America and West Indies
March 1715, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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122-141

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'America and West Indies: March 1715, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 122-141. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73959 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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March 1715, 16-31

March 16.
Whitehall.
288. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 21st March, 17 14/15. 1 p. Enclosed,
288. i. Petition of Merchants of London to the King. Notwithstanding many petitions to her late Majtie. from London and other ports for a restoration (by the pace) of the whole Island of Newfoundland and all the Islands belonging to the same, yet the French were excluded from no more than one half of the said Island, and even in this one half expresly contrary to the Treaty of Peace they have ever since continued their trade and fishery in the same manner as they did before, and are providing against the ensueing season in Placentia and St. Peters and other harbours within the sd. limitts or bounds of the English considerable quantitys of salt and other goods to the great damage of the trade of Great Britain. Pray that the French for the future may be debar'd from the sale of any salt or other goods within the bounds of the English and from all manner of trade and fishery within the same and be obliged to remove what goods or effects they have to their own settlements, and that H.M. Brittish subjects may have the sole and absolute enjoymt. of all the harbours ports and fisherys within the same moyety and of all trade fishery and commerce therein exclusive of the French and all others whatsoever, and that the Acts of 15th Charles II. and 10th and 11th William may be put in force and orders given to the Governrs. in Newfoundland and Commanders of men of war attending this Fishery as shall seem meet. Signed, Richd. Greene, Solomon Merrett and 39 others. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 80, 80 i.; and 195, 6. pp. 54–56.]
March 16.
London.
289. Capt. Wade to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following in reply to their request of 8th instant. Signed, Caleb Wade. Endorsed, Recd. Read 23rd March, 17 14/15. 1 p. Enclosed,
289. i. Capt. Wade's report of frauds and abuses in the Newfoundland fishery. The Newfoundland Trade was formerly carryed on to advantage by owners of ships in the West of England, who hired men by "thirds," vizt., the Commander and men had a third of the fish. This made every man careful for the good of the voyage. Latterly, monthly wages have been paid them, which has not answered so well. Formerly the owners of ships took great numbers of apprentices, for seven years time, whom they sent to Newfoundland every season, thence to Spain etc. with their fish, or to Virginia and the West Indies and then to London, by which means the apprentices, before they were out of their time, became hardy, able seamen, fit for the Government's service, when required. Repeats abuses in the trade previously reported.
289. ii. Capt. Wade's proposed remedies for preceding, to be embodied in an Act. Encouragement should be given for taking apprentices. The Commander of a sixth-rate frigate to be appointed to go from harbour to harbour and confer with the Admirals, etc. No penalty is laid on any person who breaks the Act of 10 and 11 William, which encourages evil men to goe on in their irregularitys. A penalty should be thought of, in the Act, etc. 6½ pp. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 82, 82 i., ii.; and 195, 6. pp. 61–82.]
March 16.
Treary. Chambers.
290. Mr. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. The Lords Commrs. of the Treasury desire the opinion of the Council of Trade and Plantations thereupon. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. Read 28th March, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
290. i. Mr. Blathwayt to Mr. Lowndes. Whitehal, 10th March, 1714. Upon the occasion of Governor Lowther's demand of an allowance to defray the charge of transporting himself, his family and equipage to Barbadoes, mention is made of a resolution of the late Earl of Godolphin (when Lord Treasurer) for discontinuing such allowance for the future. Requests copy of the said Minute. It is likewise necessary that I be inform'd upon what occasion the half salary has been allow'd to the Governor when absent by order or permission from the Crown, and whether immediately from the date of the Commission of such Governor. Which I pray may be explain'd to me from the Treasury Books for the satisfaction of Mr. Lowther. Signed, Wm. Blathwayt. Copypp. [C.O. 28, 14. Nos. 37, 37 i.; and 29, 13. pp. 296–298.]
March 16.
Whitehall.
291. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following. "There being two vacancies in the Council, we have inserted the names of Nathl. Harrison and Mann Page," etc. Annexed,
291. i. H.M. Instructions for Governor Lord Orkney, in the usual form (cf. April 15). [C.O. 5, 1364. pp. 93–205; and 5, 1335. No. 190.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
292. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Upon our examining into ye state of the Councils in the Plantations, we have found that the publick service has frequently suffered by the absence of Councilors from their posts; and this has happen'd from Councillors obtaining licences here in England to be absent as aforesaid: We therefore offer, that for the future no such licences be granted till we have been acquainted therewith, and shall have made our report thereupon. [C.O. 324, 10. p. 65.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
293. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following to be laid before H.M. for his directions thereupon. Annexed,
293. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. We have had under our consideration how to make your Majesty's Province of Nova Scotia, of use and advantage to this Kingdom, and have thereupon discours'd with sevl. people well acquainted in those parts, some of whom are lately come from thence; Whereupon we humbly take leave to represent, That Nova Scotia may be made very advantagious to this Kingdom by the production of Naval Stores, which may be had in great quantity's there, and by a plentiful Fishery upon that coast, if the proper methods be taken; But before we offer anything of that matter to your Majesty, we shall humbly take leave to make some observations upon the state of Nova Scotia. When the Expedition against that Province was undertaken, Col. Nicholson had Instructions from her late Majesty, 8th March, 170 9/10, signifying Her pleasure that such persons in the several Governments on the Continent of America, who should contribute to the reduction of Port Royal, etc., then belonging to ye enemy, shou'd have the preference, both with regard to the soil and trade of the country, when reduc'd, to any other of H.M. subjects; this having been made known in the several Governments, the people readily and chearfully came in, undertook the Expedition and conquer'd the place. When Col. Nicholson went over Governor of Nova Scotia in 1713, he had a letter from her late Majesty, signifying Her pleasure that he shou'd permit and allow such of the French as had any lands or tenements in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, and are willing to stay there, to retain and enjoy the said lands and tenements, or else to sell the same, if they shou'd rather choose to remove elsewhere. But by the 12th Article of the Treaty of Peace, there is an absolute cession of Nova Scotia or Accadie, with it's ancient boundaries, in which Cape Breton was formerly comprehended; and of the inhabitants thereof, to the Crown of Great Britain. We are inform'd, that there were about 500 French familys in Nova Scotia, amounting in the whole to about 2,500 persons. That all these, except two familys, had oblig'd themselves to remove to Cape Breton upon the threats of two French Officers, that they should be treated as rebels in case they did not. And we find by a letter from Monsr. de Pontchartrain to Monsr. d'Iberville the French Minister here, that the French had demanded some time the last summer, the term of a year to remove their persons, corn, cattle etc. to Cape Breton, and liberty to build vessels in Nova Scotia for that purpose, and to receive from France tackle and other furniture for equipping ye said vessels, and permission to sell their habitations, and to leave letters of attorney for that purpose. Upon which, we take leave to observe, that if these sevl. demands are granted, the consequence thereof will be that it will entirely defeat the settlemt. of that valuable country; for if they are allow'd to carry away their black cattle, of which they have about 5,000 heads, there will be none left for breed or fresh provisions to be had there; and to supply that Province with such cattle from New England, the nearest place, wou'd be so expensive, as to render it almost impracticable. 'Tis true, by the 14th Article of the Treaty of Peace, the French are allow'd to remove themselves with their moveable effects, to any other place they think fit within a year; But we are inform'd by Col. Vetch, your Majesty's Governor of that Province, that the French never made that demand in the time limitted; nor would they have done it at all, had they not been threaten'd as aforesaid. How far this is consistent with the Treaty, is humbly submitted to your Majesty. We take leave to make one observation more which is, that if the French are allow'd to remove from Nova Scotia to Cape Breton, the consequence will be that Nova Scotia will be left entirely destitute of inhabitants (unless it be speedily settled by your Majy's. subjects; which we shall have occasion hereafter to mention) there being none but French and Indians, except the British garrison at Annapolis Royal, and as these French have intermarry'd with the Indians, by which and their being of one religion, they have a mighty influence over them, so it is not to be doubted but that they will carry along with them to Cape Breton both the Indians and their trade, which is very considerable. And as the accession of such a number of inhabitants to Cape Breton will make it at once a very populous Colony, so it is to be consider'd that 100 of the French who were born upon the Continent, and are perfectly acquainted with ye woods, can march upon snow shoes, and understand the use of birch-cannoes, are of more value and service than five times their number of raw men, newly come from Europe, so their skill in the Fishery, as well as the cultivating the soil, must inevitably make Cape Breton, by such an accession of people, the most powerfull Colony the French have in America, and of ye greatest danger and damage to all ye British Colonies, as well as the trade of Great Britain; For we are inform'd that there is now at Cape Breton about 500 families, besides a garrison of seven Companys; that they are fortifying that Island very considerably, especially at two places, the one call'd Louisburg, and the other St. Anne; Upon which they have labour'd for these two summers past, with the utmost diligence having the assistance, not only of the garrison, ye inhabitants and a considerable number of people from Canada, but also of three ships of war, which carryed them all sorts of stores, and remain'd with them all ye summer, and are all winter to help forward the fortifications. These fortifications at Cape Breton will be a continual check to Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, and they may from thence at any time, not only protect their own trade and fishery, there, but also annoy ours, and our settlements in the abovesaid places, whenever they think proper. If therefore the French are allow'd to carry away their black cattle, sheep and hogs, of wch. they have great numbers, Cape Breton wou'd be stocked at once, which cou'd not be done other ways in many years. Besides, the agreableness of the soil and climate to those creatures (being the same they were bred in) will very much contribute to their healthfulness and fruitfulness, which cou'd not be in sevl. years expected from those transported from France. In consideration of the foregoing reasons, we humbly offer that it will be for your Majesty's service, your Majesty's orders shou'd be sent to Nova Scotia, directing the Commander in Chief there, to use his endeavours to persuade the French inhabitants to remain, and that he give all fitting encouragement to such as are willing to stay, and will take the oaths to your Majesty. As the French did elapse the time limited by the forementioned 14th Article, for carrying off their moveable effects; we are humbly of opinion, that in case they do determine to remove, your Majesty may forbid their carrying off their cattle and corn, of wch. they have plenty there. As this Colony may be made very advantagious as aforesaid, by the Fishery, and by Naval Stores, we humbly conceive it may be necessary that the fishermen have some protection by a fort and settlement somewhere on the coast between Cape Sables and the Gutt of Canceau; for without that the Fishery must be carry'd on, as it now is, to great disadvantage; the New England men that catch their fish on the coast of Nova Scotia, being forc'd for want of protection to carry their fish to New England to cure, by wch. means a quarter or a third part of their lading is spoil'd before that is done. We have also consider'd the petition of several disbanded officers, soldiers and others, referr'd to us by your Majesty's Order in Council, of 6th Dec. last, praying to be settled on some uninhabited lands lying between Sagadehoc and St. Croix, which according to their proposal cannot be done but at a very great expence. But before we can be able to lay before your Majty. what we may have to offer in relation to settlements in Nova Scotia and on these lands, and the necessary measures for securing and peopling those places, we think it may be necessary, that an Engineer, and a Surveyor be sent over to make a survey of all that coast, in order to the finding out the most advantagious places for making such settlements, and for erecting a fort, not only for protecting our fishery, but for the securing those parts from the powerfull settlements at Cape Breton; and that another person well skill'd in Naval Stores be appointed to survey ye woods and inland country, that your Majty. may have a perfect account, what trees there are proper for timber, masts and making of tar; and what land there is proper for raising of hemp. We further humbly represent, that ye persons to be imployed in the foremention'd surveys, may be such as are not afterwards to be imploy'd in building the Fort, in case your Majesty shall think it proper to be done, or in manageing the settlements to be made there; that they may have no views of private advantage, by the report they shall make. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 170–183.]
