, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 76. No. 58.]
May 23.
Treasury Chambers.
527. Mr. Taylour to Mr. Popple. My Lord Treasurer desires the opinion of the Council of Trade and Plantations, in what manner the German Protestant Refugees may be most properly disposed of. Signed. J. Taylour. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 24, 1709. 1p. Enclosed,
527. i. Mr. Coleby to the Lord High Treasurer. There are 1100 more of the German Protestants come over, and 600 more lye at Rotterdam for passage. They are very poor and sickly, and if they are not quickly disposed of, will breed a sickness in the City, etc. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 76, Nos, 59, 59. i; and 389, 66. pp. 406, 407.]
May 23.528. Copy of an Act of Maryland for the reliefe of poor debtors, etc, with criticisms thereupon. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Perry etc.) May 23, 1709. [Cf. Oct. 17, 18, 1709.] 6¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 716. No. 63.]
May 24.
Antigua.
529. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6th, Read Nov. 16, 1709. 1p. Enclosed,
529. i. Account of guns and stores of war at Montserat, Dec. 1, 1708. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, 1709. 1 p.
529. ii. Account of guns and stores of war at St. Kitts, Dec. 6, 1708. Same endorsement. 1 p.
529. iii. Account of the capture of H.M.S. Adventure, 44 guns, 194 men, Capt. Robt. Clarke, by the French man of war Valeur 36 guns, 286 men, Monst. Du Clair, Commr. March 1, 1709, between Montserrat and Martinique signed 2 sail. After chasing the Valeur and engaging her, the Capt. several officers and many of the crew were killed or wounded. The Valeur offering to board the Adventure, the crew of the latter refused to fight on, saying they had no small arms, and struck the colours. etc. Signed, Jno. Wilkinson, Master; Robt. Northoner, gunner, William Harwood, Carpenter, Same endorsement. 2¼ pp.
529. iv. List of men captured on board H.M.S. Adventure. Unwounded, Seamen 64, Marines 6, Soldiers from Antigua, 6. Wounded, Seamen 67, Marines 9, Soldiers from Antigua, 12. Killed, seamen, 21, marines 3, soldiers 5. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 8. Nos. 38, 38. i.–iv.; and (without enclosures) 153, 10. pp. 400, 401.]
May 24.
Antigua.
530. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses 3 Acts of Nevis. All temportary Laws shall be sent by the first opertunity after passed. I will endeavour to the utmost of my power to procure laws for establishing of Courts, but hitherto I have had no success. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read 16th Nov., 1709. 1 p. [C.O 152, 8. No. 39; and 153, 10. pp. 401, 402.]
May 24.
Antigua.
531. Same to Same. Acknowledges letters of Nov. 25, Jan. 19 and July 13. Meeting the packett, I had not time to make my answer, but shall doe by this. I thanke your Lordshipps for haveing Mr. Tankard put out of the Councill. When ye Minutes of Councill arrives which I sent home in the last fleet, which sailed the 6th inst., your Lordshipps will see with what insolence he behaved himselfe on a publicke day, March 8th, and doe not doubt but I shall be thought to have acted with great moderation in this insult, as well as that of the Riot, though both was design'd to make me committ some rash action or other. It is true there was seaven Councellours at St. Christophers and att Antigua, when Coll. Phipps and Col. Byam were awor, and neither of them were in the list. I must have five to make a Councill if 3 of the 7 are and have been for some time and are like to continue in such a condition as not to be able to come to Councill. What shall I doe in such a case, I cannot act anything without a Councill, this was the case of both the Islands att that time. Coll. Williams is one of the Councill in my instructions, but he never was sworne, and Major Lyons has not been able to come almost this 2 year in St. Xphers, Capt. Crooke never was above twice at Councill, and Capt. Willett sometime for 4 months together is not able to come. When I sent the lists, Col. Wm. Byam was not upon the Island though he has one of the best estates in it, neither was Major Samuel Byam, who has alsoe one of the best estates, they are both come since, and the reason I did not put in Col. Phipps was I then thought him too young, and his father-in-law Col. Crispe was of the Councill, and I did not thinke it proper to have father and son sitt together. When his father died I swore him in his place, he then being almost 3 years older. I protest I follow my instructions, and near as it is possible, but all accidents can't be provided against, and of two evills I ought to choose the least. I hope your Lordshipps will not think I have done amiss. They could not make a Councill at Nevis, Coll. Smith being off the Island, soe that at the request of the Lt. Governour and Councill I ordered John Norwood the Commissioner of the Customes to be swore. I hope your Lordshipps will lett him be confirmed. I am glad your Lordshipps have put in soe many out of the lists I sent it is a kindness to me, for when I put in one I disoblige four or five. I hope your Lordshipps will have soe much goodness for me as not to put in any that have signed Articles untill they have proved them true. I obeyed your Lordshipps' commands to the uttmost of my power in what related to the negroes, in my letter of Aug. 23 last I asked severall of the best men what quantity of negroes would supply these Island [s] every year, and they all answer'd me soe that I was not able to make any tollerasble judgmt., the merchants named about 1000, the Planters 2000, some 3000, other more modest said 1500. There is 3 Patent places, the Secretary, the