America and West Indies
July 1709, 1-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1922

Pages

408-426

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: July 1709, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 24: 1708-1709 (1922), pp. 408-426. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73804 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

July 1709, 1-15

July—
Dec. 31.
611. Permits for 20 ships to sail without convoy in America and the West Indies. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 155–187.]
[July 1st.]612. Memoranda taken from Lord Sunderland's book of Letters and Instructions concerning the West India Expedition (c. April 28 etc.). Men of warr to be ready by ye end of March at furthest etc. Concludes with memorandum of letter to Col. Vetch, 1st July, Exped. laid aside. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 24.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
613. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose following and pray for the payment of their own salaries, now five quarters in arrear. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 436, 437.]
July 1.614. Petty Expenses of the Board of Trade, Lady day—Midsummer, 1709. See Journal of Council. 6½ pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 79–83.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
615. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose Lt. Governor Bennett's letter etc. of Oct. 29, 1708, in confirmation of barbarities committed by the French and Spaniards in the Bahama Islands (cf. June 29); and of March 12, 1709, relating to their design against Carolina. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 139, 140.]
[July 1.]616. Caveat by Sir John Colleton, praying that John Colleton may not be appointed to the Council of Barbados, till his case be determined. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 8th July, 1709. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 27.]
July 2.
New York.
617. Thomas Cockerill to Mr. Popple. I am to excuse my self to you that I have not written to you since my arrival here. Our disord'red family and other affairs have taken up so much of my time that I have hardly thought of Old England. My Lord dyed here on May 6, haveing never had a well day in his Government, which I attribute wholly to the cold and sickness he caught a board the man of war upon the coast. One son dyed before him, and the young Lord a fortnight after, this bad news, I suppose, is already come to your hands. With this comes my Lady, who will want the assistance of your honble. Board to recommend her case to H.M. She hath been a very great loser, in other respects besides those already mentioned by this voyage. I dare promise myself you will do her all the good offices in your power, etc. Wee are here bigg with expectation of good success from the Canada expedition, and shall raise in this Province £10,000 towards the charg of it. I cant say that wee match the zeal and spirit of the men of New England, Rhode Island and Connecticut, but we have already sent away all our forces both regular and militia, whom Coll. Nicholson commands in cheif. Wee have some against it, but they have been out numbered. Interest, that governs all the world, tyrannises at New York. At Albany where they trade with the French at Canada, the handlers, i.e. traders, are against it, the farmers for it. In Jersey the Quakers in the Assembly voted against ye bill for raising £3000, etc. for the Canada expedition, and upon the third reading, two of ye Assembly that were not Quakers joyned with them thro somebody's instigation to render that Assembly odious, whereby the Bill was lost. But the Assembly being prorogued at the desire of the Speaker met again and have since past it. Those two men voted all along for the Bill untill the third reading. I am told the Quakers would have absented from the house if they had known of these two men's designes, but I will not altogether credit this report. It may deserve the Queen's consideration, whether Quakers shall be allowed to be chosen Assembly Men in that Province for the future. You will now send us a new Governour and consequently make some new alterations in the Councill. Coll. Depeyster (being the Country's Treasurer) will not act. There is your friend Dr. Staats, who hath the best interest in this place, and is one of the honestest men, will deserve the Queen's favour. If he be restored to his place, he will be near the top. I dare not venture to give you, other names, but my friend Sir Will. Ashhurst, if you consult him, can supply you. If you any time desire an account of persons and things here, I shall very readily obey etc. I hope to hear of the Fleet's arrival with the forces from England, for all trade is at a stand untill this expedition is over. Coll. Vetch is gon back this week for Boston to receive them. Do me the favour Sir to recomend me to the new Governour. Signed, Thom. Cockerill. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 30th Aug., 1709. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 109; and 5, 1121. pp. 392–394.]
July 2.
St. James's.
618. The Queen to Governor Crowe. We resent your disrespect in disobeying our directions Jan. 24, 1707/8, etc. We command you, as you shall answer ye contrary at your peril, to admit Messrs. Sharpe, Walker and Beresford to the Council, and comply with the Order of Dec. 30 last, etc. Cf. A.P.C. II., pp. 576, 577. Countersigned, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 8th July, 1709. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 28; and 5, 210. pp. 154, 155; and 29, 11. pp. 474, 475.]
July 4.
Custom-house. Bristoll.
619. Custom House Officers at Bristol to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enclose following. Signed, J. Reynardson, Jn. Elbridge. Endorsed, Recd. July 7th, Read Aug. 25, 1709. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
619. i. List of ships cleared from Bristol to the fishery at Newfoundland, June 24, 1708—1709. 4, of 50 to 100 tons. Signed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 96, 96. i.]