March 18.
London.
294. [Mr. Shirif] to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to questions put him by the Board relating to Nova Scotia. Being in these parts, att most these four years bygone, I made itt part of my bussiness to gett acquaintance with most of the inhabitants, etc. Itt was with abundance of reluctancy that a great many of them, especially some of the principall amongst them whom I have seen cry, resolved upon going etc. If it is possible to prevaile upon them to stay, itt will certainly be of considerable advantage to that Collny., and to those other Plantations and Great Brittain etc., but if otherways very detrimentall, for the garrison will suffer extreamly, for (1) they designed to transport all their cattle, etc. to Cape Breton, so that there will not be a bitt of provisions to be gott upon any account whatsomever. (2) The Indians of these parts, who are most in their favr. by frequent marriages and other accots. will be irreconcialable and if ever warr breaks out, a perpetual plague to that Collny., as well as to that of New England, whereas if the French be encouraged, there may be hopes of gaining these savages in time by good wages to his Britannick Majesties interest. Otherways no Englishman will almost hazard himself to settle in these parts. (3) By their going, they will very much strengthen Cape Breton, etc. (4) Itt would be very necessary that English familys were encouraged to go there, where the[y] may with safety settle as long as there is a good understanding, amongst the English, French and savages, when there would great advantages accrue to our English Nation by their dilligent improvemt. of the fishing trade on that coast, especially on the Eastern Shore, where if there were a computation made of the codfish taken by the New England vessells itt would not be found much less than 40 or £50,000 pr. annum etc. The inhabitants could catch four to one that those from New England do, because they have 100 leagues to carry them to dry, whereas those yt. live upon the coast have the opportunity of several good harbours to make and cure their fish, besides the advantage of fishing there allmost the whole year round, wch. makes itt much preferable to Newfoundland in that respect, etc. And in the proper seasons of the year, there are plenty of herrings, bass, salmon, whales etc. And as to the inland commoditys these countrys do equally yeild them to any of the Eastren or Northly Countrys of Europe, particularly pitch, tarr, rozin, boards, masts and other Navall Stores, as likewise furrs, hemp, flax and grain of all sorts, if industriously sought after, and its probable may be brought sooner to perfection by the French remaining in the country, who would furnish with provisions the English who incline after ye fishing trade, etc. Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 24th March, 17 14/15 3 pp. Enclosed,
294. i. Testimonial by six deputies representing the inhabitants of Nova Scotia, that the whole country has been in profound peace since Lt. Governor Thomas Caulfeild arrived in 1711, etc. We have never been so content under any Government, etc. If it were not that we naturally cannot refuse the grace and favours which our good Most Christian King offers us, we should choose to live and die under his government, etc. Six Signatures. 27th Aug., 1714 (N.S.). Copy. French. 1 p. Overleaf,
294. ii. Certificate that preceding is true, according to the declaration of all the inhabitants made to us in response to our enquiries for any complaints of the Governor, etc. Annapolis Royall, 30th Aug. (N.S.), 1714. Signed, (Capts.) La Ronde Denis, De Pensen. Copy. French. ½ p. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 96, 96 i.]
March 18.
Portsmo.
295. Some of the Council of New Hampshire to George Vaughan. Were an assembly sitting you might possibly have full powers sent you to act as agent in behalf of the Province as you formerly had, but we are at present waiting H.M. pleasure concerning us being of opinion the Govr. will not call an assembly untill he receives H.M. commands, so that we ye subscribers tho we can't impower you in behalf of the Province yet being six of eight wch. ye Councill now consists of, desire you to represent the state of this Province before the Lords Commissioners of Trade, etc. Particularly we pray Lt. Governour Usher may have his quietus wch. he said he had often writt to England for, he complains his office is a burthen to him and ye people think a burthen to them so 'tis pity but both were eased. Since ye beginning of this letter ye post is come in advice's us that the Governour has received a King's Proclamation via N. York that all Govers. etc. continue in their places till further order, so that ye Charter Gentn. of ye Massachusets quitt ye Governmt. and H.E. the Governour reassumes it who is to be wth. us and call an assembly some time in April. Mr. Addington is lately dead as well as Mr. Story, and we are this day going to the funerall of Mr. Coffin, etc. Signed, Wm. Vaughan, Nathaniel Weare, Robert Eliot, Richd. Waldron, John Plaisted. (Mr. Hanking was prevented by a storm of comeing up to sign.) Endorsed, Recd. Read 19th May, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 37.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
296. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. Read 22nd March, 17 14/15. 1 p. Enclosed,
296. i. Petition of merchants concerned in the trade and fishery of Newfoundland to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. The season of the year being now come for sending ships thither, we are of opinion that it is absolutely necessary for the improvement of our trade and fishery there, that the survey of those parts yeilded by the French, already begun by Capt. Taverner, should be perfected with the utmost diligence. It wou'd be of great use to us to make public the map of St. Peters which he transmitted hither in October, together with so much of his report as informs us of the coasts, bays, harbours and fishing grounds, so far as he has proceeded, and with which our mariners and fishermen are at present altogether unacquainted, etc. Recommend Capt. Taverner to be continued and supported there. 16th March, 17 14/15. Signed, Sam. Shepheard, Alex. Cairnes, Robt. Heysham, John Burridge, John Lamber, Solomon Merret, Jno. Rudge. Copy. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 81, 81 i.; and 195, 6. pp. 57–59.]
