Letters and Papers
February 1539, 6-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106

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'Letters and Papers: February 1539, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 95-106. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75844 Date accessed: 20 November 2014.


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February 1539

6 Feb.237. CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, OXFORD.
See GRANTS in FEBRUARY, No. 24.
6 Feb.
R. O.
238. JOHN, BP. OF LINCOLN, to CROMWELL.
Received, 6 Feb., Cromwell's letters of 1 Feb., from which it appears he is informed that the writer withdraws a duty of 100s. from the monastery of Godstowe, alleging that the church of Lincoln will be charged with it after the monastery is suppressed. Will explain the matter to Cromwell on coming up at Shrovetide.
One Curtas came to me for licence to preach in my diocese. He is not meet for that office either in learning or living being noted there as "a light wild person in many things." I beg he may have no licence from you. I think you know the man now that you hear his name. Wooborn, 6 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao 30o.
6 Feb.
R. O.
239. BP. ROLAND LEE to CROMWELL.
At my late being with you, your Lordship granted me a commission for ordering of the college church of St. John's, Chester; the number of ministers there being excessive, the offering being withdrawn. Two of the ministers, being discharged, withdrew certain plate and obtained a letter from you to the chamberlain of Chester and Sir John Dauen (Donne), surmising wrong to be illated to them by the dean and chapter, which is not true. There is now a convenient number, two conducts, four vicars choral, and four chantry priests. I have one of them and trust to make him bring the plate again. I beg your favour for the bearer, Wm. Duckett, my chaplain, to be one of the canons now to be founded in Gloucester. He has taken pains in the King's buildings here. I intend this Shrovetide to be at Lichfield for redress of certain matters, with Messrs. Sulzarde and Wernon, which you Lordship committed to them and me, betwixt the canons and vicars there. Wygmore Castle, 6 Feb.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
6 Feb.
R. O.
240. SIR THOMAS WHARTON to CROMWELL.
I sent a letter to the king of Scots, word for word as in the copy you sent me, adding only one article, the copy of which, together with the King's reply and a letter from lord Maxwell, and the copy of a letter I wrote to him, is enclosed. I will certify you of our proceeding at the day of march to be held 14 Feb. and will attend to your commands in your letter, dated London, 5 Jan., and received by me 28 Jan., anempst the king of Scots' rebels and the use of the Debateable Ground. Cokermouthe, 6 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. "The copy of ayne artykell wyche Sir Thomas Whartton dyde put in to his letter sent to the king of Scottes":—Hearing of that "frantic writing" I declared the same to lord Maxwell, your warden of your West Marches on the 12th of "this instant January," and since then I hear the same still goes abroad in your realm.
Small slip, p. 1.
iii. "The copy of letter sent from Sir Thomas Whartton to the lord Maxwell."
I send my servant, the bearer Robert Hodshone, to your King with letters and beg you to be a mean for his expedition. Cokermouthe Castle, 20 Jan.
Small slip, p. 1.
6 Feb.
Calig. B. VII.
252.
B. M.
241. JAMES V. to SIR WILLIAM EVERS.
Promising, upon his complaint of the circulation of certain "dogrymes" in Scotland defaming the king of England, to make more strict inquiry than he had already done at the instance of Sir Thos. Quertoun (Wharton), warden of the West Marches, and, if any of his subjects are taken with them, to punish them with death. Holyrood, 6 Feb., 26 Jan. V. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: "To oure weilbelovit freynd Schir William Evers, capitane of Berwik."
6 Feb.
R. O.
242. [LORD LISLE] to ADRIAN REVEL.
Warns him of an English pirate having lately left the Thames, a vessel of 35 tons, particularly described, and that the intention is to harass and plunder the allies of the King, "my master." Desires him to inform the captain of Dieppe, and requests that any information about them may be at once communicated to the writer that he may take measures for their apprehension. Calais, 6 Feb.
Has informed the seneschal of the Boullonnois (Du Bies).
Draft, Fr., p. 1. Add.: demourant a Dyeppe.