Navall officer, and the Marshalls, they all give secureity and take oaths, the Deputy Secretary will not informe me either what his place is worth, or what he gives Sir Charles Hedges for it, there is noe sallary allowed to any of them, their profitts arise from their fees. I desired the Marshall (ever since I had your Lordships' first letter about it) to informe himselfe, which he has, and he tells me it is worth about £600 per annum. I must confess I never thought it worth halfe soe much. The Navall Officer is one Col. Williams, who is above 80 years old, yt. is worth about £300 per annum. The Marshall tells me he has made this year £120 besides some advantage he getts from French prissoners, the difference between this mony and sterl. is 50 p.c. I want a good Secretary that is a stranger. Sir Charles writt me that Mr. Rhodes would come and be Secretary. I wish he had, or any other that was a stranger. Indeed all the officers should be strangers, had there been a stranger Marshall, Mr. Poggson had been hanged for basely murdering. Col. Johnson, and some others punished as they deserved. This present Marshall has been forced to fight severall duels, before he was able to doe his duty in quiet. I tooke him out of the Regiment, being a briske bold young Gent. that carryed armes there. I begg your Lordshipps may have his Commission Confirmed, he very well deserves it.
When I come to answer their second Article about Chester's murdering Sawyer, you will see how hard a matter it is to punnish an inhabitant, and how absolutely necessary it is to have all Ministeriall officers strangers. I will give your Lordshipps a little hint of that murder. Sawyer was a Gentleman's son of Virginia, he came here with a cargoe, he had some dealings with Chester and came in ye evening to speake to him. Chester taked up a great tankard of punch and flings it att him, and hitt him behind the ear, he staggered when he received the bnlow, went home, languished all yt. night, and the next morning he walked out complaineing of his head, but not being able to walke where he designed, he put into a house and there fell downe dead, the Jury brought it in that he died of an appoplexy, the reason I appeared in it was this, the Corroner sent a warrant to the Constable to summons a Jury of Inquest, they innocently tooke the first they mett among which there were severall masters and mates of shipps that were strangers, when they saw the returne of the jury, they were frightened, and this very Nevin and Dr. Macckennen went out of towne to meet the Corrnoer, and desired him to discharge those sommoned, and to summons a jury of the Gentlemen of the Country, they had with them some of their friends for that purpose, sent for out of the country, the Foreman was one William Flanvill, who had had an inquest sometime before on a white servant-maid he had tyed up and unmercifully beat her so that she immediately dyed, and there came from her out of her mouth a great quantity of bruised blood (as those that were not of the Jury said), but the Jury on their oaths said it was liquid lodinum, and that she had poysoned herselfe. Mr. Sawyer had a great contusion behind his ear with the marke of the edge of the tankard, yett he died of fitts. I had at that time noe difference at all with Chester, nor with anybody else, my broweating of evidence, etc., was this: —I ordered the body to be brought out into the street, and exposed, and made everyone of the jury see the contusion, and had the withnesses seperated and examined apart, by which means I discovered a great deale of roguery, and that a poor woman had been offered £50 (which she refused) to swear that the negiores in taking up the body had lett it fall on that side, which was the cause of the contusion, Daniel Mackennen, that worthy Member of the Assembly, and article subscriber, with another surgeon gave it as their opinion that the died of fitts, I asked them what they thought of the contusion, they gave me for answer only a politick shrugg; this was my first act of tyranny and breaking in upon their constitutions, and indeavors to ruin the Country. I had not concern'd myselfe, if I had not been told that the first Jury was discharged, and yt. William Granvill was sent for and made foreman, he being considerably in Chester's debt at yt. time. I would have sent your Lordshipps a duplicate of the Minutes I sent by Capt. Buor, but the Secretary was not pleased to gett them ready, he has promised them against the next packett, but perhapps he will serve me as he used to doe, the last are soe ill writt, I wish they may be read, he getts those to write that will doe it cheapest. I shall send the Order of the Councill to Nevios about the two Laws repealed, and your Lordshipps' observations about that I sent home. I have your Lordshipps' orders for not passing laws of an extraordinary nature, which I shall religiously observe, had I not been soe nice and which apas'd their bill here for Privileges, I then should not only have been payd my sallary, there being due to me £2000, but I should have had a gratuity besides, as apears by a message sent me from the Assembly, and the next morneing one of their Members came privately to me and assured me that gratuity should be a good thousand pound. I leave your Lordshipps to judge if my refuseall of this Law, and £3000 is not a great argument of my avaritious temper as they charge me with in their article about the Chancery, though I gett nothing by holding a Court of Chancery but fatiegue, having noe fee, but I suppose they would insinuate bribeery, and then all ye Councill must be bribed, for they all sitt with me. I thinke I have answered every part of your Lordshipps' commands. The Council and Assembly having formerly