[July 4.]620. Robert Tolson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. My Lord Morton and the Gentlemen subscribing will be ready to attend yr. Lopps. upon any reasonable notice, etc. Signed, Rt. Tolson. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th July, 1709. ½ p. Enclosed,
620. i. Earl of Morton and others to the Lords Committees of Trade. The matter of a proper method for reduceing the pyrates at Madagascar being referr'd to your Lordshipps, we haveing been requested by severall of the near relations of the said pyrates to be concerned as trustees for secureing to the said pyrates the due execution of such termes as H.M. should be pleased to grant unto them touching their lives and estates, and wch. persons assureing some of us that the said pyrates would accept H.M. most gracious pardon and returne to their allegiance with their effects, and Admirall Benbow's sonn (who was shipwraked at Madagascar, and lived amongst them four yeares) haveing assured us that the pyrates are willing to transport themselves with their effects to Great Brittaine at their owne expences, and they haveing drawn a petition to H.M. to the effect aforesaid desired our approbation thereof, soe far forth as to accept such trust onely as H.M. with the advice of her Privy Councill should think fit to repose in us. To obtaine such trust to be put in us, we did countenance the said petitioners as being willing to attend H.M. pleasure therein, as really thinking it an effectuall meanes to reduce the said pyrates and utterly to destroy their settlement at Mada gascar by bringing them voluntarily to Great Brittain with their effects, which we believeing could not be better effected in any other manner then as the petition of, or in the name of the said pyrates (lodged with the Secretary of State, annexed) and haveing been informed that the attempts of reduceing the said pyrates by force or otherwise have in severall late reignes proved ineffectuall, and we being induced to believe that all future attempts of that kind will likewise prove invallid, unless proper trustees be appointed to whom the pyrates may remitt their effects to be secured for and delivered to them in such proportions as may respectively belong to them, and we observeing the Address of the honble. House of Commons to H.M. for the effectuall suppressing the said pyrates and H.M. most gracious answer thereto, were incouraged to lay before H.M. the methods aforesaid as the most effectuall meanes to be used for suppressing the said pyrates without any charge to H.M. or the Government., which we pray you will represent to H.M. etc. Nota. After the method aforesaid the said pyrates will (it's supposed and hoped) voluntarily submitt themselves and bring home their whole effects to Great Brittaine, from wch. H.M. will receave great summes for Customes and save chargeable equipping of a Fleet otherwise necessary for the uses aforesaid, and her subjects for the future trade safe from the said pyrates. Signed, Morton, Cha. Egerton, and 4 others. 1 p.
620. ii. Petition of wives and relations of Pirates and Buckaneers of Madagascar and elsewhere in the East and West Indies to H.M. Pray, on behalf of said pirates and their accomplices, for a general pardon, soe that their wealth and riches may be secured to them on their return home etc. And that this great and good work may not become abortive as a former undertaking did, propose that some persons may be appointed by H.M. as trustees in Great Brittaine to give instructions to Commissioners to be appointed by H.M., who shall carry the said pardon, and receave their effects and secure the same for their use upon their returne hither, petitioners intending H.M. nor the publick should be at any charges therein, etc. Signed, Mary Read and 47 others (mostly "their marks"). Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. Nos. 79–81.]
July 5.
New York.
621. Lt. Governor Ingoldesby to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I embrace this oppertunity, which is the first I have had, to inform your Lordships that my Lord Lovelace dyed May 6, whereby the Governmt. of this and H.M. neighbouring Province of New Jersey devolved upon me, whome H.M. has been pleased to appoint Lieut. Governor thereof. My Lord Lovelace left the Assembly sitting when he dyed, and it was very lucky for the carrieing on this expedition against Canada, which I hope will be attended with the success I wish, and I have no cause to doubt it. I herewith transmitt to your Lordship several Acts of Assembly of this Province, some past by my Lord Cornbury and some by my selfe (titles given). There is one Act among these, which I cant but take some perticular notice of. It is for regulating and establishing fees, which was framed wholly by the Assembly, who seemed to be very fond of it; severall of the Councill, when it came up to them, were of opinion it required many considerable amendments, yett the part this Province is to perform in the aforesaid expedition against Canada being at that time before the Assembly for their assistance therein, those of the Councill who thought the Bill required those amendments conceived it was not proper at that time to attempt it, least it might impede those other weightyer affairs, whereupon they past it, and desired me to give my assent to it, for the same reasons. I am sencible there was reason for moderating the fees in some instances, but I think the Assembly have runn into extravigancies farr greater on the other hand, of which I am since by dayly experience convinced, for the lawyers have declined their practice in every Court, and the Officers would likewise quit their imploys, but that their duty obliges them to wait H.M. commands, and that they are in hopes they shall be releived from the hardships which they suffer from this Act. An other reason for my passing this Act is an other of the aforesaid Acts now transmitted to your Lordships, and past by my Lord Cornbury in October last, to relieve this Colony from divers irregularitys and extortions, which is so unintelligable that it rendred it doubtfull whether any fees could be taken till some other Act were past for settling the same. If your Lordships, upon the consideration of the aforesaid Act for establishing Fees, should represent it to H.M. as necessary to be rejected, I pray your Lordships consider at the same time whether it may not be proper that the other Act be likewise rejected to remove the doubts mentioned to have arisen thereon, and as to that clause giving power to the people to elect their coroners, if H.M. should think it reasonable, her signification thereof to her Governour will, I presume, be sufficient, and as to the establishing of Fees, I humbly recommend it to your Lordships' consideration and directions that offices may be capable of maintaining gentlemen of understanding and probity suitable to the nature and quality of each office, without being dependant on the humour of the Country, and that the practicers of the Law may have an encouragement to proceed as near as may be in the order and method used in England, and not Oretenus, as in some of H.M. Plantations in the West Indies, and that they may thereby have a maintainance suitable to their education and profession. The Revenue of this Province expired May 18, and I fear the Assembly will hardly be brought to give it again, I mean as they should and hitherto have done to the Queen, to be disposed of as she shall think fitt, whereby H.M. might