Letters and Papers
January 1539, 21-25

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

Year published

1894

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41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51

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'Letters and Papers: January 1539, 21-25', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 41-51. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75841 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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January 1539

21 Jan.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.,
130
104. HENRY VIII, and the DUKE OF URBINO.
Instructions by lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal, to Edmund Haryvell, sent 21 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII.
Upon report of his good qualities has given him commission in the King's affairs, as follows:—1. The King has thrown off the yoke of the bishop of Rome and would gladly support any other prince against popish tyranny. 2. It is said that the bishop of Rome is preparing an enterprise against the duke of Urbyn unjustly to deprive him of the dominion of Cameryn, and that if successful he will proceed further against Ferrara, Mantua and other Italian states. The King is to be informed of this. 3. Desires to know how the Venetians view this enterprise against Cameryn, and this the said _ (blank), considering his long residence and credit there, may find out as of himself. 4. Sends 200 mks. and requires him to spare no reasonable cost, riding abroad if need be, but keeping this communication secret, to find out how the matter of Cameryn stands and whether the Emperor has committed some of his nobles to stay that matter: also of the affairs of Ferrara and Mantua. If he find the contentions about Cameryn stayed for ever or for many months, he is to await further instructions. 5. If, however, there is no likelihood of such stay, and although the King's support ought to be sought by Urbyn and others, and the proverb is that "proffered offer stinketh" or at least is suspect, yet, considering the old duke of Urbyn was a valiant prince and one of the Order of the Garter, the King bears a good heart to his house. Directs Harvel to obtain speech of the Duke or some of his council without showing he has this commission, express a wish that he were as well acquainted with the King as the old Duke was, and put him in hope of obtaining the Order of the Garter, whereof the King has some rooms void, and also the King's assistance. 7. If (the matter of Cameryn remaining in trouble) he perceives other princes, as Ferrara and Mantua, would take part in it, "or nothing relent for the said Bishop," he shall, as of himself, act with them as with the duke of Urbyn. 8. Wherever he perceives any notable person incline to the truth and adverse to the bishop of Rome he shall circumspectly explain to them the usurpations of the Roman See. 9. Finally, keep watch on the bishop of Rome's practices against the King and with the "said Pole," and if he can find any suitable spy on the same, to retain him and send word what stipend the said spy requires; and generally send advertisement of all his doings, and his pains shall be rewarded.
Corrected draft. Endd.
21 Jan.
R. O.
105. CAPACITIES AND PENSIONS FOR MONKS.
Warrant by Cromwell for the making out, free of charge, of capacities for the following to hold one benefice each with cure. London, 21 Jan.
Canons of Notley.—Ric. Ridge, abbot; Valentine Bownde, prior; John Keney, sub-prior; Wm. Walker; Wm. Ball; John Pooll; Thos. Webbe; Wm. Okley; John Lichepole; Jas. Alborowe; Wm. Catisbye; John Tymmys; John Wheler; Ric. Smythe; Ric. Barbar; Robt. Goodedaye.
Monks of Eynsham.—Ant. Dunstone, abbot; Edm. Ranysforde, prior; Gregory Brodehurst, sub-prior; Thos. Myll, chaunter and almoner; Thos. Phillips; Thos. Knolles; Robt. Forde, chaplain and cellarer; John Kocseter; Wm. Bucke; John Hedges.
Trinitarian Friars of Dodington. —Hen. White, minister; Ric. Uncle. Signed.
P. 1.
R. O.2. Pension list for the following:—
Canons of Notley.—Ric. Rydge, abbot, 100l.; Valentine Bownde, prior, 6l. 13s. 4d.; John Kenye, sub-prior, 6l.; Thos Webbe, 6l.; Wm. Walker, Wm. Ball, John Poole, John Lychepoole, Jas. Alborowe, Wm. Catisbye, Johu Tymmys, John Wheler, Ric. Smythe, Ric. Barbar, and Robt. Goodedaye, 5l. 6s. 8d. each.