6 Feb.
R. O.
243. GUILLAUME GROUL to PIERRE BECCWIT, Secretary to Lord Lisle, at Calais.
I am surprised you do not come to see me. I have inquired about you of some Calais men who have been at the wedding of Pierre le Cordier. I beg you will come before Lent, else I shall esteem you a man sans mot, and that will condemn you to send me sorrel (? des sorez) for my Lent. Commendations to Adrian Briselle. St. Omer, 6 Feb. 1538.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
7 Feb.
R. O.
C.'s Letters,
361.
244. CRANMER to CROMWELL.
Asks him to write to the bp. of London to induct Sir John Gylderde of Rayley, in Essex, to the benefice of Sutton Magna in the same county. The patronage belongs to Margaret Wyate, widow, and Geo. Coverte, alternis vicibus, "and on a vacancy last year there was a dispute whose right it was, and both presented; Marg. Wyate presenting Gylderde, a man of literature, good judgment, and honest conversation; and Covert Sir Hugh Payne, late Observant, of no good learning nor judgment, but a seditious person. The Bp. gave institution to the latter, leaving the patrons in suit at the common law, which is not yet decided. Payne has died in the Marshalsea, and Margaret Wyate has again presented Gylderde, fearing that one Roche, late Observant, will promote himself thereto. Covert can have no colour of interest at this time, for he can claim no more at most, but to present once against Mrs. Wiat's twice. Forde, 7 Feb. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxx.
7 Feb.
R. O.
245. MILES COVERDALE to CROMWELL.
Through overmuch sufferance, there are in these countries (and I fear in many more) an innumerable sort of popish books, which are incorrect and like to keep the people in error or make them fall into such inconvenience as did of late one John Cowper, whose accusation I trust your lordship has received (or shall do) this week by the justice. I have required the curate of Newbury to call in all books either "uncorrect" or against the King's most lawful acts touching Thomas Becket and the bp. of Rome; a great many have already in two or three days come to me. I desire your lordship to give me charge by your letters that, wherever I understand such books to be, I may have them corrected. In so doing I doubt not but to win the parties, not only to make them more fervent towards God and His Word but also to increase their due obedience to the King's Grace, whom with noble Prince Edward and all you of their Council the mighty arm of God preserve evermore. Amen. Newbury, 7 Feb.
Your favourable answer I desire by the bearer my servant.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd. "Ao xxx."
7 Feb.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
635.
246. BRIDGEWATER HOSPITAL.
Surrender of the house and all its possessions in cos. Soms., Wilts, Glouc., Dors., Hants, Devon, and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 7 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by Robt. Walshe master or warden and seven others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 11.]
Seal injured.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 5, No. 21] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pensions assigned to the late master and brethren of St. John's in Bridgewater, first payment to be at Lady Day next, A.D. 1539.
Robt. Walshe, master, 33l. 6s. 8d.; Thos. Coggyn, Ric. Kymrydge, John Golde, John Wyll, and Robt. Fyssher, 4l. each; John Woode and John Mors, 40s. each. Signed: Rychard Ryche.
P. 1.
7 Feb.
R. O.
247. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
Pursuant to my last letters I send by these bearers Henry Philipps, for whom I beg favour if he perform what he has promised me. I forbore to examine him here, fearing that delay and curiousness in examination might frighten him; and the treaty only binds them to banish him from their dominions. I used him very gently, seeing he submitted himself to me as the King's minister. When he came hither with Mr. Leighton, whom I sent to Louvain for him on Tuesday afternoon, I had him brought to my chamber, where I had "one or two with me in honest sort to wait upon me." Entering he made as though he would have shaken me by the hand. "No, sir," quo' I, "I shake no hands with such fellows as you be till I hear further," and yet I am right glad you are here, not that you may be punished for your offences, but recovered from your miserable life and spared by the King's mercy to use the qualities God has given you in making amends for your detestable offences; therefore I shake no hands with you till I hear from your own mouth whether you submit to the King or no; by Mr. Leighton here I understand you repent; if it be in heart, you have not gone too far to return and receive, peradventure, grace both of God and the King. All this while I gave him leave to kneel; for when I refused his hand he fell on his knees. "Sir," quo' he, "I am come to submit myself wholly to the King's Majesty's mercy." I have so offended that I am unworthy to live, yet perhaps report has made my doings seem worse than they were. "Arise," quo' I, "and hear me, Philipps," as I see thee repentant I shall say that whatever knaves may report thou shalt find the King a most merciful prince and furnished with councillors of the same sort where they see cause of pity, but beware how thou goest about to excuse thyself; the King has been a king these 30 years and was a man before he was crowned, and "I tell thee plainly he hath eyes and ears in the bottom of their bellies and in the very lining of their hearts that be of that sort that thou hast been;" and once found a liar thou shalt deserve no mercy; thou hast no means of grace, but by telling the whole truth of thy life since thou hast been of this naughty sort: I think if thou art true and plain thou shalt find mercy, and though no man can promise anything of a king's act, yet I promise to be a suitor for thee and have good hope for thee if thou hinder not thyself with covering of thy doing, "therefore spare no man when the time shall come, but be thine own friend and thine own executor." He promised to follow my advice. Details further conversation and how he then shook Philipps by the hand.
