Letters and Papers
February 1539, 16-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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'Letters and Papers: February 1539, 16-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 117-128. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75846 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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February 1539

16 Feb.
R. O.
300. JOHN LORD AUDELEY to CROMWELL.
I did my best to give attendance upon the King's visitors, Dr. Tregonwell and Dr. Peter, who gave into my charge the house of Athelney, to keep till I should hear further from the King and you. I were greatly bound to you if I might have the said house and its appurtenances, at such price as the King and you should determine, and be at a clear point for the lead, bells, ruinous houses and church chapels that be superfluous. Fawndres Marsh, 16 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.: "Ao xxxo."
16 Feb.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
630.
301. LEGH or CANONLEGH ABBEY.
Surrender (by Eliz. Fowell, abbess, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Devon, Cornw., Dors., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. Chapter house of Canonlegh, 16 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 26.]
Fair seal.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 3, No. 6] as acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pensions assigned to the late abbess and nuns of Canonleigh, Devon, 16 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII., viz.:—
Eliz. Fowell, abbess, 40l.; Thomasine Sutton, prioress, Eliz. Carewe, and Marg. Pollerd, 100s. each; Sabyne Cobilstone, Alice Bonde, Philippe Fortescue, Helen Ayssheford, Agnes Pery, Joan Bowyer, Marg. Sydenham, Eliz. Chudeley, Agnes Bretton, Joan Abree, Christian Holbene, Agnes Dulond, and Mary Pomeroy, 4l. each; Sibell Fowell, 40s. Signed: Jo. Tregonwell: William Petre: John Smyth.
P. 1.
R. O.3. Another copy of § 2. Signed by Sir Ric. Ryche.
P. 1.
16 Feb.
R. O.
St. P. III.
118.
302. COUNCIL OF IRELAND to CROMWELL.
Have perused Cromwell's letters of the 21st ult. to the Lord Chancellor, concerning articles proposed against him by the Deputy. Marvel that the Deputy would trouble Cromwell with such feigned tales.
As to the words supposed to be spoken to Thos. Stephins and the recorder of Dublin on the way from Chester to the Court—that they should report no good of the Lord Deputy if they would have expedition of their suits, for he was out of favour—I, the Chief Justice, was present, and testify that no such words were spoken. Moreover, Stephins has denied them before us, the abp. of Dublin, bp. of Meath, and Wm. Brabason, and the recorder remembers no such words. As to the lord Chancellor's saying to the lord Deputy at Maynooth that if it cost you 1,000l. you would maintain lord Butler against the lord Deputy, the lord Chancellor has denied it before us all. Explain the so-called boasting words spoken at Kilmainham in the Council, when the Deputy, Ormoud and Butler were there about their controversy. The last article, touching the enlarging of them of Limerick without his advice, is so contrary that it argues the others of little value. Disprove it.
Beg that Cromwell will not believe such accusations against any of them without first hearing their excuses, and that he will send the same to the whole Council to be examined. Praise the lord Chancellor's conduct although his living is insufficient for the room. The Deputy stomacheth much at him, but Cromwell knows that as Chancellor and president of the Council he has to be more plain with the Deputy than others. Dublin, 16 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed: James Butler Thesr.—Georgius Dublin.—Edmwnd of Cassell—Edwardus Miden.—J. Rawson, pr of Kyllmaynam—Willm. Brabason—Gerald Aylmer, justice—Thomas Lutrell, justice—Richard Delahyd, baron—Sr John Whyt, knyght.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
16 Feb.
R. O.
St. P. III.
122.
303. GEORGE, ABP. OF DUBLIN, to CROMWELL.
This last vacation time he accompanied the Chancellor and Treasurer to Munster, preaching, and setting forth the King's "most goodly purpose." Before their return the lord Deputy came to Dublin and entered upon, and still occupies the abp's place of St. Pulcars. The Council here were never more unanimous, but the Deputy is so high and vehement that he will not listen to them unless there are three or four of them together; he misreports men's sayings. Praises the lord Chancellor. Cannot think why the Deputy is so against him, unless it be that he keeps so bountiful a house, which indeed is far above the Deputy's. Was his guest for a fortnight this Council time; for he had no place to go to but Talaugh, which adjoins the Tholes, his mortal enemies. If the Deputy compel him to live at Talaugh he is like to suffer from the Tholes as his predecessor did from the Garrantynes.