reward her servants as they deserve, but instead of that the Assembly are now taking upon them to appropriate what they give for the support of Governmt. I doubt, if it be permitted to go on, those Officers that are now the Queens will sone become the creatures and servants of the people; it's very well known that this Province has ever since it has been under the Crown supported the Governmt. handsomly and as they ought, without oppression to any or impoverishing the place, and they are still as able to do it as ever. It's true there has been of late years some ill managmt. with respect to the Revenue and the expences of the Governmt., whereby a considerable debt has been contracted, but if prudence and moderation be used in those things, or some directions given relating thereto, there need be no apprehensions of the like for the future, at present Officers are very precarious, some of them are like to have no sallary allowed them by the Assembly, and almost all the rest so much reduced that it's scarse worth accepting: 'twas the Assembly of New Jersey that first begann to appropriate what they gave for the support of Governmt., and I have been forc't to accept of what the Assembly would give here on these termes, rather then lett all the Officers starve. And that is only the Excise, no other mony being yet given for support of Government, and this is not yett appropriated, but provided to be disposed of by Act of Assembly, I hope it will not be drawn into precedent, but that H.M. will take such effectuall methods to have a Revenue settled on a sure foundation, that Officers may without fear discharge their duty, and intend the Queen's interest. The only standing Revenue the Queen has in this Province is the quitrents, and they are so much concealed that very little comes into the Treasury, nor is it practicable to make a rent roll whereby they may be collected yearly, other then by a Law to be made particularly for that purpose, for I am very well informed that, when the Dutch took this place from us, severall Books of records of Patents and other things were then lost; and how little an Assembly will favour such a Bill is much to be doubted from their interest. I wish your Lordships would give me your directions herein, that I might apply myselfe to bring this matter to a clearer sight then it has yett been in. I am informed that the Minister of this place is attempting to obtain from H.M. an allowance of £26 a year out of the quittrents for his house rent, as also the payment of some arrears occasioned in common with others by the anticipating and overcharging the Revenue, out of which this used to be paid, it was given in the infancy of the Church, when the congregation were not able to bear the expence, and 'twas a very pious act and has contributed very much to increase of it, which is now so flourishing that their Minester has a very handsome sallary of £160 per annum, besides his perquisites. And the Church has now in bank, as I am informed, £700 or £800. I hope H.M. will think of some other way of paying this arrear and house rent, for besides the ill example it will be to appropriate the remainder of it to particular uses, it will deprive the Govern ment of all manner of means to provide for severall unavoidable exigencies, this being the only money it can command on these occasions. I cannot omitt acquainting your Lordships, that tho by my Lord Lovelace's directions, the Act of Parliament for the ascertaining the rates of foreign coyns, was published in this Province and in New Jersey, yett the people of either Province pay no obedience thereto. Nay, the Assemblys take upon them thus farr to make the Act of no signification that they will pass no Bill for money, but to be paid at the value it was before the said Act took place. Indeed, Mr. Cockerill, who pays the forces here, has paid them according to that Act ever since May 1st, and the Publick Officers conform to it, but nobody elce does that I hear of. I pray your Lordship's directions herein, whether I shall cause the Attorney General to preferr an(d) information or indictment against one or two persons, and trye if that will bring the people to the necessary obedience, or what other measures I shall take. The Queen, by her Instructions to the Governor, commands him to furnish her shipps of warr with men, upon application from the Captains. The Captains of the Kingsale and Maidstone, which came with my Lord Lovelace, have applied to me for men. I was willing to supply them, but yett I doubted my hands were tied up from impressing by the Act of Parliament for the encouragement of the trade to America; yett I was unwilling to rely altogether on my own judgment, and therefore referred it to the Chief Justice and the Attorny General for their opinion thereon, who have severally given it me (enclosed). The disagreement there is in those opinions obliged me to take the advice of the Councill thereon, who have given it (enclosed). I pray your Lordships that I may have some further directions herein, or that some other method may be taken to man the Queen's shipps. I am just now honoured with your Lordships' letter, wherein was H.M. disaprobation of the Act for ye corruption of the current coin, which I have made publick, and I shall use my utmost endeavours to have the Act of Parliament for ascertaining the rates of forreign coyns obey'd, nor doe I see now what pretence the people can have not to comply therewith. I have given the Attorney Generall leave to goe for England upon his request, and his representing to me the necessity of it; he can witness to your Lordships what an unwillingness Assembly's here have to give a Revenue suitable to the exigences of the Governmt., tho many years experience has convinced the considerate and best part of mankind that the Revenue, as it has hitherto been raised has been exceeding easy to the Province. One principle motive for the Attorny Generall's going is that the Assembly have not thought convenient to give him the sallary which his predecessors had, and they are going the same way to work with the rest of the officers, of which I pray your Lordships' consideration that this budding evil may be prevented from growing greater. In my last to yr. Lordships from Perth Amboy, I sent an acct. of what then occurred both in the Councill and Assembly to that time. I have only to add that our Assembly mett according to the appointment, and have passed an Act for raising £3000, for the present service and expedition against Canada, an other for the inforcing the currency of bills of credit for £3000, and an other for the encouragement of volunteers. I have only to observe to your Lordship that they passed the House of Representatives with great difficulty, all the Quakers in the House voting against the Bills, which is a further confirmation of the representation sent to H.M. from myselfe and the Councill, in which Coll. Nicholson and Coll. Vetch have joined with us. I hope your Lordships will excuse me for not sending the Acts past in New Jersey, the Secretary not having as yett sent 'em me. I shall transmitt them your Lordships per very next opertunity. Signed, Rich. Ingoldesby. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 25th Aug., 1709. 4 pp. Enclosed,
621. i. Opinion of the Lord Chief Justice of New York. The prohibition as to pressing in the late Act. is general. and no commission or instruction can dispense with it. June 30, 1709. Signed, R. Mompesson. Endorsed. as preceding. 1 p.