"The fellow (Philipps) hath a great wit; he is excellent in language; he is no man of estimation ne can do any manner of hurt at any time hereafter; he hath freely yielded himself, thinking it better to be hanged than to live a traitor; his experience is great and may serve if the fellow may be well won." Thinks himself fortunate to have taken Philipps and begs favour for him if he be plain as he has promised. I beg you thank this bearer, Mr. Leighton, and let him return with diligence: he can do good service at table and besides is a good companion. Mons. de Likirke, of whose going to Cambray we wrote, went thence to the French king, but for what purpose I know not. I spend money apace: I received 100l. about Twelfth tide and have now 25 crs., but have sent for more, and care not for the expense if the purpose take effect. Bruxelles, 7 Feb.
Hol., pp. 5. Add: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
7 Feb.
R. O.
248. EDWARD CARNE to CROMWELL.
Mr. Leighton on Wednesday evening last brought to Mr. Wriothesley that arrant traitor Phelyps, who determined (upon the hope which Mr. Wriothesley put him in and the letter written in his favour) to submit himself to the King. Mr. Wriothesley committed him to the custody of Leighton and his companion, Mr. Joyes, to keep him in sight all that night until he were on horseback in the morning. Yet they "(far from the duty of true men)" suffered him to depart and he cannot be heard of, although such search has been made as has not been seen here for years. Mr. Wriothesley takes his escape so heavily that unless your lordship comfort him I fear a return of his ague. No man could have suspected Leighton, yet betwixt him and Joyes he (Philips) was let go. This forenoon came hither Mr. Stokes, nephew to the bp. of Bath and one Mr. Bransbye, students of Louvain, to see Mr. Wriothesley and make merry with us as they said. After dinner Mr. Wriothesley, being weak went to his chamber, and Stokes began to lament the escape of Philips, whom he had helped to convey hither. I asked how they found him. He said a young student of Louvain called Antonye, kinsman of Mr. Leyson, the priest that was Mr. Compton's chaplain, conveyed a letter to him, and he came to Antonye on Sunday morning at Mr. Stokes' lodging. Then Antony advised him not to miss the opportunity of submitting to Mr. Wriothesley, and he promised to return to Antonye the same afternoon with a letter for Mr. Leyghton. This he did, and Mr. Stokes was then walking in the court, on sight of whom the traitor began to draw back. "What, man!" cried Stokes, "thou knowest me of old and thou needest not to fear me." (I noted these words because Stokes had told others here he never saw Philips before Sunday last.) Philips was then reassured and delivered his letter to Antonye. Stokes asked where he lodged, and he said out of the town and promised to return to Stokes' lodging on Wednesday, which he did. Two hours after this conversation Stokes came to me alone and said that what Leighton said was not true, i.e., that he (Leighton) drew his sword upon Philips ere he would consent to come with him and that Philips fell on his knees before him. Stokes then said he had not seen Philyps since, three years ago, Philips came to him at Paris "all to ragged and torn" and he gave him some apparel and he tarried with him for a season and at last ran away with some of Stokes' apparel. Stokes also said he knew Philyps at Oxford. The bold coming of Philips to Stokes' lodging and the diversity of stokes' sayings makes me suspect that Philips and the English students of Louvain are all of the same sort, and that Stokes and Bransbye only came hither to excuse themselves. Bruxeles, 7 Feb. 1538.
