America and West Indies
April 1715

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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141-161

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'America and West Indies: April 1715', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 141-161. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73960 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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April 1715

[April 1.]325. Col. Robert Reading to the Council of Trade and Plantations. (v. March 25). On arriving at Port Royall, at a Council of War, no one then present being acquainted with a convenient spott for landing the forces, Memorialist voluntarily offered to General Nicholson, to go on shore next morning early with 50 of his grenadiers to reconnoitre. This he did, taking with him Col. Rednap, the Engineer of New England, and having fixed upon a convenient place, posted a party to secure it. Memorialist return'd on board to give the Genll. an acct., and in his way after sevll. hours being on shore met Coll. Vetch who was Adjutant General going to land on the contrary side of the River to that on which the Fort stands, pretending it would be necessary to have a body of men there for fear the Indians should disturb our boats as they passed by that shore, to supply our camp with what was necessary. By this stratagem he obtain'd an order from the Genll. to have 2 regimts. with new England Colls. at their heads to land with him for tho he had no other post then that of Adjutant General yet the Cols. before mentioned submitted to his orders and were commanded by him. 'Tis humbly presumed that the reason of Mr. Vetch's thus separating from the rest of the troops was owing to a dispute betwixt Memorialist and him relating to command for he was of opinion that as Adjutant General he had a right to command any Col., but being assured that if he pretended to give any directions of what kind soever otherwise then by way of orders from the Genll., he might have reason to repent it, he took the warning and left the siege, to enjoy the pleasure of his distinct command. After about 12 days seige, the Garrison sent to capitulate, and your Memorialist [was] sent into the Fort to agree upon the Articles of Surrender which he made accordingly and return'd therewith to the Camp for Mr. Nicholson's approbation, upon which a Councill of Warr was appointed the next day and Mr. Vetch sent for to attend and the terms of surrender rattified etc. Till that was done Mr. Vetch never sett foot within our camp, or was neare the besieged, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 1st April, 1715. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 98.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
326. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. is pleased to order that you forthwith lay before the House of Commons an account of the fishing ships and saicks imployed at Newfoundland from Christmas 1708 to Christmas 1714, as also a state of the trade of Newfoundland Christmas 1708–1714, with all memorials and representations relating thereunto, unto the cession of Cape Britton to France, and also a representation of the Fishery and trade of the Island of St. Peters yielded on the peace from France to Great Brittain. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 4th April, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 84; and 195, 6. p. 83.]
[April 4.]327. Certificate by Samuel Cooke and John Davis that Mary Maillard and Aronot Guichard are the daughters of Francois Muniee, owner of a plantation in the French quarter of St. Kitts, and have been refugees among the English for several years. 20th May, 1713. Signed, Sam. Crooke, J. Davis. Seals. Endorsed, Recd. Read 4th April, 1715. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 45.]
[April 4.]328. Certificate by Joseph Estridge, that the four sons of Francis Guichard were loyal refugees amongst the English at St. Kitts, etc. 21st April, 1713. Signed, Jos. Estridge. Seal. Endorsed as preceding. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 46.]
[April 4.]329. Certificate by Samuel Crooke. Confirms preceding. 23rd April, 1713. Signed, Sam. Crooke. Seal. Same endorsement. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 47.]
[April 4.]330. Copy of a grant of a plantation in the French quarter of St. Kitts, by Governor Douglas to Humphrey Sheppard for 3 years. 15th July, 1712. Signed, Walter Douglas. Endorsed, Recd. Read 4th April, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 48.]
[April 4.]331. Proofs in support of Humphrey Sheppard's petition (v. Feb. 23). Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 49.]
April 5.
Love Lane.
332. Joseph Martyn to Mr. Popple. Owing to the gout, cannot give the Board his thoughts upon the resettlement of St. Kitts, etc. Signed, Joseph Martyn. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 7th April, 1715. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 51.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
333. Mr. Popple to Archibald Cummings. Requests an account of the fishing and sack ships that went last year to Newfoundland, and the quantity of fish made, by to-morrow morning without fail, etc. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 84.]
April 7.
London.
334. Mr. Cumings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to preceding. Refers to the difficulties and charges he has been att to obtain the information required. But if the ships trading thither were obleidged to enter and clear by making a report of ther import and export, it would be a means to give your Lordships annually a perfect acco. of all the fishery and trade carried on there and how farr an illegall trade is carried on there to the prejudice of Great Brittain, etc. Off fishing ships there was in that country last year about 85 saill, whereof above 50 fished to the southward of St. Johns. Off such ships 45 from most parts of Europe, but not 40 loaded the fishery failing. Off trading ships of Brittain and the Plantations, 20 saill. Off fish catched by ships, inhabitants and by boats about 115,000 qlls. and 500 tuns of train oyll being made by 1,000 boats by computation. Not half the quantity catched as usuall. Wee compute one half of the fish to be taken by the inhabitants and by boats annually. 94 sail gone this year mostly on the fishing acco. and all from Brittain, etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Endorsed, Recd. Read 7th April, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
334. i. Account of the fishery and number of inhabitants in Newfoundland, 1714. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 86, 86 i.; and 195, 6. pp. 85–88.]
April 7.
Boston, New England.
335. Richard Rooke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Amongest ye varieteyes of enorimites comitted in New England in the Colloney of Cannette-Cutt thear is great quantities of copper halpennies and farthings coynd thare under the pretence of having obtain'd liberty from ye Crowne; which pretence I believe for to be erroneous. Tharefore I thought it my duty for to acquaint your Lordships, etc. Prays for a commission to be H.M. Collector of Customs in Boston or in " aney other of H.M. Plantations in a Mirricaye," etc. Signed, Richd. Rooke. Endorsed, Recd. 1st July, Read 6th Sept., 1715. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 5 1265. No. 6.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
336. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 13th April, Read 28th July, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
336. i. Mr. Cumings to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Since the Peace the Commissioners of the Navy have thought fitt to dismiss the Surveyor of H.M. Woods in New England. Such an officer is of greater consequence to the publick service in time of peace, owing to increase of settlements. About 7 years agoe wee had a mast ship taken by the French from America which he valued at £40,000, butt the loss wass more to us by reason the French King could not have fitted out his western Navy if he had not taken those masts, etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 50, 50 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 914. p. 65.]