621. ii. Opinion of the Attorney General of New York. June 21, 1709. It is proper for the Governor to grant warrants for impressing men to make up the complements of H.M.S. ships, the late Act of Parliament not being intended to tye up the hands of the Government here, etc. Signed, Jno. Rayner. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
621. iii. Minutes of Council of New York, July 3, 1709. The Board advised that the Governor cannot grant any warrant for impressing mariners, except deserters. Same endorsement. Copy. ½ p.
621. iv. (a) Examination of Wagrasshse and Canawanegoe, that were sent by Col. K. v. Renselaer and Robt. Livingstone spyes to Canada. (At a meeting of the Commissioners for the Indian Affairs, Albany, June 21, 1709. Present: Col. K. v. Renselaer, Evt. Banker, J. Abeel, H. Hansen.) Say that, when they sett out from Schaennechrtade, they came unto the French Praying Indian Castle of Cachnawage in Canada, the 7th day, where the Indians askt what there bussiness was, they replyd they came to fetch bevers which they had there, the next morning by order of ye Govr. of Montroyall were carryed thither, who also askt what brought them there and how all was at Albany, they reply'd that all was well and in quietness. After we left the Govr. of Canada, went according to our directions to view what quantity of great guns there was in that place, we first saw two partarrores before the Govrs. house, and 10 more and 8 great gunns near the watersyde whereof two great gunns were only mounted, after yt. ye Govr. of Montroyall sent for us again, and askt when we went home, we answered in 3 days time, upon wch. he forbid us to return thro Corlaer's Lake, for that many of his people were gone out that way to fight, and if they went that way might be kil'd, therefore desyred us to return by way of Cadarachqua River. As to the quantity of people in Montroyall, found no more then at other times, that is many officers, but few souldiers, the stockadoes round the town, we perceiv'd many decay'd, when we came by Laplarie we see some part of the Fort made new, the rest old and rotten; in Chambly Fort were two great gunns and 3 patarrares, and abt. 30 men with the souldiers there, and the inhabitants living near the same, and we also inform'd ourselves relating Quebeck, do understand that that place is very well fortifyed with a thick stone wall round it, and is enlarg'd over the Creek, at which place the Bostoners stopt when they attackt it, there is a considerable quantity of boums and three mortors. When we were at Cachnawage in order to return home, just as we were going out, came in the Govr. of Quebeck who desired a meeting with us, and all other our Indians that were there, and being convein'd, he askt us if we were going home, we answer'd yes, then sd. he, lett us first drink together, and gave every man of us a dram of brandy, and a small roll of tobacco, and sayd that he was inform'd that the hatchatt was given into the hands of the Five Nations, but that he expected the first blow from Quider, and then should know how to deal with him, for it is an easey matter (say'd he) to take Albany, and as for you children, (say'd he to us) doe what you think fitt, fight or not, it is at your pleasure. Says that the Fort at Cachnawage is also old and sett round with small stockadoes, has 3 great guns therein. We are informd that a considerable party are gone out agt. N. England, whom one of our Indians hath seen march out, in which party there is 100 Indians from Cachnawage, the same party is commanded by one Romvich, a son of Monr. Artell; they are to make a Fort on the head of New England River at a place call'd Oneyade; after that we travel'd on to Chambly in order to proceed on our journey home, we were overtaken again by a messanger from the Govr. of Canada, who desired us back again, on which we return'd back to Montroyall, and went to the Govr., who sayd he was glad we were come back, and desired us to tarry a few days to take good news along to Quider, which would be Peace, whereof he had a report, and expected letters from Quebeck every hour, where a vessel was arrived from France, and had brought that news, but he had not yet any letters relateing the same, but expected hourly, whereupon we tarryed one day, then told him we were going home, he say'd, since you will not stay, tell Quider that as soon as my letters come from Quebeck with Peace, shall immediatly send him an express, altho' I beleeve by this time he will have an account thereof by the way of N. York, so that I beleeve the expresses will meet together by the way.
(b). Examination of Matanas, one of the three that were sent to Canada by Col. K. v. Renslaer and Mr. Robt. Livingston, and return'd here this day, haveing been 8 days by the way from Chambly. Says that in his going thither he was 9 days by the way to Chambly, where he found 40 Mohags from Cachnawage and other Indians which he knew not; there he was taken up to be one of them that had kil'd of theirs in the Lake and Chambly River, and was detained there on that acct. 3 days. Says that the stockadoes round the Fort of Chambly are all rotten and propt up with cross pieces of timber to hold them up, therein is also six great gunns including patarres, all the men in't and inhabitants round it are not above 30 in number; from thence he went down to Sorrel, where he beleeves all and all is not above 40 men; then he went to an Indian Castle a little from thence call'd Adgecantehook, where the Preist bid him welcome, there he saw 2 litle pattarares, and found provision very scarce; that Castle consists of abt. 170 men when all are at home, many of them were not yett come from beaver hunting, after 10 days stay to give no suspetion he resolved to goe to Troy River, with an intention to goe to Quebeck, but the Preist takeing him to be a spye, would not allow him to take his gunn etc. with him, but gave leave to goe to see the place only, wch. put a stop to his intended proceedings, after he came to Troy River, he found it to be a town like Schaennechtady, wh. consists abt. 40 familys, has a Fort wherein is with great guns and patarrares about the number of 30, the stockadoes rotten and decay'd, he likewise meet an Indian a frind of his come there from Quebeck, by whom he understood that the stone wall round Quebeck was compleatly finish'd, being built out over the Creek where the Bostoniers made their attack, and that there was 56 great guns planted round the inside of the citty and upwards of 20 mortors; has further understood that some Indians are gone out a-fighting towards the N. W. Passage, and so return'd home.