Monks of Eynsham.—Same names as in § 1, the abbot having 133l. 6s. 8d.; Edm. Raynford (sic), prior, 10l.; George (sic) Boodehurst (sic), sub-prior, 6l. 13s. 4d.; Robt. Forde, cellarer, 8l.; and the rest 5l. 6s. 8d. Signed: Thomas Crumwell.
P. 1.
21 Jan.
R. O.
C.'s Letters,
388.
106. CRANMER to CROMWELL.
Has received his letter with the patents of the stewardship of his liberties and the mastership of his game, which he has sealed and sent back by Nevell, his steward, bidding him not deliver them till counsel has determined it may be justly done. As far as he knows now, the heirs of lord Abergavenny and the son of Sir Edw. Nevell may recover the arrearages and bring the patents in question. Asks Cromwell that his counsel may commune with James Halis and Mr. Boys on the matter. Pities young lord Abergavenny and Sir Edw. Nevell's son, one because he is "within orphany," and the other because he has lost his inheritance. Nevertheless Cromwell may do more for them than this is worth if it is the King's pleasure, and they have both justly forfeited their patents for abusing them, as he told lord Abergavenny and Nevill divers times in their lives. Forde, 21 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxx.
21 Jan.
R. O.
107. WALTER LORD HUNGERFORD to CROMWELL.
Desires Cromwell to remember the matter between him and the earl of Huntingdon. His land to the value of 28l. and more has been out of his hands over three years, by reason of an injunction from the lord Chancellor, and, if the earl were to die, the writer would be in danger of losing it. Desires to know Cromwell's advice, and whether he will have leisure to consider the case this term. Farleygh, 21 Jan.
Further, begs credence for the bearer.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell. Endd.
21 Jan.
R. O.
108. RICHARD, ABBOT OF WINCHCOMBE, to CROMWELL.
Received his letters, 21 Jan., and sends up his brother, Dan Wm. Jerom, late cellarer of Wynchelcombe. If he be found an offender, prays God send him condign punishment. Begs favour for the monastery. Wynchelcombe, 21 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
21 Jan.
R. O.
109. RICHARD STRODE to his Son, WILLIAM STRODE.
Commendations to "my daughter-in-law, your wife." I send by John Slannyg your 40s., and 31s. 6d. for Mr. Bydwyll, and a letter of instructions to both of you in my matters. Let the bearer be sped, for London is costly to strangers. Emet was in ward by a capias at the suit of the bp. of Exeter, but was relieved from appearing. I would my Lord, your master, saw the advantage of having other officers here instead of those the Marquis (fn. 1) did appoint. If there be any means for my lands at Tyverton, called Hone, let it be essayed. I put my trust in one Ric. Haydon, and Hoper, my adversary, put his in one Humphrey Cols, now dead. Both were of the Marquis's council, and before the day of meeting came Haydon certified me that the Marquis had bought the lands of Hoper to make a chantry for a priest to sing for his grandfather. When I myself made suit the Marquis said the same. Had he continued, I and mine should have had small joy; he was so bent against me. "I heard not of the distress ne capias against Hals ne Bncler." At my house, Newynham, Tuesday before the Conversion of St. Paul.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: in London without Aldgate. Endd.: "Rec. 28 Januar, Toer hill, Ao H. VIII., xxxo, per Nic. Harry de Shayh."
21 Jan.
R. O.
Rymer,
XIV. 632.
110. LACOCK ABBEY.
Surrender (by Joan Temmes, abbess, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Wilts, Hants, Glouc., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 21 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII. No Signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. u. 26.]
Seal injured.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 5, No. 25] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell and William Peter, King's Commissioners.
