America and West Indies
July 1715, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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215-235

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'America and West Indies: July 1715, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 215-235. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73964 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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July 1715, 1-15

July 1.
St. James's.
495. H.M. Instructions for Governor Hunter. Signed, G. R. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 283–301.]
July 2.
Jamaica.
496. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of 26th April. On the 3rd of the last month I receiv'd my new Commission, and am in dayly hopes and expectations of receiving my Instructions, it not being possible till then to take measures or call an Assembly etc. Encloses accounts of exports and imports. Continues:—There ariseing some difficultys and objections upon proceedings and regulations made here by Mr. Keith as Surveyor General of the Customs without produceing his originall powers, or so much as authentick copys thereof when thereunto required to show his authority for so doing, I think myself also obliged to give you the trouble of the inclosed account containing the whole transactions and dispute between us, and hope that when your Lopps. are appraised of the true state of this matter I may have the honour of your Lordships' approbation to my proceedings therein, etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 1st Sept., 1715, Read 17th April, 1716. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
496. i. An account of some disputes between Governor Lord A. Hamilton and William Keith, Surveyor General of the Customs. April 26, 1715, Mr. Keith complains that several vessels have gone out loaded from Port Royal, without entering and clearing at the Custom house, and others intend to do likewise. He requests the Governor to give orders to the Commanding Officer of the Fort at Port Royal that no ship be permitted to pass outward, until the master first produce a certificate under the Collector's hand that she has been duly cleared at the Custom house, etc. After consulting the Attorney Generals, Edmond Kelly and William Brodrick, and Mr. Keith having failed to produce his powers and instructions, which he said he had left in Virginia, or to take the oaths etc. appointed, the Governor replied, May 24th, that it would be improper and unsafe for him to give such an order, which seemed to him intended to enforce the payment of fees other and greater than ever paid, or by the laws thought demandable here, etc. Mr. Keith replied, May 24th, that there was no complaint about fees, and that such a matter related to the Officer of the Revenue and was not in the Governor's sphere, reminding him that he is commanded to give his assistance to the Officers of the Customs etc. As to taking the oaths, he had qualified elsewhere, which was sufficient, his office not being confined to Jamaica. But he was willing to take the oaths etc., if the Governor suspected his loyalty and tendered them etc. The Governor comments upon Mr. Keith's reply, June 20. Other and much larger fees have been demanded by the Collectors of the Customs, since Mr. Keith's arrival, than are allowed by the Act for regulating fees, and as justification, by his orders, they have cited the Act of Parliament 7th and 8th William III., etc., etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 42¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 11. Nos. 8, 8 i.; and (without enclosure), 138, 14. pp. 379, 380.]
July 2.
York.
497. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. I have little to add to the duplicates, only to hint what I have wrote at large to the Secry. of State, about the Indian warr in Carolina. Our Assembly will do nothing for their reliefe. I am indeavouring to ingage our Indians in warr with those who attack them if possible, but their interposition being rejected last year, I shall have the worse successe in this. I shall however do my best. The French are debauching our five Nations, contrary to the Treaty of Peace of wch. I have also complain'd, and sent an expresse to Canada, to remonstrate the danger of these proceedings, happy he who has nothing to do with those Colonys, upon the foot they stand they run a risk of an intire and speedy ruine. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 16th Augt., 1715. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. No. 1; and 5, 1123. pp. 315, 316; and (extract) 5, 1085. No. 19.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
498. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of "Trade and Plantations. H.M. intending very soon to give his directions in relation to the garrisons of Placentia and Anapolis Royal, you are to consider what may be the most regular method of supplying those garrisons either with provisions or with cloaths, so as they may not be reduced to such streights, as sometimes hitherto they have been. You are also directed to consider how farr those garrisons may be reduced, so as to answer the ends for which they are establish't, as also what may be the most advantageous way for H.M. service in those parts of disposing of such troops as it shall be thought fit to withdraw from those garrisons. H.M. service requiring all possible dispatch in these matters, you are directed to report your opinion thereof with all expedition. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th July, 1715. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 126; and 218, 1. pp. 243, 244.]
July 4.499. Col. Nicholson to Mr. Popple. Encloses following, and Mr. Walker's letter etc. of March 14, q.v. Signed, Fr. Nicholson. Endorsed, Recd. 4th July, Read 7th Dec., 1715. Addressed. ¼ p. Enclosed,
499. i. Thomas Walker to Col. Nicholson. New Providence, 14th March, 17 14/15. Acknowledges letter of July 31 from Piscataqua. Professes his loyalty to the King and the Lords Proprietors, "whose tenant I am and a pursuer prosecutor and disturber of all pirats, robers and vilians that do or expect to shelter themselves in these Islands," etc. I have rendered an accot. home of my proceedings, etc. (v. March 14). Signed, Tho. Walker. Copy. 1 p.
499. ii. John Coleman to Col. Nicholson. Boston, May 9, 1715. Encloses preceding, etc. Signed, John Coleman. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1265. Nos. 16, 16 i., ii.; and 5, 1292. pp. 488–491.]
July 5.
St. Christophers.
500. Lt. Governor Mathew to the Council of Trade and Plantations. My duty obliges me to give your Lordships an account of my arrivall at Nevis, the 30th past, where, on the reading my Commission of Lt. Genl., and the Attorney Generall's opinion thereon, the Councill of that Island were unanimously of opinion, I should receive of Col. Smith the late Commander in Chief, the Seals, Instructions, etc., as usuall. The next day I came down hither, where my Commissions of Lt. Generall and Lt. Govr. of this Island being read, I took posession of this Government. What I have to report upon the little I can have learnt since my arrivall is, that this Island in great probability will not be the least considerable part of this Government, the number of it's inhabitants increase dayly, there remains but H.M. declaring his pleasure how the French part shall be dispos'd of to engage very many familys making considerable settlements thereon, which the present uncertainty deterrs them from. Signed, William Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 15th Sept., 1715. 2¾ pp. Enclosed,
500. i. List of persons best qualify'd to supply vacancies in the Councils of the Leeward Islands:—St. Christophers, Clement Crook, John Duport, William Woodrop, Charles Payne, Peter Soulegre, John Bramley. Nevis, Thomas Butler, James Milikin, James Symonds, Roger Pemberton, Joseph Symonds, Charles Bridgewater. Montseratt, William Fry, Edward Parsons, William White, Anthony Ravell, Richard Cook, William Irish. Antego, Valentine Morrice, John Fry, Barry Tankerd, Archib. Cockran, John Duer, John Lucas. ½ p. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 69, 69 i.; and 153, 12. pp. 339, 340.]