March 20.
St. James's.
297. H.M. Warrant granting to Gregory Gougeon, a naturalised subject, and the nearest heir within H.M. dominions, a small plantation in New York formerly belonging to Elias Cothonneau. (Elias being an alien and dying without issue, as also his brother William, the said land was escheated to the Crown.) Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 124, 125.]
March 21.
St. James's.
298. H.M. Warrant revoking the patent of John Floyer and appointing Richard Carter Attorney General of Barbados, with a proviso obliging him to actual residence there. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 121, 122.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
299. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose copy of Mr. Gossalin's letter, March 14th, q.v. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 53.]
March 22./April 2.
Rio Essequebe Fort Kykoverall.
300. Commandant Vanderheyden Rezen to the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Pr. Vanderheyden Rézen. Endorsed, Read 11th July, 1715. Dutch. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 116, 21. No. 13.]
March 23.
Whitehall.
301. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to March 19th. We have consider'd the Memorial of the Merchants. In relation to the survey of the late French part of Newfoundland, we are of the same opinion as in our letter of the 10th (quoted). But as to the person to be imploy'd, we conceive the Lords Commrs. of the Admiralty, or the Navy Office, are more proper judges of the qualification of such a person. We are further of opinion that it will be of service that all mapps taken or drawn at the public charge be printed for the benefit of navigation. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 59, 60.]
March 24.
Albemarle Street.
302. T. Parkes to Mr. Popple. The Earl of Orkney sends you the enclosed to be laid before the Council of Trade and Plantations the first opportunity etc. Signed, T. Parkes. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 28th March, 1715. Addressed. ½ p. Enclosed,
302. i. List of Council of Jamaica with [? Governor Lord A. Hamilton's] recommendations. v. No. iii. ¾ p.
302. ii. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Earl of Orkney, Jamaica, 10th Dec., 1714. I must confess I did not expect much good of this Assembly, from the time I perceived they had obtained againe a small majority, by the ways and means I have told you before, on ye side of a factious party, however in their first sessions but of three days, which ended in a prorogation to the 18th Jan. next, they have exceeded all former presidents, and sufficiently shewn themselves. Not to be tedious, and to avoid repitition, I only trouble you here with the enclosed copy of my speech to them, and my own and the Councill's address to H.M. Agreed to the prorogation since the Assembly took upon them to exclude me from joyning with them a proceeding as extravagant as new. Mr. Rigby has the whole Minutes of Assembly as well as the Journall of the Councill, transmitted to him in order to lay them before you, and will make all plain to you; By this you will see I have gon to the bottom of the whole matter, and if they want for further explanation by nameing of persons I have don it to you already and will maintaine and support what I have said whenever it is required. If I am not confirmed by a new Patent or by some order from H.M., before this Prorogation is expired, I intend to further prorogue till I know authentickly what is determined in the matter, for under the present uncertainty there is no possibility of my doing anything with this Assembly that can be for H.M. service; for it was given out by the ringleaders when they were together, that I was not only turn'd out, but that you were too out of all your places, and tho' they did not believe this themselves, there were fools enough under their influence that did; which served the present turne in promoting extravagant violence, which I thank God has not in the least discomposed the quiet, and tranquillity of my mind, which a cleer conscience and a sence of haveing don my duty to the best of my understanding, gives me. Ever since the prorogation they have been in close cabal, and a Petition, Remonstrance, or something of that nature is prepared, and subscriptions solicited without admitting the subscribers into the secret, except such as they can fully confide in, more then that it is for the good of their country, I doubt not but in few days to plow with their heifer. If these proceedings are not factious I know not what faction is and I am of opinion, were there grounds for their disatisfaction, the manner of their application can meet with no encouragement from the Governt. without wounding itself. The Councill have two months ago left off contributing to the subsistance of the Companys. We are now above £1,600 out of pockett, on that service and now the whole lyes upon me, and for how long it must continue so I know not. I cannot see the men starve, and starve they must, or disband, and be in all the gaoles of the country, if I should not subsist them, when and how I shall be reimbursed God knows, since 'tis not to be expected till we have a better Assembly, which with reasonable support from home I will undertake to obtain, and set all easy and quiet otherwise it is impossible for me to serve H.M. here. Copy. 2½ pp.