April 9.
N. York.
337. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. Sending duplicates (of March 28) by this to Holland I could not omitt giveing you the trouble of my thanks for all your favours and to intreat your assistance in your way to Mr. Strahan in his applications for me. I believe you'll do it with a better heart then formerly because with greater hopes of successe. It will be hard if I am the only unhappy man of one side, be it as it will I am perfectly easy in my mind (wch. was lately much otherways) if I should be reduc'd to beg my bread. I have been oblig'd to turn out that vile fellow Griffith the Att. Genl. of ye Jerseys, who has been all along an impudent tool of Ld. Cl—and that noisy fool Coxes, has betrayed the publick service so avowedly that I veryly believ'd he had orders from home to do so. Mr. Talbot has incorporated the Jacobites in ye Jerseys under the name of a Church in order to sanctify his sedition and insolence to ye Government. That stale pretence is now pretty much discuss'd. And I am easy and shall make them so in spite of themselves. Cox Griffith and Basse are his main props. If ye Society take not more care for ye future then has been taken hitherto in ye choice of their missionaries, instead of establishing Religion they'll destroy all Government and good maners, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 16th May, Read 21st June, 1715. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 90; and 5, 1123. pp. 300, 301.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
338. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Enquires for the answers to Heads of Enquiry and Instructions by the Commodore of the convoy to Newfoundland last year etc. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 89.]
April 9.339. General Walter Hamilton to Mr. Popple. Promises report upon the settlement of St. Kitts on Wednesday, etc. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. Read 11th April, 1715. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 52.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
340. List of papers and minutes laid before the House of Commons (v. April 2nd) by the Council of Trade and Plantations, relating to Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Cape Breton etc. 7½ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 100, 101; and 218, 1. pp. 185–200.]
April 9.
Admty. Office.
341. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following for the information of the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read 11th April, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
341. i. Captain Stewart, H.M.S. Albrough (?=Aldeburgh), Falmouth, to Mr. Burchett. 4th April, 1715. Concludes: Here has several ships been put in by distress of weather, and amongst them a French ship from St. Malo's bound for Newfoundland, who informs me that there is above 40 sails of ships going this year from that port to Cape Britton. Signed, C. Stewart. Copy. ½ p. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 102, 102 i.; and 218, 1. pp. 200, 201.]
April 9.342. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their opinion to be laid before H.M. Signed, James. Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. Read 11th, April, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
342. i. Petition of Col. Robert Reading to the King. A repetition of April 2, q.v. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 103, 103 i.; and 218, 1. p. 202.]
April 11.
Admiralty Office.
343. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to April 9th. Captain Leake has not returned any answer, etc. I have this day wrote to him at the Bath, to send an account forthwith both to your office and to this, and to give a reason why he has hitherto neglected the doing it. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read 12th April, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 88; and 195, 6. p. 90.]
April 11.
Whitehall.
344. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to April 9th etc. We understand H.M. has appointed Col. Vetch Governor of Annapolis Royal, and see no reason to induce us to advise H.M. removing him, etc. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 205.]
April 11.
St. James's.
345. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Col. William Rhett, Receiver General of South Carolina. We having formerly agreed to give £500 towards the building of a Church which we are informed the inhabitants of your part of our Province are now a building in Charles Town; we take this opportunity to write to you by the Rev. Mr. Johnston, Rector of the said Church, and do hereby require you to pay by such persons as are appointed for that purpose £500 etc., which we hope will encourage others, chearfully to contribute to so good, useful and charitable a design. We have heard that Mr. Johnston has been in a more especial manner careful in procuring by all means the peace, unity and tranquillity of that part of the Church amongst you, which was committed to his care; and since his arrival here, we have been daily sencible of his endeavors and good offices, for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign parts; for which reasons we are willing to give him all due encouragemt. and do therefore hereby require you to pay unto him yearly £100 during his residence in his parish of Charlestown, and all the arrears due to him for the Assize sermons he preached from Oct., 1708–March, 1713, etc. Signed, Carteret, Palatin, (James) Bertie for B [eaufort], M. Ashley, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 85.]
April 11.346. Patent from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina appointing William Hodgson a Casique and Landgrave of Carolina. Latin. [C.O. 5, 290. pp. 86–88.]
April 11.
St. James's.
347. Warrant from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Hemoydah English to set out 5,000 acres of land for Landgrave William Hodgson. Signed, Carteret, Palatin, Ja. Bertie for Beaufort, Maurice Ashley, J. Danson, J. Colleton. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 94.]
April 12.348. General Walter Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. Read 13th April, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
348. i. Proposals for the settlement and disposall of that part of St. Christophers formerly belonging to the French. It will be the interest of the Crown, British commerce and security to St. Kitts etc. to dispose of these lands (about 20,000 manurable acres, besides salt ponds and other lands of little value) at such easie rates as to incourage the most speedie vigorous and effectual settlement etc. £3 sterling per acre for an absolute sale or a quit rent of 4s. or 5s. per acre that country money will be reasonable. The taking or plundering of three of the principall of the Leeward Islands the last warr is chiefly owing to the desertion of them by the owners of small plantations and other poore inhabitants; and therefore it will be of great consequence not only to take all proper measures to have the said Island well peopled but likewise to retaine them there. This would probably be effected by granting 2,500 acres next the sea in six acre plantations to poore people gratis with provision that they shall never pass to any person possest of any more land in that Island. Each holding to furnish a white man bearing arms. The remainder of the 20,000 acres to be divided into plantations of 300 to 50 acres, obliged to provide one white man equipt with arms for every 50 acres, and for every 100 acres one trooper etc. It will probably be contended that this part of the Island is not lyable to the payment of the dutie of 4½ p.c. of all the produce of the same exported as the English part and the other Leeward Islands are in regard that it was then under the jurisdiction of the Crown of France and therefore not bound by the Acts of the Assemblyes that imposed that duty; it would therefore be convenient to avoid disputes to reserve this duty to the Crowne by their grants besides the quitt-rents. Great care ought to be taken to prevent the depopulating the other Leeward Islands; the six acre plantations might be granted only to settlers from other parts etc., who should be obliged to improve a proportion of their land within a time limitted, etc. This part of the Island to be divided into parishes and glebes allowed for Ministers, etc. A proportionate number of representatives and Councilors to be appointed from this part. To encourage the speedy building of the towns of Basseterre French Sandy Point and White Flag Bay, the ground to be laid out for building tenements and granted gratis to applicants who must build within 18 months, etc. 1¾ closely written pp. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 53, 53 i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 12. pp. 190, 191.]