July 5.
Boston, New England.
501. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. Encloses Acts and Minutes of Council of New Hampshire ending 24th June. Continues:—The death of Mr. Secretary Story must be excuse for anything not in due form I having only a clerck of the council untill H.M. pleasure is further known. P.S. Col. Burgess is dayly expected here. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Aug., 1715, Read 26th June, 1718. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 162; and 5, 915. p. 145.]
[July 5.]502. John Graves to the Council of Trade and Plantations. A scheme of what is required for the garrison of New Providence, etc. Signed, Jno. Graves. Endorsed, Recd. 5th July, Read 7th Dec., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1265. No. 13.]
July 5.503. Mr. Bridger to Mr. Popple. Encloses following, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 12th July, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
503. i. Mr. Bridger's reply to the charges made against him. Gives details of his work and that of his deputies, in marking and saving trees, and copies of testimonials by Governor Dudley etc. Signed, J. Bridger. 13 pp.
503. ii.–iv. Copies of Governor Dudley's recommendations etc. of Mr. Bridger Dec. 2, 1714, Jan. 12, 1715, Dec. 29, 1714. All signed, J. Dudley and endorsed as preceding. 3 pp.
503. v. Merchants trading to New England to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recommend Mr. Bridger and the renewal of his Commission. Signed, Wm. Willard and 26 others. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 48, 48 i.–v.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
504. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. We have consider'd an Act of Virginia, Oct. 23, 1705, declaring who shall not bear office in this Colony. Quote clause referred to June 24, q.v. This Act was intended to encourage people to settle there, but we are apprehensive it will not answer that end, for that few persons will be willing to settle there, in prospect of a place after three years. Whereas were it permitted that persons arriving there, of characters and capacities for places, shou'd indifferently with the other inhabitants, enjoy such places as might become vacant, it wou'd be a temptation and encouragement to them to settle themselves and families there. But besides this genl. observation, we humbly take leave to represent that the abovesaid clause as it has been lately interpreted in Virginia, is repugnant to the Act for preventing frauds and regulating abuses in the Plantation Trade, etc., by one clause whereof it is enacted that the Lord Treasurer, the Commrs. of the Treasury and Commrs. of the Customs in England may appoint officers of the Customs in any city etc. belonging to any of the said Islands, tracts of land etc. And by another clause in the said Act, it is declared that all laws of the Plantations in any wise repugnant to the Laws of England, are illegal, null and void. Quote case of Keith and Kennedy, v. June 24. Upon this occasion we have consulted several persons, particularly Col. Jennings, President of your Majesty's Council of Virginia, who was there at the passing the foresaid Virginia Act, who have acquainted us that it was not then understood to restrain any persons from having offices who were commissionated from hence by persons having authority from the Crown, and that it was only intended to restrain the Governors from giving away the best places to their favourites. Upon the whole, we are humbly of opinion, that tho' Mr. Kennedy is not in strictness within the exception of the Virginia Act, not being appointed by your Majesty, yet it ought to be so understood, he being constituted by persons in authority from your Majesty, for that and other purposes, by virtue of the Act of the 7th and 8th of King William aforesaid. And the Virginia Act being repugnant to this, we humbly offer that your Majesty be pleased to signify your disallowance and disapprobation of the said law. But as the said Act, contains several other beneficial clauses, we further humbly offer, that your Majesty's pleasure be signify'd, that the Assembly may pass a new Act to the same effect, so it be not lyable to the abovemention'd objections. [C.O. 5, 1364. pp. 224–229; and 5, 1335. No. 191.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
505. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following. "We desire you will please to lay the same before H.M. as soon as possible that if H.M. shall be graciously pleas'd to approve of what we have humbly propos'd, there may be time for it's being consider'd in Parliament this Session." Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
505. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. The furnishing of your Majesty's Navy with Naval Stores from the Plantations, is a matter of such importance that the Parliament have thought fit, for the encouragement thereof, by an Act pass'd in the 3rd and 4th years of her late Majesty's reign, to allow a premium of £4 per ton upon tar and pitch etc. Since which, there has been considerable quantities of pitch and tar etc. imported into this Kingdom. And whereas besides the trees fit for tar, rosin and masts, there are vast quantities of others in the woods, fit for the building of ships and houses, wherewith a considerable trade might be carry'd on between this Kingdom and those parts; whereby the bullion which we annually send to the East Country for those commodities, wou'd be kept at home, were there a proper encouragement given to this trade. But at present by reason of the length of the voyage, the freight is so high, that such timber from America cannot be had so cheap as from the Northern Crowns. We therefore humbly offer to your Majesty that such timber as aforesaid, imported from the Plantations, may be exempted from the duties to which they are now lyable; for tho' these duties are lower than those from the Northern Crowns, as will appeare by the annex'd account; yet when it shall be publickly known in the Plantations, that timber of all sorts may be imported from thence into this Kingdom Custom free, it will be an encouragement to that Trade, and in some measure alleviate the burthen of the high freight; and we humbly conceive that an equivalent to be made to your Majesty instead of this duty, will properly fall under the consideration of the Parliament, if your Majesty shall be graciously pleas'd to recommend this matter to them. We further humbly represent to your Majesty, that the people on the Continent of America have very much of late years fallen into the making of woollen and other manufactures there, to the great disadvantage of the trade of this Kingdom, and we do not see how the same can be prevented otherwise than by turning their thoughts and industry another way; which we humbly conceive, may be most advantageously done, by giving encouragement to the production and importation of Naval Stores from thence. This will not only be an increase of our Navigation, but will occasion a great exportation of our woollen manufactures, to pay for the said timber and other Naval Stores, instead of exporting bullion to the Northern Crowns, as is before observ'd. Besides, if this Trade can be once settled, it will free this Kingdom from a dependance on the said Northern Crowns for Naval Stores, which has often proved expensive and precarious, especially in time of war. In case your Majesty shall be graciously pleased to approve this our proposal, and that the duties upon importation of such timber be taken off, we humbly offer that the pre-emption or refusal of such timber be offer'd and tender'd to the Commissioners of your Majesty's Navy upon the landing the same, and if within the term of 20 days after such tender, the said Commissioners shall not bargain for the same, the importers be then at liberty to sell such timber to their best advantage. Autograph signatures. 3¾ pp. Enclosed,