302. iii. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Earl of Orkney. Jamaica, 15th Nov., 1714. The Elections are now all over; and tho' I am unwilling to prejudge of them, there is too much ground to suspect it will still be a troublesom Assembly, there being a small majority of the same kidney the last was of, which they will soon strengthen, by determining controverted elections, by trying the persons and not the cause. The ballance was cast by the Port Royall Election, wch. sends three who would have all been good men, had the inhabitants of the place been left to themselves; but the influence, threats, and unfair proceedings of some, whose duty it was to have acted a far other part, carryed it other ways. Since I have so good an opportunity, I shall plainly, and freely explain to you, from whence all the opposition the publick affairs has met with proceeds, in the first place, the dissatisfyed, who call themselves the Country party, have had no small encouragemt. from the intilligence they have had of my not being supported from home, as I might have expected, consequently gave them hopes of my being recalled. To obtaine which, by seemingly to make it necessary, all supplys for support of Governt. are to be opposed, and the Island represented to be in so low and poor a condition, as not to be able to support the expence of a Captn. Generall, that a Lieutenant Govr. might answer the end better, and who so proper for that, as one of themselves. These are their maxims and views, tho' they cannot own them. These ends cannot be obtained, nor a Governour here made uneasy enough, by the Assembly alone, running into violent proceedings, without a party in the Councill, to underhand support and foment them. Then indeed the prerogative is in danger and Government weake. This has been the case, this the difficulty, I have been strugling with ever since I have been here; and tho' I have spoke my mind freely to some of the Councill and have, in hopes of their reforming, never made any complaint of them at home, nor exerted the power I have of suspending, but if I am to be confirmed in my Commission, there is an absolute necessity of my being strengthened in the Councill, and the proper time for that is, when the nomination of them is made in my Instructions that accompanys the Patent, if this can be brought about, I would propose two men that are now in, should be left out. These are Mr. Chaplain and Coll. Blair, the first is Custos and Chief Magistrate at Port Royall, a cuning subtill fellow, and is intirely under the influence of Mr. P. Beckford, and has all along barefacedly opposed the Governmt. and been most active in electing men of most violent and pernishious principalls; I need but name one Daniel Axtle now againe a member of the Assembly. These two Councellers have been most instrumentall in electing that man, how consistant this is with their duties the world will judge. They are unanimous with others of the Councill, in sensuring that bold step of the last Assembly, in adjourning themselves. This Axtle was violent in it, and declares himself still of the same opinion, if this be acting as Councellers and according to their oaths I have done. Blair is my countryman, and a heavy fellow and little in him and I take his oppossition worse then the others. In short without more support from home, with an Assembly and a party in ye Councill stricking at Government, 'tis impossible for me to carry things here as they ought for H.M. service. What I have said I beleive sufficient to give a true idea how matters stand here, and if any use can be made of it by a representation to the proper Ministers, you may rely on your information. I think I told you before, that I find extracts of my letters, to the board of Trade, have been obtained and transmitted back here, even before I have had any answer to these very letters, 'tis easy to guess from whose interest and favour, but I hope that will faile them now. I hope it will be considered, the stand everything will be at, if directions should not come before ye six months are elapsed. I make myself as easy as I can, if I am continued, I think ye necessity of supporting me in my endeavours to preserve the prerogative (for I know of no other difference between us) appears so plainly, that I cannot fail of it. A little time now will shew, how the Assembly will act. I am resolved to keep steady to ye same maxims I have hitherto governed myself by, the necessity of affairs shall not drive me from any point my duty requires me to maintaine. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 10. Nos. 69, 69 i.–iii.; and (without enclosure i.) 138, 14. pp. 206–214.]
[March 25.]303. Planters and others concerned in Jamaica to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In obedience to the commands of this Honble. Board we do humbly represent as our oppinion, for the better planting, peopling and thereby securing that Island against the insurrections of negroes and invasion of enemys that it be recommended to the Governour, Council and Assembly there to enact, that all persons men and women not above 45 or under 10 years of age shall have their passage paid and be free upon their arrivall there only entering into bonds to the King every man for himself, wife and children not to depart the Island in less than four years unless he or they repay the Publick the money disburs'd for their passage, and then to be at liberty. That all and every such a person be subsisted by such planters as have not white servants in proportion to their number of slaves untill they be otherwise employ'd or provided for by their own consent. That all tracts of land exceeding 100 acres whereof no part is planted or inhabited by any white person be tax'd yearly or surrender'd to the Crown and granted in fee to such persons as will be obliged to settle it in such quantitys as may conduce most to the peopling the Island and encouraging strangers to become fix'd inhabitants. To defray this expence and charge, we hope H.M. will lay a foundation out of something due to the Crown in that country or otherwise as H.M. shall think fit which may encourage the Assembly to pass a law for seven or eight years to apply to this use all the penalties for the deficiencys of white servants in proportion to negroes and cattle which has been ascertain'd by former laws and some now in force in that country. And further for the defraying the said charge and encouraging the settling of white people it is proposed, That all Jews not being Planters and all houses in the towns tennanted or inhabited be tax'd yearly. That the Proprietors of every negro artificer, wherryman, cannoeman or sailor be tax'd for each a certain sum annually and all persons prohibited breeding up any more in any of these imployments for the future, etc. Unless some such means be found out to fix a good number of people in the planting interest it must sink, and the Island be lost to the Nation. Signed, Nicholas Lawes, John Moore, Richd. Rigby and 14 others. Endorsed, Recd. Read 25th March, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 10. No. 68; and 138, 14. pp. 203–206.]
March 25.304. Warrant of Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Henroydah English, Surveyor General of South Carolina, to set out 500 acres of land for the Rev. Gedeon Johnston, etc. Signed, Carteret, Palatin; Ja. Bertie for Beaufort; M. Ashley, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 84.]