Upon receiving from Cromwell his authority in causas ecclesiasticas he will travel the country as far as his English can be understood, and let Dr. Nangle, bp. of Clonferte, set forth things in the Irish tongue. The said bp., who was promoted by the King and Cromwell, is expelled, and a Rome runner (fn. 1) supported, by McWilliam, governor of the country, who threw away the King's broad seal to Dr. Nangle. The Deputy is so affectionate to McWilliam that he will see no redress; and, indeed, in O'Brene's country he deposed a bishop (fn. 2) of the King's appointment, who at Clonmell declared the matter to the lord Chancellor, lord Treasurer, sub-treasurer, and the abp. This bishop seemed a right fatherly person: the Deputy has replaced him by a Grey Friar, confessor to one of the late Garrantynes, and a rank traitor. Dublin, 16 Feb. Signed.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
16 Feb.
R. O.
304. ARTHUR LORD LISLE to [CROMWELL].
Has received a letter from the King of the 13th inst., directed to himself and the Council here, and another from his Lordship to Lisle, desiring him to see it put in execution. Will do so to the best of his ability. As for the proclamation for the repair hither of the King's councillors, and others, it was published on the 15th inst. for the second time. Sends a book brought in by the master of the ordnance here of all the munitions that are here in his custody and under the custody of Sir Chr. Morres's deputy; also another book of the number of persons within the town, and the scunage of the same. Has ordered a search through the twelve wards of all manner of victuals. Gives the particulars. Encloses a letter of news brought by Hugh Giles, who was sent to the coast of Normandy. Has sent one to Paris to come home by Durlans and Heding. Sent Blag, the Scotch lacquey, to Cromwell, that he might verify his sayings. Commends the petition of Hugh Giles, who is a man of substance. Looks daily for the surveyor, as nothing can be done until his coming. There is no timber here. Has sent him Wm. Petley, the bearer, who has great need of Cromwell's help. Calais, 16 Feb. Signed.
P.S. in his own hand. After closing the letter, heard "that Mons. de Wervyn and the Ytalyon warrydyn (were ridden) post for the edyffyinge of Arde."
Pp. 2.
16 Feb.
Harl. MS.
283 f. 5.
B.M.
Chron. of
Calais, 181.
305. LORD LISLE, and Others, to HENRY VIII.
Have received his letters dated Westminster 13th inst., and caused proclamation to be made for the resort of all officers and soldiers belonging to the town. Will certify the King of the provision of victual ready in the town and marches. The corn and cattle in poor men's hands cannot be had except for ready money. The men have not enough money to provide for themselves, and the owners cannot keep it in their hands. If a sudden "rode" were made, much of the victuals now in the marches would be destroyed, and they think the town should be securely provided. Will also certify the King of what is lacking in the fortifications and munitions. There is no timber for repairs.
Mention these things now as it will take some time to certify everything. Calais, 16 Feb. Signed. Arthur Lyssle, k.: Ryc. Graynffeld: Robart Fouler: Edmund Howa[rd]: Thomas Palmer: Wyngffeld R. Sir: Willm. Sympson: John Rokwood.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
306. [ANTHOINE BRUSSET to LORD LISLE.]
R. O.I understand by my man whom I last sent to you that you have been told that Captain Tovar the Captain of Tournehen and I have been at Ardre with Du Bies to consult about refortifying that town. He who told you so, deceived you, for there is no truth in it, and for my part, I do not love the French so much as to desire to gratify them in any way. As to Maistre Guillaume the surgeon and physician, he is banished from this town very unjustly, because the bailly of this town disliked him for interfering with the profits of his nephew, a barber surgeon, "lequel est une beste quy ny sept ryens." I beg you will let the said Master William gain his living in your town of Calais, till I can procure a repeal of his banishment.
Hol., Fr., p. 1.
307. [CROMWELL] to LORD [LISLE].
R. O.The King hears that you and other of the Council cause the people to bring in their goods and other things, which needeth not. My secret advice is that having a vigilant eye and "awayte" to the sure defence and fortification of the town and marches, you do nothing to the emboldening of the King's enemies or putting in fear his subjects more than necessary. The King and his Council think your doings not circumspectly considered.
P. 1. Mutilated. Endd.: Touching the precept of both pales.
16 Feb.
R. O.
308. WRIOTHESLEY to [CROMWELL.]
As commanded in your Lordship's letters of the 4th inst., I have spoken to Mons. de Vauldry about the wines and told him of the fault of the late ambassador (fn. 3) in detaining both the money appointed for the carriage of the said wines and that sent as a reward to him (Vauldry). Declared how displeased the King had been when lately, by Vauldry's messenger who came to demand money for the carriage, he learned that the money had not been paid. The King would shortly send him a reward and I would at once pay the 146 crs. carriage. Details conversation in which Vauldry explained that he authorised George, the ambassador's man, to bring him the money for the carriage and excused the ambassador, as he (Vauldry) was absent in Spain, and if the ambassador had lived it would have been sure enough. Asked him to supper, it being then after dinner, and he came with two other gentlemen. Paid him the money with thanks, and so went to supper. Told them the whole story of the traitors (fn. 4) who lately suffered in England, and they commended the King's clemency.
