Historical Collections
1640, May

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History of Parliament Trust

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Author

John Rushworth

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1149-1189

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'Historical Collections: 1640, May', Historical Collections of Private Passages of State: Volume 3: 1639-40, pp. 1149-1189. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74918 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Friday, May. 1

Friday, May 1. the Commons gave the Lords a meeting at a Conference, as was desired the day before: the matter of the Conference was thus delivered by the Lord Keeper.

The Lord Keeper's Speech.

'My Lords have commanded me to let you know, that the desire and care on your part at the last Conference, represented unto them for preserving a good Union and Correspondence between their Lordships and you, is by them entertained with all respect, and requited with all good affection; as that which is the best way to bring our Consultations and Resolutions to an happy issue, to give his Majesty a dutiful account of our zeal and forwardness in those great and weighty Affairs, for which we were assembled; and to further those United Proceedings that may tend to the Happiness of this Kingdom, and the Contentment of both Houses.

'Their Lordships well know the great Privileges belonging to both Houses of Parliament, of which they and you alike participate: and they are not ignorant of those that are distinctly to each House: what belongs to you of the House of Commons, they never had thought to impeach or diminish' in the least kind; and what they may justly challenge to themselves, they presume you will not attempt upon, since you cannot doubt but they will be as tender of their Honour in the preservation and upholding of their own, as they are and shall be careful not to invade or violate any of yours.

'This (their Lordships commanded me to tell you) will best and most clearly appear, by the Course hath been held in their own House, and by their proceedings with you.

'Their Lordships (as in duty and affection to his Majesties Crown and Government they are bound) took into serious Consideration the great and weighty motives of his Majesties calling us together at this time, the great Evils and Calamities that hang over our Heads, and the apparent danger this Kingdom is like to run into, if by speedy and fitting supply his Majesty be not enabled to prevent it.

'These with Reasons inforcing, how unsupportable Delay and Protraction was, and how impossible it is for both Houses to recover the loss of time, in a matter of so urging and pressing Consequence, whereby his Majesties Command delivered to their Lordships and you both in the Lords House and in the Banquetting-House at White-Hall, his Majesty being present.

'His Majesty, I say, at both those times, expressed his gracious and Princely desire to do all that from a just and a gracious King might be expected, whereby this Parliament might have an happy and blessed conclusion, to bring Joy and Consolation to his Majesty and all his Subjects. He told you, that all your just Grievances should be graciously heard and relieved; that he would therein let you be at no loss of time.

'Their Lordships were Witnesses, that his Majesty gave his Royal Word herein, and for their parts lodge it in their hearts with as much trust and confidence of his Majesties Royal performance, as ever Subjects did.

'Not long after, his Majesty was pleased to honour the Lords House with his presence again, to renew their Remembrance of all that before had been delivered to both Houses, both for the necessity of the Supply desired, with an impossibility of admitting delay, and the clearness of his Majesties intention and resolutions to give all just satisfaction, to what with reason could be defited of him.

'His Majesty then took notice to their Lordships of somewhat that had been voted in your House concerning Religion, Property of Goods, and Liberty of Parliament; whereby his Majesty conceived the matter of his Supplies set aside, which he had so often and with such weight of Reason desired might have precedence, after very gracious assurances to their Lordships of his Majesties constant affection and zeal for the true Religion, for preventing all Innovation therein, of his so often iterated promise to give a gracious Ear and just Relief to all your just Grievances, expressing his Royal Intentions in that of Ship-Money, which he found so much stood upon. He was pleased to desire their Lordships (as Persons in their Ranks and Degrees nearest to him in Honour, as much and more concerned than others, and in the safety and prosperity of his Kingdom, at least equally interested with the rest of his Subjects) in a case of this great and important weight.

'They would by their counsel and persuasion, incline you of the House of Commons to give his Majesty a speedy answer and resolution in the matter of supply.

'Their Lordships took his Majesties Desire into serious and dutiful consideration, and after a great and solemn Debate, they resolved, that their opinion was, That the matter of his Majesties supply should have precedency, and be resolved of before any other matter whatsoever; and did think fit, there should be a conference desired with you of the House of Commons, to dispose you thereunto. And this was all they then voted or concluded, with which other Conference their Lordships acquainted you: This as it was just and honourable for them to do, so it neither extended the Bounds and Limits of their own Privilege, nor narrowed or straitned any of yours. And yet at the last Conference, which their Lordships are apt and willing to believe, proceeded rather from some mistaking than any intention to lessen their or enlarge your own Privileges, it was urged in your name, that the Voting of this was a breach of your privilege, and that therein their Lordships had been transported beyond their grounds, which they had set to themselves: because in their former Conference their Lordships had admitted, that matter of supply ought to be given in the House of Commons, as naturally belonging to that House, and wherein their Lordships would not meddle, no not so much as to give advice: And yet by Voting what they did, had not only meddled in matter of supply, but as far as in their Lordships lay, had concluded both of matter and order of proceeding, for which you demanded Reparation from their Lordships: Wherein I'm commanded by their Lordships to let you know, that they have neither varied nor been transported from their own grounds, nor voted any thing contrary to your rights and privileges, or to that admitting of them at that Conference, which is pretended. For their Lordships did and I do admit, that the Bill of Subsidies ought to have its Inception and beginning in your House, that when it comes up to their Lordships, and is by them agreed unto, it must be returned back to you, and be by your Speaker presented.

'And therefore as they do disclaim any thought or intention of such beginning in their House, so they did at their Debate and Conference with you, disclaim to meddle with the matter of Subsidies or Supplies; that is by naming the Time or Number, or any such Circumstances incident to the Bill, which ought to begin with you, or therein to give you any the least advice, but to confer and talk with you about Supplies in general.

'Their advice therein they do not, nor ever did hold derogatory to yours, or exceeding the privileges of their own House: for as you frequently impart your Grievances to them, so it's all the reason in the world they should communicate their fears and foresights of Dangers to you, their Lordships being a Body that moveth in an Orb nearer unto the Royal Throne than you do, and thereby the likelier to communicate in the Counsels and Secrets of State, and for their Persons and Fortunes, at least as considerable in point of Danger.

'Their Lordships are not unacquainted with that Establishment in Parliament, which was by you at the Conference stiled, The Indempnity of the Commons: but it is indeed the Indempnity of the Lords and Commons, and so stiled in the Record it self, by that Record made at Glocester 9 H. 4.

'It appears there was a Conference between the Lords and Commons, about the State of the Realm and Defence of it: after which the King demanded of the Lords, What Aid was fit to be granted? they said a Tenth and a half in Cities and Boroughs, and one Fifth and a half of others, and a Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage for two years.

'Upon which, the King sent to the Commons to send up to him and the Lords, twelve of their Company; when they came, it was by the King's Command declared, what had been of the King demanded of the Lords, and what the Lords answer thereunto was (which the King willed them to report to their Companions, that they might with better speed conform themselves to the intention of the Lords.)

'This indeed the Commons were troubled at, as being a great Derogation to their Liberties; whereupon to prevent for the future any thing that might turn to the prejudice of their Liberty, or against the Liberty of the Lords, it was established, That it should always be lawful for the Lords to commune among themselves in the King's absence of the State of the Realm, and the Remedies needful; and so for the Commons among themselves: Provided always, that neither the Lords or Commons report to the King any things granted by the Commons and assented to by the Lords, nor the Communication of it, before the Lords and Commons be agreed, and then be represented (as the manner is) by the Speaker of the House of Commons.

'This is the substance of that Establishment, which only bath relation to the manner of presenting Subsidies and Aids to the King, and giving him knowledge of them. And as it hath not one word that bars the Lords and Commons from conferring about them; so it plainly declares, that Lords and Commons in their several houses, may equally treat amongst themselves of the Dangers the Kingdom is in, and of the way to remedy them: and this my Lords have well weighed, and are satisfied verifies their proceedings to have been according to antient usage and custom, as they are grounded upon just and weighty Reasons.

'Many other Reasons their Lordships have, to justify their proceedings in this particular: but they conceive this Record alone mentioned by your self, will give you herein abundant satisfaction, and plainly shew, that the House of Commons had no cause to demand Reparation herein from their Lordships.

'A second thing objected, wherein their Lordships have been said to have broke another great Privilege of the House of Commons established by that Ordinance which I have mentioned before, is, that their Lordships have taken notice of some proceedings in the House of Commons concerning three particulars, viz. Religion, Propriety of Goods, and Privilege of Parliament. To which their Lordships have commanded me to give you this just and honourable answer.

'His Majesty told their Lordships you had resolved something concerning these three head, and by that way of proceeding preferred the Grievances before the matter of Supply. How his Majesty knew that you had so resolved, belongs not to their Lordships to enquire into, their Lordships not medaling with any thing that others said to the King. But withal his Majesty said to their Lordships, and for their Lordships to hear what his Majesty declared to them, and for them thereupon to report the same to the House of Commons, their Lordships are so far from holding it any diminution, or violation of your Privileges, that on the contrary in Duty to his Majesty they could do no other; and the communicating it to you in that manner, they think rather merits your opinion and belief of their affections to you, and desire of Correspondence with you, than any other misconstruction whatsoever.

'And that which you called the Indempnity of the Commons, hath no word in it that can be construed to make that any breach of your Privilege; and therefore their Lordships having thus cleared and justified their own proceedings, and freed themselves from any Imputation of invading your Liberties, they cannot but return to their first grounds and resolution, which were in all fair and affectionate manner, to stir up in you the just consideration of those great and eminent dangers that threaten this Kingdom at this time, and how dangerous and irrecoverable delay is; and withal to dispose you to take into your first and best thoughts the matter of his Majesties Supply, and give him a speedy answer therein.

'This their Lordships are confident, will be the means to preserve and continue a good union and understanding between their Lordships and you, to make this a happy Parliament, and to avert the publick calamities, that menace the ruine and overthrow of this famous and renowned Monarchy.

Saturday May 2. Sir Henry Vane Treasurer of the King's Houshold delivered this Message from the King.

Saturday, May 2.

That his Majesty hath by divers and sundry ways acquainted the House with the urgent danger inevitably to fall upon the whole State, upon his own Honour, and the Honour of the Nation, if more time shall be lost

That nevertheless his Majesty hath received no answer at all, though heretofore his Majesty had told the House that a Delay in this case is as destructive as a Denial; and doth again desire them to give him a present answer concerning his Supply, his Majesty being still resolved on his part to make good his promise made by himself and the Lord Keeper.

Upon the delivery of this Message, the House of Commons immediately turned themselves into a Grand Committee to take the same into consideration, which held debate till almost six at night, but came to no resolution, William Lenthall Esq; being in the Chair.

Likewise the House of Commons continued the Debate in a Grand Committee, Whether Supply or Grievances should have precedency? but after the whole day was spent in Debate, came to no resolution.

May 4. Sir Henry Vane delivered a second Message to the House of Commons in these words.

Monday May 4.

Whereas, upon Saturday last his Majesty was pleased to send a Message to this House, desiring you to give a present answer concerning his Supply, to which as yet his Majesty hath had no other answer, but that upon this day you will again take it into further consideration: Therefore his Majesty (the better to facilitate your Resolutions) this day hath thought fit to let you know, that of his grace and favour he is pleased, upon your granting twelve Subsidies to be presently passed and to be paid in three years, with a proviso, that it shall not determine the Sessions, his Majesty will not only for the present forbear the levying of any Ship-Money, but will give way to the utter abolishing of it, by any course that your selves shall like best.

And for your Grievances, his Majesty will (according to his Royal Promise) give you as much time as may be now, and the next Michaelmas; and he expects a present and positive answer upon which he may rely, his affairs being in such a condition as can endure no longer delay.

The House was turned again into a Grand Committee, and spent the whole day till six at night in debate of this Message, but came to no resolution; and desired Sir Henry Vane to acquaint his Majesty that they intended the next day to proceed in the further consideration thereof.