[April 13.]
Windsor.
349. Copy of H.M. Warrant confirming a grant of land in St. Kitts to Elizabeth Bowden, for an additional term of 2½ years, 14th Aug., 1707. Countersigned, Godolphin. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 21st April, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 55.]
April 13.
Boston in New England.
350. Address of the Ministers of Christ in H.M. Provinces of the Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire to the King. Tho' the great distance of your American Dominions where the hand of Heaven hath placed us from the Throne did not allow us to be so early with our congratulations of your Majesty's happy accession to it; yet we beg liberty to assure your Majesty we now do it, with as great a sense of duty, loyalty, zeal and joy, as inspire the breasts of the best of your subjects. We give thanks to the Most High God our Saviour who has placed your Majesty on the Throne over us. The refreshing rays of your Government like those of the sun reach your most distant Dominions. Both Hemispheres feel the comfort, and share in the joys of it. Your Majesty has here in America some hundreds of thousands of subjects who triumph in the hope of your Royal favour to them. But none more than your loyal New English Colonys. The name of the great King William was ever dear to us beyond expression; but there is nothing by which his Immortal memory is more endeared to us than in the provision by him made for the succession of the Crown in the Protestant line, and in the serene House of Hanover. No words of ours can be strong enough to express the sense we have of the Divine goodness to us in the peacefull accession of your Majesty to the Throne, for which unspeakable blessing we and our united brethren still pour'd out unto the God of Heaven, by whom Kings reign, our most hearty as well as our most publick supplications. And now that God hath answered our prayers, and filled our mouths with praise, your Majesty will be graciously pleased to believe concerning us that we shall ever continue to pray for the life of the King, and of his Son, and to inculcate those principles of loyalty and subjection, the practice whereof may always bespeak your paternal regards to us, among the rest of your dutifull people. Our humble petition to your most excellent Majesty is, that while our united Brethren in Great Britain receive those marks of the Royal benignity, which their signall zeal for your most Illustrious House might give them leave to expect from the best of Princes; and while your Majesty's generous tenderness for good men of different perswasions is in so princely a manner exemplifyed in your German territorys, your Majesty will give us also leave to promise ourselves your most gracious protection in the enjoyment of our religious liberty's as well as civil, which have been granted to us by the Royal Charter of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and by subsequent laws that have had the Royal Assent unto them, and for the sake whereof our Fathers with great expence and no small hazard and hardship subdued this vast wilderness, and made a valuable addition to your Majesty's Dominions. We beg leave also to profess before your Majesty, and unto all the world, that notwithstanding our different apprehensions from those of the Church of England, yet the very few among us of that communion and form of worship as they now do, so shall by the Grace of God ever receive from us all that Christian and brotherly respect which the spirit of Christianity, and the most universall charity doth direct unto. May it please the Eternal King of Kings to make your Majesty his glorious instrument for asserting and maintaining His true religion in the world; may your Majesty live long to sway the Imperial scepter over the British Nations in righteousness, and extend the clemencys thereof unto the American Churches, than which there can be none more sincerely devoted to your Majesty and your Royal Family, and more heartily desirous of conformity to the doctrines and maxims of the religion which our glorious Redeemer hath revealed to us. And may the God of Heaven build your Majesty a sure House, whereof it pleaseth Him so graciously to seem to speak for a great while to come, in the person of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and his illustrious issue; as the Lord His God did give to David a lamp in Jerusalem to set up his son after him, and to establish his people. Signed, Increase Mather, Moderator. In the name of the Ministers in the two provinces. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 752. Nos. 7; and (duplicate) 8.]
April 14.
Whitehal.
351. Mr. Popple to Sir E. Northey. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire, that you wou'd reconsider your report of July 14, 1713, upon an Act of Jamaica for the quieting of possessions etc., and let them have your further thoughts thereupon. For that the not passing of that Act, and thereby keeping the inhabitants' titles to their lands precarious, has been one of the occasions of the difficulties the Government has met with there, and a great discouragement to the Planters, so that it seems to their Lordsps. absolutely necessary that some favours be granted from the Crown for the quieting the minds of the people in order to the better settlement and strengthning of that Island; And as there are now ships sailing thither very soon, they desire your further opinion without delay. [C.O. 138, 14. p. 219.]
April. 14.
Whitehall.
352. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. It being, as we conceive, for H.M. service, that we should be inform'd from time to time, of the several persons nominated by H.M. to be Lieut. General or Lieut. Governors in his several Plantations in America, upon whom the Governmt, of the said Plantations may devolve; we desire to be informed of such Commissions for Lieut. Generals or Lieut. Governors as have been already granted, and are now in force, and that for the future we may be apprised of such nominations before the passing of their respective commissions, to the end we may know whom to correspond with upon occasion. Autograph signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 4. No. 9; and 324, 10. pp. 66, 67.]
April 15.
St. James's.
353. H.M. Instructions to Governor the Earl of Orkney. Signed, G.R. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 128–197; and 5, 1364. pp. 94–205.]
April 20.
Admty. Office.
354. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. I find that I transmitted to you Oct. 12th last the answers of Capt. Leake, etc. (v. April 11th). Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read 21st April, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 89; and 195, 6. p. 91.]