addressed me to make the Lieutenant Governour Chief Justice, I then refused it as not being willing to displace him I found possessed of it, though he was very unfittly quallified, being noe lawyer, and having murdered a man that had noe weapon, but he haveing layd downe, and the Council once more addressing me to put in the Lieut. Governour, I did it, I hope it will not be thought I have acted amiss since there is noe other in the Island fitt for it but himselfe, being a good lawyer and has the reputation of a very honest man. It is very rare any writt of error are brought before ye Councill, there has not been any in my time, and if ever there should come any, there will be Councellours enough besides to try it, in Barbados, and other Goverments there are choice of men to be had, but it is not soe here, for except it be ye Lieut. Governour, there is not a man in the Island understands anything of the Law. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 8. Read Nov. 16. 1709. 5 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 40; and 153, 10. pp. 403–412.]
May 24.
Antigua
532. Same to Same. I had not the honour to receive any command from your Lordshipps by this pacekett, but by the dilligence of my Agent Mr. Micajah Perry, I had a coppy of the articles sent. Indeed it is noe wonder to us all now they were soe very carefull to swear people to secrecy, before they would lett them be seen, they talked of noe less then fourscore at first, and as I am informed soe many wer sent up with their Ambassadour to Coll. Codrington and he reduced them, and licked them into ye forme they now apear in. I must confess were they true, or but any one of them, I very well deserver to be hanged, but they are all falce, notwithstanding the affidavits they have gott to support them. I hope to recieve from your Lordshipps by ye next packett directions how and before whome I shall answer them though almost all of them are already answered in the Minutes of Councill. Your Lordshipps will find that some of the Articles will be much to my honour, even that of the Chancery, which they say all good people look upon with horror. Your Lordshipps will find it is only Mr. Nevin and Samuel Watkins, and all bad people thinke of it with horror, as they have reason, could Mr. Baron or 20 more I could name bring there causes before me, their adversarys would look upon the Chancery with horror. I am soe cautious that I never sitt in Chancery, but all the Councill sitts with me as if they were sitting in Councill, and I asks their opinions in the same manner, it is very true I have often publickly told Nevin I would have noe manner of regard to what he should avver to be Law for two reasons, first because he is no Lawyer, and the next is I have noe opinion of his integrity, but whenever we had any cause that admitted of a dispute, we have stated the case home, with orders to the parts to bring us the opinion of two able Chancery men, and I shall governe myselfe accordingly. I shall send your Lordships the proceedings of ye Chancery in answer to this Article, by which you may see if there be the least reason for such a villanous reflection; what villany is couch'd under the first article, and all that for noe other purpose but to take of those two great persons from doeing me any more good, but I hope I have the honour to be soe well knowne to them that it will make noe impression on either of them to my disadvantage, they had as I am informed a worse article of this kind, and to support it gott one Kate Sullivian's affidavit, she was formerly Codrington's wench and she layd two bastards to him, but she giveing him the pox, he turned her off, but haveing occasion for affadavitits, she was sent for to lend an oath, but it soe happned that some time after she fell sicke and thinkeing she should die, she confessed she had perjured herselfe, for which she had £16 given her, and that Perrie, Tankard, etc. had subscribed a paper to give her £100 more if the Genll, was turned out, that article I find is left out, it relateing to a great Lady, but soe very scandallous, I dare not mention it, though Codrinton has been heard to report it in Barbados, little dreaming his Irish wench had soe squeamish a conscience. I find myselfe well rewarded in the 9th article for all the fatiegue and charge I underwent about those lines at St. Johns, which your Lordships will find in the Minutes of ye Councill now before you were done by virtue of a Law made by myselfe, Councill and Assembly, had I a mind to have delivered them up to the French, would it not a been as easy for me to a carry'd them to Monk's Hill, and done it there as at St. Johns. I have never done anything but with the advice of my Councill, I have sometimes acted by theire advice though contrary to my owne opinion, but never acted in any one thing without them as the Minutes will make apear. The two bribes I am charged with to have recieved from Mr. Chester, the £150 for some brandy, his account will make that apear to be falce. I never had one farthing of him in my life in ready-money, I payd him £800 sterl. for 20 negroes, there was a mistake in that account, and I can prove I told him of the mistake many months before ye brandy, and the next time I settl'd another account with him, which was above 6 months after the brandy, hee allowed me this mistake, and that it may apear how carefull I was to have the brandy seized haveing put centrys at almost all the warehouses in towne, but when my friends told me the whole Island would be strangely alarmed at it, I order'd the centrys to be taken of, but before I did it, I sent for the Collector and Navall Officer, and ordered them with their officers to goe and search for prohibited goods, for