Hol., pp. 4. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
249. [WRIOTHESLEY to WILLIAM LAYTON.]
R. O.Would God that your news were true! but we hear nothing of that false traitor, who will never fall again into such a man's hands as God himself, I ween, drew him into at this time. I send you the six crowns, leaving but two in my purse. I have sought your chamber for your purse but cannot find it. Bestir yourself if you suppose to win your spurs, and let either Mr. Joy or you bring some news as soon as you may. Things are better taken towards you this day than they were, so that I doubt not but all shall be well.
Draft in Wriothesley's hand, p. 1. Endd.: "Layton's letter with mine answer."
7 Feb.
R. O.
250. ANTHOINETTE DE SAVEUSES to LADY LISLE.
Compliments to lord Lisle. I have received your letters and with them four rozinboz and three "stoetres" in payment of the dozen and a half coiffes that I last sent. I think them ill becoming the reverence of your "noble et reprezentable personne, et pour longueur des personnages a quy de vostre bonne grase avez envie den ferre prezent." I send two dozen coiffes d'homme that I received on the 4th Feb., and half-a-dozen for women; but I fear they will not give you satisfaction. Before receiving your letters I saw that the work and cloth were unlike some cloths I had received before, and I wrote to them expressing my dissatisfaction. They sent me work which I would not have given to peasants, much less sent to one of the great houses of England to present to other great personages. I have received an answer from the abbess that a Spanish merchant has bought of them the monopoly of those articles for three months, but after that time she will supply me with anything I want, at 5½ sous the piece for women's coiffes, and seven for men's, for she loses at present by the merchants, who only give her 4½ sous for women's and 6 for men's, and things being dearer than they were, she makes them only of the kind sent to you. But I think if you sent for the marshal's wife to your house, and without letting it appear that it was about the said coiffes, [said that I] presented my compliments and if I understood her rightly she promised me when I was with you that if I sent her coiffes she would get them sold again; you might tell her the price, and for your sake she would re-imburse you. Dunkirk, 7 Feb.
Hol., Fr. p. 1. Add.
8 Feb.
R. O.
251. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
By bearer, Robert Clare, your servant, I send you both your patents, of Fristock and of your annuity, and enclose the key of the long box in which they are. I cannot yet learn my lord Privy Seal's answer about the loan of the 400l., although Mr. Polsted has moved it. As far as I can learn, his Lordship's pleasure is to redeem it out of hand for ready money, which shall nothing benefit you. "The Friars tarrieth Mr. Polsted's coming." Mr. Aylmer is here and has him commended to you, but knows nothing of Wyckes' matter touching Maxmyll and refers it wholly to the vicar of P[o]rtsey. The abbot of Westminster has not yet received his wine, but I think he will be better advised and take it. My lord Privy Seal called me on Thursday and said it was time for your Lordship now to wax grave and not give credit to every light tale; and not to be hasty in writing, for he knew how things did frame there well enough. This he willed me to certify you as his own motion, and it shows his good will. I think the matter has arisen by some letter you have sent lately. London, 8 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.: "Concerning news of light report."
8 Feb.
R. O.
252. THOS. PRIOR OF CHRISTCHURCH, CANTERBURY, to CROMWELL.
Has received his letter concerning the King's wish to have Bockyng Wood and a farm called Panfield Priory in Essex, in exchange for land of like value assigned by Sir Ric. Ryche, Chancellor of the Augmentations. Sends his brother Dr. Thorneden, warden of their manors, who knows about it. Cromwell's servant brought no deed for the abbot and convent to seal and subscribe, as Cromwell wrote. Canterbury, Saturday, 8 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxx.
8 Feb.
R. O.
253. MILES COVERDALE to CROMWELL.
Must write again to signify that a great number of priests have incurred prœmunire for not having "utterly extinct" all the ecclesiastical service against the King's laws. In the feast called Cathedra S. Petri a great part of their matins is plainly a maintenance of the bp. of Rome's usurped power, as appears by the great matin books of Newbury church. Was surprised to discover this on the 7th inst., as it is so long since the Act was passed. Has not mentioned this to any one, not even to the bearer, Mr. Wynchcombe, notwithstanding his true heart to the King. Newbury, 8 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.: Anno xxx.