April 20.355. Mr. Attorney General to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to April 14, q.v. I have perused the entry in my own books of that report (July 4, 1713, upon an Act of Jamaica for the further quieting of possessions, etc.) and am of opinion if the matter propos'd at ye end thereof by several gentlemen on the behalf of that Island had been complyed with (which might have been done in the two year's time since that report was made) the Country thereby would have had satisfaction. And as to the report, the objection as to the recital therein being but the recital will be of no great consequence. The next objection, touching establishing possessions for seven years pass't without allowing any time for persons who may be entitled to claim or sue, is fully stated, and as to that if your Lordps. can be satisfied that this Law which has been so long desired by the country and has not been opposed either there or here by any persons interested in the country will not be prejudicial, the law may be confirmed notwithstanding that objection. As to the next objection touching the rights of the Crown, H.M. will best judge, and can only determine whether he will waive the same for the quieting of the Island. As to the objections to the first provisoe omitting to give time to persons in prison to sue for future titles, and to the saving the rights of suites or entry only to the persons entituled and not to their heirs, and the proviso not extending to suits where the deft. shall be beyond sea but only the pet., and the objections to the proviso touching bonds, bills etc., if your Lordps. could have reasonable satisfaction, that these should be explain'd by a subsequent law, these objections might be now waived. And as to the last objection, that the law has a retrospect and makes bargains and sales registred make as good a title as a fine and recovery would have done, if your Lordps. can be satisfyed that there are no titles in the Island that would be concern'd in that objection as is alledged by those that press the confirming this bill, which is not improbable (for that no application hath been made from any such) that objection also may be waived. I cannot but observe upon this occasion that very great inconveniencies may ensue, if it be drawn into president to doe unreasonable things for the satisfaction of persons, who contrary to their duty to the Crown would endeavour to put difficultyes upon the Government if their unreasonable demands be not granted. Signed, Edw. Northey. Endorsed, Recd. Read 29th April, 1715. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 10. No. 73; and 138, 14. pp. 325–328.]
April 20.
Kingston in Jamaica.
356. Deposition of Jethro Furbur, master of a sloop forc't to put into Cape Briton on 20th Nov. last. There deponent found a settlement of about 1,500 people, who are making of three fortifications, of 50 gunns each, and he was well informed, that the French King gave to ye settlers and Indians, one barrel of powder, two blanketts and a years provision, also boats and craft for ye Fishery. He was informed that there was 40 sail of shipping there, and a very fine harbour, bigg enough to hold 500 sail of shipps. The French men at Cape Breton told him, that ye English gave them a wedge of gold for a peice of silver, and that ye fishing boats used to go out a fishing twice a day and bring in their loads, for the banks and shoals were very nigh, etc. Signed, Jethro Furbur. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th Aug., 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 4.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
357. Order of Lords in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 26th May, Read 13th June, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
357. i. Petition of Charles Earle and Thomas Abbot to the King in Council. Martinique, Fort St. Piere, 20th Dec., 1714. Taken as hostages from Nevis, 1706, for the payment of 1,400 negroes, it was agreed that they should be relieved by four other inhabitants every three months. Nevis has neither relieved petitioners, nor sent them money or credit. For 8½ years they have been close confined prisoners in Fort Saint Pierre goale, destitute of the common support of life, reproached by their enemies, and void of any human comfort, etc. Pray for H.M. directions for their speedy exchange or discharge, or they must inevitably fall a miserable sacrifice for a most barbarous and ungratefull countrey etc. Signed, Charles Earle, Thomas Abbot. Endorsed, Recd. 26th May, Read 13th June, 1715. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 58, 58 i.; and 153, 12. pp. 211–215.]
April 25.
Whitehal.
358. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following. Upon which we observe, that in regard of the weak and dangerous condition of that Island and being in a manner environ'd by French and Spaniards (especially the French at Hispaniola, who are encourag'd to settle and fortify there by the King of France, at the public expence of which we have had repeated advices) we have made several alterations in the said Instructions, etc. Annexed,
358. i. Same to the King. We take leave to lay before your Majesty the draught of Instructions for Governor Lord A. Hamilton in the usual form, except some few alterations, which we humbly offer as follows; His Lordship having frequently complained of the obstructions he met with in that Government from the Assembly, particularly in their claiming the sole right of passing mony-bills, refusing the Council the liberty of amending such bills, and in assuming to themselves the power of adjourning at pleasure without the concurrence of the Governor, contrary to former usage and practice in like cases; And his Lordship having acquainted us, that unless some of the Council, who encourag'd those proceedings in the Assembly, were removed, he was afraid he shou'd not be able to do your Majesty any considerable service, and as Charles Chaplin and John Blair Esqrs. have been represented as such by his Lordship, we have omitted their names in the list of Councillors, and have inserted those of John Ayscough and John Sadler Esqrs., who have been recommended to us as persons every way qualify'd to serve your Majesty in that station, if You shall be graciously pleased to approve thereof; We have also added the name of Richard Elliston in the room of Edmond Edline, who has been absent a considerable time from his post in that Island. And whereas Governors of Plantations have often suspended Councillors from their places upon particular or private disgusts, we have added in the 9th clause of the said Instructions relating to the power of suspending Councillors, that the Governor do not suspend any without the consent of the majority of the Council. Most part of the valuable lands of Jamaica are granted in large tracts, or by purchase now come into the hands of private persons, who do not plant and cultivate the same, which is an obstruction to the settlement of that Island, by hindering others who might come there to settle, did any of the said lands remain in your Majesty's disposal. We have therefore prepared the 35th Instruction, that the Lord Archibald shou'd endeavour to get a Law pass'd