that I had an account that a great quantity of brandy had been landed the night before, they told me they could not break open doors without a warrant, I sent imediately for ye Deputy Secretary, and order'd him to write two warrants, which I signed, but not haveing officers enough, whilst they were searching one place they removed it to another; as I am inform'd there was to the vallue of £1500, if I had seized it, I should have got £1000, what reason had I to quitt £1000 for £150, to an enemy. This shall apear by the affidavitts of the Collector, Navall Officer and Depty. Secretary, (who is one of my enemys) and by Chester's owne account, and for the tenn barrils of flower I am charged with, Mr. Roach was by, he will clear me of that suffitiently; Chester himselfe for severall months has been ashamed of it, and curses those that put him upon it, he was enraged at looseing his Dutch cargoe, and they made him quite madd by telling him twenty storys wch. he had since found to be falce, that at that very time he was heard he would be content to lye seaven years in Hell to be revenged of me, and now repents of it, and never goes near any of them. I will not trouble your Lordshipps with any more of them now, they never expected this, they were in hopes £5000 would turne me out, the articles were only designed for a pretence. Yet I must say something to the 14th article. I gave that Order; the Councill and Assembly haveing addressed me soe to doe, and I daresay it is in the Minutes sent home, if not it shall be sent. When I gave that order, I told them it should only be in force untill they could make a Law, to exempt the Islands from paying powder, but they neglecting soe to doe, I countermanded my order, this is my suspending the Laws, this I take notice of because I find it in the petition of the London Merchants. I had hithertoo Charity enough to thinke it was only their factors here that drove only a trade to the Dutch and French Islands with their effects, and that it was they alone that used tricks to defraud the Queen of her 4½ p.c, but this Petition of theirs has altered my opinion, this zeal of theirs could not proceed from nothing, it is strange to thinke soe many men should desire an injustice to be done on hearsay. My Lords, the Queen has noe friend here but myselfe, and if a Governour is to be removed when the merchants don't like him, he must either not doe his duty, or if he does he must expect to be turn'd out for his reward, those merchants echo what those that have signed the Articles have writt to them, the fresh articles they say is my neglect of the fortifications, the Minutes will testifie how often I have pressed that to the severall Assemblys. I hope they don't expect I should build them at my owne charge. Then for the enemy's landing and taking of negroes, there never has been one negroe taken of since I came, but before my time there was a great many taken of forty at one time, they alsoe intimate as if I open'd their letters, for my justification the officers that have allways given them out and taken them in shall make their affidavitts, that directly nor indirectly I never gave them any manner of orders, or ever concerned myselfe about them, they bring me my letters when the Packett arives, and they call for them when she sayles. They might have as well put in their Petition that I was a Mahometan or a Jesuit. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 8th, Read Nov. 16th, 1709. 4 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 41; and, 153, 10. pp. 413–420.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
533. The Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following, H.M. being desireous to have your advice, and particularly to know from you when Port Royal was taken by the French. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 25, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
533. i. Address of the Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay to the Queen. Oct. 20, 1708. It's nothing short of 20 years that your Majesties good subjects of this Province have been wasting under the calamitys of a distressing and expensive war, taking the commencement thereof from the rebellion and eruption of the Eastern Indians in 1688, save only the intervention of 3 or 4 years cessation after the Peace of Reyswick, during the continuance whereof they forbore to commit their bloody villanies and outrages. The French not daring then openly to avow, assist and protect them therein, yet in those years we were put to a very consuiderable charge in keeping constant guards and espyals over them to prevent surprisals by their perfidy and treacheries. And very soon upon the new declaration of war with France, they broke out again in open rebellion and hostility, committing divers barbarous murthers, just after a repeated and fresh recognition of their duty and allegience to your Majesty. We have been sharers in common with other our fellow subjects to a great degree in losses both of men and estate at home and at sea, both in the former and the present war, our trade is greatly diminished and we are very much exhausted, our yearly expence for our necessary defence, and to prevent the incursions of the enemy, is vastly great. But by the good Providence of God, in the early advice from time to time given of the motions of the enemy, and the prudent methods taken by your Majesty's Captain General to observe them, and preparations made for their reception in their descents upon us, has prevented those impressions which probably we might otherwise have felt, and they have been forced to return back ashamed, not without loss on their part. But we have no prospect of the end of these troubles and of being eased of