Tuesday May 5.

Tuesday the fifth of May, Secretary Windebanke went early to Mr. Speaker at his house in Chancery-Lane, and had a command to bring the Speaker to White-Hall. The Commons met at the usual hour, and the Speaker not coming according to his wonted custom, the Members concluded the House should be dissolved; and while they were discoursing with one another, about eleven of the Clock James Maxwel Gentleman Usher came with the black Rod, to let the Commons know his Majesty was in the House of Lords, and expected their coming thither. When they were come his Majesty thus spake.

My Lords,
There can no occasion of my coming to this House be so unpleasing unto me as this at this time. The fear of doing that which I am to do this day, made me not long since come into this House, where I exprest as well my fears as the remedy which I thought necessary for the eschewing of what is to follow

I must confess and acknowledge that you my Lords of the higher House did give me so willing an ear, and with such an affection did shew your selves, that certainly I may say, that if there had been any means to have given an happy end to this Parliament, you took it; so that it was neither your Lordships fault nor mine, that it is not so. Therefore in the first place. I must thank you my Lords for your good endeavours.

My Lords, I hope you remember what the first day of the Parliament my Lord Keeper said to you in my name, and what likewise he said in the Banqetting-House in White-Hall, and what lately I said unto you in this place my self. I name all this unto you, not doubting that you do not well remember it, but to shew you that I never said any thing in way of Favour to my people, but (by the Grace of God) I will punctually and really perform it.

I know that they have insisted very much on Grievances; I will not say but there may be some, though I will confidently affirm, that there are not by many degrees so many as the publick Voice doth make them. Wherefore I desire you to take notice, now especially at this time, that out of Parliament I shall be as ready (if not more willing) to hear and redress any just Grievances, as in Parliament.

There is one thing much spoken of, I mean as to matters of Religion. Concerning which, albeit I expressed my self fully the last day in this place, yet I think it fit again on this occasion to tell you, that as I am concerned, so I shall be most careful to preserve that purity of Religion which I thank God is so well established in the Church of England, and that as well out of, as in Parliament.

My Lords, I shall not trouble you long with words, it being not my fashion; wherefore to conclude, what I offered the last day to the House of Commons, I think it is very well known to you all; as likewise how they accepted it, which I desire not to remember, but wish they had remembred, how at first they were told by my Lord Keeper, that delay was the worst kind of denial: yet I will not lay this fault on the whole House of Commons; I will not judge so uncharitably of those whom for the most part I take to be Loyal and well-affected Subjects; but it hath been the malicious canning of some few seditiously affected men, that hath been the cause of this misunderstanding.

I shall now end as I have begun, in giving you thanks for your affections shewn to me at this time, desiring you to go on and assist me in the maintaining of that Regal Power that is truly mine. As for the Liberty of the People, that they now so much starile at; know my Lords, that no King in the world shall be more careful in the propriety of their Goods, liberty of their Persons, and true Religion, than I shall.

And now, my Lord Keeper, do as I have commanded you.

The Lord Keeper then added,
'My Lords, and you the Gentlemen of the House of Commons, The King's Majesty doth dissolve this Parliament.

Soon after his Majesty caused the aforesaid Proceedings to be comprized in a Treatise, and published in his name by way of Declaration.

A Catalogue of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal summoned by the King's Writ to appear in Parliament appointed to meet at Westminster the thirteenth of April 1640.

  • King Charles.
  • Prince Charles.
  • James Duke of York.

    Dukes.

  • George Villiers, Duke, Marquess, and Earl of Buckingham, and Coventry, Viscount Villiers, Baron of Whodden, infra œtatem.

    Marquesses.

  • John Pawlet Marquess of Winchester, Earl of Wiltshire, and Lord St. John of Basing.

    Earls.

  • Thomas Howard Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal of England, and Knight of the Garter.
  • Awbery Vere, Earl of Oxford, &c.
  • Algernon Percy, Earl of Northumberland, Lord Poynings, Fitzpayn, and Brian, Knight of the Garter, Lord High-Admiral.
  • George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, Lord Talbot, Furnival, Verdon, and Strange of Blackmere.
  • Anthony Gray Earl of Kent, Lord Ruthin.
  • William Stanley Earl of Derby, Lord Stanley Strange of Knocking, and of the Isle of Man, Knight of the Garter.
  • Henry Somerset Earl of Worcester, Lord Herbert, Regland, and Gower.
  • George Manners Earl of Rutland, Lord Ross of Hamelake, Belvoir and Trusbut.
  • Francis Clifford Earl of Cumberland, Lord Clifford, Westmorlanad and Vesey.
  • Edward Ratcliffe Earl of Sussex, Viscount Fitz-walter, Lord Egremont and Burnel.
  • Henry Hastings Earl of Huntington, Lord Hastings, Hungerford, Botreaux Moeles, and Molyns.
  • Henry Bourchier Earl of Bath, and Lord Fitz-Warin.
  • Tho. Wriothsley Earl of Southampton, and Baron Wriothesley of Tichfield.
  • Francis Russel Earl of Bedford, and Lord Russel.
  • Philip Herbert Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Baron Herbert of Cardiffe and Shirland, Lord Parre and Ross of Kendal, Marmion, and St. Quinton, Lord Chamberlain of his Majesties Houshold, and Knight of of the Garter.
  • William Seymour Earl of Hartford, and Baron Beauchamp.
  • Robert Devereux Earl of Essex, Viscount Hereford and Bourchier, Lord Ferrers of Chartley Bourchier and Lovain.
  • Theophilus Fyne Earl of Lincoln, and Lord Clinton.
  • Charles Howard Earl of Nottingham, and Lord Howard of Effingham.

    Earls made since the first of King James.

  • Theophilus Howard Earl of Suffolk, Lord Howard of Walden, and Knight of the Garter.
  • Edward Sackvile Earl of Dorset and Baron Buckhurst, Knight of the Garter, and Lord Chamberlain to the Queen's Majesty.
  • William Cecil Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Gramborne, and Baron Cecil of Essinden, Knight of the Garter.
  • William Cecil Earl of Exeter, Baron Burgeley, Knight of the Garter.
  • Robert Carre Earl of Somerset, Viscount Rochester, and Baron of Brandspath, Knight of the Garter.
  • John Egerton Earl of Bridgwater, Viscount Brackley, and Baron Ellesmere, Lord President of Wales.
  • Robert Sidney Earl of Leicester, Viscount Lisle, Baron Sidney of Fenthurst.
  • Spencer Compton Earl of Northampton, Baron Compton of Compton.
  • Robert Rich Earl of Warwick, and Lord Rich of Leeze.
  • William Cavendish Earl of Devonshire, and Baron Cavendish of Hardwicke, infra œtatem.
  • James Hamilton Earl of Cambridge, Marquiss of Hamilton, Earl of Arran, Baron of Even and Aberbroth, Master of the Horse to his Majesty, Knight of the Garter.
  • James Stuart Earl of March, Duke of Lenox, Lord Aubigny, Baron of Leighton Bromeswold, Lord Darnley, Mertiven, and St. Andrew's, Knight of the Garter.
  • James Hay Earl of Carlisle, Viscount Doncaster, Lord Hay of Sauley.
  • William Fielding Earl of Denhigh, Viscount Fielding, and Baron of Newnhampadox.
  • John Digby Earl of Bristol, and Baron Digby of Shirborne.
  • Lionell Cranfield Earl of Middlesex, and Baron Cranfield of Cranfield.
  • Charles Villiers Earl of Anglesey, Lord Daventry, infra œtatem.
  • Henry Rich Earl of Holland, Baron Kensington of Kensington, and Knight of the Garter.
  • John Hollis Earl of Clare, Lord Houghton of Houghton.
  • Oliver St. John Earl of Bolling-brook, Lord St. John of Bletso.
  • Mildmay Fane Earl of Westmoreland, Lord Le Despencer and Burghwash.
  • Earls made since the first of King Charles.
  • Henry Montague Earl of Manchester, Viscount Mandevile, and Lord Kimbolton, Lord Privy-Seal.
  • Thomas Howard Earl of Berkshire, Viscount Andover, and Lord Charleton, Knight of the Garter.
  • Thomas Wentworth Earl of Cleaveland, Lord Wentworth of Nettlested.
  • Edmond Sheffield Earl of Mulgrave, Lord Sheffield of Butterwike, and Knight of the Garter.
  • Henry Danvers Earl of Danby, Lord Danvers of Dantsey, Knight of the Garter.
  • Robert Cary Earl of Monmouth, Lord Cary of Lepington.
  • James Ley Earl of Marleburgh, and Lord Ley of Ley.
  • John Savage Earl Rivers, Viscount Colchester, and Rock Savage, and Lord Darcy of Chich.
  • Robert Bartue Earl of Lindsey, and Lord Willoughby of Eresby, Lord Great Chamberlain, Knight of the Garter.
  • William Cavendish Earl of Newcastle, Viscount Mansfield, Lord Boulsover and Ogle.
  • Henry Cary Earl of Dover, Viscount Rochford and Lord Hunsdon.
  • John Mordant Earl of Peterborough, Lord Mordant of Turvey.
  • Henry Gray Earl of Standford, Lord Gray of Groby, Bonvile and Harrington.
  • Thomas Finch Earl of Winchelsey and Viscount Maidstone.
  • Robert Perpoint Earl of Kingston upon Hull, Viscount Newark upon Trent, and Lord Perpoint of Holmes Perpoint.
  • Robert Dormere Earl of Carnarvan, Viscount Ascot, and Lord Dormere of Wing.
  • Mount-joy Blunt Earl of Newport, Lord Mount-joy of Thurveston.
  • Philip Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield, and Lord Stanhope of Shelford.
  • Nicholas Tuffton Earl of the Isle of Thanet, and Lord Tuffton of Tuffton.
  • Ulicke de Burgh Earl of St. Albans, and Clanrickard, Viscount Tunbridge and Galloway, Baron of Somerhil, and Imanney.
  • Jerome Weston Earl of Portland, Lord Weston of Neyland.
  • Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford, Viscount Wentworth, Baron Wentworth of Wentworth, Woodhouse, New-March and Oversley, Raby, Lord Lieutenant of the Realm of Ireland.

    Viscounts.

  • Francis Brown Viscount Mountague of Cowdrey.
  • Viscounts made by King James.
  • John Villiers Viscount Purbeck, Lord of Stoke.
  • William Fines Viscount Sey and Seal, Lord Sey and Seal.
  • Viscounts made by King Charles.
  • Edward Conway, Viscount Conway and Killultagh, and Baron Conway of Ragley.
  • Edward Noel Viscount Camden, and Baron Noel of Ridlington.

    Bishops.

  • William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury his Grace.
  • Richard Neile Archbishop of York his Grace.
  • William Juxton Bishop of London, and Lord High Treasurer of England.
  • Thomas Morton Bishop of Durham.
  • Walter Curle Bishop of Winchester.
  • John Thornburgh Bp of Worcester.
  • John Bridgeman Bp of Chester.
  • John Williams Bp of Lincoln.
  • John Davenant Bp of Salisbury.
  • Robert Wright Bp of Coventry and Litchfield.
  • Godfrey Goodman Bp of Gloucester.
  • Joseph Hall Bp of Exeter.
  • Richard Mountague Bp of Norwich.
  • Barnabas Potter Bp of Carlisle.
  • John Owen Bp of St. Asaph.
  • William Pierce Bp of Bath and Wells.
  • John Bancroft Bp of Oxford.
  • George Coke Bp of Hereford.
  • Matthew Wren Bp of Ely, Dean of his Majesty's Chapel Royal.
  • Roger Manwaring Bp of St. Davids.
  • Robert Skinner Bp of Bristol.
  • William Roberts Bp of Bangor.
  • John Warner Bp of Rochester.
  • Brian Duppa Bp of Chichester.
  • John Towers Bp of Peterborough.
  • Morgan Owen Bp of Landaffe.