March 25.
St. James's.
305. H.M. Commission to William Mathews to be Lieut. General of the Leeward Islands. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 123, 124.]
March 25.
St. James's.
306. H.M. Warrant revoking the patent of Samuel Cox and appointing Richard Woollaston Naval Officer in Barbados, with a clause obliging him to residence. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 126.]
March 25.
Whitehall.
307. Wm. Pulteney, Secry. at War, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers following for their examination and report. Signed, Wm. Pulteney. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read 28th March, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
307. i. Petition of Col. Robert Reading to the King. Petitioner was in command of the (800) Marines at the capture of Port Royal, 1710, etc. Prays to be appointed Governor of Annapolis Royal. French. 1 p.
307. ii. English version of preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 97, 97 i., ii.]
March 25.308. Petty Expenses of the Board of Trade, Stationery, Postage etc. Dec. 25, 1714—March 25, 1715. 4½ pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 183, 185, 187.]
March 26.
St. James's.
309. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Eden. Reply to letter of Sept. 15, 1714. Abstract: We think the number of deputies (four) to be joined with you in determining publick matters, too material a point to be alter'd, but we send you blank deputations, for you to put in such persons' names as you shall think willing to give their attendance, and will be most ready to assist you, etc. We gladly comply with your request in making Mr. Christopher Gale our Chief Justice, etc. We wish you success in the Treaty of Peace with the Indian Captaine, etc. Tho' we are convinc'd that a re-survey of the land in your Province might tend to the advantage both of us and every Planter, yet we think it proper to have that matter a little longer deferr'd, least the peace and quiet of the country shou'd be interrupted, etc. We think it proper to give all due encouragements to such persons as are willing to come to settle among you, and therefore require you to give a liberty to any New England men or others to catch whale, sturgeon or any other Royal Fish upon your coast, during the term of three years, they paying only two deer-skins yearly, etc. Signed, Carteret, Palatin; M. Ashley, J. Danson. Printed, N.C. Col. Rec. II, 175. [C.O. 5, 291. pp. 31, 32.]
March 26.
St. James's.
310. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Eden. It having been represented to us that an Act of Assembly was pass'd in North Carolina, Nov. 1713, that all persons who have taken up any lands there, and have not paid the purchase money for them to us shou'd pay the said purchase money within three months after the date of the said Act, otherwise any other person might lawfully purchase the said land, paying the purchase money to our Receiver General. This law indeed seems plausible and intended for our service (tho' at the same time we think the Assembly need not have made any law relating to the purchase of our lands) but we are given to understand that a very ill use has been made of this law, and under colour thereof several poor persons, who have lost their husbands or fathers, or have otherwise been reduc'd by the late war, and are consequently objects of compassion have for want of the payment of their purchase money at three months end, been dispossess'd and other persons (several whereof are our officers) did pay the purchase mony for the said land with an intention to sell the same at great advantage. If this be the truth of the case, here has been the greatest oppression and fraud imaginable practis'd under colour of law, for by this means the poor people who by the calamities of the war have been render'd incapable to pay the purchase mony within the time limitted have lost their lands, and the rich men by payment of the first purchase money have got possession of the same to their own advantage but to the ruin of several poor widows and orphans. If this appears to be the case we will highly resent it and censure such of our officers who have been concern'd in these ill practices, and we require you strictly to examine this matter and make your report of the truth thereof by the first opportunity. We in the mean time are of opinion that the persons who are turn'd out of their lands by the unjust advantage that has been taken of this law shou'd have their lands restor'd again upon paying back the purchase money with the interest thereof within a year after your receipt of this to those persons who advanc'd the same under colour of that law, and that such persons who by the war have been utterly disabled from paying the purchase money shall be assisted by our publick money, they giving security for paying principal and interest to our Receiver Genl. within three years. And if any difficulties shall happen to arise upon lands having been transferr'd from one to another, so that some parcels of those lands may now be in the possession of persons who have purchas'd bona fide at considerable rates beyond what was the original price of those persons who procur'd this law for obtaining this very advantage, we commend this and all other intricacies that may arise to the Assembly, and we hope they will provide for the same, it being our intention that the poor original purchasers shou'd not be defrauded. Signed, Carteret, Palatin, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 291. pp. 33, 34.]
March 28.
New York.
311. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Not having received any directions from your Lordps. or the present Ministry since H.M. happy accession to the Crown except what was picked up from the wreck of ye Hazard sloop, I am at a loss what to write, only in generall I must inform your Lordps. that by the choice made of Representatives for both Assemblys here I have too much reason to expect little besides confusion in both Provinces. The Jerseys are soe divided about their claimes and titles to lands, that whatever party prevailes in the Assembly will expect to be gratifyed by some Acts in favour of their claimes before they consent to doe anything for the Government. Mr. Cox, who is the sower of sedition, has gott himselfe chosen by these who are linked to him by land purchases on purpose to make confusion, he is indeed capable of nothing else, he has done what in him lay to raise tumults and has hitherto escaped prosecution and punishment by the means of the two infamous officers of the Government, the Attorney General and Secretary. The first of whom I was laid under a necessity of suspending, as your Lordps. will perceive by the inclosed Minutes of Councill, and must immediatly take the same measures with the other or suffer that Government to be trampled upon and stuck. I think my Lords, I may now without a crime speake out, those two with their abetters have acted noe other ways then as they were prompted all along from the other side by a late (fn. 1) Governour of these Provinces, and his Agents on this side, and that very avowedly the people being incessantly threatned, and frightned with his restoration. That fright how groundless soever even at that time had some effect but I thank God it is now over, how far Cox may work upon the insuing Assembly by the means I have already mentioned time will shew. I shall whilst I live retaine a just sence of your Lordps.' justice to me and your endeavours for my reliefe, though for reasons that I cannot dive into they have hitherto proved ineffectual, but as matters stand at present I must conclude it impossible that ye wretched condition of this Government should be any longer overlook'd or neglected at home. For I must with confidence affirm that some men in my station would have made concessions of any kind how prejudicial soever to the intrest of the Crown rather than be reduc'd to that misery that I have groaned under these five years past. If it may be of any service to H.M. or the Publick that I should continue to beg my daily bread of those who take pleasure in my sufferings I submitt with pleasure. I know your Lordps. are of another opinion which encourages me humbly but earnestly to obtest your Lordps. againe to use your endeavours for a settlement here by Act of Parliament as her late Majesty was pleased to direct for I can stake my life and fortunes upon't that never any can be obtain'd on this side but from yeare to yeare and that not halfe sufficient to answer the ordinary and necessary expence of Government, the funds for this last yeare not compleating one halfe of their own scanty allowance. And if ever such a precarious provision is made it must be upon such conditions that a man who has in the least measure the interest of the Crown at heart can never assent to. I shall not further trouble your Lordps. at this time, but as you have been hitherto my most worthy Patrons and Protectors haveing to my knowledge not soe much as in a thought rendred myself unworthy of it, I must most humbly intreat that you'l continue to be soe, etc. P.S. Mr. Mompesson our Cheife Justice is dead. I have commissionated Lewis Morris in his room for these reasons amongst others that he is a sencible honest man, and able to live without a sellary, which they will most certainly never grant to any in that station, at least sufficient to maintain his Clerk. I have in the room of Mr. Griffith granted a Commission to Thomas Gordon Esq. heretofore Chief Justice. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 13th May, Read 21st June, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 88; and 5, 1123. pp. 295–298.]
March 28.
New York.
312. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. This comes by a very poor conveyance; a small sloop to Bristol, so that 'tis doubtfull whether it may reach you. I have been in much perplexity haveing no orders since H.M. arriveal. I hope duplicates may arrive speedily, for the originals must have miscary'd. Mr. Nicholson, who was sent hither with two strange Commissions, is now gone home without executing either for he never came nearer to us than Boston where he remain'd upon assurances of a Commn. for this Government. I am pretty easy as to him for the present folks have no maner of occasion for madmen. It is impossible that the oppressions I have groan'd under here should make no impression on the minds of the present Ministry, especially those who sent me hither; I know their justice and generosity too well to doubt it, so I shall patiently and confidently expect a remedy. I had plants for you from the West Indies, some dy'd in ye boxes by the unexpected cold weather, etc. Sir, I must now earnestly recommend my poor affairs to your assistance, I hope, the time is come when I may have it in my power to repay the obligations I have ever had to you, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 16th May, Read 21st June, 1715. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 89; and 5, 1123. pp. 299, 300.]
March 28./April 8.
Rio Essequebe Fort Kykoverall.
313. Commandant Vanderheyden Rézen to the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Pr. Vanderheyden Rézen. Endorsed, Read 11th July, 1715. Dutch. 3 pp. [C.O. 116, 21. No. 14.]
March 28.314. Copy of Minutes of Council of New Jersey. Enclosed in Col. Hunter's letter of March 28, 1715. Endorsed, Recd. 13th May, Read 21st June, 1715. 5½ pp. [C.O. 5, 970. No. 171.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
315. Mr. Pringle to Mr. Popple. Encloses following to be laid before the Board. Signed, Ro. Pringle. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 30th March, 1715. ½ p. Enclosed,
315. i. Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Admiralty Office, 26th March, 1715. In answer to your letter of the 19th instant, with one from the Council of Trade and Plantations (v. March 14), we do acquent you that as many inconveniencies have happened by putting the ships of warr intirely under the disposall of the Governours, soe we do not doubt but those inconveniencies occasioned the leaving out that clause in the Governours' commission, etc. (v. March 14). As the ships from time to time sent to the Plantations, are particularly appointed to the imediate service of them we do by our Instructions to their Commanders direct them to employ the said ships in such manner as may be most for the service of the Islands, or Government, and therein to advise with the Governours, and follow their directions which is in our opinion, the proper method to keep them to a strict performance of that necessary duty, which is expected from them, and so prevent their being otherwise employed at the will of the Governours. Signed, Orford, G. Byng, Geo. Dotington. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 10. Nos. 70, 70 i.; and 138, 14. pp. 214–216.]
March 28.
Whitehal.
316. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. Reply to March 16. The Council of Trade and Plantations know not of any rule relating to the half salary [of absent Governors], but what is contain'd in the inclos'd copy of an Instruction, wch. is the same to all Governors. As to the allowances made to Governors for their transportation, they presume that the minute by Lord Godolphin may be found in the Treasury Books, if any such there were, and that it may be found in the Admiralty Books whether any of the said Governors had allowances of tunnage, or no. [C.O. 29, 13. pp. 298, 299.]
March 28.317. Marquis of Wharton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Desires dispatch in report on case of Humphrey Sheppard of St. Kitts (v. 23rd Feb.) etc. Signed, Wharton. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 31st March, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 44.]