8 Feb.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
632.
254. ATHELNEY ABBEY.
Surrender (by Robt. Hamlen, abbot, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Soms., Wilts., Dors., Devon, and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 8 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by Robert, the abbot, Ric. Bolles, prior, and five others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 8.]
Fine seal.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 5, No. 26] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell, King's commissioner.
8 Feb.
R. O.
255. SIR CHR. MORES to CROMWELL.
We have finished matters at Berwick, and indented with Thomas Suttell, late deputy to Sir Thomas Clifford, late captain, for the castle and ordnance, and also with Sir William Ewry alias Ivers, now captain, to whom we have delivered the town, castle, and tower, with all ordinance, munitions, artillery and habiliments of war therein. That done, we have viewed the same town, castle, &c., and the repairs necessary, and I will bring particulars at my coming to London. 8 Feb, 30 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Feb.
R. O.
St. P. III., 116.
256. COUNCIL OF IRELAND to CROMWELL.
Wrote 18 Jan. from Clomell by Mr. Wise's son that they had sent for the pretended earl of Desmond and his kinsman Gerald McShane. They sent frivolous excuses. Sir Thomas Butler (in whom they note good obedience) came to them. At Clomell were two abps. and eight bishops in whose presence my lord of Dublin preached, and the Chancellor after-wards gave them the oaths to the succession and supremacy. Difficulty in persuading the counties of Wexford, Waterford, Kilkenny, and Tipperary to pay the King's subsidy (detailed). Cromwell should thank Ormond and Butler for their assistance therein. In Waterford it cannot be levied until the false traitor Gerald McShane be exiled or reformed. The part of the shire under Lady Catherine Butler, widow of Sir Richard Power, is in reasonable obedience. Gerald McShane is the promoter of all the mischief there and stirs James O'Desmond to disobedience. Mr. Sentleger and the late commissioners can declare his misdemeanours. Cromwell should write to the lord Deputy for the persuasion of the said Gerald.
Returned from Clomell to Kilkenny where they executed one malefactor and fined others. Came to Dublin Crastino Purificationis. Dublin, 8 Feb. 30 Henry VIII. Signed by Allen, Abp. Browne, Brabazon, and Aylmer.
Add.
8 Feb.
R. O.
257. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
This morning I received your letters of the 4th inst. and shall see them accomplished if it appear to me that Vauldry has caused such demand to be made. He comes here often and we have talked of the same wines and yet he has never mentioned any such matter. I thank you for all your goodness. I beg that by next post I may have a letter from the King to the Regent for the delivery into my hands of "that false traitor;" (fn. 1) perhaps his companions, to acquit themselves, would have taken him, thinking that he shall never be gotten from hence. I would have touched in it how he robbed his own father, and now has villanously used me who so tenderly sued for his pardon. It must be general, naming no certain place, and I shall not deliver it but in case of need. Bruxelles, 8 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Feb.
R. O.
258. NICH. TYCHEBORNE to STEPHEN VAUGHAN.
1538, 8 Feb., at Antwerp:—This morning a friend of mine, a burgess of Andwarpe, and Almain born, who has great correspondence with France and the high country of Germany, secretly showed me of the duke of Macle-bourgh's ships that are abroad and said it was thought the navy now prepared in Zealand should do some displeasure to England. He said he could not think the Emperor would suffer any such thing. Further he said the French King does all he can to have war and will have war with England if occasion be found. As to the fleet in Zealand I suspect it the more because the Emperor is far hence, and you know what in times past the rulers here have lone in their masters' absence.
P.S. The princes and nobles of Germany have appointed an assembly at Francforde to conclude certain articles spiritual "against all resisters to the contrary."
P. 1. Add.: Governor of the Merchant Adventures, at Barrow.
8 Feb.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 51
B. M.
259. [JAMES V. to PAUL III]
Desires the Pope to grant the pension of 400 mks. on the priory of Quhitherne at the appointment of Malcolm Flemyng, to John Maxwell, 17 years of age, in place of John Erskyn, as James previously requested, Maxwell's father is one of the wardens of the Marches against the English. Edinburgh. 6 Id. Feb. 1538.
Latin. Copy, p. 1.