our heavy and insupportable charge and burthen, whilst we can act only defensively, and have to doe with enemys and rebells within our very bowells, who like beasts of prey, seek their living by rapine and spoil, and are such monsters that their barbaritys and crueltys are horrendous to humane nature, and they are animated and encouraged to such barbaritys by the French setting the heads of your Majesty's subjects at a price upon bringing in their scalps, and they kill many in cold blood after they have received them to quarter; they have the advantage of retiring for shelter to the obscure recesses of a vast rude wilderness, full of woods, lakes, rivers, ponds, swamps, rocks and mountains, whereto they make an easy and quick passage by means of their wherries, or birch canoes of great swiftness and light of carriage, the matter whereof they are made being to be found almost everywhere, and their skill and dexterity for the making and using of them is very extraordinary, which renders our tiresome marches after them inaffectual. These rebels have no fixed settlement, but are ambulatory and make frequent removes, having no other houses but tents, or hutts made of bark or rinds of trees, matts, etc., which they soon provide in all places where they come, so that it is impracticable to pursue or follow them with any body of regular troops; they are supported and encouraged by the French who make them yearly presents gratis of cloathing, armes and ammunition, besides the supplys they afford them for the beaver and furrs which they take in hunting, and constantly keep their priests and emissaries among them to steady them in their interests, and the bigoteries they have instiled into them. The French also oftimes join them in their marches on our frontiers. We humbly conceive, with submission, that the most probable method of doing execution upon them and reducing of them, is by men of their own colour, way and manner of living. And if your Majesty shall be graciously pleased to command the service of the Mohawks and Nations of the Western Indians, that are in friendship and covenant with your Majesty's several Governments, against these Eastern Indian rebels, for which they express themselves to stand ready, and to whom they are a terrour, they would, with the blessing of God, in short time, extirpate or reclaim them, and prevent the incursions made upon us from Canada, or the East. The force of the Enemy is chiefly bent against this your Majesty's Province and Province of New Hampshire, whilst we are a barrier to ye others. A letter from Monsieur Vaudreuil, Governour of Canada, to Mr. Brouillan, late Governour of Port Royal, was sometime since happily intercepted, and came to our Governour's hand, wherein he writes thus, namely, that he endeavours to keep all quiet on the side of Orange (or Albany) having command from the King his Master not to have any quarrel with your Majesty's subjects on that side, or with the Mohawks, which he hath strictly observed, and they are in a profound peace, having met with little or no loss on the land side, either in men or estates this warr, which has proved so very chargeable and grievious to us, in respect of both, which we made bold humbly to represent to your Majesty in 1704 etc. In the former war, when your Majesties subjects of Albany with their dependant Indians acted offensively against the enemy by partys frequently issuing forth into the woods, they greatly distressed the French and the Indans in their interests, made considerable spoils upon them, and prevented the descents from Canada upon these Plantations, which now are frequent. We pray leave in most humble manner further to offer to your Royal consideration the very great disadvatage this your Majesty's Province is at all times under, more especially in time of warr, by reason of Port Royal remaining in the hands of the French, which was orginally a Scotts Colony granted and begun, and is included in the Royal Charter, or Letters Patent of this Province granted by their late Majestys King William and Queen Mary; the situation whereof makes it a Dunkirk to us with respect to navigation, it lying so apt and commodious for the intercepting of all shipping coming to, or going from hence to the eastward, and is a fit receptacle for privateers, who can soon issue out thence, and are near hand to send in their prizes, as also to annoy our Fishery, whereof we have had frequent experience, to the very great hurt of the trade of our Nation, and the diminution of your Majesty's Revenue. If your Majesty shall be graciously pleased, during the continuance of the present war, by your Royal Armes to reduce that Countrey and take it by force out of the French hands, or if by the blessing of God the just armes of your Majesty and your Allies be followed with repeated glorious successes, as of late they have been, so that the French King find himself under a necessity of suing for peace, and a treaty be thereupon negotiated, and your Majesty in your princely wisdome shall think fit, that place may have a consideration in that Treaty to be restored to your Majesties obedience, and setled by your Majesty's British subjects. It will be of the last importance to your Majeties. good subjest, trading to and from these Provinces, and a general security to them, and also of singular benefit and advantage for the providing of masts for the use of your Majesty's Royal Navy, whereof that Countrey affords great plenty, which are now grown scarce nearer hand, and prevent the French King of that yearly supply he has from thence of Naval Stores. Signed by Order, Isa. Addington, Secrey. Council; Thomas Oliver, Speaker. 2 closely written pp. [C.O. 5, 865, Nos. 16, 16. i.; and 5, 913. pp. 66–74.]