(c). Intelligence given by an Indian call'd Ticonnondadiha deserted from a French party gone to N. England. Says that it is now 24 days ago since that party went out from Canada, wch. he left 3 days ago at the head of the other Creek at a place call'd Oneyade, and to goe over a long carrying place before they come to the N. England River; this party consists of 180 men, 40 Christians and 140 Indians; they are de sign'd for Dearfeild, and intended to post themselfs near the Fort, and then send out a skulking party to draw out the English, thinking by that means to take the place. That by another Indian coms latter from Canada confirms that this party is out, and that two N. England Captives deserted from thence 14 days ago.
Albany, June 22, 1709. Hereupon that Comrs. for the Indian Affairs have sent Danl. Ketelhuyn expresse with a letter to Coll. Partridge to give an acct. hereof. Same endorsement. 4½ pp.
621. v. Extracts from the Journals of the Assembly of New York relating to the expedition to Canada. Same endorsement. 5½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1049. Nos. 107, 107. i.–v.; and 5, 1121. pp. 372–385.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
622. W. Popple to the Marquis of Carmarthen. I am again commanded by the Council of Trade and Plantations to acquaint your Lordship that they will be ready between tenn and eleven of the clock on Friday morning next, to hear what your Lordship may further have to offer in relation to the pirates at Madagascar. [C. O. 324, 9. p. 405.]
[July 6.]623. Copies of depositions of James Feild, Richard Cochran, and Jeffry Duncombs, as to soldiers being sent to seize Barry Tankard for his contemptuous behaviour to Governor Parke. Antigua, April, May, 1709. Endorsed, Recd. Read July 6, 1709. 8 pp. [C. O. 152, 8. Nos. 22–24.]
[July 6.]624. (a). Deposition of Samuel Walker. Thomas Gateward, J.P., informed him that he did not think there would be a sessions, because there could not be a jury got to condemn the gentlemen, etc. May 2, 1709. Copy. 1½ pp.
(b). Deposition of Francis Carlisle. Governor Parke said he would have no man to serve as his Provost Marshal, but such as should summons such jurors as he should direct or approve, etc. April 27, 1709. Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read July 6, 1709. [C. O. 152, 8. Nos. 25, 26.]
[July 7.]625. Deposition of Jedidiah Hutchinson late of St. Kitts. Deponent received the following Instrument from Col. Jno. Ward, Speaker of the Assembly of St. Kitts, to be delivered to Wm. Nevin, etc. (a). Council of St. Kitts to the Assembly. Dec. 7, 1708. We know of no grievance against the General [Parke] such as some malicious people of Antigua report, and desire you to inform us if you know of any. (b). Reply of the Assembly. Dec. 7, 1708. We heartily wish we could concur that H. E. has been guilty of no maleadministration. (1). The Public grievances: (1). His not laying before H.M. the Act for raising 100,000lb. of muscovado sugar per annum for the Governor's house-rent, which, considering our unhappy circumstances by the late hurricane and great debts, as well publick as private, we were in hopes would not have had the Royal assent. (2). H.E.'s keeping the late Assembly 15 months longer than is dircted by the Act for preserving the freedom of elections. (3). His taking greater fees than any General heretofore for licences of marriage, probate, etc. (4). The discouragement of the settler in ye late French quarter of Basseterre. (5). The Lieut. Governor's sloop being sent, Easter 1708, with, a Flagg of Truce to Martineco loaded with beef, which the country was then in great want of. As to particular grievances, we give for instance the hardship done Col. Codrington, Col. Ward, James Emra, Capt. Marcum, Christopher Stodard, and Guillias McArthur being deny'd guardians. What shall we say to the case of Mr. Vanbell, Capt. Derby Donovant, Capt. Tho. Copping and their companies, with Capt. Mallary, who was struck by the General, as 'tis said, for only offering to search his sloop, Robert Jones, master, that came from Carrasau with contraband goods, as it's supposed. Mrs. Clark, who was marryed in the night in the General's presence, in a little thatcht hutt agt. the inclination of her guardian, Col. Daniel Smith, and carryed off this Island, by the General in H.M.S. Hector etc., etc. Copy. 4 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 27.]
July 7.626. Deposition of Jedidiah Hutchinson. Deponent was resident in St. Kitts 1706–1709. The inhabitants of the French part made great complaints amongst themselvs of the arbitrary government of Governor Parke, who exacted a yearly rent from them, which was never demanded by any preceding General, and caused many to remove from the Island. Corroborates other charges against the Governor. He indecently assaulted Mrs. Du Southsay in. St. Kitts. Signed, Jedh. Hutchinson. Endorsed, Recd. Read July 8, 1709. Copy. 4 pp. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 28.]
July 7.627. Roger Mompesson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Petitions to be continued as Chief Justice of New York. Signed, Roger Mompesson. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 27th July, 1709. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 104.]
July 7.
St. John's.
628. Observations made in Placentia, June 1709, by Allen Southmaid and Jno. Collin. Endorsed, Recd. Feb. 23, 1709 (1710). 5 pp. [C.O. 194, 22. No. 74.]
July 8.
New York.