505. ii. Account of the gross duties payable on timber imported from the Northern Crowns and from America. Signed, Chr. Tower, D. Coll., May 12, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 4. Nos. 10, 10 i., ii.; and (without enclosure ii.) 5, 914. pp. 55, 60.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
506. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to July 3rd. As to the supplying of Annapolis with provisions, refer to letter of 18th May. Contracts should be made here with some persons of New England etc. But we apprehend it will be difficult to find credit in New England for this purpose, unless the bills drawn by those who have hitherto supply'd that garrison be put in a method of being discharg'd. As to the clothing, repeat letter of 18th May. It seems therefore necessary that the Agent for that Garrison or such other person as shall be thought fit, do immediately provide a proper cloathing to be there before winter, lest the men should perish with cold. But as the off reck'nings are ingaged to 1717, we conceive some money must be advanced for that purpose. As to provisions for the Garrison of Placentia, while there was a garrison at St. John's in Newfoundland, during the late wars, they were always supply'd from the Victualling Office here, and the cloathing was provided by the Agent, and we are of opinion, that the same methods ought to be continued, by Agents better vers'd and instructed in these matters than we find the present Agents are. As to the reducing of those Garrisons, we cannot give any opinion thereupon, till we know how H.M. may be pleas'd to settle Nova Scotia as a frontier, for the greater security and improvemt. of the Fishery on that coast, and the production of Naval Stores there, as we represented 17th March; for that the keeping of a garrison even at Placentia itself, will very much depend upon the settling of Nova Scotia. Besides wch., as the Indians about Penobscot and the rest of the French Indians are not inclin'd to submit themselves to H.M., and that there seems to be a general defection of the sd. Indians from the British interest on the Continent of America, by the instigation of the French Missionaries, we apprehend it may not at present be very safe to reduce the said Garrisons. As these matters, and several others relating to the Plantations, are of very great consequence to this Kingdom, and require some speedy directions, we should be glad of your assistance and of that of the Lords of the Committee of Council, so soon as conveniently may be. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 244–248.]
July 7.507. (a) Deposition of Major David Dunbar, formerly in command of two regiments in Nevis. D'Iberville forced the inhabitants to agree to the second articles, when the negroes had escaped to the woods and refused to come in. When he demanded hostages no one was willing to go, and some joined the negroes in the woods, fearing to be sent. Whereupon D'Iberville seized and carried off one Mr. Stanley as a hostage etc. Corroborates June 15th supra. Signed, David Dunbar.
(b) Deposition of James Butler, of Camberwell. Corroborates preceding. 8th July, 1715. The whole Endorsed, Recd. Read 28th July, 1715. 2½ pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 61.]
July 7.508. Thomas Bannister to the Council of Trade and Plantations. An Essay on the Trade of New England, etc. We take off some hundred thousand pounds' worth of Brittish manufactures yearly, and pay in such commodities, as serve your necessities, and not one article that increases your luxury, and unnecessary expence etc. Some difficulties this trade labours under; (1) The large duty upon our pine boards, masts etc. is near as much as the prime cost. The East Countrey merchants purchase all their Norway deals with the curt. money of this Kingdom, which is certainly a pernicious trade, and tends to impoverish the Nation etc. If the duty was removed, New England would send you finer boards, and at a cheaper rate, [than Norway], and take our pay in the manufactures of the Nation, etc. (2) The want of a fund for the Bounty money on the importation of Naval Stores. The certificates sell at 45 p.c. discount. The war in the North, and the disturbance of the navigation of the Baltic have already raised Naval Stores to an unreasonable price. Certinly then it behoves us to improve our own, to such a degree, that it will not be in the power of those Northern Princes, tho' combin'd in the strictest alliance, to hurt us. For quantities, it is certin the Plantations are able to furnish of some sorts the whole expence of Great Brittain and Ireland. One fleet from New England only has brought 6,000 barls. of pitch and tar to London; and that Plantation has millions rotting in the wilderness for want of encouragement to collect them. If a fund was provided, that we might have the bounty as larg as it was intended, the importation of Naval Stores will increase to the utmost of your wishes, etc. We were verry dilligent upon the first notice of the bounty, and began to relax when we heard how poorly it was pay'd. Mast, certinly, we have the finest in the world and enough to serve the Nation for ever, if due care be taken and a propper person appointed to preserve them. Hemp, we yet raise but little of, and I am at a loss to say the reason, for it's certin we have soil that will bear it, a climate not unkind, and the proffit I think would exceed all other labours of the Husbandman, etc. But arguments have been in vain. If therefore upon application for royal favours, the King would only grant those people upon condition that such a quantity of hemp should be raised, they, brought by necessity to taste the sweets of the proffits, would generally give into it. Our woods afford all sorts of ship timber and plank, and if cut in a propper time and had a due seasoning, I believe would prove equal to that of any other countrey. Of late we build ships verry well, and for beauty and strength may generally compare with any Nation. We abound with iron ore, but have not yet got into the way of makeing enough for our own supply, etc. You will judg what steps may be taken to invigorate the Parliament to promote their own and the Plantation's interest in this point also. If some method be not taken, the Crown is in danger of looseing the beneficial trade to that Plantation, and the supply of naval stores from thence. The importation of New England exceeds their exportation, this if not ballanced, will bring on this double evil. It will oblige us to set up manufactories of our own, which will intirely destroy that branch of trade, and those manufactories will employ the verry hands that might be at work on naval stores. And then the Nation may come intirely to depend on the humours and politic designs of the Russ, the Dane and the Sweed, for leave to set a fleet to sea. Refers to manufacturies, started 9 years ago when English goods were sold at about 225 per cent., which put the husbandmen and householder upon makeing, buttons, stuffs, kerseys, linsey woolseys, shalloones and flannels, which has decreased the importation of those Provinces above 50,000 per annum, etc. Our Fishery is the next thing, and indeed the most considerable branch of our trade, and if well follow'd would equal the mines of Potocsi. We are oblig'd to fetch our salt yearly from the Saltertudos. In war we allowed convoys, or sent long warlike ships able to defend themselves and small ones committed to their care. But