    Barons.

  • Henry Howard Lord Moubray and Maltravers.
  • Henry Clifford Lord Clifford, only Son of Francis Earl of Cumberland.
  • Henry Nevil Lord Abergavenny.
  • James Tenchet Lord Awdeley of Highleigh.
  • James Stanley Lord Strange, eldest Son of William Earl of Derby.
  • Charles West Lord Delaware, infra œtatem.
  • George Berkley Lord Berkley of Berkley Castle.
  • Henry Parker Lord Morley and Monteagle.
  • Richard Lemcard Lord Dacres of Hurstmoseux.
  • Edward Sutton Lord Dudley of Dudley Castle.
  • Edward Stourton Lord Stourton of Stourton.
  • Edward Vaux Lord Vaux of Harrowden.
  • Thomas Windsor Lord Windsor of Bradenham.
  • Thomas Cromwel Lord Cromwel of Ockham.
  • William Eure Lord Eure of Whitton.
  • Philip Wharton Lord Wharton of Wharton.
  • William Willoughby Lord Willoughby of Parham.
  • William Paget Lord Paget of Beaudefert.
  • Dudley North Lord North of Carthlage.
  • George Bradges Lord Shandois of Sudley.

    Barons made by King James.

  • William Peter Lord Peter of Writtel.
  • Dutton Gerrard Lord Gerrard of Gerrards Bromley.
  • William Spencer Lord Spencer of Wormleighton.
  • Charles Stanhope Lord Stanhope of Harrington.
  • Tho. Arundel Lord Arundel of Wardour.
  • Christopher Roper Lord Tenham of Tenham, infra œtatem.
  • Edward Mountague Lord Mountague of Kimbolton, eldest Son of Henry Earl of Manchester.
  • Basil Fielding Lord of Newnham Paddocks, eldest Son of William Earl of Denbigh.
  • Robert Grevil Lord Brook of Beaucham-Court.
  • Edward Mountague Lord Mountague of Boughton.
  • William Gray Lord Gray of Wark.
  • Francis Leake Lord Danecourt of Sutton.
  • John Roberts Lord Roberts of Truro.

    Barons made by King Charles.

  • William Craven Lord Craven of Hamstead Marshal.
  • Thomas Belasis Lord Fauconberge of Sarum.
  • John Lovelace Lord Lovelace of Hurley.
  • John Pawlet Lord Pawlet of Hinton St. George.
  • William Harvey Lord Harvey of Kidbrooke.
  • Thomas Brudenel Lord Brudenel of Stouton.
  • William Maynard Lord Maynard of Estaynes.
  • Thomas Coventry Lord Coventry of Alesborough.
  • Edward Howard Lord Howard of Estricke.
  • George Goring Lord Goring of Hustperpoint.
  • John Mohun Lord Mohun of Okehampton.
  • Thomas Savil Lord Savil of Pontefract.
  • John Butler Lord Butler of Bramfield.
  • Francis Leigh Lord Dunsmore.
  • William Herbert Lord Powis of Powis.
  • Edward Herbert Lord Herbert of Chierbury.
  • Francis Cottington Lord Cottington of Hanworth, Master of the Court of Wards, and Chancellor of the Exchequer.
  • John Finch Lord Finch, Baron of Fordwich, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England.

Some Lords (as Privy Counsellors) though not Peers of the Kingdom of England, such as the King shall be pleased to call thither for their Assistance, and sit on the Wool-sacks.

    Judges.

  • Sir John Bramston Lord Chief Justice of the Kings-Bench.
  • Sir Edward Littleton Lord Chief-Justice of the Common-Pleas.
  • Sir Humphrey Davenport Lord Chief-Baron.
  • The Judges of the Kings-Bench.
  • The Judges of the Common-Pleas.
  • The Barons of the Exchequer.
  • The four Masters of the Chancery there attending, according to the Direction of the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England.
  • The King's learned Council.
  • The Serjeants.
  • Sir John Bankes the King's Attorney General.

    The Officers of the higher House of Parliament.

  • The Clerk of the Crown.
  • The Clerk of the Parliament.
  • The Usher.
  • The Yeoman Usher.

His Majesty's Declaration to all his loving Subjects, of the Causes which moved him to dissolve the last Parliament.

The King's most Excellent Majesty well knoweth, that the calling, adjourning, proroguing and dissolving of Parliaments are undoubted Prerogatives inseparably annexed to his Imperial Crown, of which he is not bound to render any Account but to God alone, no more than of his other Regal Actions.

Nevertheless his Majesty (whose Piety and Goodness have made him ever so order and govern all things, that the Clearness and Candor of his Royal Heart may appear to all his Subjects, especially in those great and publick matters of State that have relation to the Weal and Safety of his People, and the Honour of his Royal Person and Government) hath thought fit (for avoiding and preventing all sinister Constructions and Misinterpretations, which the Malice of some ill-affected Persons to his Crown and Sovereignty hath or may practise, to infuse into the Minds and Ears of his good and faithful Subjects) to set down, by way of Declaration, the true Causes as well of his assembling as of his dissolving the late Parliament.

It is not unknown to most of his Majesty's loving Subjects, what Discouragements he hath formerly had, by the undutiful and seditious Carriage of divers of the Lower House in preceding Assemblies of Parliaments, enough to have made him averse to those antient and accustomed ways of calling his People together; when instead of dutiful Expressions towards his Person and Government, they vented their own Malice and Disaffections to the State; and by their subtil and malignant Courses endeavour'd nothing more than to bring into Contempt and Disorder all Government and Magistracy.

Yet his Majesty, well considering that but few were guilty of that seditious and undutiful Behaviour, and hoping that Time and Experience had made his loving Subjects sensible of the Distemper the whole Kingdom was like to be put into by the ill-govern'd Actions of those Men; and his Majesty being over desirous to tread in the Steps of his most noble Progenitors, was pleased to issue forth his Writs under the Great Seal of England for a Parliament to be holden the 13th day of April last. At which day his Majesty, by the Lord Keeper of his Great Seal, was graciously pleased to let both Houses of Parliament know how desirous he was, that all his People would unite their Hearts and Affections in the execution of those Counsels that might tend to the Honour of his Majesty, the Safety of his Kingdoms, and the Good and Preservation of all his People: And withal, how confident he was that they would not be failing in their Duties and Affections to him and to the Publick.

He laid open to them the manifest and apparent Mischiefs threatned to this and all his other Kingdoms, by the mutinous and rebellious Behaviour of divers of the Scotish Nation, who had by their Examples drawn many of his Subjects there into a course of Disloyalty and Disobedience, not fit for his Majesty, in Honour, Safety or Wisdom, to endure.

How (to strengthen themselves in their disloyal Courses) they had address'd themselves to foreign States, and treated with them to deliver themselves up to their Protection and Defence, as was made apparent under the Hands of the prime Ringleaders of that rebellious Faction.

These Courses of theirs tending so much to the Ruin and Overthrow of this famous Monarchy, united by the Descent of the Crown of England upon his Majesty and his Father of blessed Memory; his Majesty (in his great Wisdom, and in discharge of the Trust reposed in him by God, and by the fundamental Laws of both Kingdoms, for the Protection and Government of them) resolved to suppress, and thereby to vindicate that Sovereign Power entrusted to him.

He had by the last Summer's tryal found that his Grace and Goodness was abused, and that contrary to his Expectation, and their faithful Promises, they had (since his being at Berwick, and the Pacification there made) pursued their former rebellious Designs; and therefore it was necessary now for his Majesty by Power to reduce them, to the just and modest Condition of their Obedience and Sujection, which whenever they should be brought unto, or seeing their own Errors, should put themselves into a way of Humility and Obedience becoming them, his Majesty should need no other Mediator for Clemency and Mercy to them than his own Piety and Goodness, and the tender Affection he hath ever born to that his native Kingdom.

This being of so great weight and consequence to the whole Kingdom, and the Charge of an Army fit to master such a business amounting to such a Sum as his Majesty hath no means to raise, having not only emptied his own Coffers, but issued between three and four thousand Pounds, which he borrowed of his Servants upon Security out of his own Estate, to provide such things as were necessary to begin such an Action with; his Majesty, after the Example of his Predecessors, resorted to his People in their Representative Body the Parliament, whom he desir'd, (with all the Expressions of Grace and Goodness which could possibly come from him) that taking into serious and dutiful Consideration the Nature of these bleeding Evils, and how dangerous it was to lose the least minute of time, lest thereby those of Scotland should gain the opportunity to frame their Parties with foreign States; that they would for a while lay aside all other Debates, and pass an Act for the speedy Payment of so many Subsidies, as might enable his Majesty to put in readiness for this Summer's Expedition those things which were to be prepared before so great an Army could be brought into the Field

For further Supply necessary for so great an Undertaking, his Majesty declared, that he expected it not till there might be a happy Conclusion of that Session, and till their just Grievances might be first graciously heard and relieved.

Wherein as his Majesty would most willingly have given them the Precedence before Matter of Supply, if the great Necessity of his Occasions could have permitted; so he was graciously pleased for their full Assurance and Satisfaction therein to give them his Royal Word, that without determining the Session (upon granting of the Subsidies) he would give them before they parted, as much time as the Season of the Year and the great Affairs in hand would permit, for considering all such Petitions as they conceived to be good for the Commonwealth, and what they would not now finish, they should have full time to perfect towards Winter: His Majesty graciously assuring them, that he would go along with them for their Advantage, through all the Expressions of a gracious and pious King, to the end there might be such a happy Conclusion of that as might be the Cause of many more Meetings with them in Parliament.

From their first assembling until the 21st of April, the House of Commons did nothing that could give his Majesty any Content or Confidence in their speedy supplying of him: Whereupon he commanded both the Houses to attend him in the Banquetting-House at Whitehall in the Afternoon of that 21st of April, where (by the Lord Keeper) his Majesty put them in mind of the End for which they were assembled, which was for his Majesty's Supplies; That if it were not speedy it would be of no use unto him, part of the Army then marching at the Charge of above a hundred thousand Pounds a Month; which would all be lost, if his Majesty were not presently supplyed, so as it was not possible to be longer forborn.

Yet his Majesty then express'd that the Supply he for the present desired was only to enable him to go on with his Designs for three or four Months, and that he expected no further Supply till all their just Grievances were relieved.

And because his Majesty had taken Notice of some Mis-apprehensions about the levying of Ship-Money, his Majesty commanded the Lord Keeper to let them know, that he never had any Intention to make any Revenue of it, nor had ever made any, but that all the Money collected had been paid to the Treasurer of the Navy, and by him expended, besides great Sums of Money every Year out of his Majesty's own Purse.

That his Majesty had once resolved this Year to have levyed none, but that he was forced to alter his Resolution, in regard he was of necessity to send an Army for reducing those of Scotland, during which time it was requisite the Seas should be well guarded.

And besides, his Majesty had Knowledge of the great Fleets prepared by all neighbouring Princes this Year, and of the Insolencies committed by those of Algiers, with the Store of Ships they had in readiness.

And therefore, though his Majesty for this present Year could not forbear it, but expected their Concurrence in the levying of it, yet for the future to give all his Subjects Assurance, how Just and Royal his Intentions were, and that all his Aim was, but to live like their King, able to defend himself and them; to be useful to his Friends, and considerable to his Enemies, to maintain the Sovereignty of the Seas, and so make the Kingdom flourish in Trade and Commerce: he was graciously pleased to let them know, that the ordinary Revenue now taken by the Crown, could not serve the Turn; and therefore that it must be by Ship-Money, or some other way, wherein he was willing to leave it to their Considerations, what better Course to find out, and to settle it how they would (so the thing were done) which so much imported the Honour and Safety of the Kingdom.