8 Feb.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 51 b.
B. M.
260. JAMES V. to RODOLPH, CARDINAL OF CARPI.
To the same effect as the preceding letter to the Pope. Edinburgh, 6 Id. Feb. 1538.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
8 Feb.
Add. MS.
28,591 f. 24
B. M.
261. ANDREA DORIA to CHARLES V.
Provisions for the enterprise against the Turk, headed, "Lo que escribe el Principe Doria a viij. de hebrero 1539."
Spanish abstract, with the Emperor's comments in margin. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 5.
9 Feb.
R. O.
262. ANTONY KNYVET to CROMWELL.
Is driven by necessity to declare how he stands with his creditors in London, who now have him in suit, viz., Edward Ley in Watling Street for 70l., one Gontor in Cornell for 40l., Mr, Rede in Brdstret (sic) for 25l.; these have him at the "exsegent" of outlawry and writs are out for is arrest. Begs Cromwell's favour with the King to get him a little piece of land to pay his debts with and he will never run in such folly again. Waltham, 9 Feb.
Begs pardon for his boldness in writing this; his whole trust is in Cromwell to help him out of danger.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
9 Feb.
R. O.
263. SIR ADRIAN FORTESCU to the EARL OF ESSEX.
I have been before this sued for your lordship for 110l., in which I and others are bound for your debts to the King. Should have been at exigent this term, but I made request to commence a new action against your lordship and lady Walgrave, Sir Fras. Brian and my sister, his wife, as well as myself. I had to pay for the old process, 12s. 9d., and paid previously 30s., in all, 42s. 9d., which I beg you to send me. I beg your lordship to take some perfect end, else I must complain to the King and put you in suit. London, 9 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Sealed Endd.: Ao xxx.
9 Feb.
R. O.
264. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
I am now enforced to write in another tune than I thought to have done, as my letters sent herewith shall declare. Philips came as I wrote, and I talked with him again after supper (he having supped at my own table), and I put him out of all fear. I committed him to the charge of the traitors Leighton and Joise (elsewhere Joy), not forgetting to tell them what fantasies might come in the brain of a desperate man, what watches should be laid on him, and what displeasure it would be to the King, and to me, if he escaped. I could not but trust them when one of them, with the counsel of the other, had brought him to me. Leighton promised to lie in the same bed with him, and Joye should lie in another bed in the same chamber, with Leighton's man outside the door, and two of my men beneath; yet as soon as my watches were gone to bed, which was between 6 and 7 a.m., when they were all up, they aided him to depart, the one going "with sleveles arraunts from chamber to chamber to see all things sure" while the other led him out of the gates. I cannot excuse myself for suffering Leighton to be by when I advised Phillips to spare no man in the declaration of his naughty life: they, being of his counsel, must have feared he would accuse them. They have let go a traitor who could have told of all the traitors out of England "or who have recourse in and out under the cloak of loyalty." Well, I sent out my horse every way, sent men to the seven gates here to watch for him, sent word to the Queen that an Englishman who had already been condemned for robbing his own father, and was a traitor whose pardon I had procured, had robbed me this morning of 2,400 crs., and I besought her help for his apprehension, and sent the same story to the borrowe masters and council of the town. I asked to have every house in and near the town searched, offered 1,000 gold guilders to whosoever would bring him to my hands, and 100 crs. for such information as would lead to his capture. There was such running and riding and stirring about the town as has not been seen these hundred years. The councils of the Emperor and the town agreed and made proclamation that anyone harbouring him should, if it were known at any time within 10 years, suffer confiscation and banishment. All this has been in vain. Would that I had watched him myself. Joye was as soon out of the town as Philips could have been: Leighton pretended great sorrow and went to Louvain to seek him and there resteth, as the bearer can relate, to whom give credence. Within few days I will send you Leighton and Joye, who I think know as much as the other, and I will get Philips again if possible. There are in Louvain other Englishmen, Stokes, the bp. of Bath's nephew, Branesby and Anthony Leason the priest's cousin. I cannot accuse them; but by Mr. Kerne's information you shall smell somewhat of one of them. I see and hear so much that I wish no Englishman would study abroad unless he could maintain himself without help from England or were specially licensed by the King.