the Peace has rendred such ships unprofitable, and the small ones are insulted by the Spanyards and treated as robbers. On this voyage we have lost more and better ships dureing the short Peace than we did the whole warr. This once might have been prevented by speaking. Refers to Spanish claim and English title to Saltertudos. Asking would have procured us the liberty to rake salt I suppose, from the success of our glorious warr. It's of no vallew to the Spaniards, etc. This I shall be very glad to see cared for as a real benefit that will extend itself to all the fishing Plantations. We were made to hope we should supply the whole world with fish after the delivery of Placentia. But such unhappy managers were they in this Article, that they have only increased the Nation's charg by takeing an expensive garrison to maintain, while the French remov'd to a more happy clime, and better scituation to annoy us, their fishing ground inlarg'd, and they eas'd of a great expense, were the only people benefitted by this delivery. Much of the same nature was our log-wood trade to the Bays of Campeche and Honduras, where in time of war if taken we were treated as lawfull enimies, but now as pyrates and thieves. This trade employs a great number of New England ships, and has been verry profitable to us and the Brittish Nation, by the great number of sailors it makes and maintains, all which are generally left in England, but especially by the vast duty this commidity pays, etc. This likewise is an important Article forgot or omitted thro' a crimenal ignorance or pernicious obstinacy, altho the Nation has so eagerly desired it, for 50 years last past. I find Sir William Godolphin in his Spanish Embassie had nothing more perticularly recommended to him in the affair of trade than this liberty to cut wood in those Bays. I believe the Nation was generally of opinion that never a better time to ask than in 1710. It is certain the Spaniard would not cut and bring it to market if we did not, doubtless therefore a thing of no vallew to them would have been thrown in to oblige and quiet us. I shall mention our trade to Surinam by way of prevention, because the Gentlemen of Barbadoes have openly attackt it, representing it as prejudicial to the English Islands, therefore desired an Act of Parliament to prohibit it. This trade takes off a great number of small stores of no use to us and fit for no other market: it imploys a great number of ships and sailors. The tradesmen feel the benefit by the merchandize of soap, candles, beer, building of ships and the great number of casks this trade imploys. The landed interest shares with them in the export of verry much hay, oates, onions, apples, pork, beef, staves, boards, butter and flower. The Fishery by a great export of mackeril and refuse cod. Other parts of merchandize by shipping thither much wine and some salt. And the Custome house by the wine aforesd. exported without a drawback. The return for these is molassus, which we brew and distil, and thereby raise many good liveings; And the merchant finds it one of the most profitable trades he drives, etc. [Barbadoes and the Islands are not injured, because] we expend all the Barbadoes molassus we can purchase or procure, and pay 3d. or 4d. per gallon more for it, and it is almost as dear again as it useth before this trade was opened. We send them more vessels now than formerly, and such quantities of everything that their markets will not take them off, but our commodities lie there and perrish. The grand articles of this trade are unfit for the Islands, or are in such quantities that we can overstock both markets. Their endeavours to cut us off from this trade is rather the effect of picque than any publick interest. I will say nothing of what may in time be done by pottashes, or sturgeon if we had the art to cure it, by copper mines of which we have perhaps the best in the world and near navigable rivers; but proceed to mention the evil which above all others opprest those Provinces, and which alone will destroy them, if some method be not found out to prevent it. The want of money or a propper medium of trade necessarily arises from the difference between our importation and exportation. The former exceeding the latter obliged us to make the ballance in money, when we had it, and the necessities of the Government calling for a Paper Credit, which obtein'd a currency amongue us in all purchases and payments, and made way for the more easy shipping off all our gold and silver; and those necessities ceasing with the war, the Treasury of course sinks all the paper and leaves us without a medium of trade in a helpless and deplorable condition. As things now stand a man worth £10,000 in land is certainly ruin'd if he owe one upon bond, because so much land will not answer, but all must be sold, or so much as will raise the sum due, wch. will not fetch in such extreamities, five shillings in the pound, and if some expedient be not found out, will scarce fetch money, on any terms. To deliver themselves from this big-belly'd evil, the inhabitants have projected a Bank of Credit founded upon land security, etc. Urges the granting of a Charter for it, etc. I am senseable it has been the policy of some Ministers to curb the forwardness of the Plantations least they should grow too big for the Kingdomes they belong to. What I have here propos'd is principally to render the Plantations more service to the Crown and Nation, and consequently the more flourishing the more beneficial to both: Certinly the best way to keep them firm to the interest of these Kingdomes is to keep them depending upon them for all their necessaries, and not by any present hardships to force them to subsist of themselves. If they once run into manufactories, what will they ask from England ? Allow them to keep the ballance of their trade and they will never think of manufactories. But if the nature of their trade, or great duties on their goods, destroy this ballance, of necessity they must make for themselves, and will, since they have materials to work on. But the notion is wild and ungrounded of the Plantations ever setting up for themselves. Different schemes, interests, notions, religions, customes and manners will forever divide them from one another and unite them to the Crown. He that will be at the trouble of reviewing only the Religion of the Continent, and consider how tenacious each sect is, will never form any idea of a combination to the prejudice of the Land of our Forefathers. Proposes a Light House in a propper place in the Massachusets Bay, which would save great numbers of lives, ships, merchandize, which are lost yearly, and among the rest the King last fall had a vessel perished, at our verry doors in dark weather, upon the spot where the Lighthouse should be set, and every soul perished. This was the man of war sloop that come to bring us the happy newes of H.M. peaceable accession etc. There is a necessity that something be done in this affair here in England, since all remonstrances to the Legislature in New England have been rendred ineffectual thro' the artifices of designing men. The preventive officer at Newfoundland being only there a month or six weeks in the year, occasions illegal trading. A ship may load with Naval Stores for Newfoundland, there he takes up his certificate to discharge his bonds. As soon as the Preventive Officer's back is turn'd, he loads again and runs to Portugal with his naval stores. The same may be done with any other commodity of the growth of the Plantations, etc. Signed, Thos. Bannister. Endorsed, Recd. 15th July, Read 6th Sept., 1715. 18 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 67; and 5, 914. pp. 129–148.]