R. O.2. Pensions appointed to the late abbess and nuns of Lacock, Wilts, 21 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII., viz.:—
Joan Temmes, abbess, 40l.; Eleanor Monmorthe 100s.; Anne Brydges, Annys Patsall, Elyn Benett, Marg. Legetton, Eliz. Baynton, Agnes Bygnor, Marg. Welshe, Joan Marshall, Eliz. Wye, Eleanor Basdale, Anne Trace, Eliz. Wylson, Scoleast Hewes, Eleanor Maundrell, Tomesyn Jerves, from 4l. to 40s. each. Signed: Jo. Tregonwell: William Petre: John Smyth.
P. 1.
21 Jan.
R. O.
Rymer,
XIV. 628.
111. COMBE ABBEY.
Surrender (by Robt. Kynver abbot, &c.) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Warw., York, Leic., and Ntht., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. Appointing John Redyng and Thos. Williams, laymen, as attorneys to receive and deliver possession of the premises to John London and Edward Baskerfyld, clks., to the King's use. 21 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by Oliver Adams alias Symmynge, quondam abbot, Robt Kynver, (fn. 2) abbot, Ric. Coventre, sub-prior, and 11 others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 16.]
Fine Seal.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 1, No. 56] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, King's commissioner.
112. DR. LONDON to the CHANCELLOR of the AUGMENTATIONS.
R. O.I have taken the surrender of Cumbe, where the abbot, the same day 12 months after being made abbot, left the house again. He had paid part of his first fruits and tenths, and his coming in, by ordinary fees was chargeable to him. He voluntarily surrendered; the lands are worth 293l. 2s. 4d. a year clear, and the rent at Lady Day next will satisfy the debts. I therefore assigned the pensions following and beg that they may be ratified, to encourage others.
Robt. Bate, late abbot, 80l., Humph. Sterkey, Thos. Sutton, cellarer, Wm. Sutton, cook, Ric. Symmyng, sub-prior, and Wm. Freman, 6l. each; Ric. Wastell, Ric. Braddoke, Oliver Hardwyn, Wm. Perse, Thos. Holme, Thos. Clercke, Geoff. Daniell, and Robt. Hepworthe, 5l. 6s. 8d. each. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
113. DR. JOHN LONDON to CROMWELL.
R. O.
Ellis, 3rd Ser.
III. 183.
I have, with much ado, dispatched the priory of Black Monks at Coventry, the Charterhouse, and Combe abbey. The priory was in debt before "he" came and he has made me an account. I have left the church and house unspoiled and undefaced as yet. At the Charterhouse I found 20 nobles' worth of goods to dispatch the whole house; howbeit God has so disclosed their crafty dealing that I have given each brother 40s. for apparel, paid the servants wages, given each brother "his whole cell saving the house and a vestment," paid all debts within 10l., and shall yet have 200 oz. of plate over, where at his coming he found not 40 oz.
At Combe I left the honse with the implements unspoiled. Harford, now sheriff of Coventry, informed me that the abbot of Combe had 500l. in a feather bed at his brother's house. I searched the bed and found but 25l., which the abbot readily confessed was to pay certain debts at Candlemas, and was put there because he could ill trust any servant he had. He surrendered the house the same day twelve month he was made master and left it, everything considered, in a competent state. I found there 15 monks and 68 servants. To stay spoil and for the safeguard of evidences, let the surveyors come as speedily after me as may be. I have followed your pleasure for your servant Mr. Whalley at Pollesworth, and beg you will remember Mr. Cheyney at Bow Vale Charterhouse by Nottingham. I have from these three houses over 800 oz. of plate which I will bring with me at my coming to London. My servant shall deliver you such ornaments as I have sent up.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
21 Jan.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
126.
114. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
Has no news of importance and hears nothing of the post expected out of Spain, but writes in order that he may not be again blamed for seldom writing. Gives reasons for mistrusting the Queen and Emperor. As the King is father to all Christian kings in time of reign and in wisdom, trusts to see the day when they shall all be glad, do him honour and yield him his own. They babble much here that the French king will no more pay his pension and that the King of Scots "will do many things." Thinks that, "things at home once established as they have been devised," all who have livings in Calais or the marches should be ordered to dwell upon them. When people talk of these things and tell how the bp. of Rome has given a new sentence against the King, Wriothesley makes such discourse of the Bishop's usurpations and the King's power that they cannot or dare not reply. Shows them that he trusts to see the King correct that tyrant of Rome even within Rome's gates.