To show that Leighton and Joy are of likelihood as rank traitors as Philipps:—On first coming here I enquired about Phillips and was told that Leighton and Joye could tell as much of him as any men, and that "they kept a banquetting house and gave no intendement to their study: where-upon I gathered that Lovain was but a cloak for the rain, as all such like universities on this side the seas be, for many of them that live of them-selves." Afterwards come Leighton and Joye to Bruxelles to do their duties, as they said. I made them "good semblance," but advised them to spend their money in England and not rob their country under colour of study when they did nothing less. They excused themselves, and I thought best to pass all over, and prayed them to come again soon, which they did. Mean-while I hesitated whether to write home my suspicion upon such slender information or to use them to get Philips into my hand. Thus I delayed till they came again when I fell to specialties, and asked if they knew Philips, the traitor. They said they did. "How know you him?" quo' I; "play honest frank men with me and I will upon hope of my master's grace adventure somewhat with you." They were loth to say more than that they they had seen him him casually, and I did not press them. They said "they could tell that he would be glad to be restored." I said that, as I heard he had many good qualities, I would be a suitor for him if he would yield himself to the King's mercy, and willed them to find out where he was and bring me word at Christmas. At Christmas they brought me word he was in the High Country. In the Christmas season I talked often with them, and told them that unless they would leave Louvain and return to England and do their best to bring that traitor Philips to my hand I would take them for traitors. They seemed not glad to return, but said they would from Louvain to Italy, by way of Germany, if they might. "What?" quo' I "will you go [to] the traitor cardinal: this is as we say in England de malo in pejus venite adoremus. You may do it" quo' I "but beware what you do; the King's majesty is a wise prince, and hath a wise and discreet council." Had I thought they would do it I would have sent them into England with gags in their mouths. I reminded them how I loved some of their friends, as my lord of Duresme and Dr. Leighton, who I said would be sorry to see such unkind imps of their stock. They counselled together and said they would follow my advice, and we settled that after Twelfth Day they should go to Louvain and pay their debts and write to Philips to come and submit himself to me. They did so, and one of them brought him to me indeed, which not only took from me all suspicion, but made me write in my other letters in his favour. Would to God I had not trusted him so much, and then I had not fallen into this trap which has almost killed me, and shall "eat me" until I know that the King and you take all in good part. Neither Philips nor the rankest traitor of them all can do the King any displeasure. I beg you to send the bearer back soon. Bruxelles, 9 Feb.
Hol., pp. 10. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Feb.
R. O.
265. S. VAUGHAN to CROMWELL.
As I lately advertised your Lordship from Antwerp by a merchant named Ric. Wylson, I came to Barrugh to visit the merchants, among whom I hear of four ships the duke of Maghleburg has set to sea to take the merchants' ships now going to England from the cold mart: "he hath found such a smacke in the last that he took that he longeth to have mo." To show what a very honest young man, (fn. 2) a merchant of the Staple, this day advertised me from Antwerp concerning these ships and other things, I send his letter. The merchants' ships, being taken, would make a "fatt bote (booty)" and being "such pevisshe small vessells" could make no resistance; so the merchants entreat me to desire your lordship's aid. I tell them they should provide for themselves against pirates. A merchant stranger told me Pole was ridden in post to the Emperor. I am bold to write what I hear and beg you to pardon any fault. Barrugh, 9 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: "Ao xxxo, Tycheborne and Vaughan."
9 Feb.
R. O.
266. ANTHOINE BRUSSET to LORD LISLE.
I have received your last letter dated 4 Feb., informing me that you have written to the King for a licence in my favour to get a certain quantity of corn out of the King's country, viz., between Oye Sluice and the village of Oye, and the Old Church, without going further into your pale. I am obliged to go into Zeeland to take farewell of admiral De Bevres, my master, who leaves shortly for Constantinople with the Emperor and a large fleet. I hope to have your answer before I leave. Gravelines, 9 Feb., 1538.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.: a Calles.
9 Feb.
Calig. E. IV.
30.