July 7.
Whitehal.
509. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The enclosed letter having been laid before the King, etc., it is H.M. pleasure that you do forthwith inquire into the state of that Province, and under whose direction it is at present, and report your opinion on these points, as also of what you shall judge may be the most proper and speedy method of assisting and supplying them under their present necessity, etc. Refers to enclosure No. i. for their information, etc. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 8th July, 1715. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
509. i. Lt. Governor Spotswood to Mr. Secretary Stanhope, Virginia, May 27, 1715. It is with a just concern for the miseries of my fellow-subjects that I presume to lay before H.M. the advices I received two days ago from the Governor of South Carolina, that there is a general revolt of all the Indians bounding on that Province, who have broke out in open hostility, murdering the inhabitants and destroying their habitations, and with such numbers as have never been known to combine together since the English were settled here. The hurry Col. Craven was in did not allow him time to write me all the particulars of this event, but the messenger relates many circumstances very dreadful. In this exigency Col. Craven has applied to me to assist him with arms and ammunition, as that which is much wanting, and I am accordingly dispatching with all speed such a supply of both out of H.M. stores here, as the condition of this Colony will allow me to spare; for as there is some ground to suspect that this heathenish combination may be more general over the main, it is to be feared that this Colony will have occasion to arm in it's own defense, however I would not delay this assistance to Carolina, hoping that according to a letter I recd. from the Earl of Dartmouth when Secretary of State intimating that her late Majty. had directed all the small arms designed for the Canada Expedition to be lodged at New York and New England for the service of the Plantations, I shall be supplied out of H.M. stores there, if the necessity of this Governmt. should require it. I hope this service of supplying the Government of Carolina with stores of war on this occasion, will induce H.M. to grant us a larger supply especially now I have got the country to build a convenient magazine for preserving both the arms and ammunition, and that the neighbouring Colonys may be readily supplied from hence whenever their occasions require. As I understand that most of the people of South Carolina are fled into Charlestown, and have no other way to be supplied with provisions but by sea, I have ordered the man of war attending this station to repair thither to keep open the communication with the town, and have likewise writ to the Governors to the northward advising them to send likewise H.M. ships in those stations to visit that place from time to time as the best means to encourage the people to a vigorous defense, till some other measures be contrived for their relief. I am now taking the necessary measures for putting our frontiers in a posture of defence. And because I have certain intelligence that there has been of late a more than ordinary intercourse between the Southern Indians and the Nations to the Northward, I have sent expresses to the Governours of Maryland, Pensilvania and New York to advertise them thereof that they may be upon their guard, and to keep a watchful eye upon the Indians in their neighbourhood, as I have upon some just suspicions of one of the most considerable nations of our Tributaries, who keep a correspondence with foreign Indians, found it necessary to have them disarmed, which will be speedily put in execution, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood.
509. ii. Governor Craven to Lord Townshend. South Carolina, May 23, 1715. The neighbouring Indians, with whom we have had a long and continued amity, haveing for almost these two months last engaged themselves in a most bloody war agst. this part of H.M. Dominions, I held myself obliged to give your Lordship a plain and true account of the present state of this Colony, being well assured that it will be as soon as possible, laid before H.M. by your Lordship. I have no necessity to acquaint your Lordship, that South Carolina is of all the Dominions belonging to the Crown of Great Britain in North America, the utmost frontier, having the Spaniard at St. Augustin or Florida, and the French at Movill on the great River Mechasipi on the South and on the South West. St. Augustine is not above 70 leagues from our settlements, from which place we have reason to beleive, our Yamasee Indians who first began this warr upon us, have receiv'd their principal encouragement to attack us. These Yamase's being look'd upon by other Nations to be the most warlike, have prevail'd with almost all the rest to become their confederates and allies, so that we compute that we have at least 8,000 Indians engaged agst. us, all of them till now entirely in our interest, and with whom we had a constant trade and commerce. About the middle of last Aprill, one of the said Yamasee Indians, gave some hint to a trader or two that liv'd amongst them, of the horred design they had been sometime contriveing to cutt of all the English and become sole masters of their fine and flourishing plantations; this astonished the poor people, and caused them to begg only so much time as they could come to me to Charles Town and return again, and they assured the Indians that anything would be done to give them satisfaction, with which they seem'd contented. The two traders made all the dispatch, rideing night and day, to acquaint me with what had happened; upon which the Council was called, and we dispatch'd the messengers to let the Indians know, that some of our chief men should meet them forthwith at a place appointed, to hear and redress their complaints and grievances if they had any. The Indians waited for the return of the messingers, but they had not been with them above 12 hours, but without more adoe they were knock'd on the head by the Indians, with several more white people who were barbarously tortured and murthered by them. The adjacent settlements were some of them imediately destroyed by the Indians but most of the people escaped by wonderfull Providences; this horrible and amazeing account of several massacres being brought to me from several hands, I soon mounted a party