The Emperor will go no further than Naples; the King of the Romans shall be captain general of the army. There is an agreement between the Emperor, King Ferdinando and Voivoda. The Emperor will first settle the affairs of Italy and then pass into Almain to frame a Council. He will need good tools to make that frame. Shall live Nestor's years before he sces a free council unless the bp. of Rome be first reformed. Poole is not in such esteem at Rome as he was; but men of his sort are more meet for Rome than England, and God will one day show "how unworthy he is to live amongst men." The matter between Urbyn and the bp. of Rome is referred to the Venetians; Urbyn to keep Cameryne until they decide how much the Bishop shall give for it in the name of the Duke's wife's dote. The duke of Venice, Andreas Grytty, is dead. Philip Strocia is dead in Florence; some say he killed himself. The French ambassador that went towards Cambray turned back upon meeting the grand esquire of the constable of France who came hither in post. The best we can do here is to keep a countenance; and till our things be established it will not be amiss with some ambassadors to keep them in suspense and never ask for their post but pretend we are still seeking when we have already found, and then let them feel that they might have had with ease what they shall not with all their force be able to compass. Has less hope than ever of success here, for Don Diego has sent for the remainder of his household to meet him at Venice. Is still troubled by the "dregs" of his fever. Bruxelles, 21 Jan. Signed.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao 30.
21 Jan.
Vatican MS.
115. LATINO JUVENALE'S MISSION.
"Sommario de la lettera di M. Latino di 21 di Gennaro da Parigi."
Arrived in Court on the 16th, and next day had audience of the King. Spoke of the peace, of England and of the Council. As to the peace, Francis said he was on good terms with the Emperor, and thanked his Holiness for his efforts, though he had not yet obtained restitution of Milan. But an expedition against the Turk was difficult and unadvisable, without the union of all the Christian princes; in which case he would, even without Milan, join the League. As to England, he had several times since his departure from Nice prayed that King to return to the obedience of the Church, but seeing him every day do worse, he held him for a heretic and schismatic, and was content to withdraw his ambassador and let the bull be published, and obey it if the Emperor would do the same; that, however, two letters should be procured from Spain, one to the Imperial ambassador in England, and the other to queen Mary, to give order that upon the same morning both the ambassadors, of the Emperor and of France, should take leave of that King, and that the bull should be published and obeyed. He professed great desire, and thought it easy to acquire that island with three armies— his own, the Emperor's, and the king of Scots', saying that it could be divided among the three; and when Latino replied that it would be easier to create a new King, it did not appear to displease him.
As to the Council, the King did not see that it could do any good without a peace between him and the Emperor; and as to the Lutherans, they ought to be gently dealt with, because they have collected 3,000,000 florins, and that he himself should negociate with them, as they do not get on well with Henry, and the Landgrave has offered his Majesty (Francis) 30,000 foot for the enterprise against England. Here, apropos of this war, M. Latino suggested a truce with the Turk by the whole League, which Francis approved, offering, if the Emperor wished it, to procure a truce for five or six years, which he fully believes he can obtain.
Italian, From a modern copy in R.O., pp. 2.
22 Jan.116. SIR EDW. MONTAGUE, CHIEF JUSTICE of the KING'S BENCH.
See GRANTS in JANUARY, No. 30.
22 Jan.
R. O.
117. EDMUND PEKHAM to WRIOTHESLEY.
Since my last letter to you I have received by Mr. Palmer your costly token for the New Year. Thanks. Was glad to hear from Mr. Palmer that you were well and honourably entertained, and had great resort of the noblemen of the country. If you want money I will send it on your writing how I shall make exchange, and to whom it shall be conveyed. London, 22 Jan.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Ambassador in Flanders. Endd.: Anno xxxo.