to oblige the patentees of such lands to plant and cultivate the same in three years, or to dispose thereof to such persons as will undertake to do it; otherwise the uncultivated lands to revert to your Majesty, to be disposed of as your Majesty shall think fit. As the number of White People in Jamaica bears no proportion to that of the Blacks, which may be of dangerous consequence not only from the attempts of an enemy but from an Instruction of the negroes, we have prepared the 37th Instruction, that the laws for encouraging the importation of white servants, and for encouraging the settlement of that Island, be punctually put in execution; and that he endeavour to get further laws for that purpose, in which two white women may be esteem'd equivalent to one white man. The lands in Jamaica not being made extendable by the laws of that Island, to the great prejudice of creditors, and the discredit of trade, we have prepared the 38th Instruction, that the Lord Archibald may endeavour to get a law pass'd for remedying that inconveniency, or for the more easy recovery of debts. By Her late Majty.'s Instructions, the Governors were restrained from granting escheats, until upon signifying to the Commissioners of the Treasury or High Treasurer for the time being, the occasion of such escheats, with the value thereof, he shou'd have receiv'd H.M. directions therein. This has proved a great prejudice to that Island, for the value of escheats is appropriated by a Law of Jamaica [for raising a revenue] towards the support of that Government, and has amounted in two or three years past, to about 3 or £4,000, which wou'd have been of use and have so far prevented deficiencies, had it been applyed according to the said Law, to the support of the Government. We further take leave to observe that the said Instruction, is contrary to another confirmed law of that Island, for preventing of law-suits, by which the Governor is empower'd (after the Marshall shall have made inquiry by a Jury upon their oaths into the true value of an escheated estate, which valuation may be re-examin'd and a new inquisition had in case the Courts shall think the first valuation too low) to pass any grant of such escheated estate under the seal of that Island. We have therefore thought it for your Majesty's service that the Governor be left to act according to the last recited law; which is also agreable to the opinion of your Majesty's Attorny General, whom we have consulted in this matter; provided the Governor take care the escheats be not undervalued, and that particular accounts thereof, their values, and the names of the persons to whom granted, be transmitted to your Majesty's Treasury here, and to your Commissioners for Trade and Plantations; and provided that in all such grants of escheats, there be a clause obliging the grantee to settle and cultivate those lands in three years after the date of his grant, and to keep a proportionable number of white men or women as requir'd by the laws of that Island, and we have accordingly prepared the 34th Instruction for this purpose.
We most humbly take this occasion to lay before your Majesty the state of the two companies at Jamaica. During the late war there was a Regiment there for the security of that Island, and the Assembly did, in addition to Her late Majesty's pay, allow quarters to the private sentinels, or 5s. per week to each man at the choice of such planters as were to quarter them, and 20s. per week to each officer. This was done from year to year by temporary laws. This regiment since the Peace has been reduced to two Independent Companies, and the Assembly has given them none of the additional allowance since May last, not considering the dangerous state that Island is in at present, which we shall therefore take leave to lay before your Majesty. Jamaica is in a manner surrounded by Spanish and French settlements, and particularly the French on Hispaniola, are grown so formidable and strong, that if there is no regular force at Jamaica, it may be in danger from the attempts of an enemy in case of any rupture. There are a great many rebellious negroes in the mountains who frequently do a great deal of mischief. Besides the inhabitants are in apprehension of an insurrection of their own negroes, being about 60,000 in number and very insolent, and not 2,000 whites able to bear arms. The militia there is too few, and too much scatter'd for the defence of so large a place. An instance of this is, that upon the Lord Archibald's viewing the said Militia (tho' but a regiment at a time) he was forced to send a body of horse into those parishes from whence the foot were drawn, so apprehensive were the Planters of their danger, and yet the Assembly have hitherto refused to contribute anything further than May last for their own security. The Fort at Port Royall (which cost the Government about £100,000) is mounted with 120 guns, and so strong, that it has never yet been attempted by an enemy, and is absolutely necessary for the defence of your Majt's. ships, of the Island, and the trade thereof in time of war; so that we cannot think it advisable for the reasons aforemention'd, that a Fort of such consequence should be left in the hands of so weak a militia, and therefore we are humbly of opinion, considering the present circumstances of that Island, that the two Companies now there, at least, are necessary even in time of peace, to garrison the forts, and keep other guards, until in consequence of the laws to be made, the Island be better peopled with white men. But as the Assembly have not subsisted them any longer than May last, the Govr. and Council have done it, and were in Dec. last above £1,600 in disburse. That the Council had then also refused to contribute any more, so that the Lord Archibald was oblig'd to do it himself. This being the state of the said two Companies, we humbly offer, that your Majty.'s pleasure be signify'd to the Lord Archd. Hamilton, that he move the Assembly in the most pressing manner that they contribute as formerly towards the support of the said Companies, that he assure them in your Majt's. name, that if they will pass such laws as shall be effectual for the peopling that Island with white men, your Majty. will in a short time after the passing such laws and after the Island's being in a reasonable state of defence, recall the said soldiers. Having thus humbly laid before your Majesty the weak and dangerous condition of the Island; We further take leave to represent that by the decrease of white people occasion'd in part by the late wars, and by the loss of their trade to the Spanish coast, which was considerable, the inhabitants are not able effectually to provide for all that may be necessary to people that Island, from whence there is too much reason to apprehend the Island is in danger of being lost, unless it be some ways assisted from hence, which we are induced to offer to your Majesty's consideration, Jamaica being so valuable an Island to the trade of Great Britain.
358. ii. Draught of H.M. Instructions for Governor Lord A. Hamilton. In the usual form, except for alterations, indicated in preceding in Clauses 9, 34, 35, 37. [C.O. 138, 14. pp. 220–315.]
April 25.
Whitehal.
359. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. We have considered all your Lordship's letters since your being at Jamaica. We very much approve your Lordship's punctual correspondence, and shou'd have been glad you had found the same from hence; We desire your Lordship to continue it with us; and on our part we shall be exact in answering your Lordship, and in doing your Lordship all the justice that lyes in our power. In your future correspondence, we must desire a little alteration, and that is, that instead of referring in short to the Minutes of the Council and Assembly, your Lordsp. wou'd please to express the matters more at large in your letters, and only refer to the pages of the said Minutes, as vouchers to what your Lordship shall write; This we do not do as finding any fault with your Lordship, but as a method that will make the thing more easy to us, under the multiplicity of business that lyes before us. There is another thing that wou'd be of great service, and wou'd save a great deal of time, which is, that the Minutes of Council and Assembly which your Lordsp. shall transmit to us, be abstracted in the margent; And it wou'd be a further advantage if the Acts were so too. We have laid before H.M. our opinion, that the Captains of men of war, be directed to live in good understanding with your Lordship, and to obey and follow your directions, during their stay at Jamaica. But this not being fully comply'd with by the Lords of the Admiralty, we think it necessary to send your Lordship a copy of their letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope (v. March 28) for your Lordship's information. We cannot now be so particular in this letter, as we shall hereafter, in our correspondence with your Lordship, and must therefore for this time refer your Lordship to the inclosed copy of a Representation (v. preceding) for your information of what we have done for the advantage of Jamaica, and the making your Lordship easy in your Government; and as we are apprehensive H.M. pleasure may not be signify'd thereupon before Mr. Rigby's departure; we would not lose the opportunity of informing your Lordship how ready we are, and shall be in assisting your Lordship in every thing that is for the prosperity of that Island. We agree with what the late Board writ, July 20th, 1713, relating to the allowing appeals from the Chancery to the King in Council, and therefore your Lordship will do well to allow all such when they shall exceed the sum of £500. As to escheats, your Lordship will see by our foremention'd Representation, what we have proposed to H.M. Upon this occasion we must take notice to your Lordsp. that complaints have been made here, of escheats having been undervalued, and particularly that of Kupius. And therefore if H.M. shall approve of what we have represented, we doubt not but your Lordp. will take particular care, that the juries, be men of the best characters, that the escheats be not undervalued, and that the other conditions, upon which we have proposed to alter the old Instruction, be punctually comply'd with, which will take of all the insinuations that some persons might otherwise make. We concur with what the late Board writ, 21st June, 1714, relating to the Speaker's refusing your Lordship the Minutes, to the Assembly's adjourning themselves without your Lordship's leave, and refusing to let the Council amend mony-bills. The good dispositions which are shewn here for the support of Jamaica, make us hope the Assembly will give you no such grounds of complaints for the future, or treat your character with such disrespect, as to put you under the necessity of proroguing them, as the last did, in refusing to let your Lordship joyn with them in their Address. Your Lordship will see by our foresaid Representation, that we have proposed to H.M. several articles in your Lordship's Instructions for the better and sooner peopling of Jamaica; we did upon this occasion consider the two Jamaica Acts, for encouraging the importation of white servants, and the settlement of that Island, and thereupon observe that the penalties in those acts are too severe: for the prolonging of servitude for having been in drink, and some other such like crimes, will discourage people from going there: whereas considering the want of white people, all manner of encouragement ought to be given to their coming to settle in that Island. And therefore we think that if a fund cou'd be found for paying the passage of people that wou'd go thither, those people to be free on their arrival, and to have a certain portion of land granted to them to make a settlement, it might be a means to draw people thither; But then in case they leave the Island in four years, they shou'd be obliged to refund what was paid for their passage. And we think that if all persons who shall be deficient in their number of white men, were obliged to pay a fine of £6 per annum for every such deficiency, it might be a considerable help towards such a fund. Another help wou'd be that every boat keeper at the port of Kingston, and other places of trade, shou'd be obliged to keep one white man for every boat, under the penalty of a fine of £6. And as the Island can never be peopled without a sufficient number of white women, it seems necessary that all persons shou'd be obliged for every 20 negroes to keep one white woman, or rather that two white women shou'd be reckon'd equivalent to one white man. Another thing that might conduce to the peopling the Island, wou'd be if the Assembly cou'd be persuaded to pass a law to restrain negroes being brought up to trades for the future, and such as are now handicraftsmen hinder'd after three or four years to work in towns. And that your Lordship may have some further hints upon this subject, we enclose to your Lordship the copy of a memorial, we have received relating thereunto; [? March 25—Ed.]. These we only mention to your Lordship as what we think may be proper to be framed into a law by the Assembly in lieu of the present penalties and provisions by the foremention'd laws. We doubt not but your Lordship will represent this to the Assembly in such a manner as will make them not only sensible of their own danger, but also of the necessity of applying themselves immediately to what is necessary for their own good and preservation, and only proposed as such. This gives us occasion to desire your Lordship to let us have as particular an account as you can, of the strength of the French on Hispaniola, their several settlements, and the encouragement given them by the King of France to settle, the nature of their Government, and what and how much of their maxims may be apply'd towards the improvement of Jamaica. We desire your Lordship also to let us have an account of the lands ungranted in Jamaica, what the nature of them is, and how they may be best disposed of to the advantage of the Island. As also the quantities of lands possess'd by the several planters, and how much thereof is cultivated. Upon your Lordship's repeated desire that the Acts for quieting possessions and regulating fees, shou'd be laid before H.M. for his Royal approbation, and upon Mr. Rigby's having applyed to us several times on this occasion, we have consider'd the said Acts; but as we find there have been objections made to the first of them, we have referr'd it back to the Attorny General, for his reconsidering it, and so soon as we have his report, we shall lay the Acts before H.M. in the most favourable manner; For we are both inclined and willing to do all that in us lyes for the advantage of the Island. And your Lordship may assure both the Council and Assembly, as you think fit, that nothing shall be wanting on our parts, that can be desired in justice and reason, to make the people easy. [C.O. 138, 14. pp. 316–324.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
360. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Reply to April 20th. Capt. Leake's answers transmitted Oct. 12th, appear to be for 1713, etc. Desires the Commodore's replies to Enquiries of May 13, 1714. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 91, 92.]
April 26.
Admiralty Office.
361. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to preceding. The Commodore who went with the last year's Fishery to Newfoundland, is not yet return'd; but when he does, I shall not fail to transmitt his account to you, etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 27th April, Read 2nd May, 1715. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 90; and 195, 6. p. 92.]
April 26.
Jamaica.
362. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Haveing this opportunity by the Folkston man of war, I very willingly acquit my self of my duty to transmit to your Board accots. of what occurs here, etc. Your Lordships by haveing recourse to what I have formerly represented to the late Board will observe the many difficultys I laboured under in the discharge of my duty by the oppositions of a party not only in the Assembly, but even in the Council, obstructing everything proposed for the support of the Government, nay even for their own interest and safety. I question not but your Lopps. may have long ere now lay'd the whole before H.M. in such a manner that proper measures are taken for remedying those disorders. Since the last desolution I have delay'd calling a new Assembly, believing I may do it with better success after receiving my Patent with new Instructions, which I am resolved to waite for; Tho the occasions of the Government for supplys are verry pressing, I shall instance but one. The late Regiment here, as alsoe the Two Independant Company's form'd upon its reducement, have since May last been subsisted by my self wholely excepting some small part advanced by the Council of which they quickly grew weary. In pursuance to the commands of their Excellencys the late Lord Justices relating to illegal trade with the French settlements (v. Aug. 19) I have caused the Proclamation your Lopps. will find in the Minutts of Council of 22nd March, herewith transmitted, to be published. I am further commanded by the said letter to take particular care that the Captains of the men of war attending the Island do not take on board any merchandize etc. I have long since in the orders I have had occasion to give the Captains of men of war here, particularly recited the article of their general Instructions restraining them from takeing on board any goods or merchandize; so that if there has been failures therein I hope I can be thought no ways answerable for them. And I must further observe to your Lopps. that not haveing authority to remove or suspend any officer of a man of war upon any breach of orders, a punctuall complyance where a command is so precarious, as Governors of the Colonys have over ships of war 'tending on their Governments, is hardly to be expected. I have formerly given accts. of my correspondence with our neighbours the French and Spaniards since the first suspention of arms. I must own that on the part of the first their has not been the least ground of complaint, mutuall restitutions and good offices, strictly agreeable to Treatys, haveing passed between us. I cannot say that it has been the same on the part of the Spaniards, who upon various pretences have seized and confiscate many of our tradeing vessells; and as often as applications has been made to me I have not fail'd demanding restitutions from the Governours where such seizurs have been made, but without any success, many instances of which will doubtless come before you from the partys concern'd. I am sory to find that instead of our increasing in people, there is hardly one parish in the Island that is not weaker in men fitt to bear arms, then before the Peace. The true cause of which proceeds in great measure from the late Assembly's letting fall the deficiency Act, which obliged the planters keeping a certain number of white men in proportion to their negroes, and their not makeing any other necessary provision for the incouragement of familys to come reside and settle with them; my utmost endeavours have not been wanting in recommending these things to their serious consideration; but indeed for these two years last I may say few right steps have been made by the Assemblys here. Some time since I receiv'd by the hands of William Keith Esqr. (who arrived here from Virginia in the Nightingall man of war) a letter from the late Commissrs. of Customs dated 8th of May last signifying to me their haveing deputed in pursuance of a warrant from the late Ld. Treasurer of Great Britain, the said Keith to be Surveyour General of the Southern district of America, in which this Island is comprehended; dureing his stay here he has made several new officers and regulations, which I find has a good deal allarm'd the tradeing part of the Island. I must now give your Lopps. some acct. of my conduct on a particular that has lately occurred, since 'tis probable your Lopps. may be apply'd to upon it. Mr. Peter Beckford haveing some days since attended me with H.M. Letters Patents appointing William Congrave Esqr. Secretary and Clerk of the Inrollments of this Island, and likewise produceing a deputation from Mr. Congrave appointing Saml. Page Esq. his deputy, and in case of his death or absence Peter Beckford Esqr. who desireing to be admitted accordingly, I gave him for answer that I did not think proper to approve of him for the execution of that office, and that I should give my reasons for soe doeing where they were proper, which I am now to doe to your Lopps. Mr. Peter Beckford haveing dureing the course of my Government here distinguished himself, not only when a Member of the Assembly, but likewise as their Speaker, by a continued opposition to whatever I thought necessary to propose for the support of the Government and interest of the Island, many instances of which (too long to be here mentioned) I have given in my accots. to the late Board, and which they were so well satisfy'd with, that they were pleased to disapprove of his conduct in these words. Quotes 21st June, 1714, q.v. Continues: I conceive it needless to trouble your Lopps. with further reasons tho' many might be assign'd, and I presume those allready mention'd may be sufficient likewise for not approveing of Mr. Page as being only a toole of the others. However I have taken such care that the interest of Mr. Congrave the Patentee shall no ways suffer, and in the mean time the office shall be duly executed. By late advices from the Havana I am told the gallions from Vera Cruze were dayly expected there in order to join two Spanish ships of war, one of which was the Hampton Court, who are said to have great treasure on board for Old Spain. I am likewise inform'd from thence that the French agent at that place had received advices from their settlement in the Country call'd Ilinois towards the head of the River Mississipi granted by the French King for a term of years to the Sieur Crozat, that two silver mines had been lately discoverd and open'd there, one of which proved extreamly rich, etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 27th June, 1715. 8 pp. Enclosed,
362. i. Account of H.M. Revenue of Jamaica, Michaelmas, 1713–1714. Receipts, £7,988 Os. 7¾d. Expenditure, £2,076 8s. 6d. Balance due, £5, 911 12s. 1d. Outstanding debts, £6,374 12s. 8d. Signed, James Knight, Recr. Genl., Peter Heywood, Dep Audr., A. Hamilton. Endorsed as preceding. 10 pp. [C.O. 137, 10. Nos. 79, 79 i.; and (without enclosure) 138, 14. pp. 339–347.]
[April 26.]
from my lodging at Mr. Mathew Probee against the Swan near Water Lane and Temple gate.