629. Col. Nicholson to [the Earl of Sunderland.] Announces and explains his acceptance of the command in chief of the land expedition against Canada, as June 28, q. v. Col. Vetch went last week for Boston. Enumerates enclosures, including a Proclamation for [?raising] of voluntiers in the Jersies, Pensilvania etc., "tho' Capt. Farmer hopes to get the men, yet I am very doubtful thereof, and if they are raised it will be late before they can joyne the other forces, and I fear they will not before we have marched from the Wood Creek, if so we shall have 350 men less then were ordered," etc. Some of the Long Island Indians are come to me already, and I am in hopes there will be more. By the accot. that the Indian spyes give (who are returned from Canada) your Lordship may likewise see in what condition they were in, in Canada, if the Indian account may be relyed upon. I find that one of the great difficulties I shall meet with is the transportation of the men, provitions, and amunition, and I suppose we shall meet with the like difficulty of carrying of 3 or 4 small brass guns, but I will endeavour to make good use of the cowhorne morters and granadeers, for I have (tho' with very much trouble) got arms and accouterments for 218 of them. I think very few of the forces have been in any service were great guns have been used, wch. I find we are like to meet with, yet I shall endeavour to manage affairs accordingly. We have as yet no news of the Fleet being arrived at Boston, which makes people here somewhat uneasy by reason of the sumer's being so farr advanced. But notwithstanding any of these difficulties I hope in God that the usuall success will attend H. M. arms. This day Governr. Ingoldesby and myself designes for to meet Indians at Albany, wither all the forces are gon up, and most of the arms and amunition, the last being now loading to go with us or presently after, I found it absolutly necessarie to stay here for the dispatch of the affairs, etc. I hope your Lordship will be pleased to excuse this unpollished letter, etc. P. S. This is designed by John Rayner Esq., H. M. Attorney Generall here, who tells me he is bound for Great Britain upon some affairs wch. he proposes will be for H. M. interest, etc. Signed, Fr. Nicholson. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 26.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
630. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We have considered the Articles of complaint etc. against Governor Park (see March 31). It being but just and reasonable that he should be heard in his own defence, we humbly offer that your Majesty be pleased to order that copies of the Address, Petitions and Articles be sent to him, and that he be directed by your Majesty's letters mandatary to make his particular answer to all the said Articles as soon as possible; and that he be required to give free liberty to the complainants and other persons concerned to make affidavits before any judge or magistrate of what they know in those matters, and that such judge or magistrate do summon before them such person or persons as the complainants shall name; and that Col. Park do signify your Majesties pleasure herein to such judge or magistrate accordingly. We further humbly offer that the complainants be obliged to give unto Col. Park authentic copies of their affidavits and other proofs; and also that he do in like manner deliver to them copies of his answer and such depositions and other proofs as he shall think necessary for his defence within the space of one month after publication of your Majestyes said letters mandatary upon rect. thereof without delay. And further that within 20 days after having so recd. each others proofs, they do in like manner change the replys that each of them shall think fit to make, and that ye whole be returned hither by the first conveyance to be laid before your Majesty. [C.O. 153, 10. pp. 363, 364.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
631. Same to Governor Parke. Recommend Mr. Jurdine to his care and assistance in the dispatch of his business etc. (See June 9.) [C.O. 153, 10. p. 365.]
July 10.
South Carolina.
632. T. Nairne to [? the Earl of Sunderland.] Having been imployed by the Generall Assembly of this Province in the quality of an Agent, and itenerary Justice among the Indians, subject to our Governmt., among other things usefull to be known for the safety and interest of this Colony, I aplyed myself in particular to have a very minute acct., of all people as well Europeans as salvages, from Virginia to the mouth of the Mississipi. I have had a personall view off most of these parts, either formerly when a Commander in the warrs, or this year by travelling, altho my inquiries and serches of this kind are not finished, yett considering the juncture, that peace must of necessity in some small time be concluded, I could not dispense with myself from laying before yr. Lordship a map of such travells and observations as I have already taken, to the end yr. noble Lordship may at one view perceive what part of the Continent we are now possest off, and what not, and procure the articles of peace to be formed in such a manner that the English American Empire may not be unreasonably crampt up. Yr. Lordship[s] may depend on the Inland topography to be exact as any thing of that kind can well be. The numbers of the inhabitant I took with the greatest care. Yr. Lordship upon view of the map will presently conclude that if the French now setled at Mobile were possest of all the Indians subject to ye Governmt. of Carolina, and had united them to those of the Mississipi, they wold be in circumstances to draw from among them such bodies of forces as wold be intollerably troublesom either to the English Colonies, or the naked unarmed country of New Mexico, and that this province, only by trading and other management. can put a check to them, a consequence of this is that this province, being a frontier both against the French and Spand., ought not to be neglected. I have represented this matter in such a true light to the Genll. Assembly, that they resolved to raise some forces, to reduce either the French fort at Mobile, or at least all the Indians betwixt us and the Mississipi, now in their alliance, accordingly I was busy providing everything for my voyage. I entertained intelligence among the Yassas, Tassas and Nochees, inviteing them to setle up Cussate river, I ventured my life, and made peace with the Chactas, in short I design'd to invite by fair means all that wold accept of our friendship, upon the terms of subjecting themselves to our governmt. and removeing into our territory, and quite to ruine such as wold not, soe that the French might never be in a capacity to raise an Indian army to disturb us or our allies, and that the lower parts of the Mississipi, being left desolate, the trade of the up[p]er might fall to this province by means of factories, setled on Cussate river, for the French from Mobile wold find it extreme difficult to carry on that commerce, unless had releif and defence from the Indian towns on the Lower parts. But as I was imploying myself in concerting measures for the intended expedition, the intelligence of the French and Spands. designing to invade Carolina put a full stop to it, only I continue to invite over by fair means all that I can, which I hope will not be altogether in vain. My design was to fall down from the Talapoosies against the French with a fleet of 80 canoes man'd with 500 Indians and 1000 by land 15 English on ye one part and 30 with the other, with these forces I pretended either to destroy or remove into our