And his Majesty for his part, would most readily and chearfully grant any thing they could desire, for securing them in the Propriety of their Goods and Estates, and in the Liberty of their Persons. His Majesty telling them, it was in their Power to make this as happy a Parliament as ever was, and to be the Cause of the King's delighting to meet with his People, and his People with him.

That there was no such way to effect this, as by putting Obligations of Trust and Confidence upon him, which as it was the way of good Manners with a King, so it was a surer and safer Course for themselves, than any that their own Jealousies and Fears could invent; his Majesty being a Prince that deserved their Trust, and could not lose the Honour of it; and a Prince of such a gracious Nature, that disdained his People should overcome him by Kindness.

He had made this good to some other Subjects of his; and if they followed his Counsel, they should be sure not to repent it, being the People that were nearest and dearest unto him, and Subjects whom he did, and had Reason to value more, than the Subjects of any his other Kingdoms.

His Majesty having thus graciously expressed himself unto them, he expected the House of Commons would have the next Day taken into Consideration the Matter of Supply, and laid aside all other Debates, till that was resolved of, according to his Desire.

But instead of giving an Answer therein, such as the pressing and urgent Occasions required, they fell into Discourses and Debates about their pretended Grievances, and raised up so many and of so several Natures, that in a Parliamentary Way they could not but spend more time, than his Majesty's great and weighty Affairs could possibly afford.

His Majesty foreseeing in his great Wisdom, that they were not in the way to make this a happy Parliament (which he so much desired and hoped) that nothing might be wanting on his Part to bring them into the right Way, for his Honour, the Safety of the Kingdom, and their own Good, he resolved to desire the Assistance of the Lords of the Higher House, as Persons in Rank and Degree nearest to the Royal Throne, and who having received Honour from him and his Royal Progenitors, he doubted not would for those and many other Reasons, be moved in Honour and Dutiful Affection to his Person and Crown, to dispose the House of Commons to express their Duties to his Majesty, in expediting the Matter of Supply for which they were called together, and which required so present a Dispatch.

For this Purpose, his Majesty in his Royal Person come again to the Lord's House on Wednesday the twenty fourth Day of April, where himself declared to the Lords the Cause of his coming, which was to put them in mind of what had been by the Lord Keeper in his Name delivered to both the Houses the first Day of the Parliament, and after at White-Hall: how contrary to his Expectation, the House of Commons having held Consultation of Matter of Religion, Property of Goods, and Liberty of Parliament, and voted some things concerning those three Heads, had thereby given them the Precedence before the Matter of his Supply. That his Necessities were such, they could not bear delay; that whatever he had by the Lord Keeper promised, he would perform, if the House of Commons would trust him.

For Religion, that his Heart and Conscience went together with the Religion established in the Church of England: and he would give Order to his Archbishops and Bishops, that no Innovation in Matter of Religion should creep in.

For the Ship-Money, that he never made, nor intended to make any Profit to himself of it, but only to preserve the Dominion of the Seas; which was so necessary, that without it the Kingdom could not subsist. But for the Way and Means by Ship-Money or otherwise, he left it to them.

For Property of Goods, and Liberty of Parliament, he ever intended his People should enjoy them; holding no King so great, as he that was King of a rich and free People; and if they had not Property of Goods and Liberty of Persons, they would be neither rich, nor free.

That, if the House of Commons would not first trust him, all his Affairs would be disorder'd, and his Business lost. That though they trusted him in part at first, yet before the Parliament ended, he must totally trust them; and in Conclusion, they must for Execution of all things, wholly trust him.

Therefore since the Matter was no more, than who should be first trusted; and that the Trust of him first, was but a Trust in part, his Majesty desired the Lords to take into their Considerations, his and their own Honour, the Safety and Welfare of this Kingdom, with the great Danger it was in, and that they would by their Advice dispose the House of Commons, to give his Supply the Precedence before the Grievances.

His Majesty being departed, the Lords took into serious Consideration what his Majesty had commended to their Care, and forthwith laying aside all other Debates (such was their Lordships Dutiful and Affectionate Carriage, they well remembring what had been formerly declared in his Majesty's Name to both Houses, his Majesty's gracious Promises and Expressions then and at this time, with the pressing and urgent Occasions which so much imported the Honour of his Majesty, and the Good of this Kingdom) their Lordships delivered their Votes in these Words;

We are of Opinion, that the Matter of his Majesty's Supply should have Precedence and be resolved of, before any other Matter whatsoever. And we think fit, there shall be a Conference desired with the House of Commons, to dispose them thereunto.

Accordingly the next day being Saturday the twenty fifth day of April, a Conference was had in the Painted Chamber by a Committee of both Houses, where the Lord Keeper (by the Lords Command) told the House of Commons of his Majesties being the day before in Person in the Higher House, how graciously he had exprest himself in matter of Religion, Property of Goods, and Liberty of Parliament; and that he would therein graciously hear and relieve them, and give them what in reason could be-desired; with the effect of what else had been graciously delivered unto them by his Majesty, as well touching his constant zeal and affection to the Religion establish'd in the Church of England, as touching the Ship-Money.

Memorand. The Declaration proceeds further on to a great length in repeating the King's Speech in the House of Peers, and the Votes which the Lords did pass thereupon in their House, to dispose the Commons to give Supply precedence, and how the Commons did vote the Proceedings of the Lords to be a breach of their Privilege, and to demand reparation, and how the Lords meant by their Votes, that it is no breach of Privilege of the Commons. This Declaration also repeateth the two Messages which the King sent by Sir Henry Vane to the House of Commons, and how they had no effect at all with them.

All which said Passages are omitted here, because they are fully set down in the Narrative of the Proceedings of this Parliament: which Omission in this place is done to save the Reader a double trouble. That which follows in this Declaration after the said Passages so omitted is in these words:

By all the Proceedings herein declared, it is evident to all Men, how willing and desirous his Majesty hath been, to make use of the Antient and Noble way of Parliaments used and instituted by his Royal Predecessors, for the Preservation and Honour of this famous Monarchy: And that on his Majesties Part nothing was wanting, that could be expected from a King, whereby this Parliament might have had a happy Conclusion, for the comfort and content of his Majesties Subjects, and for the good and safety of this Kingdom.

On the contrary it is apparent, how those of the House of Commons (whose sinister and malicious Courses enforced his Majesty to dissolve this Parliament) have vitiated and abused that antient and noble way of Parliament, perverting the same to their own unworthy Ends, and forgetting the true Use and Institution of Parliaments.

For whereas these Meetings and Assemblies of his Majesty with the Peers and Commons of this Realm, were in their first Original, and in the practice of all succeeding Ages, ordained and held as Pledges and Testimonies of Affection between the King and his People; the King for his part graciously hearing and redressing such Grievances, as his People in humble and dutiful manner should represent unto him; and the Subjects on their part (as testimonies of their Duty) supplying his Majesty upon all extraordinary occasions for support of his Honour and Soveraignty, and for preserving the Kingdom in Glory and Safety.

Those ill affected Members of the House of Commons, instead of an humble and dutiful way of presenting their Grievances to his Majesty, have taken upon them to be the Guiders and Directors in all Matters that concern his Majesties Government, both Temporal and Ecclesiastical: and (as if Kings were bound to give an Account of their Regal Actions, and of their manner of Government to their Subjects assembled in Parliament) they have in a very audacious and insolent way, entred into examination and censuring of the present Government, traduced his Majesties Administration of Justice, rendred, as much as in them lay, odious to the rest of his Majesties Subjects, not only the Officers and Ministers of State, but even his Majesties very Government, which hath been so just and gracious, that never did this, or any other Nation enjoy more Blessings and Happiness than hath been by all his Majesties Subjects enjoyed ever since his Majesties Access to the Crown: nor did this Kingdom ever so flourish in Trade and Commerce, as at this present, or partake of more Peace and Plenty in all kinds whatsoever.

And whereas the ordinary Revenues of the Crown not sufficing to defray extraordinary Charges, it hath ever been the Usage in all Parliaments to aid and assist the Kings of this Realm with free and fitting Supply, towards the maintenance of their Wars, and for making good their Royal Undertakings, whereby the Kingdom intrusted to their Protection, might be held up in Splendour and Greatness:

These ill affected Persons of the House of Commons, have been so far from treading in the Steps of their Ancestors by their Dutiful Expressions in this kind, that contrarily they have introduced a way of bargaining and contracting with the King; as if nothing ought to be given him by them, but what he should buy and purchase of them, either by quitting somewhat of his Royal Prerogative, or by diminishing and lessening his Revenues; which courses of theirs, how repugnant they are to the Duty of Subjects, how unfit for his Majesty in Honour to permit and suffer, and what hazard and dishoanour they subject this Kingdom to, all Men may easily judge, that will but equally and impartially weigh them.

His Majesty hath been by this means reduced to such straits and extremities, that were not his Care of the Publick Good and Safety the greater, these Men (as much as in them lies) would quickly bring ruine and confusion to the State, and render contemptible this glorious Monarchy.

But this Frowardness and undutiful Behaviour of theirs, cannot lessen his Majesties Care of preserving the Kingdoms entrusted to his Protection and Government, nor his gracious and tender Affection to his People, for whose good and comfort his Majesty by God's gracious Assistance will so provide, that all his loving Subjects may still enjoy the Happiness of living under the blessed Shade and Protection of his Royal Scepter.

In the mean time, to the end all his Majesties loving Subjects may know how graciously his Majesty is inclined to hear and redress all the just Grievances of his People, as well out of Parliament as in Parliament, his Majesty doth hereby further declare his Royal Will and Pleasure, that all his loving Subjects who have any just Cause to present, or complain of any Grievances or Oppressions, may freely address themselves by their humble Petitions to his Sacred Majesty, who will graciously hear their Complaints, and give such sitting Redress therein, that all his People shall have just cause to acknowledge his Grace and Goodness towards them; and to be fully satisfied, that no Persons or Assemblies can more prevail with his Majesty, than the Piety and Justice of his own Royal Nature, and the tender Affection he doth and shall ever bear to all his People and loving Subjects.

Lord Brooks, Sir John Hotham, &c. committed.

The day following the Dissolution of the Parliament, some Members were imprisoned; the Lord Brooks his Study, Cabine's and Pockets were searched for Papers: Henry Bellasis Knight of the Shire for the County of York, and Sir John Hotham, were convented before the Council, and there examined concerning some particulars importing the King's Service: whereunto they making (as the Board conceived) no satisfactory answers, (for they were interrogated concerning Passages in Parliament, his Majesty being present in Council) were ordered to be committed to the Fleet: the Order for their Commitment doth follow.

Warrant for the Commitment of Mr. Bellasis and Sir John Hotham after the Parliament was dissolved.

Whereas Henry Bellasis Esq; and Sir John Hotham Knight Baronet, were this day Convented before the Board, and Interrogated concerning some particulars importing his Majesties Service: Whereunto they did make very undutiful Answers (his Majesty being then present in Council) for which it was thought fit and resolved, that they should stand Commited to the Prison of the Fleet: These are therefore to will and require you to take into your Custody the said Henry Bellasis and Sir John Hotham, and keep them safe Prisoners till further order from his Majesty or this Board. For which this shall be your Warrant. Dated the 8th of May 1640. Signed

  • Lord Arch-bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Marquess Hamilton.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord High Admiral.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Dorset.
  • Earl of Salisbury.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Earl of Strafford.
  • Lord Viscount Wilmot.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Comptroller.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebanke.
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

Mr. Crew also committed.