of men, and with them together with a small number of Indians who live among us, I march'd to attack the Yamasees before they were joyned by other Indians; it pleas'd God to give us success against a much more numerous party of Indians; they receiv'd an unexpected defeat from our handfull of men with the loss of eleven men kill'd outright and twenty wounded on our side. The enemy having suffered very much in this engagement, insomuch that haveing lost several of their chief warriors and abundance of them being wounded, they flew from their towns and settlements and left their provissions and good plunder for our men, they have not as yet been so hardy as to shew themselves, but keep in unaccessable swamp and unapproachable fastnesses. The country is now very active in fortifying several places, which may hinder the Indians from comeing lower into our settlements, and is so industriously employed for their deffence that all manner of other business is laid aside, so that there will be hardly any rice or other provision planted which will therefore be much wanted the next year. I take all suitable measures for the preservation of the Colony, besides white men (which I am sorry to say it, are but few, being not above 1,500 in the whole Province, and they too at great distances from one another and dispers'd in several forts) I have caused about 200 stout negro men to be inlisted, and these with a party of white men and Indians are marching towards the enemy; but the greatest discouragemt. I meet with, is the want of arms and ammunition, for which I am now sending to New England, but I am afraid they can't sufficiently supply us besides I am endeavouring to bring off some of the confederate Indians and make them our friends again by presents and by all the most probable waies can be thought of. It is great pity, my Lord, so fine and flourishing a country should be lost for want of men and arms, a countrey so beneficial to the Crown by its trade, and once so safe to other Colonies by reason of the vast number of Indians it was in alliance with. I have no occasion therefore to press your Lordship to consider, that if once we are driven from hence, the French from Movill or from Canada or from old France will certainly gett footing here if not prevented, and then with their own Indians and with these which are now our enemies they will be able to march agst. all or any Colony on the main and threaten the whole British settlements. People here are under such a dreadfull consternation and surprize haveing the most barbarous enemy on earth to deal with that they are many of them for goeing off; but I shall take all imaginable care to prevent this evill and have made them somewhat easy, by giveing them assurance that his Most Sacred Majesty will send them a speedy and sufficient supply of everything. I am perswaded your Lordship will be pleas'd to use your best offices for the assistance and preservation of this hopeful Province, which without timely supplies from the Crown, will be in the utmost danger of being overrun by the heathen enemy, etc. Signed, Charles Craven. Endorsed, Referred to the Board of Trade, etc. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 147, 147 i., ii.; and 5, 1292. pp. 424–434.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
510. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Enclose copy of preceding (July 7) and desire a conference any morning the next week. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 435.]
July 8.
St. James's.
511. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. We have received letters two days ago from Carolina, which give us an account of the deplorable condition H.M. subjects in that Province at present are in, by an invasion the Indians have lately made upon them, who have exercis'd the greatest barbarities, in torturing to death most of the British traders that were amongst them; and the case seems to be the worse, because it dos not proceed from any provocation given to them as we are inform'd, but it is the opinion of that country, that all the Indian Nations amounting to ten thousand in number have combin'd to ruin, if they are not in time prevented, all the British settlements on the Continent of America, to which Carolina is a frontier. We the Proprietors have met upon this melancholy occasion, and to our great grief find that we are unable of ourselves to afford suitable assistance in this conjuncture, and unless H.M. will graciously please to interpose by sending men, arms and ammunition, we can foresee nothing but the utter destruction of his faithfull subjects in those parts. The Honble. Charles Craven Esqr., our Govr. of South Carolina, has behav'd himself as a man of his quality ought, with the utmost bravery, and to his conduct is it owing, that the country is not already taken by the enemy; we wou'd most willingly give at our Board sufficient security to repay to the Government such sums of money as shall be expended upon this necessary occasion, if some of our members, particularly his Grace the Duke of Beaufort, and the Right Honble. the Lord Craven cou'd by reason of their minority be bound. Whatever assistance is by H.M. goodness afforded, we hope may be speedily sent. We retain one ship on purpose to carry arms, and others shall we procure to go at a day's warning. We have consulted General Nicholson, who has commanded forces against these Indians, and he gives in the following estimate as necessary for the defence of the Province, vizt. 300 barrels of powder, 1,500 musquets wth. bayonets, 2,000 cutlasses, 40 cohorn mortars with hand grannadoes; Colo. Nicholson is likewise of opinion, that it will be highly necessary, that all H.M. subjects in the several Colonies upon the Continent be by Proclamation prohibited to sell any arms, ammunition etc. to the Indians, and that the French and Spanish Ministers may be desir'd to give the same directions to their respective Colonies in those parts. All which is recommended to your Lordps'. wisdom, and we intreat your Lordps. to make a report to the Secretaries of State or Council, as soon as you can conveniently. P.S. Since this was wrote, we have received your Lordps'. letter, and shall be ready to attend you on Monday morning etc. Signed, Carteret, Palatin, Ja. Bertie for Beaufort, J. Colleton. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th July, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 148; and 5, 1292. pp. 436–439.]
July 9/20.
Rio Essequebe, Fort Kykoverall.