B. M.
267. THE ABP. OF MILAN to SIR FRANCIS BRIAN.
* * *
... valermi dell opera sua, confidan ... volmente. Venendo adnnque in Inghilterra que[sto] ... mastro di stalla del Sor Duca (fn. 3) mio fratello, mandato di ... cagione che la S. V. intendera da lui, ho preso partito ... a lei, pregandola, come faccio di core, che sia contenta ... suo aiuto et favore appresso quella Mta a fine che egli [abbia buona] speditione di quello perche il Sr Duca lo manda che certo ... et io insieme restaremo molto tenuti a V. S. d'ogni [favor che] le piacera di farle in questo caso, con prontiss animo d ... in ogni occasione che ci verra di poterle far cosa grata ... core mi raccommando, pregandola a fare le humil ... in buona gratia di S. Mta a la quale sono obedientisso [servitor]. Di Fontana Belleo, il ix di Febraro MDXXX [IX].
(Signed) Come bon fratello l'arcives[co] di Milan[o]."
Add: "* * come fratello * * i Brian, &c. * la Mta del Rè d' Inghilterra.'
10 Feb.268. BOROUGH OF BRIDGEWATER,
See GRANTS in FEBRUARY, No. 34.
10 Feb.
Cleop. E. IV.
270.
B. M.
Ellis, 2nd Ser.
II. 130.
269. E. HORD, [Prior of Henton,] to his brother, ALEN HORDE.
Where you marvel that I and my brethren do not freely surrender our house at the motion of the King's commissioners; I should rather have expected you to think us light and hasty if we gave up that which is not ours to give but dedicate to God. We have given no cause why we should be put down but have observed the service of God, religious conversation, hospitality, almsgiving and all other duties as well as any house in this realm or France; but because you write of the King's displeasure and my lord Privy Seal's, who has always been my good lord, I will try and get my brethren to conform. Hentun, 10 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: in Middle Temple. Endd.
10 Feb.
R. O.
270. BUCKLAND or MINCHIN BUCKLAND PRIORY, or HOSPITAL.
Surrender (by Katharine the prioress and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Soms., Wilts, Dors., Devon, Glouc., and elsewhere in England, Wales and the marches thereof. 10 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 12.]
Seal defaced.
Enrolled [Close Roll., p. 5, No. 33] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell and Wm. Peter, King's commissioners.
R. O.2. Pensions granted by the King to the late surrendered house of Buckelonde, Soms., first half year's payment to be at Lady Day next, A.D. 1539.
Kath. Bowser, prioress, 50l.; Marg. Sydnam, sub-prioress, 4l., 13s., 4d.; Julian Kendall, 4l. 6s. 8d.; Joan Hyll, Anne Plummer, Thomasine Huntyngton, Kath. Popham, Anne Maunsell, Mary Dodyngton, Alice Emerforde, Jane Babyngton, Mary Mathew, Agnes Mathew, Isabel Grene and "Sir William Mawdesley, confessor and professed in their Order," 4l. each. Signed: Jo. Tregonwell: William Petre.
P. 1.
10 Feb.
R. O.
Ellis, 3rd Ser.
II. 379.
271. RIC. ABBOT OF GLASTON to CROMWELL.
I have received yours of the 6th "purporting th' impetracion of the advowsaunte, of Batcombe in Somersetshire, together with an advowsaunt' redie writen which ye desired to be granted and sealed." Dr. Tregonwell has obtained it for a friend of his. But we have the parsonage of Netilton in North Wilts still in our hands, of which we send you the advowson. Sturmester Castle, 10 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Sir Thomas Cromwell lord Cromwell. Endd.
10 Feb.
R. O.
272. JO. HERYNG to MR. BOTOLF, of LEYSTOK, in SUFFOLK,
Your matter is set forward. Trusting you will, ere long, hear of a good end therein. London, 10 Feb.
Hol., p. 1, small slip. Add. Endd.: Mr. Heryng of the Arches.
10 Feb.
Calig.
E. IV. 32.
B. M.
273. NICOLLAS CARON to his Master, JEHAN ... IN.
News of marriages of common friends. Expects to be at Castelnau shortly. His uncle is urged to marry one of the ladies of Madame du Bies.
French, pp. 2. About a quarter lost by fire. Add.: Secretary to Mons. de Castillon, ambassador in England. "A t ... Xme de Fevrier 1539."

Footnotes

1 Henry Philips.
2 Nicholas Tycheborne. See No. 258.
3 The Duke of Ferrara.