Other buildings of interest

Sponsor

English Heritage

Publication

Author

C. R. Ashbee (editor)

Year published

1900

Pages

43-44

Citation Show another format:

'Other buildings of interest', Survey of London: volume 1: Bromley-by-Bow (1900), pp. 43-44. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74453 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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XV.—SOME SMALLER HOUSES AND BUILDINGS OF INTEREST, EITHER AT PRESENT STANDING IN BROMLEY, OR DEMOLISHED DURING THE COMPILATION OF THIS REGISTER.

HOUSES IN HIGH STREET.

The house on the west side of the Vicarage (No. 95) is probably of middle 18th century date. The plan is square, and the front has red brick window facings and strings. In the centre, on the ground floor was the principal entrance, over the door was a canopy with fine carved scroll brackets; this was removed some six years ago, when the house was bought by Messrs. Edie, founders, whose works adjoin, and a window made in its place. The interior is spoiled, the panelled room, capacious cupboards and fine staircase having suffered greatly from the alteration.

In the Committee's MS. collection are—

A view of the house from High-street.

ASHMORE TERRACE, Nos. 101 to 105.

The Ashmore-terrace houses are of the later 18th century. The doorways are of wood, with pilasters at sides and cornice over the top. The wrought iron entrance gates and railings, though of no great note, are the only examples remaining now in Bromley. The fronts of these houses facing High-street are of brick, but the backs are weather-boarded.

In the Committee's MS. collection are—

(1.) General view of the houses from the street.
(2.) Details of the porches.
(3.) Drawings of the iron gates and railings.

No. 45, HIGH STREET.

On the north side, at the corner of Baker's-alley, was an interesting building of middle 17th century date. It had a long low elevation, 40 feet wide, and two stories (with attics) in height. The walls were of dull red bricks, with lighter colour for the window jambs, arches, &c. At the eaves was a large moulded wood cornice.

The entrance door in the centre of the front had a flat canopy, with carved oak acanthus scroll brackets. The windows had sliding sash lights, with a mullion in the centre: they evidently were of much different form originally, and extended nearly the whole width of the front. The sashes of the attic windows still preserved the original leaded lights.

Internally, nearly all the fittings that were movable (e.g., stair balusters, rails, &c.) had disappeared, most probably for firewood. Only one feature of interest still remained: one of the circular cupboards, in a room on the ground floor.

The house disappeared at the beginning of 1896 to make room for a block of cottages.

In the Committee's MS. collection are—

(1.) A block plan of the house and ground.
(2.) A drawing of the front facing High-street.

Nos. 2 to 18, HIGH STREET.

These houses stand at the west end of the High-street, between Devons-road and Bow-road, and are of 17th and 18th century date.

No 2 has a long low elevation, with weather-boarded upper storey. No. 4 has a gabled and weather-boarded front, and is illustrated in plate 34. The remaining houses are all small, with brick fronts, mullioned and sash windows, and some have interesting bits of detail in canopies and doors. The grouping of the whole block is very picturesque.

In the Committee's MS. collection are—

* (1.) View looking north-west.
* (2.) View from north-east.
* (3.) East front, No. 4.
These are all reproduced here.