territory all the salvages from Mobile to the Mississipi, and up the river to 36 degrees of latitude. The French of Mobile have their support by the furr trade from the head of the Mississipi, and a good underhand trade with the Spaniards of La Vera Cruz by way of Pansacola, that small garrison depends on Vera Cruz, and live in extream good terms with Mobile, being both afraid of our subjects, the Talapoosies, who last year burnt Pansacola town, tho the French at Mobile be now weak, yett they are well scituated for Indian trade. I have fix'd a red Cross to these places now subject to Carolina and a triangle at these in amity with Mobile. The English trade for cloath alwayes atracts and maintains the obedience and friendship of the Indians. They effect them most who sell best cheap. This makes it necessary that the trade with them should in England lye under as small duties and embarrassment as may be, sixpence custom for such dear skins as are small and not worth 12d. seems unreasonable. Yr. Lordship may perceive by the map that the garrison of St. Augustine is by this warr reduced to the bare walls, their Castle and Indian towns all consumed either by us in our invasion of that place or by our Indian subjects since, who in quest of booty are now oblidged to goe down as farr on the point of Florida as the firm land will permitt, they have drove the Floridians to the Islands of the Cape, have brought in and sold many hundreds of them and dayly now continue that trade, so that in some few years they'll reduce these Barbarians to a farr less number, there is not one Indian town betwixt Charlestown and Mowila Bay except what are prickt in the mapp, only am uncertain of the numbers of the Floridians. Our friend the Talopoosies and Checasas imploy themselves in making slaves of such Indians about the lower parts of the Mississipi as are now subject to the French. The good prices the English traders give them for slaves encourage them to this trade extreamly, and some men think that it both serves to lessen their numbers before the French can arm them, and it is a more effectuall way of civilising and instructing, then all the efforts used by the French missionaries. Ye English in next Treaty of Peace have just reason to insist upon the French quitting that setlemt. on the Bay of Mowila, because they setled it in prejudice to and dispight of the just title the English had to that Bay and the River of it. It seem they found the Mississipi unfitt to setle on, and not willing to give any umbrage at that time to the Spaniards by going to the westward of it, made bold (tho' in time of Peace) with the English of Carolina, and setled on the Bay of Mowila, 150 miles to the east of the Mississipi, all the inhabitants whereof had for 10 years before submitted themselves and country to the governmt. of Carolina, and then actually traded with us; the French upon their first arrivall were so liberall of thein presents yt. they entirely decoyed the people of the lower parts from their duty, and endeavouring to doe the same with the Talapoosies who live higher up, 5 of them were killed in the attempt, as they were coming up, by an Indian called Dearsfoot; this has made them desist ever since, and the English are now in possission of the greatest part of the people of that River. Yr. Lordship by a view of the map will perceive that if the Englist think fitt to use any efforts to make themselves masters of the furr trade from the head of the Mississipi, it must be done by drawing up the Yassas etc. to setle on Cussate river and making small forts to defend the traders merchantdise where the places are marked. Yr. Lordship will likewise se that the Cherockee nation now entirely subject to us are extreamly well scituate to keep of any incursions which either ye Illinois or any other French Indians may think of making into Carolina, and in effect so it is, they are now our only defence on the Back parts, but are themselves miserably harrassed by the Iroquis. Yr. Lordship may please to write to the governours of Maryland and New York to interpose as much with the Iroquois in their behalf a[s] possible, all parts of the English Dominions ought mutually to espouse one another's interest in everything that relates to the Common Defence against ye French and their party. I have considered this coast, what parts may be any way usefull to ye Brittish nation in order to setle Colonies. It is certain we have firm possession by means of our Indians from Charles Town to Mowila Bay, excepting only the garrison of St. Augustine and ye Islands of Cape Florida. If the English could spare people, it seems fitter to strengthen this Province, then setle any new. But if an inclination to setle any place to the Eastward of the Mississipi should prevaile, the old Country of the Apalachias is the only best, being for 40 miles long and 20 wide clear feild fitt for the plough, formerly manured by the Indians, who were four year agoe subdued, and the remaining part of them removed to Carolina. This place wold be proper for the seat of a governmt. to take in the neck of Florida and 100 miles to the westward along the Bay, that country is full of catle and horses, which before the war belonged to ye Spaniard and Apalachia Indians, but are now all wild. But if yor. Lordship please to have laid before you all the printed mapps and descriptions that are in England of the country to the westward of the Mississipi, and thoroughly consider all circumstances, you will incline to beleive that the English Nation can setle a Colony nowhere to greater purpose then upon some convenient place any where 60 or 80 miles to the westward of the mouth of ye Mississipi. It is certain there are considerable numbers of Indians there, so farr from being subject, that are at constant warrs with the Spaniards of new Mexico it is certain the french could not persue La Salle's design formed against ye mine country, by reason of their present circumstances with Spain, so that if the English put in and gett the Indians of their side, it may be a means of at least enjoying a good share of the trade both' with ye Spaniards and their Indian subjects of that part of New Spain, the example of Queriso shows us that neither galleys, men of warr, nor garrisons can prevent a trade of that nature, and no man can foretell how favourable some revolutions of time might prove in affording oppertunities worth catching att, to gain some of the mines. The Bay of Campeeche lying not farr of the bay, men might be invited to setle in the new Colony and make it the port to ship home their wood from, and occasionally exercise the trade of cutting logwood from, that port, above all things arming the Indians, purchasing their commodities, making discoveries and sending youths to learn their language wold be of the utmost consequence to the firm establishing ye Colony, for of them might be had men ready at any time to help oppose the Spaniards, a thing of this nature must be done with great secrecy, and first setled with considerable strength, and fortified with the utmost celerity. If the Spaniard patiently suffer the french to goe sharers with them in the Peruvian trade, it's equally reasonable that the English, should aim at gaining some of the Mexican. It's easy to make the peace and inland discoveries from Carolina, from whence we are already well acquainted as farr as the Mississipi. 2 or £300 sterling's worth of goods proper will be sufficient and for discovering the coast and finding a fitt River to setle on a sloop may be sent from hence privately. Signed, Thomas Nairne. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 382. No. 11.]