512. Commandant Vanderheyden Rezen to the Directors of the Dutch West Indian Company. Signed, Pr. Vanderheyden Rezen. Endorsed, Read 17th Oct., 1715. Dutch. 4 pp. Enclosed,
512. i.–xxx. Bills of lading, clearances, list of requirements, inventories, etc. [C.O. 116, 21. Nos. 15, 15 i.–xxx.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
513. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. A proposal having been made to H.M. for the disposal of the offices of Treasurer and Storekeeper of Barbados, which, as I am informed, have been some times disposed of by the Crown, and sometimes by the Assembly of the Island, I must desire to know of you, how that matter stands at present, and if you think that it is more for H.M. service in those parts, and for the good of that Plantation, that the aforesaid offices should be disposed of by H.M. rather than by the Assembly. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 20th July, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 14. No. 42; and 29, 13. p. 311.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
514. Mr. Popple to Richard Shelton. The letter of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, dated the 8th instant, being receiv'd but this morning, the Lords Commissioners for Trade will be ready to confer with them between 10 and 11 of the clock tomorrow, etc. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 436.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
515. Council of Trade and Plantations to Wm. Pulteney, Secretary at War. Desire, by to-morrow morning, copies of the Establishment of Annapolis Royal and Placentia, and the last accounts received of the effective men and clothes in store there. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 250.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
516. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Having been this day with the Lords of H.M. Cabinet Council, it was agreed by their Lordships, that we shou'd send you the inclos'd queries, to which we must desire your Lordships' answers in writing to-morrow morning at the [sic] of the clock, and that you will favour us with your company at the same time. Annexed,
516. i. Queries put to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. (1) What orders their Lordships have given to the Governor of Carolina for the defence of that Government. (2) What dispositions they have made here, toward the present supplying that Province with arms and ammunition and provisions. How many ships they have resolv'd to send from hence thither, their burthen and strength, and how soon they will be ready to sail. (3) In case H.M. shou'd be dispos'd to send some men from any of the garrisons in North America, whether their Lordships will supply shipping and provisions for their transport. (4) What, and how much mony, they require of the Government to be advanc'd for their assistance, and how they propose to repay it ? (5) Whether such of the Lords Proprietors as are not minors, are willing for themselves to surrender the Government to the King, and what provision will or can be made in the Colony for supporting the Government thereof, without any new charge to H.M. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 440–442.]
July 15.
St. James's.
517. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to preceding. (1) We have given orders to the Government of South Carolina, immediately upon the receipt of our letters, to imploy such goods and effects as our Receiver has in his hands (wch. we conceive may amount to near £2,000) towards procuring arms and ammunition for the defence of that Government. (2) The Assembly did send in May last to the value of £2,500 to New York, New England, etc., for the purchasing of arms and ammunition, to inable them the better to defend themselves against their Indian enemys. Whatever effects we have from thence lately receiv'd, shall be, as soon as may be, dispos'd of and the produce thereof apply'd to the publick use of the Province; there is a vessel lying in the River and now ready to sail with our orders, of about 100 ton burthen, and others will be sailing in a very short time after. (3) If H.M. shall be graciously pleas'd to send his Royal orders for any men from H.M. garrisons in North America, we do not doubt but the Governmt. of Carolina will send ships and provisions for their transportation. (4) It is humbly submitted to H.M. great wisdom, what sum of money H.M. will be pleas'd to grant for our assistance, and great care shall be taken, when the Province can be resettled, that the same shall be repaid, from the effects and produce of the country as soon as may be. (5) If the Lords, who are not minors, shou'd surrender for themselves, that wou'd give the King no better title than he has already, for the title of the Minors wou'd still subsist. And in case the money advanced as aforesaid by H.M. shall not in a reasonable time be repaid, we humbly conceive H.M. will have an equitable right to take the Government in to his immediate protection. The Proprietors have continually supported and defended the Government when attack'd by the French or any other enemy; neither H.M. nor any of his predecessors have ever been at any charge for ye supporting or defending the Province of Carolina from the first grant thereof to the Proprietors, which is above 50 years; and the Proprietors hope when this war is over, H.M. will never have any further trouble for any charges and expences whatsoever. Signed, Carteret, Palatin, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. Endorsed, Recd. Read 15th July, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 149; and 5, 1292. pp. 442–445.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
518. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. It being necessary for us on several occasions, to consult ye maps of the Plantations, in order to our having not only a true idea of those parts, but also of the matters before us, we have made all the inquiry possible for such maps, and can find but few here that are to be depended on; And therefore we think it for H.M. service, that H.M. Minister at the Court of France, be desir'd to direct some person there, to make a collection of the best maps of America, that can be had, whether general or particular maps of Islands, Provinces and Settlements made by any Europeans there; not doubting but good maps may be found there in print, or in the hands of private Pattentees or Adventurers; and that the same be transmitted to us as soon as conveniently may be. [C.O. 324, 10. pp. 74, 75.]
[July 15.]519. Accounts of cloathing of garrison of Annapolis Royal to Oct., 1714. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Shirreff) Read 15th July, 1715. 6 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 128.]
July 15.
Virginia.
520. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I must not ommitt informing your Lordships of the extraordinary events in these parts of H.M. Dominions. The Province of South Carolina hath been lately attack'd by many powerfull Nations of Indians combin'd together for extirpating H.M. subjects there; and this combination so secretly carry'd on that (tho' some of the Indians pretended to be uneasy on the account of some hardships in their trade) the blow was struck before any one suspected their intentions, whereby many of the inhabitants of that Province were surprized, and cruelly butcher'd by the enemy, and many more forced to desert their habitations, and leave their houses and effects a prey to the Heathen. In this their distress, the Government of that Province applyed hither for an immediate supply of arms and ammunition. Whereupon I without delay dispatch'd away H.M.S. Valeur with 160 musquetts, and some powder and ball out of H.M. Magazine here. And upon that Governt's. sending Commissioners hither soon after, to beg assistance of men, to enable them to defend the small territory which is yet preserved from the ravages of their enemys, the Council concurr'd with me in a resolution of raising 300 men for that service. And I used such diligence therein, that there pass'd but 15 days from the arrival of the Commissioners here to the time of their sailing hence with 118 of that number. I have now 40 or 50 more ready to embark in two or three days time, and am preparing the remainder, with 30 of our Tributary Indians against the return of the Valeur; so that I hope the whole complement of men from hence will be in Carolina within a month at farthest, and well armed out of H.M. stores here; but tho' I judg'd it necessary to succour H.M. subjects of South Carolina in their present danger, in hopes thereby to extinguish the flame before it reach'd hither, yet I cannot help representing how unprovided this Colony is of arms, notwithstanding ye supplys sent in by Her late Majesty. We have a large extent of frontier to defend, and don't want a numerous Militia for that purpose, but so wretchedly arm'd that they are perfectly useless, and the laws of the country are so very defective that it is impossible to bring ye Militia to a better regulation. Yet such is the unaccountable humour of the Assembly that I could never prevail with them to sett it on a better foot. Wherefore my humble request to your Lordps. is, that you would be pleas'd to intercede with H.M. for a further supply of arms to be lodg'd here; not only to serve the occasions of this Colony, but to supply any other of H.M. plantations which may happen to be in distress, this being the most convenient repository, as lying in the center of H.M. Dominions on this Continent, and to which they may send with the greatest ease, and I have lately prevailed with the Assembly to build here a convenient magazine for keeping such arms, and to settle an annual sallary to an armourer. That I may the better provide both for the defence of this Colony, and the succour of our distress'd neighbours, I have called an Assembly to meet the 3d of next moneth, and shal ommitt no arguments to move them to suitable resolutions. I shal then have occasion to write to your Lordps. more at large, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 15th Sept., 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1317. No. 10; and 5, 1364. pp. 245–248.]