John Crew Esq; [now Lord Crew] was also convented before the Board, his Majesty being present in Council, and was there desired several times by his Majesty to deliver to the Clerk of the House of Commons all Petitions, Papers and Complaints that he received, being in the Chair at the Committee for Religion. The Council urged, that it was agreeable to the Practice and Course of all others who had served in the like imployment as Chair-men to Committees appointed by that House, and therefore required the said Mr. Crew to deliver such Petitions and Papers as he had so received, to the Clerk of the House of Commons, to have them forth-coming when required by a Parliament; and being unwilling to discover the Names of Subscribers to Petitions which complained of Innovations in Religion, and against Proceedings in the High Commission Court, &c. least they should (the Parliament being now dissolved) fall into the Hands of those who would bring them into trouble about the same; whereupon he desired to be excused as to the delivery of them: thereupon it was commanded, that he should be committed close Prisoner to the Tower, where he continued till near the time of the meeting of another Parliament November 3. 1640. The Warrant for his Commitment doth follow.

A Letter directed to the Lieutenant of the Tower of London.

A Warrant for his Commitment.

These are to will and require you, to receive into your Custody, the Person of John Crew Esq; and to keep him safe, and close Prisoner in the Tower till you shall receive further order from this Board: And for so doing, this shall be your Warrant. And so, &c. Dated the 10th of May 1640. Signed,

  • Lord Arch-bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy-Seal.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Newburg.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.

The Parliament being now dissolved, and the King's Declaration of the Causes which moved him thereunto being published, we return to the Month of April where we broke off, lest Interruption should be given to the proceedings de die in diem of that Parliament: and that which offereth it self unto us in order of time, is

A Letter directed to Sir Michael Earnly Knight, Lieutenant Governour of his Majesties Town and Garison of Berwick.

Scotch-men lately Inhabitants within the Town of Berwick to depart.

Whereas his Majesty hath been advertised that divers Persons of sundry Qualities have for their relief and safety in this troublesome time, been enforced to remove themselves and their Families out of Scotland, and have taken up their residence within the Town of Berwick; which because it imports his Majesties Service, that Town should be kept as free and empty of People as conveniently may be, now that his Majesties Army is to approach those Parts: It was his Royal Pleasure consideration should be taken thereof at this Board, and such order given therein as might be requisite, both for his Majesties Service, and also for the fit accommodation of those refugiat Persons: We after mature deliberation have thought fit hereby to require you, to cause all such Persons to remove with their Families out of the said Town, to the full distance of miles hitherwards. At which distance from the Borders his Majesty will be pleased they may reside and continue, but not come nearer the City of London, than the County of York. And for their remove from thence, they are to have seven days warning; and are to be dismissed with all fair respect and such assistance from you, as may most conveniently be afforded unto them according to their several Qualities and Conditions But for such Persons of Quality as repair thither, having but little company with them, and shall have occasion to make only a short stay there, being to pass forward, either to attend or to serve his Majesty, you are not to understand them to be included in this our Order; wherein not doubting of your Care, and requiring an Account from you of your Proceedings, we bid you, &c. Dated the 18th of April 1640.

At this time it was thought fit by the Lords of the Privy Council to prevent inconvenience that might happen upon May-Day, to write these two following Letters.

A Letter Directed to the Earl of Dorset, and to the Earl of Holland, as followeth.

To suppress the Insolencies usually practised on May-day.

After &c. to your Lordships. Although it is well known unto you, what have been the Insolencies and Disorders committed on May-Days, and how express and frequent the Directions of this Board have been for preventing the same; nevertheless we have thought good hereby to renew our Directions to your Lordships, praying and requiring you to give order to the Justices of the Peace of the County of Middlesex, to cause strong and sufficient Watches to be kept in all fit places within their several Jurisdictions on May-Day next; and (if need be) to cause some of the Trained Bands to be Mustered and Trained on that day in such places as shall be thought fittest to prevent the Disorders aforesaid, and to hinder the confluence of People together: so praying your Lordships to use especial care and diligence herein, we bid your Lordships, &c. From White Hall the 24th of April 1640.

  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord Viscount Wilmot.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebanke.

Also another Letter to the same purpose was directed to the Lord Mayor of the City of London, as followeth.

To suppress the Insolencies usually committed on May-day.

After &c. to your Lordship. Although it is well known unto you, what have been the Insolencies and Disorders committed heretofore on May-Days, and how express and frequent the Directions of this Board have been to your Predecessors for preventing the same; nevertheless we have thought good to renew our like Directions to your Lordship, hereby requiring you, that besides the keeping of strong and sufficient Watches in all fit places within that City and Liberties thereof, you do likewise appoint to be in readiness with Powder and Shot, some of the Trained Bands to the number of eight hundred, to be Instructed and Trained (as need shall require) on May-Day next, in such convenient places as may best serve for the preventing of any Riots or Tumults, which by the number of Apprentices joyned with loose and dissolute persons, (which abound in these Parts) might otherwise happen, or be attempted: and so requiring you to use especial care and diligence herein, We bid your Lordship, &c. From White-Hall the twenty fourth of April 1640. Signed

Lord Keeper.
Lord Privy Seal, &c.

A Letter Directed to the Lords Lieutenants of the several Counties mentioned in the List immediately following: which Letter was dated May 5.

Concerning the Soldiers that are to march by Land.

Whereas by our Instructions dated the 26th of March last, sent together with his Majesties Letters for pressing of Foot within that County of your Lordship's Lieutenancy for Defence of the Realm, your Lordship was (amongst other things) prayed to take Order that the said men to be raised, should be appointed to meet in Companies of one hundred a piece at particular Rendevouz in that County most convenient for every hundred men till the 10th of this Instant May, to be weekly exercised by such Officers as the Lord General should send down; and to be brought the 10th of May to the General Rendevouz, which your Lordship was by our said Instructions to appoint on the Confines of that Shire most convenient for the said Souldiers march towards Newcastle upon Tine; at which General Rendevouz in that County the said men were to remain till the 20th of this Instant May, to be there exercised and put in order for their march towards Newcastle: We are now by his Majesties express Directions and Command, hereby to pray and require your Lordship to take present and effectual order, that the said men be not brought to the General Rendevouz of that County till the first of June next; but that they be continued to be exercised once every Week at their particular Rendevouz until that day, and then repair to the General Rendevouz of that County, and remain there till the tenth of the same June, to be exercised and put in order for their march towards Newcastle, according to our former Instructions of the 26th of March last: which said Instructions your Lordship is to cause to be carefully pursued and observed in all other particulars without delay. And so we bid your Lordship, &c. Dated May 5. 1640. Signed by the

Lord Arch-bishop of Canterbury.
Lord Privy Seal, &c.

The Reader is desired to excuse any mistake as to the number of Men, the Copy by which it was printed being impersect.

Men.
Berks. 600
Brecknocke. 200
Bristol. 200
Cardigan. 150
Carmarthen. 250
Carnarvon. 160
Chester. 500
Cornwall. 600
Denbigh. 200
Devon. 2000
Flint. 080
Glamorgan. 200
Glocester. 1500
Hereford. 300
Leicester. 400
Merioneth. 100
Monmouth 250
Montgomery. 200
Northampton. 550
Dorset. 600
Oxford 600
Pembroke. 300
Radnor. 100
Rutland. 60
Salop. 500
Somerset. 2000
Southampton. 1300
Stafford. 300
Warwick. 500
Wilts. 1300

Letters were directed to the Lords Lieutenants of the several Counties, particularly expressed in the List mentioned in the former Letter.

Touching the Souldiers that are to be sent by Sea.

Whereas by our Letters of Instructions dated the 26th of March last, sent together with his Majesties Letters for pressing of Foot within that County of your Lordships Lieutenancy, for defence of the Realm, your Lordship was (amongst other things) prayed to take order, that the said Men to be raised, should be appointed to meet in Companies of one hundred a piece at particular Rendevouzes in that County, most convenient for each hundred Men till the of this instant May, to be weekly exercised by such Officers as the Lord General should send down, and to be brought the said of May to the General Rendevouz, which your Lordship was by our said Instructions to appoint on the Confines of that Shire, most convenient for the said Souldiers March to Gravesend; at which General Rendevouz in that County, the said Men were to remain till the of June next, to be there exercised and put in order for their march towards Gravesend: We are now by his Majesties express Directions and Command, hereby to pray and require your Lordship, to take present and effectual order, that the said Men be not brought to the General Rendevouz of that County till the first of June next: but that they be continued to be exercised once every Week at their particular Rendevouz until that day; and then repair to the General Rendevouz of that County, and remain there at the charge of that County, till the tenth of the same June, to be exercised and put in order by such Officers as are or shall be sent thither for that purpose by the Lord General, till such time as his Lordship shall give order for their marching to Gravesend to be there shipped; but all the said Men are to enter into the King's pay the tenth of June next, albeit they shall not march thence so soon; and are to deliver up the Arms borrowed of the Trained Bands, when they shall march out of that County: and for all other particulars concerning this Service, your Lordship is to cause our former Instructions to be carefully pursued and observed. And so, &c. Dated the sixth of May 1640. Signed by

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Marquiss Hamilton.
  • Lord Admiral.
  • Earl of Dorset.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebanke.
Gravesend. Yarmouth.
Sussex. 600 Huntington. 400
Surrey. 800 Suffolk. 600
Kent. 700 Norfolk. 750
Cinque ports. 300 Cambridge. 300
Bedford. 400
Harwich. Grimsby.
Middlesex. 1200
Hertford. 650 Lincoln. 200
Essex. 700 Nottingham. 300
Buckingham. 500 Darby. 400

A Memorial of his Majesties Declaration to continue the sitting of the Convocation for the quiet of the Church.

'On the seventh of May, two Days after the first Dissolution, his Majesty sitting in Council was pleased to declare, that he intended according to his gracious Speech delivered at the dissolution of the late Assembly in Parliament, to take into his Princely consideration all the just Grievances there complained, and to remedy so many of them, as he should find to be real: and more particularly and in the first place, those concerning Religion. And that to this purpose, his Majesty was minded to continue the sitting of the Convocation House for some time, for the better discovery and reformation of such abuses in that kind, as shall be found to be justly complained of; which his Majesties pious and gracious Declaration and Resolution their Lordships having by his Majesties command taken into due consideration, after a serious Debate they did all of them with one unanimous consent humbly approve thereof, and commanded that a Memorial of his Majesties Care in continuing of the Convocation for the quiet of the Church, should be entred in the Register of the Acts of Council.

After this time the Convocation sat till the 29th of May, and then ended.

At the Court at White-Hall, on May 7.

    Present: The King's most excellent Majesty.

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Marquess Hamilton.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord High Admiral.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Salisbury.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Viscount Wilmot.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Comptroller.
  • Secretary Windebank.
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

Touching Proceedings to be had against Sheriffs for their contempts and neglects in Ship-service

'His Majesty and their Lordships taking into consideration the great and supine negligence of the High Sheriffs of divers Counties, in the execution of his Majesties Writs for Ship-money issued in November last, and resolving that a round course shall be forthwith taken for punishing of them according to their demerits; it was this day ordered, that Mr. Attorney General shall be hereby prayed and required to send for the present High Sheriffs of the Counties of London, Middlesex, (fn. 1) York, Berks, Surry, Leicester, Essex, and Northampton; and to examine them concerning their proceedings and performance of that Service, and to proceed against them for their contempt and neglect in so important a Service, in the Star-Chamber or otherwise, with all convenient expedition, as his Majesty's said Attorney shall see cause.

May 9. Saturday, a Paper was pasted on the Old Exchange, London, animating Apprentices to sack the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury's House: Whereupon the Privy Council directed a Letter to the effect following, to the Lord Lieutenant of Surry.

Trained Bands of Southwark to be in readiness in Saint George's Fields.

'His Majesty's Pleasure is, that your Lordship take present and effectual order that all the Trained Bands belonging to the Borough of Southwark be drawn forth, and put in Arms and readiness, with Powder and Shot, in St. George's Fields, on Monday next in the Morning; and that they continue and remain so till the Evening, unless your Lordship shall see cause to give order for their discharge sooner. And thus not doubting your Lordship's care herein, we bid, &c. Dated May 10. 1640.

