The Vicarage of St. Mary

Sponsor

English Heritage

Publication

Author

C. R. Ashbee (editor)

Year published

1900

Page

14

Citation Show another format:

'The Vicarage of St. Mary', Survey of London: volume 1: Bromley-by-Bow (1900), pp. 14. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74440 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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II.—THE VICARAGE OF ST. MARY.

General description and date of the structure.

The house is middle or late 18th century, with additions of about the year 1800, and subsequent modernizations in about 1850. The entrance hall is the principal feature, and is quarried with black and white marble, and simply panelled. In the corner is a fine piece of English 18th century cabinet work, a triangular cupboard in Spanish mahogany, with carved doors and drawers, and an inlay of light wood in the broken pediment above. There are two good coloured marble mantelpieces of the Adam time in the drawing room and dining room. Some of the 18th century wainscoting in the upper part of the house still remains.

In the vicarage is also the famous silver gilt chalice and paten of 1617, possibly by Viansen, as it bears Nuremberg design in the workmanship. The inscription in both cup and paten is—"1617, Bromley, Middlesex: the gift of the women."

The Jacobean oak pulpit of the church is preserved in the vicarage, the late vicar having upholstered it with French leather and converted it into a lounge.

Condition of repair.

The house is in good repair.

Historical notes.

The house is stated formerly to have belonged to Messrs. Smith, Garrett and Co., brewers, before it was used as a vicarage. It was purchased from them in 1858 for £1,288 18s. 6d.

Bibliographical references.

Dunstan (History of the Parish of Bromley St. Leonard, pages 134–138), gives at length the report of the committee "to consider the propriety of purchasing the house [the house occupied by the incumbent in 1857] as a perpetual residence for the clergymen of the parish." A very brief account is given of its appearance and surroundings. A view of Broadway, 1840, where the vicarage stands, is given.

In the Committee's M.S. collection is—

(1.) View of house from the churchyard (photo).