May 24.
London.
534. Mr. Tryon to [? Mr. Popple]. States English claim to St. Kitts. H.M. having made grants of several Plantations in ye French part during the warr, which are now settled at great expence, the restoreing them to ye French must prove very runius to ye present possesors, if a recompence be not made. etc. The weak condition all those Islands are now in makes it highly necessary for their safety, that a cessation of hostilletys, with a time fixed for restitution of what shall be taken afterwards, be obtain'd as soone as possible, the only man of warrt they had for a gard being taken, land ye enemy's privaters being very numberus exposis them to ye danger of haveing their negroes etc. carried of, all suplys intersepted, and upon a prospect of peace ye enemy wont faile to improve their time as much at our expence as possible, as has allways been usuall with them at such junctures, etc. Signed, Rowld. Tryon. Endoresed, Recd. 25th, Read 27th May, 1709, 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 17.]
May 24.
Crochett Fryers.
535. Mr. Merrett to Mr. Popple. Reply to May 19. Refers to enclosure. When the last peace was concluded, our tradeing ships abroad did not enjoy the Peace but in several places and latitudes therein specified, so that the enemy tooke more merchant ships within two months before and after the peace took place than they tooke in all the yeare before, from which it may be presumed that severall ships were fitted out by the enemy for that intent, wherefore I humbly offer that it will highly conduce to the safety of trade that in the Peace now on foote, one article may be that all ships taken on either side after the date of the Peace, (or sonner if it shall be thought convenient) shall be restored to the Proprietors in the same condition they were in when taken, which if published may prevent the capture of a great many ships, especially those comming home from long voyages. The duty French shipping paid here, which occasioned them to lay the same on our shipping in Frence, was much to the prejudice of our shipping, as we had and may have 20 times the ships go to France, etc. Signed, Solomon Merrett. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 27th May, 1709. 1¼ pp. Enclosed,
535. i. Merchants trading to Newfoundland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeat former statements as to French encroachments and the value of the Newfoundland fishery. London, May 21, 1709. 18 signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 91, 91. i.; and (without enclosure) 195, 5. pp. 91, 92.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
536. Mr. Popple to Mr. Taylour. Reply to May 23. 40/s a day per 100, would be a competent provision for the German Refugees. And whereas the 1100 Germans last arrived are still on ship-board for want of proper places to put them in, the Council of Trade and Plantations propose that they be lodged for the present in a large rope yard at Deptford, now not in use, and which might be fitted up for them at a small expence, etc. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 407, 408.]
May 25.537. Abstract of the list of the German Protestant Refugees. (See May 9.) Endorsed, Recd. Read May 25, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 76. No. 62; and 389, 36. p. 410.]
May 25.
Petty France, Westminster.
538. Mr. Chamberlayne to [Mr. Popple?]. Enclosed following. Signed, John Chamberlayne. Endoprsed, Recd. May 25, 1709. 1 p. Enclosed,
538. i. Proceeding of a Committe for lodging and relieving the German Protestant Refugees. Temple Exchange Coffee-house. May 20–24, 1709. 3½ pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 60, 61; and (without enclosure) 389, 36. p. 409.]