March 28.318. Earl of Orford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Similar request. Signed, Orford. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 44, i.]
March 28.
St. James's.
319. H.M. Warrant renewing the appointment of William Cock as Secretary of Virginia. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 127.]
March 28.
Virginia.
320. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. By the Solebay man of war, I had the honour to recieve from your Lordships' Board a letter of 19th Aug. relating to the French trade, and have a particular satisfaction in finding my proceedings here so agreeable to the sentiments and commands of their Excellencys and the Lords Justices; for since the conclusion of the Peace, I have caused to be siezed and condemned two vessells for trading with the French Islands and importing from thence wines of the growth of Europe; And an officer of the Customs having contrary to my express orders given leave to the master of a French ship putt in here by stress of weather to land his whole loading, and to dispose of a considerable part of his cargo, consisting of cotton and indico, I so soon as I heard thereof, put a stop to the delivery of the goods, and not only obliged the French supercargo to transport hence all his merchandize in British ships bound for London (his own being intirely disabled from going to sea again) but I so represented the ill consequence of such a practice in the Customhouse officers, that the Surveyor Generall here thought fitt to suspend the person who granted that illegal permitt. The scheme I communicated to your Lordships in my last letter for improving H.M. Quitt Rents is likely to answer fully my expectation; and 'tis with much pleasure that I can acquaint your Lordships that this country now feels the good effect of the new regulation of their tobacco trade; the publick credit which was one main end thereof being now raised above 200 per cent. My new method likewise for guarding our frontiers, and bringing the Indians under a regulation for the better security thereof, succeeds hitherto so well, that we have not had the least mischief done this year and half, to our outward inhabitants; but it is of such a nature, and the people of this country are generally such supine favourers of all new attempts, that I must bestir myself till I perfect the design; and for that purpose I am going out upon another expedition into the woods, where before my return I expect to meet the Deputys of three or four Nations of remote Indians, and hope to be able in my next to give a particular account of their peaceable disposition towards H.M. subjects, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 27th June, 1715, Read 16th May, 1716. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1317. No. 28; and 5, 1364. pp. 338–341.]
March 29.
St. James's.
321. Order of King in Council, approving Instructions of Governor Lord Orkney. (March 16). Signed, William Blathwayt. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1342. No. 1.]
March 29.
St. James's.
322. Order of King in Council. Approving John Hart as Governor of Maryland. The Council of Trade and Plantations are to take care that security be given, as March 4. Signed, William Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. 4th April, Read 5th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 65; and 5, 727. pp. 446, 447.]
March 31.323. Petition of Merchants of Bideford trading to Newfoundland, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. All Newfoundland doth undoubtedly belong to the Brittish Crown by antient right, etc. The first settlement of the French was about 50 years since, but they never had any right thereto. The Act 10 and 11 W. III. gives to fishing ships the preferance in the choice of all stages, except only where English subjects inhabiting, or fishing there, could claim a prior right. The French having never had any right to any settlements, or stages, there, and being oblidged to quitt, the benefitt of these settlements, or at least the stages, must accrew entirely to the fishing ships, if they please to choose them. But the present Governor of Placentia, and his friends, and the French, have confederated together, to deprive Great Brittain of the said settlements and stages, and imposed on the fishery ships the last season, a tribute for useing the stages in Placentia Bay, and pretended that such stages belonged to the Governor, or his friends, by purchase from the French, and the best bidder whether English or French, hath hitherto been admitted to such stages; and those persons threaten, if the French shall not use such stages, that they will gett inhabitants to repurchase the same, and so either way will deprive Brittish ships of any use of them. But we hope such invasions of the rights of the Brittish Nation and ships, will find no encouragemt; If what was possessed by the French, be vested in inhabitants, Great Brittain can reap no benefitt therefrom; the inhabitants are supplyed with provisions, tobacco, rum, sugar, rice, etc. from New England and the Colonys of America, and what proffitt they make by catching and cureing fish, is spent in Newfoundland; besides inhabitants, on the least encouragemt., will so encrease in number, as soon to be sufficient to carry on the whole fishery by themselves; and the whole employ of this Island being fishing there can be no Freshmen among them, to be bred up sailors, or if there were, Great Brittain would gain nothing by having sailors bred for its plantations abroad. The breed of sailors in this trade for the service of Great Brittain, can only be in the fishing ships; and by them only can any proffitt, by catching and cureing fish at Newfoundland, center in Great Brittain. Pray that Lt. Governor Moody may be restrained from putting in execution the designs aforesaid, etc. Some persons out of private views have proposed the building of more forts on the Island. This would do more mischief, then good to Great Brittain. The more Governrs. the more our fishermen would be molested, and oppressed by them; and the more forts, the greater prottection would be for the inhabitants, who increase too fast already, to the prejudice of Great Brittain. The fishing ships are dispersed in so many different harbours, that men of warr only can prottect them. These Floating Castles are the only security for such a fishery, and the less expended in forts and garrisons, the greater number of men of war may be allowed. Pray that an ample and early prottection may be granted every year to this glorious trade, by a sufficient number of men of warr, etc. Signed, Cha. Davie, Mayor, and 32 others. Endorsed, Recd. Read 31st March, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 83.]
[? March.]
St. James's.
324. Copy of H.M. Instructions to Governor Lowther. Signed, G. R. Undated. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 101–117.]

Footnotes

1 [? Clarendon. Ed.]