22 Jan.
R. O.
118. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Sundry persons have said that the earl of Bridgwater was sore sick and in danger of death. Mr. John Graynfeld says he heard it from some of the Earl's servants, but I have inquired at his lodgings and can hear no such thing, but that he intends to be here next week. "Die when he will, he shall have my good will." My lord Privy Seal is well contented with the matter this bearer had to do with him; "for he had this day that which he delivered him to the King to see." I hope your suit for the Friars will shortly take place. As yet I cannot get your money from Mr. Pope. The King has deferred his journey to my lord Prince till after Candlemas. London, 22 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
22 Jan.
R. O.
119. THE EARL OF ARUNDEL to CROMWELL.
I beg you will see a good end between me and Sir John Russell touching the profits of the baillywick of Burley in the New Forest, which I doubt not the King's laws will give to me, though I have forborne this ten years. I find Sir John intends to delay me unless I should take the extremity of the law, which I would be sorry to do if I might have it otherwise. Downeley, 22 Jan. Signed: Your lover, Arundell.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.: Mr. Arundell's letters."
22 Jan.
R. O.
120. JOHN PALMES to CROMWELL.
Considers that the King's letters patents have delivered him from all bondage brought into Christ's Church by the usurped power of the bp. of Rome, concerning his benefice, the parsonage of Bentworth. As these letters do not forbid marriage, specially to those who have neither taken the holy orders nor avowed the contrary, has married, for which he is called into the bp. of Winchester's court by a citation ex officio. Looks for little favour. Offers to resign the benefice. Has to answer on Candlemas eve. Bentworth, 22 Jan. Signed: by your blind man and destitute of worldly help, John Palmes.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
22 Jan.
R. O.
121. DR. JOHN LONDON to CROMWELL.
I have committed the custody of the late friary of Thelsforde to Mr. Lucye. It is a very poor house. I have despatched the brethren and taken a way for payment of their debts. The house is in much ruin, and the church little and unfinished; to have defaced them would not have made 20l. to the King, but standing as it does it may do Mr. Lucye pleasure, who is a man of learning and lives quietly with his neighbours. I send a rental of the lands, for I suppose Mr. Lucye will make suit for them, whom I recommend to your favour; he has many children and brothers and sisters on his hands. I could no rather dispatch that friary, I have been so let by snows and storms, and by the dissimulation of the good father of the Charterhouse, who had spoiled his house before my coming. Howbeit I am even with him, and have set forth his double and crafty dealing. Now I beg your favour to him in his pension, for I have done sufficiently for the reformation of his doubleness. Thelisforde, 22 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
22 Jan.
R. O.
122. BISHOP ROLAND LEE to CROMWELL.
Your Lordship wrote to me to take into my service one of Lord Montague's servants, and, though I have little devotion to any that belong to traitors, I have done so. In these parts there hath been such floods since Christmas and afterwards such snow as has not been in memory of man seen. Wygmore Castle, 22 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.: Bp. of Chester.
22 Jan.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
615.
123. NEWBURGH PRIORY.
Surrender (by Wm. Leanwodd, prior, and the convent) of the monastery, and all its possessions in co. York and in — (blank). 22 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by William, the prior, 13 priests, and 4 deacons. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 32.]
Seal injured.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 5, No. 57] without mem. of acknowledgment.
22 Jan.
R. O.
124. SIR NICHOLAS FAREFAXE to CROMWELL.
Asks Cromwell, if Mr. Bellasses leaves the preferment of Bylande for any other thing, to give him the preferment of the demesnes there. They are commodious for him, being near his house. If the King has disposed of them, asks for the preferment of the demesnes of Newbroughe or Whitbye, when they shall be surrendered. Will give him 40l. to buy a gelding. Gilling, 22 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
22 Jan.
R. O.
125. JAMES V. to CROMWELL.
Desiring licence for the bearer his "familiar" servant, Thomas Udart, to buy in London 16 pieces of malvoisey and other "stark" wines, 4 doz. bows, 2 cases of arrows, &c., for James' use. Linlithgw Palace, 22 Jan. 26 James V. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
22 Jan.
Vatican MS.