May. 25.539. Rowland Tryon to [? Mr. Popple]. H.M. predecessors have always claimed St. Lucia, Dominico, Tobago, etc., notwithstanding the French have at times possesst several of them, when both nations were in peace, but the Governors of Barbados have as often sent and disposest them, particulerly from St. Lucias. The French have allways with great industry cultivated a frindship with the native Caribbeans and formented ye cruilltys frequently exercised by those canibals upon the English and countenance that nest of bararus natives and runaway negroes yt. are setled upon St. Vincents and Dominico. Allso when any negries run of from Barbados, or any other of our Islands to theirs, they have always refused to deliver them when demanded, tho in times of peace. It would be of great advantage to the Nation if liberty could be obtained to export our woolen manufactorys, herrings etc., from Britain and the British Islands to those possest by ye French, wch, by their Laws and allso by a Treety between them and the Dutch we are debar'd. Barbados is well scituated for all the trade to those parts of the Spanish West Indies that lye from the River Arnasones to Rio Delahathe, therefore greate regard ought to be those to that trade, for generally we can go and come between those costs and Barbados upon a strech with a Trade wind, It's allso to be observed if the French should be suffered to keep Petiguavas, they will by degrees possess themselves of all Hispaniola. Signed, Rowld. Tryon. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 27th May, 1709. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 20.]
May 25.540. Richard Harris to Mr. Popple. Sir B. Gracedieu shewed me your letter of May 19. What seems absolutely necessary, especially for Jamaica, is to remove the French from among our settlements in America. In Canada they have prevented the people of New England for many years from extending the limitts of that Country. What they have done at Newfoundland is wel known. By being fixed att Martinico and Guadalupa, they intercept all ships coming with provisions from our Northern Colonies, without a supply whereof the planters must suffer and their negroes perish, which was the case of Barbadoes in 1694, when of 27 such vessels 24 were brought in by privateers to Martinico in 4 months. But the French settlements on the north side of Hispaniola, now called La Coste de Sta. Domingo are a sad and greivous thorne in ye side of Jamaica, which were first begun by malefactors or others banished from France, and were farther improved by the bucaniers and other pirates setling among them, who durst not returne to their country, but in ye first warr after the Revolution, the French subjects being drove from St. Christophers went down thither and largely extended those settlements, etc. described. It May justly be computed that the French are in possession of more than 2/3rds of that fine Island, which by degrees they have tho' unobserved and without noise possessed themselves of in a very few yeares time. From hence arise 3 great mischiefs to Jamaica and Great. Brittain, (1) The productions of Hisopaniola being the same as those of Jamaica hinder the vent of ours among our neighbours, (2) In time of peace they wil quickly interfere with us in our trade with the Spaniards. (3) In time of warr those of Hispaniola lying to windward of Jamaica, and but 25 leagues distant, can in a sudden invade and, before our inhabitants can have any notice, which was the case when M. Du Casse invaded it in the late warr, etc. Whether the French may be forced to yeild up these Colonies again to ye Spaniards, I know not, etc. Signed, Rd. Harris. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 27, 1709. 2½ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 40.]
May 25.541. Arthur Freeman to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays the Board to write to Governor Parks about the Act to enabler Robert Freeman, etc., sent over by them in 1707, or that he may have it pass here. Signed, A. Freeman. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 25, 1709. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 16.]
May 25.
Jamaica.
542. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since mine of the 1st inst. sent by the Tiger of Bristoll, nothing extraordinaty has happened. In a sloop taken by H.M.S. Roebuck bound from Cuba to Carthagence letters were found that give advice of a French squadron's being arrived, or was every day expected at Carthagene, and directions were therin sent to prepare their effects to ship on board them; the truth of it I must confess I much question, the Spaniards and French very often giving out false reports. The galleon is still at Carthagene and a great fleet at La Vera Cruz, and also some ships at Havanna, all which' I am informed are very rich. I have already given your Lops. an acct. of the success H.M.S. Portland has had in the taking a French Guinea-man; off Porto Bell, in which engagement the French own they lost 90 men, besiders what were wounded. I had on board the Portland 560 soldiers, of which double the number were killed and wounded that there was of sailors. The great fitigue the Regiment is under by serving on board the men of war, having had there at once betwixt 2 and 300 men, and the hard duty at land, is the occasion I shall want a great many recruits, if the Regiment is not relieved, and therefore I hope your Lops. will befriend the Agent and my officers in that affair, that I may not lie under the censure of not having done my duty, if any attempt should be made. I send the Acts passed the last Sessions, with the Minutes of the Councill and Assembly, and an account of the stores as near as I can from the time of my entring into the Government, which I likewise send to the Board of Ordnance. I am now very busy in repairing the fortifications and making a new line for guns at Port Royall. This packett goes in H.M.S. Severn accompany'd with the Scarborough, and 15 or 16 merchants ships under their convoy. The men of war have on board them considerable riches, and I hope they will have a good voyage. Our sloops are all returned from the Spanish coast; who say they have had very indifferent trade especially in our woolen manufactures, and have sold little or nothing but negroes, for the Spaniards complain they have not mony to buy them necessarys. The Island is at present healthy and likewise the men of war, but very thin of sailors, for they would not be able to send a ship to sea without a third part of their complement were soldiers. Signed, Tho Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read Nov. 11, 1709. 3 pp. Enclosed,
542. i. Account of stores of war at Jamaica Dec. 12, 1705—May 24, 1709. 4 pp.