363. Sampson Sheafe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Province of New Hampshire is of very great importance both for ye honour and service of H.M. and good and benefit of the whole Kingdom being in some respects preferable to anie other of H.M. plantacons in that it affords trees fit for masts, yards, bowspritts, such as for their goodnesse, and large dimensions have never yet been found in anie other part of the world but there and in the adjoining Province of Meine, being fit for H.M. greatest ships of war as also trees for smaller masts in great plenty. Likewise pitch, tar, rosin, turpentine etc. The soil is also suitable to produce hemp and flax. I have formerly been at considerable charge to search the country as far eastward as Kennebeck River sending several skilful persons etc., but tho' they found smaller masts plentiful, yet they found few trees beyond New Hampshire and Meine would make masts exceeding 32 inches diamr. Proposes that H.M. Navy should be supplied from thence instead of Norway and Sweden etc. It is needful that the Lt. Governor reside in the Province; the Governor residing at Boston, as is proper, cannot visit New Hampshire more than once or twice a year, etc. This Province may well be termed the Key of New England. If an enemie should possess themselves thereof (as in the late war was much feared) it would endanger the whole countrey, etc. Signed, Sampson Sheafe. Endorsed, Recd. 26th April, Read 5th May, 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 32; and 5, 914. pp. 10–13.]
April 28.
St. James's.
364. H.M. Commission to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 280, 281.]
April 28.
St. James's.
365. H.M. Commission for William Taylor to be Lieut. Governor of the Massachusets Bay, under the Governor in Chief, Elizeus Burges. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 258.]
April 29.
Whitehal.
366. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. We have considered an Act past in Jamaica, 1711, for regulating fees, which we take to be of service to the inhabitants, and have no objection to your Majesty's confirming the same. We have also considered another Act of that Island past there 1711, for the further quieting of possessions, and preventing vexatious suits at law, and thereupon humbly represent to your Majesty the reasons for the passing of this law, vizt.: that by the earthquake and fire at Port Royal, and other accidents, some records of that Island have been utterly destroy'd and lost, and that sevl. titles heretofore made of lands, for want of skill in those that drew the conveyances, might admit of disputes and suits in law and equity: For prevention whereof, it is enacted, that all persons that have been in possession of any lands, houses, negroes etc. for the space of seven years before the making of this Act, without suit, claim or interruption, or who shall continue in such possession from the first possessing of the same (by themselves or those under whom they claim) for seven years, shall have and enjoy such estate and hold the same in fee against all persons whatsoever etc. And having had the opinion of your Majesty's Attorny General thereupon, and being attended by the most considerable merchants and planters here in England, who unanimously agreed in desiring that the said Act might be confirm'd by your Majesty, and that the Act having now been almost four years in force, and no persons interested either there or here, having complained against any part thereof, we have no objection why your Majty. may not be graciously pleased to approve and confirm the said Act, which we humbly conceive will be a means to quiet the minds of the people, who are in great anxiety whilst their titles remain precarious; Besides, that if your Majesty shou'd be graciously pleased to confirm this Act, it will be an encouragement to the inhabitants to carry over white people for the better settling and peopling that Island, which are so much wanted there, as is more fully express'd in our Representation of 25th instant. [C.O. 138, 14. pp. 328–330.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
367. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have ordered Mr. Pringle to transmit to you the following list etc. as desired 14th inst. etc. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 30th April, Read 2nd May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 17. No. 115; and 389, 25. p. 176.]
Apryle 29.
Whitehall.
368. Mr. Pringle to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, Ro. Pringle. Endorsed, Recd. 30th April, Read 2nd May, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
368. i. List of Lt. Governors appointed by H.M.:—John Moody (Placentia), Feb. 3, 1715; George Hay (Montserrat), Oct. 1, 1714; Saml. Vetch (Nova Scotia and Annapolis Royal), Jan. 20, 1715; William Mathew (St. Christophers), Jan. 26, 1715; Edward Byam, Antegoa, Jan. 28, 1715; Daniel Smith (Nevis), March 2nd, 1715; Wm. Mathews (Leeward Islands), March 25, 1715; Alexander Spotswood (Virginia), April 28th, 1715; — Tailer (Massachusetts Bay, and New Hampshire), April 28th, 1715. Signed, Ro. Pringle. ¾ p. [C.O. 323, 7. Nos. 43, 43 i.; and 324, 10. pp. 68, 69.]
April 29.
St. James's.
369. H.M. Warrant renewing the appointment of William Broderick as Attorney General of Jamaica. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 198.]
[April 29.]370. Petition of John Salkeld, Clerk, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for H.M. further confirmation of a grant of land in St. Kitts etc. v. A.P.C. II. No. 1233. Endorsed, Recd. 29th April, Read 2nd May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 56.]
April 30.
St. James's.
371. Order of King in Council. Confirming Acts of Jamaica, for regulating fees, and for the further quieting of possessions, etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 23rd June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 10. No. 74; and 138, 14. pp. 331, 332.]
April 30.
St. James's.
372. Order of King in Council. Approving John Hart as Governor of Maryland, upon the petition of Francis Lord Guildford, who, as guardian of Charles Lord Baltemore, has re-appointed him, etc. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th May, 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 66; and 5, 727. pp. 447, 448.]
April 30.
St. James's.
373. Order of King in Council. The Treasury are to appoint Commissioners for the sale of the lands in St. Christophers, as proposed by the Council of Trade, 5th May, 1714. Lands that belonged to the popish clergy are not to be sold, but their quantity and value is to be laid before H.M. in Council for his farther pleasure therein, etc. v. A.P.C. II. No. 1210. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. Read 20th Aug., 1716. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 11. No. 20; and 153, 12. pp. 448, 449.]
April 30.
St. James's.
374. Order of King in Council. Approving Representation of 24th Feb., 1715, and restoring her estate to Elizabeth Salenave, etc. Signed, Chris. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 21st Aug., 1716. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 11. No. 21; and 153, 12. pp. 449, 450.]
April 30.
St. James's.
375. Order of King in Council. Approving Representation 5th May, 1714, and restoring the estates in St. Christophers of the French Protestant Refugees, Elizabeth Renoult, Aletta de la Cousay, Paul Minvielle de Bonnemere, Mary and Margaret de Nampons, Catherine Fraise, and Martha Assaillies. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 5 pp. [C.O. 152, 11. Nos. 22, 23; and 153, 12. pp. 450–453.]