  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Admiral.
  • Lord Marquess of Hamilton.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.

Monday, May 11. At midnight, saith my Lord Bishop, my House at Lambeth was beset with five hundred persons of the rascal riotous Multitude: I had notice, saith the Arch Bishop, and strengthened the House as well as I could, and God be blessed I had no harm. Since I have got Canons, and fortified my House as well as I can, and I hope all may be safe. But yet Libels are continually set up in all places of note in the City.

Upon the occasion of this Tumult and the besetting of Lambeth House, these following Orders were made by the Lords of the Privy Council, for the securing of his Grace the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury from the Insurrection of the People.

A Letter to the Lord Mayor of the City of London.

May 12. 1640.; For keeping Watches and strict Courses in the City.

'Upon occasion of the late tumultuous Assembly in and about Lambeth, his Majesty hath commanded us to signify his Pleasure to your Lordship, to take present and effectual order that there be double Watches kept within the City and Liberties of London; and that the said Watches do continue in their charge till five a clock in the morning. Your Lordship is further to cause every Housholder within the said City and Liberties, to be answerable for the quiet and peaceable behaviour of all his Apprentices and Servants. And lastly, your Lordship is to take especial care that there be a good and sufficient Watch kept every night at the Bridge-Foot, to intercept all vagrant Persons, and to prevent any concourse of People to pass in or out of the said City. Which strict Course and double Watch is to be continued by your Lordship's vigilant care till your Lordship shall receive further Order. And for your Lordship's so doing this shall be your Warrant. And so, &c. Dated May 12. 1640.

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Marquess Hamilton.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord High Admiral.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Salisbury.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Viscount Wilmot.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Comptroller.
  • Secretary Windebank.
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

A Letter to the Justices of Peace of Westminster and Liberties.

May 12. 1640.; That double Watches and strict Courses be kept to prevent Tumults.

Upon occasion of the late tumultuous Assembly in and about Lambeth, we are by his Majesty's especial Command to require you presently to take effectual order that double Watches be kept every night in and about the City and Liberties of Westminster, to prevent Disorders and tumultuous Assemblies, and to intercept and apprehend all vagrant and wandring persons, and bring them to Justice. And you are further by his Majesty's express Command to take some course that every Housholder within the said City and Liberties may be answerable for the peaceable and quiet behaviour of all his Apprentices and Servants; which double Watch and strict course is to be continued by your care and vigilancy until further order. For which this shall be your sufficient Warrant. And so, &c. Dated May 12. 1640. Signed,

Lord Privy Seal.
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, &c.

A Letter to the Earl of Dorset and the Earl of Holland, his Majesty's Lieutenants for the County of Middlesex.

May 12. 1640.; Strict courses to be used for suppressing of Tumults.

Upon occasion of the late tumultuous Assembly at Lambeth, we are by his Majesty's express Command hereby to require your Lordships presently to take effectual order that there be double Watches kept in and about St. Giles's and Tuttle-Fields, and all other passages and places near London and Westminster within the County of Middlesex, to prevent tumultuous Assemblies, and to intercept and apprehend all idle and vagrant persons, and to bring them to Justice. And your Lordships are to give order that there be Boats provided to be ready to transport Horse and Men at Lambeth-Ferry and elsewhere, upon any occasion, for the better suppressing of such Disorders and Tumults as may happen. And thus not doubting of your Lordships care herein, we bid, &c. Dated and Signed ut ante.

A Letter to the Earl of Arundel and Surry, the Earl of Nottingham, and the Lord Maltravers, his Majesty's Lieutenants of the County of Surry.

May 12. 1640.; To appoint a Provost Marshal and Watch and Ward of Horse and Foot.

Upon occasion of the tumultuous Assembly the last Night, we are by his Majesty's special Command to require your Lordships presently to take order that there be appointed forthwith an able and well-affected Provost Marshal, together with a considerable and competent number of sufficient Horse and Foot, well armed and provided to watch and ward this night, and so by turns from time to time, in and about Lambeth, Newington, St. George's Fields, and the places and passages thereabouts, to prevent any Concourse or Assembly of People: and to intercept and apprehend all wandring and vagrant Persons, and to bring them to Justice. Which Watch and Ward is to be continued till your Lordship shall understand his Majesty's further Pleasure. For which this shall be your Warrant. And so, &c. Dated May 12. 1640. Signed by

Lord Privy Seal.
Lord Duke of Lenox, &c.

After two days respit, Informations came every hour of more Libels posted up, whereupon a Letter was sent to the Lord Mayor of London to this effect.

May 14. 1640.; That the Trained Bands be in readiness for suppressing Tumults.

Whereas by the late tumultuous Assembly in and about Lambeth, we find that it may be necessary upon the like occasion to have the Trained Bands of the City of London and Liberties in a readiness to suppress any disorderly, riotous, and like tumultuous Meetings, which may happen now or at any other time hereafter; We have therefore thought good hereby to authorize and require your Lordship, for the prevention and suppressing of any Danger that may happen by the gathering together of vagrant or any other idle Persons, from time to time, and so often as you shall find it requisite, to cause the Trained Bands of that City, &c. or such part thereof, as your Lordship shall think necessary to be drawn forth in their Arms, and put in readiness for the Service aforesaid. For which this shall be your Lordship's Warrant. And so, &c. Dated the 14th of May, 1640. Signed by

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Earl of Dorset.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.
  • Mr. Comptroller.

Another Letter was directed to the Earl of Dorset and the Earl of Holland, his Majesty's Lieutenants for the County of Middlesex.

May 15. 1640.; Trained Bands of Middlesex to be sent for ease to those of Surry.

Whereas by reason of the late tumultuous Disorders in Southwark and the parts thereabouts, the Trained Bands of those parts have been by order from his Majesty and this Board commanded to watch several nights together, whereby they are so wearied as they are not well able longer to undergo that Duty; We are therefore by his Majesty's Command, hereby to require your Lordships to take present and effectual order that some of the Trained Bands of the County of Middlesex nearest adjoyning be sent this evening into Southwark, and the parts adjacent, and so from time to time employed by turns to relieve and ease the Trained Bands of Surry, as shall be by your Lordships Deputy Lieutenants and the Deputy Lieutenants of Surry agreed unto and ordered. We have also by his Majesty's Command, written to the Lord Mayor to cause some of the Trained Bands of the City to be sent to morrow in the Evening into Southwark, in like manner, for ease of the Trained Bands of Surry. Whereof we have thought good also to advertise your Lordships, that your Deputy Lieutenants may likewise agree with them at what times to send the Bands of Middlesex for the Service aforesaid. For which, &c. Dated the 15th of May. Signed by

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Marquess of Hamilton.
  • Earl of Suffolk.
  • Earl of Newcastle.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.
  • Lord Goring.

At White-Hall, May 15. 1640.

    Present: The King's most excellent Majesty.

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Treasurer.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Suffolk.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Earl of Newcastle.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Cottington.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Comptroller.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

Order for publishing a Proclamation for the punishing and repressing traiterous and rebellious Assemblies.

'Whereas there is a Proclamation drawn immediately to be published, for the punishing and repressing of the late traiterous and rebellious Assemblies in Lambeth, Southwark, and other places adjoyning, it was this day ordered by his Majesty, with the advice of the Board, That the Lord Mayor and the Sheriffs of London shall presently, as soon as the said Proclamation shall come unto their hands, cause the same to be proclaimed in the Market-places and chief Streets of the said City and Liberties thereof; and the Sheriffs of Middlesex shall cause the same in like manner to be proclaimed in the chief Streets and Places of the Suburbs, and Places adjacent thereunto: and the Sheriff of Surry in like manner shall cause the same to be proclaimed in the chief Streets and Places adjacent in the Borough of Southwark; and the Bailiff of Westminster within the Liberties of Westminster. Whereof they are not to fail respectively in their several Jurisdictions.

At the Court at White-Hall, May 16, 1640.

Present: The King's most excellent Majesty.

May 16. 1640.

Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, &c.

Concerning Beamont, Sprat and Wilson.

'It was this day ordered (his Majesty present in Council) that the Examinations of Richard Beamont, George Sprat, and Edmond Wilson, shall be forthwith sent to Mr. Serjeant Heath and Serjeant Whitfield; who, together with the Recorder of the City of London, are hereby prayed and required to consider of the same, and to take such further Examinations of the said Persons, and of Gervase Oglethorpe, mentioned in Richard Beamont's Examination, and of such others as they shall discover, or as the said Serjeants and Mr. Recorder, or any two of them, shall conceive fit and best for discovering of the truth of the business expressed in the Examinations already taken and sent herewith. And in the mean time the said Beamont is to stand committed to the Prison of the Fleet.

At the Court at White-Hall, May 16. 1640.

    Present: The King's most excellent Majesty.

  • Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury.
  • Lord Keeper.
  • Lord Privy Seal.
  • Lord Duke of Lenox.
  • Lord Marquess Hamilton.
  • Lord Great Chamberlain.
  • Lord Admiral.
  • Lord Chamberlain.
  • Earl of Dorset.
  • Earl of Salisbury.
  • Lord Goring.
  • Lord Newburgh.
  • Mr. Treasurer.
  • Mr. Comptroller.
  • Mr. Secretary Windebank.
  • Earl of Holland.
  • Earl of Berks.
  • Earl of Morton.

To restrain Boats from carrying idle persons after nine a clock at night.

'His Majesty and their Lordships understanding that when the late Tumults were in and about Southwark and Lambeth, there were divers idle and lewd persons transported to and from Ratcliff, Blackwall, Rodorith, Wapping, and other parts thereabouts, whereby the said disorderly and rebellious Assemblies were much increased; It was therefore this day ordered, his Majesty present in Council, that as well the Master and Wardens of the Trinity-house, as the Master and Governors of the Watermens Hall, should be hereby required to take present and effectual order that there be no Boats of any sort suffered to transport, after Nine a Clock at Night, any idle or suspected Persons, for whom they will not answer or give account.

Another Letter to the Lord Mayor of London.

May 16. 1640.: Newgate to be securely guarded till Bensteed be delivered to the Sheriff.

Whereas Thomas Bensteed, now Prisoner in Newgate, is not to be executed till to morrow morning, we have therefore thought good hereby to will and command your Lordship to give effectual order that the said Prison be this night (and so till he shall be delivered to the Custody of the Sheriff) fafely and securely guarded: Whereof your Lordship may not fail. And so, &c. Dated as before.

A Letter to the Lieutenant of the Tower of London.

May 16. 1640.; To have the Trained Bands of the Tower in readiness for defence of the same.

Whereas by the late Tumults about the City, we find it may be necessary upon occasion to have the Trained Bands within the Precincts and Liberties of the Tower in a readiness, not only to suppress any disorderly, riotous and like tumultuous Meetings, which may at any time happen, but for the defence and safety of his Majesty's Tower, whereof you have charge; We have therefore thought good hereby to authorize and require you for the Service aforesaid, forthwith, and so long as you shall find it requisite from time to time, to cause the Trained Bands within the said Precinct, &c. or such part thereof as you shall find necessary, to be drawn forth in their Arms, and put in readiness with Powder and Shot; and to take so many of them for your assistance into the Tower, as you shall think fit, for the safety and defence of the said Tower. For which, &c. And so, &c. Dated the 15th of May. Signed by the

Earl of Dorset.
Earl of Holland, &c.

At this time a Letter was sent to the Lords Lieutenants of the County of Norfolk.

Touching Refusers to pay Coat and Conduct-money.