126. CARD. POLE to CARD. FARNESE.
Arrived today at Avignon. Reached Carpentras yesterday where he could not help visiting Sadolet. Here at Avignon is as usual incognito, and has sent no word to the Legate, who is ill in bed. Will tomorrow go towards Nemes (Nimes), and hurry on as much as possible, being now out of the mountains, and in a great measure out of the snow and ice. Avignon, 22 Jan. 1539.
Italian. From a modern copy in R. O., p. 1.
23 Jan.
R. O.
127. NICH. ELIOTT to CROMWELL.
Does not like to be troublesome, but is impelled to write by Cromwell's zeal for religion. Has travelled in various regions and encountered great dangers, and since his return to his country many can bear witness that he has not been idle either in teaching or learning. Expresses great admiration of Cromwell's character and gratitude for favors shown him in consideration of his kinsman, Hen. Polsted. Cromwell is now his only refuge in poverty. Signed: Nicolaus Eliottus Gilfordiensis, Januarii 23o.
Lat., pp. 3. Add. at the head. Endd.: "Ao xxx."
23 Jan.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
629.
128. KEYNSHAM ABBEY.
Surrender (by John, the abbot, &c.) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Soms., Wilts, Glouc., Oxon, and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 23 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by John, (fn. 3) Wm. Herne, prior, Wm. Tibbett, sub-prior, and 8 others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 25.]
Seal a little broken.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 3, No. 8] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell, King's commissioner.
23 Jan.
R. O.
129. PHILIP, ABBOT OF EVESHAM, to the STUDENTS OF GLOUCESTER COLLEGE, OXFORD.
As, last summer, I had commandment from my lord Privy Seal to make a governor of the college and take an inventory of the plate, furniture of the chapel, and other moveables, I have now received further commandment to send the said plate and moveables to him. I have therefore appointed your manciple, the bearer, to carry it up, and require you to permit him quietly to receive the same. Evesham, 23 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
130. MARGARET VERNON to CROMWELL.
I hear "there is a little gentlewoman with Master Saddlere which I would very fain have the governance and bringing up": it were to my comfort now in mine age. I hear the house my lady of Salusbury had at Bysham is in the King's hand. If you help me to it for my money, I trust to have some pasture thereby to maintain my poor house. If it be passed by promise, please help me to some other. Haknay, 24 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
131. HENRY EARL OF ESSEX to CROMWELL.
I am "acrasyd" and have got licence of my lord Chancellor to depart the town for a season. I beg you to have me in remembrance "for I lese yssewys for lacke of my oblygacyons." Friday, 24 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao 30.
24 Jan.
Vesp. F. XIII.
111 b.
B. M.
132. JOHN LORD AUDELEY TO CROMWELL.
By your comfortable letters you have bound me to you for ever. I beg your help for the barony of Kemes. Latterly Wm. Owen, by his subtle letters to Parson Davys, would compass me to follow his desires contrary to my heart and mind. Every pound he offers me in my present necessity is worth three; but I would rather abide your pleasure than that my cruel adversaries should drive me. At my poor lodging at Fandereys Marche, 24 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
24 Jan.
R. O.
133. JAMES CARTER to CROMWELL.
Encloses the confession of Thos. Burdhede, of Barkston in the soke of Grantham, as to heinous words of treason spoken against the King and Cromwell by John Bushy, of Hogham, Lincolnshire. The confession was made before Jas. Carter, alderman, Ric. Alen, John Blak, Thos. Lees, Thos. Alen, Robt. Taylyour, Geffray Kell, Thos. Wilkynson, and other burgesses of Grantham, on 23 Jan. Grantham, 24 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal and Vice-Gerent. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
134. WILLIAM LORD DACRE to CROMWELL.
Sends the payment he owes the King. Asks Cromwell to move the King that he may lie at Hinderskelf in Yorkshire, that he may be near the lord President. He will thus be the sooner out of debt and more able to do the King service. C[o]nysclif, 24 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd. Sealed.