[July 10.]633. Petition, statement of case, and depositions (2) of George Lillington. v. following, and C.S.P. 1705, and A.P.C. II. No. 1088. 7 pp. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 5–8.]
July 11.
Windsor.
634. Order of Queen in Council. On petition of George Lillington, the Order of May 19 is revoked, and the matter referred to the Committee for hearing Appeals, etc. v. A.P.C. II. No. 1088. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 2, 1709. 1½ pp. [C.O. 28, 12. No. 30; and 29, 11. pp. 483, 484.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
635. W. Popple to Mr. Burchet. Encloses extracts from Governor Handasyd's letter April 6, relating to the case of the Naval Officer condemned in Jamaica, to be laid before the Lord High Admiral for his directions therein. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 415, 416.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
636. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose extracts from Governor Handasyd's letter, April 6th, relating to a serjeant condemned in Jamaica, etc., to be laid before H.M. for her pleasure therein. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 416, 417.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
637. Same to the Queen. Recommend that Samuel Sherlock, Samuel Smith, Wm. Outerbridge, Leonard White and John Peasly be appointed to the Council of Bermuda. [C.O. 38, 6. p. 467.]
July 13.
Antigua.
638. Masters of ships lying in the harbour of Antigua to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Address in favour of Governor Parke and his fair and regular administration etc. 10 signatures. Endorsed, Recd. Read July 13, 1709. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 8. No. 29.]
[July 14.]639. Christopher de Graffenried and Luis Michel to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Explain their proposal for settling Swiss Protestants in Virginia (see June 28, supra). Signed, De. Graffenried, Michel. Endorsed, Recd. 14, Read 15 July, 1709. French, 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 28.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
640. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledge letters of Aug. 2, 1708, and April 6, 1709. What you write of the want of seamen has been laid before the Lord High Admiral, and we have also transmitted to him the case of the Naval Officer etc. We have likewise laid before H.M. your desire in relation to the Serjeant etc., and as soon as we shall know H.M. pleasure, we shall give you notice thereof. We are glad to perceive that the Assembly have passed the Acts you mentioned which we shall expect according to your promise, and when received shall consider that same as opportunity offers. P.S. Since our writing the above, we have received yours of May 1, and have only to add that H.M. has been pleased to pardon the Serjeant, etc., and the same is now preparing by Mr. Attorney Generall for passing the Great Seal. [C.O. 138, 12. pp. 417, 418.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
641. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose Addresses from Antigua and St. Kitts in favour of Governor Parke, to be laid before H.M. [C.O. 153, 10. p. 366.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
642. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Crowe. Acknowledge letters of March 2 and May 18. As to the proceedings of the Grand Session against Alexander and Wm. Walker, we can give you no directions therein; that matter is now depending, and Mr. Lillington's son is here to prosecute his father's complaint, as also Mr. Wm. Walker to defend himself, so that till both sides have been heard, we cannot make any determination thereupon. The Acts you transmitted, March 2, shall be considered; but we have not received the Act about Agents referr'd to, May 18. And therefore we supposed that it has been sent to the said Agents, which ought to be immediatly transmitted to us from yourself. As to your refusing to readmit Mr. Sharp, Mr. Walker and Mr. Beresford into the Councill, and your not issuing orders for their taking of depositions pursuant to H.M. directions to you, H.M. having been pleased to determine that matter in Councill, and having accordingly writ fully to you thereupon, we need not add anything in that matter. [C.O. 29, 11. pp. 476, 477.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
643. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Bennett. Acknowledge letters of April 8, June 12, Aug. 4 and 14, Oct. 29, 1708, and March 1708/9. We can now make no return to what you write in relation to Mr. Jones, because the hearing of the complaints, which we had begun, has been put off till Michaelmas next by reason of the term then at hand, and other business; so that till both' sides have been fully heard, we cannot give you any particular answer upon that head. We have recommended 5 proposed by you for the Council (v. July 13), and doubt not but the orders for their admission will be sent you by the Agent. We have received the tryal of Mr. Daffy, and shall as occasion offers have recourse thereunto. We have laid before H.M. what you writ us in relation to the cruelties of the French in the Bahama Islands, and to their design on Carolina. As to the condemnation of the Margaret, that matter being transmitted to the Commissioner of Customes, we need not say anything thereupon, not doubting but they will take care to justify their own officer's legal proceedings. [C.O. 38, 6. pp. 468–470.]