542. ii. Account of stores of war issued for land and sea service. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 8. Nos. 64, 64. i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 138, 13. pp. 34–37.]
May 26.
Jamaica.
543. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I must in a particular manner recommend to your Lops.' favour the confirmation of a private Act for the sale of part of the estate of George Joy Esq. decd., whereby the ffamily of that gentleman, whose behaviour in his lifetime deserved very well of the Government will be preserved from runine, and his creditors be satisfield their just debts, a matter which could by no other means be effected. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endoresed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read Nov. 11, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 65; and 138, 13. p. 13.]
May 26.
Craven House.
544. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. It having been represented to us that the French about 8 years since made several settlements upon the river Messisippi, which settlements if they are suffered to continue will be of dangerous consequence not only to the Province of Carolina, but very prejudicial to all other H.M. Colonies in America, we therefore desire that your Lops. upon this occasion of a Treaty for a General Peace, would lay this matter before H.M. in Council, that the French may be obliged to relinquish such settlements for the security of all H.M. Colonies and Plantations, which are of so great consequence to the Crown and People of Great Britain. Signed, Craven, Palatine, Beaufort, Craven for the Lord Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 30, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264, No. 68; and 5, 1292. p, 136; and 5, 289. p. 219.]
[May 27.]545. William Atwood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Petitioner, late Chief Justice of New York, having notice that a letter is come from the Governor of New York to desire one who succeeded him may be continued in possession, acquaints your Lordships that a report from, Mr. Attorneym, when Solicitor, upon his claim to a restitution lyes with ye Earle of Sunderland to be presented to H.M. with a petition against him, falsely suggesting that, upon a report from ye Boade, his suspension by ye Lord Cormebury was confirmed by H.M. Prays the Board, that, if they acquaint H.M. with ye Governor's desiring has successor's continuance, they will at ye same time certify petitioner was never heard at the Board upon any complaint against him, and asks for papers, etc. Signed, Wm. Atwood. Endorsed Recd. May 27, Read June 9, 1709. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 103; and 5, 1121. pp. 368, 369.]
[May 27.]546. Col. Jory to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to the miserable condition of the 4 hostages carried off from Nevis by the French to Martinique. [1706]. Insists on the necessity of making St. Kitts altogether English etc. Signed, Jos, Jory. Endorsed, Recd. Read 27th May, 1709. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 18.]
[May 27.]547. Constantine Phipps to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Similar memorail re St. Kitts. Signed, Con. Phipps. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 19.]
May 27.548. Mr. Campbell to the Council of Trade and Plantations. A deduction of the English title to Newfoundland, and an account of French encroachments (cf. May 19). The losses susteyned from the French by H.M. subjects trading in and to Newfoundland during this warr only amounts by a very modest computation to £300,000 sterl., wherein I have the misfortune to be a large sharer. Signed, Ja. Campbell. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 27, 1709. Addressed. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 92.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
549. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney General and Mr. Solicitor General. Whereas many poor people are lately arrived from the Palatinate in Germany, most of whom are husbandmen, and H.M. being desirous they should have relief, etc., the Council of Trade and Plantations desire your opinion to-morrow morning if possible, (1) whether H.M. has a right and power by law to grant parcells of lands in her forests, chaces and wasts to any of her subjects, with licence to build cottages and inclose the said lands, in order to convent the same to tillage and husbandry; (2) what security H.M. may give to indemnify the respective parishes from the settlements of poor families amongst them, who shall be admitted to dwell in the said cottages. [C.O 389, 36. pp. 411, 412.]