[July 15.]521. Thomas Bannister to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to some queries by the Board. Cf. No. 508. (1) Prefers that a private rather than a public Bank should be established in New England. (2) As the people of New England have earnestly sought the taking off the duty on boards, no doubt it will be sufficient encouragement to them to ship them. (3) The country between Casco and Annapolis Royal is healthfull, temperate, a rich soil, abounding with naval stores, fine rivers, incredible quantities of fish, wild fowl, and runs naturally into English grass, which formerly bread the largest and fattest neat cattle. The south-west side of Kennebeck River is the best, but is claim'd by Proprietors who with the Dog in the Fable will neither serve themselves, nor let others be serv'd. But I rather think the design'd settlement will be to the north-eastward, where the King is sole Proprietor, and where they haveing once obtain'd a Charter, can have no disputes but with Indians, which I now come to consider, etc. (4) The Indians were salvage, but not so extreamly barbarous as not to improve since our settlement amongue them. We have untaught them the genuine dictates of Nature and that wild innocency and simplicity wch. was verry remarkable at our arriveall, and instead thereof implanted our own vices and follies. If I mistake not, Breach of Faith Hypocrisie and Drunkenness are no older amongue them than the English Settlements, tho' I must own the last mention'd vice seems so natural that I take sobriety before our arrival amongue them to be rather a necessity than a virtue because they had not strong liquors. Their quarrels and warrs were not for ambition, empire or blood thirstyness, but to defend their property and bounds. Therefore when a subject of a neighbouring Dominion trespassed by pursueing a dear or bear over the boundarys, it was esteem'd a sufficient ground for war. But so easily were they appeased that upon resigning the offender into their hands, or doeing publick justice on him, the war together with their animosities ceased, which shows there was no natural inveteracy. The inveteracy therefore which now appears I take to be the effect of repeated injuries and provocations, and the instigation of French Priests. Their injuries have been verry great; as divesting them of their land by force or fraud; first makeing them drunk and then to sign they knew not what. And no wonder, since Dominium temporale fundetur in gratia, serv'd both for our civil and religious, and so forsooth the Natives had no title to their bread and water, without leave from the Saints, who had the fee simple of their whole countrey, and therefore frequently asserted in their courts, that the native Indians had no better title to the soil than a bear or dear. No wonder then that they have conceiv'd an opinion that our design is wholly to exterminate and destroy them; and to this our faithlessness in Treatys has verry much concur'd, one instance of which, will live with them to latest posterity, and equally in their memories and resentments. I mean the time when in friendship and pretended benevolence we invited them into an Isthmus, and while full of other expectations, butchered a number of them. This was done upon the Eastern Indians who have since been our most inveterate enimies, and will neither heartily forgive, nor trust us. This their just indignation has been improv'd, by the pious frauds of French priests, who have taught them, that the Virgin Mary was a French woman, Our Saviour born in France, and the English the Jewes that crucify'd him. Ad to this, our inhumanity to them whenever in time of peace they doe come amonge us. We villifie them with all manner of names, and opprobrious language, cheat abuse and beat them, sometimes to the loss of limbs, pelt them with stones, and set dogs upon them. From this short view your Lordships will see what difficulties they have to struggle with, that shall attempt a new Plantation. They must sit down strong enough at first, that the salvages be not enticed by their weakness to crush them. They must verry early perswade them, that they have no design to rob them of their land, that they don't justify the older Plantations in their proceedings; that they shall find them another sort of people than those in New England: that they will at all times comfort and assist them; and accordingly, make due lawes and see them executed, to redress the wrongs and injuries of the Indians at least with as much care as they doe English. To shew as little distrust and jealousy as possible, tho' always upon a prudent guard. They must undersell the French and take especial care the Indians are not cheated in the prices of their furrs. These in time, I believe, would beget trust and confidence and at last an intire friendship. Above all they must be most religiously exact in their Treaties which is a point the more early Plantations have failed in. I have been present when an Article of the Peace has run in one sence in the English, and quite contrarie in the Indian, by the Governour's express order, and this has brought unnumbered mischiefs upon them. As for the Religion of the Natives, tho they are bred Roman Catholics, I never could perceive they spent many thoughts about it, however ours obliges us to doe them whatever spiritual service we can, but this must be by perswasion not compulsion. (5) Capt. Southac's maps of New England are undoubtedly the best. (6) There is no certin computation to be made, but I recon [the number of inhabitants in New England] about 160,000, of which the town of Boston conteins about 14,000. (7) As to the vallew of Brittish manufactories they yearly import, I differ widely from the honourable Mr. Cook. It was impossible for him by the utmost industry to make a judgement by the Custom house books, but rather to be misled. The first computation is, that the Toun of Boston consisting of 14,000 inhabitants, and some few hundreds, expend(s) yearly in Brittish manufactories £7 sterling each one with another. This amounts to £100,000. The Countrey cloathing much with their own manufactures, I will allow to spend yearly but ⅓rd of what a Boston man does, which makes £328,500, etc., etc. Signed, Thos. Bannister. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 29th July, 1715. 13 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 53; and 5, 914. pp. 66–78.]