24 Jan.
R. O.
135. [JOHN] STURGYN, late prior of Frithelstoke, to LADY LISLE.
Reminds her that he requested her servant John Davy for leave to wear lord Lisle's cognisance, with which lord and lady Lisle were contented. Since then Master Roll has discharged him from the farm of the benefice of Frystok, which he had by lease from Sir Thos. Arundell. Trusts that lord and lady Lisle will allow him to enjoy it. Understands there is more money granted for the same "than I do bear, by John Cleve, which is not friend, and done of malice." Hopes to do them as good service as he can. Remits the matter to her goodness till he can speak with her. 24 Jan. Signed: "Sturgyn, late prior of Frystoke. Helpe now good lady."
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
R. O.136. GEO. ROLLE to LADY LISLE.
Lord Lisle wrote to me desiring that John Davy, your servant, might have the preferment of the benefice of Frystoke. I wrote accordingly to tell him what was offered me for it yearly and by whom, that he might have the whole or half with John Clyffe. Davy has now written that he will not meddle with it at that price, and Clyffe has sent me the enclosed letter, saying how he will take it and of what he will be discharged. Surely he shall have a very dear farm, but that he is a very worldly man. It is now advanced 6l. and a noble. I intend to ride to Devon the latter end of the first clean week in Lent, and I wish to know my lord's pleasure and yours, how I shall use the same lease. Sturgeon, who is now farmer, is loath to depart from the farm.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
24 Jan.
R. O.
137NICOLAS DE CLEYBERGHE to LORD LISLE.
I regard you as my sovereign protector, considering the gracious promises you have made to me. Nevertheless after having wasted my time for six or seven months in fruitless solicitation, the Sieur Paulmes has told me that he had no longer any power to retain me. Therefore considering the promise I made you some days before leaving Calais never to serve against the Emperor, I retired towards Zeelland because I had been robbed in that town of all my money. Otherwise I would have visited you.
My poor wife remains there with child, and in great distress, friendless, and without money. I beg you in consideration of my services, to give her a trifle to enable her to withdraw, as I have advised her to do. "Et quant est daccomplir le pont d ... ner ... le fondement de la place parfondir le havene pourveoir ... s autres honnestetez et nouvelles inventions ... e mandant a toutes heurres, et naura faulte de me trouver vers vostredite excellence et accomplir mesdites remonstrances." London, 24 Jan. 1538.
Since writing, I have landed at Dover, and there, finding some evil suspicion, after entering the haven, I went out and came to this town intending to come with this mariner, but I determined to leave this to your pleasure. Be assured of my loyalty.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
25 Jan.
R. O.
138. WILLIAM BASYNGE, Prior of Winchester, to CROMWELL.
Sends by his servant, the bearer, 50l., which, with the money sent after his election, makes the full third payment to Cromwell of his obligation. Is greatly bound to Cromwell for sparing him so long. Winchester, 25 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Sir Thomas Cromwell, lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal. Endd.
25 Jan.
R. O.
139JOHN DAVYE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your letters dated London, about your conclusion with lord Bridgwater. I will do nothing with the woods of Bekingholt and Wareham but according to your writings. John Butler advises that your ladyship should buy the whole woods, for whoever lies at Womberlegh will need them. "My lord of Bridgwater will sure down with all, and that were pity." I have been at Esthagyngton and advised the bailly and tenants to retain the rents till your ladyship's council and my lady Coffyn's have conferred together. I have also delivered to Mr. Harres a copy of the grant made to Sir Will. Coffyn, and written to Mr. Roll to speak with lady Coffyn's council. I thank you for granting me the farm of the church of Frydelstock, but Mr. Rolle has set it at such a price that it is not meet for me, and Sir John Sturgyan says he has a grant of the letting of Sir Thos. Arundell. Sir John Bounde has not been out of his chamber since All Hallows' day. He knows no man by sight. Your ladyship wrote to him that he should continue this next half year. I desire to know if Mrs. Jane shall have the sight of your stuff or not, for Sir John will not deliver it without your letter. St. Paul's day.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