Whereas we understand by a Paper presented to this Board by some of your Lordships Deputy Lieutenants of the County of Norfolk, that there are divers Persons within that County, who refuse to pay Coat and Conduct-money, for the seven hundred and fifty Men ordered to be raised there for the present Expedition for his Majesty's Service: And whereas your Lordships said Deputy Lieutenants desire to know how to proceed with such Men as refuse to receive Prest-money for the said Expedition; We have thought good hereby to pray and require your Lordships to give speedy Directions to your Deputy Lieutenants of that County to send to your Lordships, to be presented to this Board, the Names of those of the principal and ablest Men of that County who shall refuse to pay Coat or Conduct-money for the said Men to be levied there. And that they commit to Prison such Persons as, being liable to the said Press, shall refuse to receive Prest-money for the said present Expedition for hi Majesty's Service. And thus knowing very well your Lordships care to give Expedition to Service of this nature and importance, we bid, &c. Dated the 7th of May. Signed by

Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, &c.

May 17. 1640.

On the 17th of May, 1640. it was also thus ordered by the Privy Council.

Order for the burning of Popish Books.

'Whereas there was lately found in the House of one Alexander Lea, a Taylor dwelling in Bloomsbury, a Trunk belonging to one Mary Sylvester, wherein was locked up to the number of 200 Popish Books, or thereabouts, all in English, viz. Jesus Psalters, Invectives and Rhimes against Luther and Calvin, Rhemes Testaments, Preparative Prayers to the Mass, Manuels, and other superstitious Prayer Books and Catechisms, such as by the Law of this Kingdom ought to be burnt: It was this day ordered, his Majesty present in Council, That all the said Popish Books shall be forthwith delivered to the Sheriffs of the City of London, who are hereby authorized and required to cause all the said Books to be brought into Smithfield, and there, in the Market-place, between ten and eleven of the Clock in the Morning on a Market-day, laid upon a heap, and all publickly burnt by the Hangman.

Gentlemen of Lincolns-Inn questioned for drinking a Health to the Confusion of the Arch Bishop of Canterbury..

After the dissolution of this Parliament, and the apprehension which the People had, that his Grace of Canterbury was the principal cause thereof, occasioned People of better sort also to be dissatisfied with his Grace; and it so fell out, that at a meeting in a Tavern in Chancery-Lane, certain Gentlemen of Lincolns-Inn were drinking a Health, of which a Drawer informed the Arch-Bishop that it was a Health to his Confusion; whereupon his Grace procured a Warrant to Keym a Messenger, to bring before the Board Mr. C. Mr. G. Mr. O. Mr. M. and Mr. T. young Gentlemen of Lincolns-Inn. And when the said Gentlemen, a little before their Appearance, made their Application to the Earl of Dorset to stand their Friend, and to pardon their unadvisedness in drinking a rash Health. The Earl ask'd them, Who doth bear witness against you? They answered, One of the Drawers Where did he stand, said the Earl, when he heard you drink the Health? They replied, He was at the Door going out of the Room. Tush, said the Earl, the Drawer was mistaken, you drank a Health to the Confusion of the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury's Foes, and he heard the first part of your words, and was gone before he heard the latter words. This hint put the Gentlemen upon a new way of excuse which they thought not of before; but the Earl advised them to carry themselves with all humility and respect to the Arch-Bishop when they were called in before the King and his Council: They improved this Advice with as good Language as they could; and by the favour of the said Earl and others they only received a Reproof and Admonition, and so were dismist.

After the Lords of the Council had committed some Members of Parliament, and secured the Archbishop of Canterbury's House at Lambeth from Tumults, they then took into Consideration how to procure Moneys for the King's present Supply: whereupon divers Aldmen were sent for to the Council Table to give in the Names of such Citizens of London as were able to lend the King Money, which they refusing to do were committed to Prison, as by the following Orders and Warrants do appear.

Names of persons in London able to lend money to the King, to be presented to the Board.

'It was the day of May order'd (his Majesty present in Council) That as well the Lord Mayor and all the Aldermen of the City of London, who this day attended his Majesty (excepting Sir Nicholas Rainton, Alderman Somes, Alderman Geere, and Alderman Atkins) as also all the rest of the Aldermen who were this day absent, together with the Deputies of the Wards belonging to the said Sir Nicholas Rainton, Alderman Somes, Alderman Geere, and Alderman Atkins, shall forthwith meet and set down in Writing the Names of all such persons Inhabitants within their several and respective Wards, as they conceive are able to lend his Majesty upon security, in the whole amongst them all, the Sum of two hundred thousand pounds. And that they shall every of them respectively set down particularly how much every person in their Wards is able in their opinions to lend towards the said Sum of two hundred thousand pounds, and present the same in Writing to the Council Board on Friday next at two a Clock in the Afternoon. And the said Lord Mayor and Aldermen may (if they please) call to them the Deputies of their several and respective Wards to assist and inform them for their better dispatch of this business. And if any of the Aldermen who were absent, or their Deputies of any of the said Wards shall refuse or delay to join herein according to this Order, his Majesty's express Command is, That the Lord Mayor do forthwith return his or their Names to the Board.

The same day this Order following was made.

Sir Nicholas Rainton and other Aldermen of London to be examin'd and proceeded against.

'Whereas Sir Nicholas Rainton Alderman of the City of London, Alderman Geere and Alderman Atkins were heretofore with the rest of the Aldermen of the said City made acquainted with his Majesty's urgent and present occasions to use and employ the Sum of two hundred thousand pounds for the safeguard and defence of the Realm, and were required in his Majesty's Name to set down the Names of such Persons within their several and respective Wards, who are in their opinions able to lend his Majesty moneys towards the said defence, and to set down how much they conceive every such person is able to lend: And whereas the said Sir Nicholas Rainton, Alderman Geere, and Alderman Atkins being this day convented before the Board (his Majesty present in Council) refused to set down the Names of such persons within their several and respective Wards, which in their opinions were able to lend his Majesty money for the service aforesaid, and how much they conceive every such Person is able to lend, (altho other Aldermen have therein given his Majesty satisfaction) for which their Contempt they now stand committed by Warrant from this Board. It is order'd that Mr. Attorney General shall be hereby prayed and required forthwith to examine all the said Aldermen apart, and having taken all their Examinations, to take present Order for proceeding against them for their said Contempts, by Information in the Star-Chamber or otherwise, as he with the advice of others of his Majesty's learned Counsel shall conceive to conduce most to his Majesty's Service.

After these Orders these Warrants following were also made.

'A Warrant to commit Alderman Somes to the Prison of the Fleet. Dated May 10. Signed by,

  • Lord Archbishop of Canterbury,
  • Lord Keeper,
  • Lord Treasurer,
  • Lord Privy Seal,
  • Lord Duke of Lenox,
  • Lord Marquess Hamilton,
  • Lord Great Chamberlain,
  • Lord Lieutenant of Ireland,
  • Lord Cottington,
  • Lord Newburgh,
  • Mr. Treasurer,
  • Mr. Comptroller,
  • Mr. Secretary Windebanke,
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common-Pleas.

'A Warrant to commit Alderman Atkins to the King's Bench. Dated May 10. Signed by,

Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Keeper. Ut supra.

'A Warrant to commit Sir Nicholas Rainton to the Marshalseas. Signed, Ut supra.

'A Nother Warrant for the Commitment of Mr. Alderman Geere to thhe Prison of the Gate house. Dated and Signed, Ut ante.

At this time a Letter was directed to the Sheriffs of the several Counties expressed in the List after the Letter.

Round Letters to require the people to pay in Ship-money be times.

It so much importeth the Defence and Safety of the Kingdom that the Ship Money payable by that County, should be forthwith (without further delay) levyed and paid in to the Treasurer of the Navy, and you have already to that purpose received from this Board so many Letters to quicken you in the performance of your Duty in that behalf, as we shall not only let you know that his Majesty's Occasions for the Defence of the Kingdom are rather more, than less pressing, and that if thro your continual Neglect all the Ship Money be not timely paid, both this and the former admonitions given you will add weight to your Default and Contempt. And if you pay not in at least one half of the Money payable by that County for the said Service by the last of this Month, and the other half by the 24th of June next; you must expect to feel the Smart and Punishment due to so wilful a Remisness in a Business of so great Import and Consequence. And so, &c. Dated May 11. 1640. Signed by

  • Lord Archbishop of Canterbury,
  • Lord Keeper,
  • Lord Treasurer,
  • Lord Privy Seal,
  • Lord Marquis Hamilton,
  • Lord Admiral,
  • Lord Lieutenant of Ireland,
  • Lord Viscount Wilmot,
  • Lord Goring,
  • Lord Cottington,
  • Lord Newburgh,
  • Mr. Treasurer,
  • Mr. Comptroller,
  • Mr. Secretary Windebanke,
  • Lord Chief Justice of the Common-Pleas.

    A List of the Counties.

  • Buckingham,
  • Bedford,
  • Bristol,
  • Cornwal,
  • Cambridge,
  • Cumberland,
  • Chester,
  • Devon,
  • Derby,
  • Dorset,
  • Duresme,
  • Gloucester,
  • Hertford,
  • Huntingdon,
  • Kent,
  • Lancaster,
  • Lincolne,
  • Monmouth,
  • Notingham,
  • Northumberland.
  • Northfolke,
  • Oxford,
  • Rutland,
  • Somerset,
  • Suffolk,
  • Sussex,
  • Stafford,
  • Southampton,
  • Salop,
  • Warwick,
  • Worcester,
  • Wilts,
  • Westmoreland,
  • Carnarvan,
  • Denbigh,
  • Flint,
  • Montgomery,
  • Brecknocke,
  • Cardigan,
  • Carmarthen,
  • Pembroke,
  • Radnor.

In this Month of May this ensuing Order was made by the Lords of the Privy Council.

Order for a Proclamation to require Deputy Lieutenants, &c. to repair to their Dwellings.

'Their Lordships taking notice that there are now in and about this Town divers Deputy Lieutenants and Justices of Peace, whereby the present Services of his Majesty and the Government of the Country are very much neglected; It was therefore this day order'd, that Mr. Attorney General shall be hereby prayed and requir'd forthwith to prepare a Bill fit for his Majesty's Signature, containing a Proclamation requiring and commanding all Deputy Lieutenants, and Justices of Peace of Counties, forthwith to repair to their several and respective Dwellings in the Country, and to reside and attend there the Services of his Majesty, and Affairs of their Country. Which Draught of a Proclamation is forthwith to be drawn up and presented to be read at the Board.

At the Court at Whitehall, May 20. 1640. His Majesty present.

Order appointing a Committee for the Shipping business.

'Upon consideration this day had, how much it importeth the safety and defence of the Kingdom (in regard of the great Preparations that are made of Sea Forces by neighbouring Princes and States) that all the Ship-Money which is in Arrear should be pressed to be paid with all possible Expedition, His Majesty present in Council did hold fit that a select Committee of the Board should be appointed for the Shipping Business; and thereupon was pleased to nominate the Lord Keeper, Lord Privy-Seal, Lord Chamberlain, Earl of Dorset, Earl of Salisbury, and the Lord Chief Justice Littleton, or any three or more of them, who are by his Majesty's special, Command requir'd to meet every Thursday Morning out of Term, and every Thursday in the Afternoon in the Term time, and oftner, as there shall be occasion, to hear and consider of such Letters, Petitions, Accounts and Papers as shall be sent or presented concerning that weighty Business, and to give Answers and Dispatches to such ordinary matters concerning that Service as they shall think good, and to acquaint his Majesty and the Board with such others as they shall hold to be of more Importance and Consideration: and Mr. Nicholas Clerk of the Council is requir'd to attend their Lordships at their said Meetings, and oftner as their Lordships shall appoint, for Dispatch of such Businesses concerning that Service, as their Lordships shall direct.

The same day his Majesty present, this Order was made.

For a Provost Marshal, and to be furnished with Arms, Saddles, &c.