25 Jan.
R. O.
140. FRANCIS HALLE to HARRY PALMER.
My son, I commend me to you, to good Mrs. Hootton and to all my friends. This day I received your letter dated Dover, 16th inst., by your friend the bearer who appointed where I shall always have your "xxx. c. latthe" at my pleasure. This day I have given knowledge of the same to my daughter, your bedfellow, by her servant, whom she sent to bid me advertise you that yesterday certain Italians took measure about the walls of Aarde for fortification and that this day Mons. de Biese intended to be at Aarde. This morning about 9 a.m. one of Mons. de Bowcourtes sons, of Boullyn, came here about buying my grey gelding, of which he had heard from John Brown, for his father. When he knew the price he desired that my man might show him a little on the way out of the town. Though he said he had not broken his fast he would not tarry nor eat till he came to Boullyn though I think he met with his company at Aarde. He asked whether the King had made men at arms in England, and I said, "Yea." He asked where Sir Nic. Carew was; I said, in the Tower, unless he had already suffered for his demerits. Calais, 25 Jan., 1538.
Larke your man is no speedier in his work than before.
P. 1. Add.: at Sir Thomas Palmer's house in Mark Lane, London. Endd.
25 Jan.
R. O.
141. JOHN BEKYNSAW to JOHN MASON.
I was glad when a letter came to me on 21 Jan. with a superscription in your hand which I know well; but inside I found another hand of whom I was glad to hear, for he is my friend. When Mr. Welden showed me your letter only, asking him to send you word how I did, and saying it was reported I was married here, I thought your friendship was gone from me. I wrote to you in Spayne for counsel upon a certain purpose of mine and declared it to you more fully at your passing by us. If you had sent me your "cloke case" I would have done you that service. Love me as you have ever done. Not six men in this town know I am married. I wrote it to my lord Privy Seal myself and did not expect it would have been spread abroad. "I do not repent that I have done. "My wife had nothing (for if she had I would not have had her) and I nothing wherefore we have great need of friends." Paris, 25 Jan., 1539.
P.S. If my master talk with you of this, tell him he left me desperate, forbidding me to write to him, so that I could not have his counsel.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.: Ao 30
25 Jan.
Vatican, MS.
142. THE NUNCIO, JO. POGGIO, to CARD. FARNESE.
* * * Yesterday I told his Majesty again of the coming of Card. Pole for the affairs of England, and he expects him, and I hope he will find him well enough disposed. This ambassador complains rather that the Holy Inquisition persecute him. They act nobly and I hope they will drive him away from here. For this and the affairs of Germany I have touched cautiously upon the peace; but no dependence can be put upon the marriages. Proposed marriage of the duke of Orleans with "la Portughesa." The enterprise of Levant. Ascanio Colonna. Latino Juvenale's going to France. "Solicitaro per il Rmo Carle Polo et per il desiderio che sua Santita tiene se li facci qualche demostratione sara stato a proposito il farsi veder q." The Emperor is glad the Pope is satisfied with Lope Hurtado and his wife. These people have detained M. Giorgio until 25 Jan., 1539. Toledo.
Italian. From a modern extract in R.O., pp. 2, headed: Di Monsignore Jo. Poggio, nunzio, dei 25 di Gennaro 1539 da Toledo.

Footnotes

1 Of Exeter.
2 "Kynu'" misread "Kym'" in the Deputy Keeper's Report.
3 Does not describe himself further.