'Upon consideration of the many Insolencies and Disorders lately committed by leud and base People tumultuously assembled in divers Parts in and about the City of London and Liberties, It was this day order'd, his Majesty present in Council, that Captain William Davis (who hath formerly discharged with good Satisfaction the Office of Provost Marshal for the said City and Liberties of London) shall be forthwith employed Provost Marshal for the said City and twenty Miles Compass thereabouts. And for his better Performance of that Charge, he is to have twelve Horse Carabins and twelve Foot; of which Foot six are to be armed with half Pikes or Halberds, and six with Harquebusses. And that for his Salary the said Captain shall be allowed five Shillings per diem (being the like Pay as is allowed to the Provost Marshal of the Horse employed in his Majesty's Army) and the twelve Horse are to have two Shillings apiece per diem, being the Pay of Carabines, and the twelve Foot are to be allowed eight Pence per diem: which Entertainments or Pay are to be made monthly to the said Captain for himself and his said Company by the Treasurer at War for the time being, or his Deputy. And there is further to be forthwith paid to the said Captain by the said Treasurer the Sum of one hundred forty and four Pounds for present levying of all the said twelve Horse, after the rate of twelve Pounds an Horse. Which Horse are to be furnished with Arms, Saddles and Furniture out of his Majesty's Magazine of the Tower. And the said Captain is to take care that the said Arms, &c. after the Service shall be ended, be carefully and entirely restored and deliver'd back into his Majesty's said Magazine.

Thursday, May 21. One of the chief of the Tumult being taken, was brought to his Tryal, and condemn'd at Southwark, and hang'd and quarter'd on Saturday Morning following.

The Burgesses of Westminster to reside in Town, and not to depart without leave from his Majesty or the Board.

'It was about this time thought fit and order'd (his Majesty being present in Council) that the twelve Burgesses and their Assistants of the City of Westminster and Liberties thereof, shall for the more orderly Government of the said City and Liberties, reside and continue in Town, and none of them to depart without leave from his Majesty or the Board. And they are to be vigilant in the Execution of their Offices in their several Wards, and be aiding and assisting to all subordinate Officers within their Jurisdiction upon all occasions that shall arise; and especially for the preventing and suppressing of all tumultuous Assemblies and Riots or other Disorders any way tending to the Breach of the Peace; as also to take care and provide for the visited in this time of Infection; and for such of the particulars aforesaid, as are contained and provided for in the particular Act of Parliament of 27 Eliz. made for the better Government of the said City and Liberties. Whereof all and every the Persons whom it may concern are to take knowledge, and to govern themselves accordingly.

A Copy of Letters to the Lords Lieutenants of the several Counties, expressed in the List following the Letter.

May 27. 1640.; Horse and Carters to be provided according to the List.

Whereas by our Letters of the 26th of March last you were requir'd to cause Horses and Carters to be provided in that County of your Lordship's Lieutenancy for the Train of Artillery, and the Carriage of Ammunition, &c. which Horse and Carters were to be ready at Newcastle upon Tine by the 15th of June next; We are now by his Majesty's special Command to require your Lordship to give present and effectual Order, that the said Horse and Carters be not brought to the said Rendezvouz at Newcastle aforesaid, until the 5th of August next, when they are not to fail to be there: And for all other Particulars mention'd in our said Letters concerning the said Horse and Carters, the same are punctually to be performed and kept. And so, &c. Dated May 27. 1640.

Horses. Carters.
Bedford 50 17
Berks 30 10
Buckingham 50 17
Cambridge 50 17
Chester 50 17
Derby 60 20
Dorset 20 7
Essex 60 20
Gloucester 50 17
Hertford 50 17
Hereford 30 10
Huntington 50 17
Kent 20 7
Leicester 70 23
Lancaster 50 17
Lincoln 60 20
Middlesex 30 10
Norfolk 60 20
Northampton 70 23
Nottingham 50 17
Oxford 40 13
Rutland 20 7
Salop 40 13
Somerset 20 7
Southampton 50 17
Stafford 50 17
Suffolk 60 20
Warwick 60 20
Worcester 50 17
Wilts 50 17

May 29. The Convocation having sat from the Dissolution of the Parliament on the fifth of May last till this day, they made in that time seventeen Canons: and the Oath therein contained was as followeth.

The Oath.

'I A. B. do swear, That I do approve the Doctrine and Discipline or Government established in the Church of England, as containing all things necessary to Salvation: And that I will not endeavour by my self or any other, directly or indirectly, to bring in any Popish Doctrine, contrary to that which is so established: nor will I ever give my Consent to alter the Government of this Church, by Arch-bishops, Bishops, Deans, and Archdeacons, &c. as it stands now established, and as by right it ought to stand; nor yet ever to subject it to the Usurpations and Superstitions of the See of Rome. And all these things I do plainly and sincerely acknowledge and swear, according to the plain and common Sense and Understanding of the same Words, without any Equivocation or mental Evasion, or secret Reservation whatsoever. And this I do heartily, willingly, and truly, upon the Faith of a Christian. So help me God in Jesus Christ.

The Table of the Canons then made doth follow.

  • 1. Concerning Regal Power.
  • 2. For the better keeping the day of his Majesty's most happy Inauguration.
  • 3. For suppressing the Growth of Popery.
  • 4. Against Sooianism.
  • 5. Against Sectaries.
  • 6. An Oath enjoined for preventing of all Innovations in Doctrine and Government.
  • 7. A Declaration concerning some Rites and Ceremonies.
  • 8. Of preaching for Conformity.
  • 9. One Book of Articles of Enquiry to be used at all Parochial Visitations.
  • 10. Concerning the Conservation of the Clergy.
  • 11. Chancellors Patents.
  • 12. Chancellors alone not to censure any of the Clergy in sundry Cases.
  • 13. Excommunication and Absolution not to be pronounced but by a Priest.
  • 14. Concerning Commutations, and the disposing of them.
  • 15. Touching concurrent Jurisdictions.
  • 16. Concerning Licences to marry.
  • 17. Against Vexatious Citations.

Dr. Goodman Bishop of Gloucester refuseth the Oath, &c.

Which Canons were all Voted Nemine dissentiente, except Godfrey Goodman Bishop of Gloucester, who did not relish the said Oath; (notwithstanding the main Virtue and Operation thereof was intended for the establishing of the Hierarchy) wherefore, for refusing to subscribe the said Oath, &c. he was suspended: but afterwards he submitted, took the Oath, and was released by the King's Command; and writ a Letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury: of which this which follows is a Clause.

'Most Reverend, &c. Bishop Mountague of Norwich did privately encourage me to dissent (tho I confess I was little moved with his Words, for I never had an Opinion of that man) yet in publick to please your Grace he pressed my Deprivation, falsly quoting some Councils (God forgive him as I do.) At that instant I could have proved how that in his Person he did visit and held Correspondency with the Pope's Agent, and received his Letter in behalf of his Son, who was then travelling to Rome, and by his Letters he had extraordinary Entertainment there. This Bishop Mountague would ascribe the Credit which he had gotten was by his Writings, which in truth I think are not worth the reading.

His Majesty confirmed the Canons before-mention'd under the Great Seal in Manner following.

'We of our Princely Inclination and Royal Care for the maintenance of the present Estate and Government of the Church of England by the Laws of this our Realm now settled and established, having diligently with great contentment and comfort read and considered of all these their said Canons, Orders, Ordinances, and Constitutions agreed upon, as is before expressed: and finding the same such as we are persuaded will be very profitable not only to our Clergy, but to the whole Church of this our Kingdom, and to all the true members of it (if they be well observed) have therefore for us, our heirs and lawful successors, of our especial Grace, certain knowldge, and meer motion, given, and by these presents do give our Royal Assent, according to the Form of the said Statute or Act of Parliament aforesaid, to all and every of the said Canons, Orders, Ordinances and Constitutions, and to all and every thing in them contained, as they are before written. And furthermore we do not only by our said Prerogative Royal and supreme Authority in Causes Ecclesiastical, ratify, confirm and establish by these our Letters Patents, the said Canons, Orders, Ordinancies and Constitutions, and all and every thing in them contained, as is aforesaid; but do likewise propound, publish, and straitly enjoin and command by our said Authority and by these our Letters Patents, the same to be diligently observed, executed and equally kept by all our loving Subjects of this our Kingdom, both within the Provinces of Canterbury and York, in all points wherein they do or may concern every or any of them according to this our will and pleasure hereby signified and expressed. And that likewise for the better observation of them, every Minister, by what Name or Title soever he be called, shall in the Parish Church or Chappel where he hath charge read all the said Canons, Orders, Ordinances and Constitutions at all such times, and in such manner as is prescribed in the said Canons, or any of them: The Book of the said Canons to be provided at the charge of the Parish betwixt this and the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel next ensuing: straitly charging and commanding all Archbishops, Bishops, and all others that exercise any Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction within this Realm, every man in his place to see and procure (so much as in them lieth) all and every of the same Canons, Orders, Ordinances and Constitutions, to be in all points duly observed, not sparing to execute the penalties in them severally mention'd upon any that shall wittingly or willfully break or neglect to observe the same, as they tender the honour of God, the peace of the Church, the tranquillity of the Kingdom, and their duties and service to us their King and Sovereign. In witness whereof we have caused these our Letters to be made Patents: Witness our self at Westminster, the 30th day of June, in the 16th year of our Reign.

A Letter directed to the Lord Mayor of London.

May 31. 1640.; For levying 4000 Foot for the present expedition into the North.

'By his Majesty's Letters dated in March last sent herewith, you shall understand his Majesty's pleasure and intention for the levying of 4000 Foot within the City of London and Liberties, to go in this present expedition into the North parts. By which Letters your Lordship is referred to us for such instructions and directions as shall be requisite for that Service: We have therefore thought good hereby to pray and require your Lordship to take order in the first place, that Coat and Conduct money be levied for them, so as it may not fail to be ready by that time the said Men shall be raised; and that there be an especial care had in the choice of the Men, that they be of able Bodies, and of Years meet for this Employment, and well clothed; but none of the said Men are to be taken out of the Trained Bands, which you are still to keep entire: Care is likewise to be had, and express order to be given, that the Men to be levied be all in a readiness to march away by Land by the first of July next; and that they be brought by the Conducters to such Rendezvous as our very good Lord the Earl of Northumland, Lord General of his Majesty's Army, shall direct, there to be delivered to such Captains or Officers as shall be appointed by his Lordship to receive them. And for that it will be uncertain what Conduct-money will suffice for them, we think fit that they be allowed eight Pence a piece per diem sterling, for fourteen days from the time they shall be delivered to their Conducters, under whose leading they are to march by reasonable journeys to the place of their said Rendezvous, which we expect shall not be under fifteen miles a day. And we further pray and require your Lordship to make choice of fit and able Conducters, and to make a reasonable allowance, according to the precedents of former times, having regard to the proportion and number of Men they are to conduct; enabling them with some assistance to keep their Men from straggling and pilfering the Country as they go, or from running from their Colours. And your Lordship is further to take care that they be commodiously provided of Coats. All which Money to be employed for the coating and conducting of the Soldiers, and pay of the Conducters, you are to take order that the same be levied in the City and Liberties, according to the precedents of former times upon other like occasions of Service. And it is his Majesty's Pleasure, that the said Moneys so disbursed shall, upon a just account thereof made, be repayed again out of his Majesty's Exchequer, as in former times upon the like occasion. And we do likewise pray and require your Lordship, that at the delivery of the Men to the Conducters aforesaid, the number and names of the Persons may be received by Indenture between the said Conducters and such as shall have charge by your Commandment to see the Men delivered to them. Whereof one Duplicate is to be sent to the Board, and another to the Lord General, to the end there may be an account given when the same shall be required.

Footnotes

1 Sir Marmaduke Langdale then Sheriff