On Monday, after the despatch of my last letters, I got hither Wm. Layton and have him in a chamber well watched. On Tuesday I went to court and thanked the Queen for her assistance touching Philips, whom I could in no w[ise] hear of, and said I counted my money for lost, as others of my folk were of his counsel, such as Joye and Layton, and I was sure [that Joye and Philips] were gone toge[ther]. Relates conversation, in which he asked leave to send Layton to England to be examined, for he would here confess nothing. She replied she could not do this without the consent of the Council of the Long Robe, and asked him to make the request in writing and she would herself expedite the matter; for otherwise they would say a matter of justice might be as well settled here as there. Said that on such slender proof as he had he would not put the man to such rebuke, but would let the matter drop: she begged, however, to have a note of the request, and he promised to send it next morning to Mons. de Molembois. Asked if she had no news yet out of Spain. She said she looked for it every hour. Gives conversation, in which he complained of the delay and said it was time he took leave and returned home; she pressed him to stay a little longer, and he consented to presume upon the King's clemency and stay a little longer than he had commission to do. Bewailed his ill luck in this journey; had been sick ever since he left England and was still scarce able to go 10 paces; his charge had been unsuccessful, and now he had lost his money; he had lost one of the honestest men that served him since he came last to this town and he had had losses in England. Told her how pleased he was to hear the Duchess declare herself in the thing that was untruly reported "by" her, &c., and with a repetition of his first matter took leave. The Duchess was with the Queen and gave good ear to them, and made Wriothesley "very gentle countenance." Is sure she is much "inclined," and will rather live as she is than consent to any of the other marriages proposed. The Queen has not sent the expedition: if it come not soon, will risk sending Leyton to England with three or four of his folk. Treats Leyton gently although he watches him. On Wednesday entertained the captain of Gravelines at supper. After long talk about the traitors, whom the captain seemed to detest, complained of the coldness he had met with here, and said he would take the Emperor as most ungrateful, because but for the King, his master, he had never been Emperor. The captain said it was our Holy Father who marred all. "Marry," quo' I, laughing, "a jolly father and meet to be called the Devil's vicar rather than one of God's ministers that would for his own glory set p[rinces] together at war, wherein many thousand in ... may chance to die, but they be both wiser than with such danger to fantazie ones the satisfaction of the Bishop's pleasure." "Oh," quod he, "you be earnest. I trust and doubt not within this four year to see the King, your master, and our Holy Father as great friends together as we be now with the Frenchmen." Details long conversation, in which Wriothesley said he was earnest in his master's cause, who might be the Pope's friend if he would let the Emperor be emperor of Rome indeed, and not make him fall on the ground to kiss his stinking feet. Discoursed about the abominations of Rome, Pope Anne labouring with child, Pope Julius the jolly warrior, &c. The captain said they were but lewd folks that said the Emperor would convert his army upon England. Had heard this muttering before, but never so plainly, and though he does not believe in it, thinks it his duty to write it, as he has heard that the Emperor lately sent for Pole into Spain. Much is said here about the excommunication, and it is noted how all debts are discharged. God save the King and my lord Prince, and remind his Grace to be prepared. Would like this friendship entertained, but thinks the woman worth more than such friendship "if worldly policy taught not that the one is more to be desired for the other." The news of Poole's going to the Emperor came from the bp. of Palermo, who is a "right villain," "bearing here a marvellous great swynge." Brussels, 16 Feb.
P.S.—When this letter was ready for sealing arrived here Mr. Knighte with your letter of the 11th inst. Dilates upon the kindness of the King and Cromwell. Is sorry these folks should daily show more and more their ingratitude; but they are too Popish. Brussels, 16 Feb. Signed.
Pp. 11. Slightly injured by damp.
17 Feb.
R. O.
309. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
I have of Bracy received your letters with the letter and pardon, which I delivered to my lord Privy Seal, who has advertised you fully concerning the affairs of that town, and longs for your answer. I wrote on the 14th by one Wm. Clerck, who named himself to be your retainer, and enclosed the letter which Francis the post left behind him. As for the 400l., I trust after Ash Wednesday to know my lord Privy Seal's determinate pleasure; but I am sure he will be paid (if he deal) out of Paynswick. I intend to come over myself with Mr. Polsted. The quarter of ling I send by Vernam. Mr. Knevet looks daily for his page; I trust he will come in the next ship. The abbot (fn. 5) is yet at no point. If he refuse, the wine shall not be lost as the last was. London, 17 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
17 Feb.
R. O.
310. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your letter by Bracy. I wrote four days since by one Will. Clerck, who said he was put to my lord by my lady Garneshe, enclosing a letter from my lady Rutland. I hope it has arrived safely, for I had misgivings. As to the suit of vestments of bawdkin, I think they were never made under 40l., and till I know your pleasure further I do not mean to meddle with it. As to the 400l., I shall know to what to trust in four days; "but I am sure if he meddle, he will be repaid of Paynswick." When Mr. Polstede comes I will come with him. The abbot* has not yet had his wine. If he refuse it, it shall not be lost, like the last, for his pleasure. I can hear nothing of Care. The spaniel is not yet delivered; but I will give it into lady Suffolk's own hands tomorrow. I thank you for John Goughe. I would not have troubled your ladyship if Mr. Henage's clerk had and not spoken to me. London, 17 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
17 Feb.
Close Roll,
p. 1, No. 53.
Rymer, XIV.
629.
311. BRUSYERD ABBEY.
Surrender (by Mary, the abbess, &c.) of the site, buildings, &c., of the monastery, the manors of Brusyerd, Bokkyng Hall and Remes, Suff., Southrepps and Hargham, Norf., and Baberham, Camb., the advowsons of the churches of Brusyerd, Burgh, and Sutton, Suff., Hargham, Norf., and Bulmer, Essex, with the rectories and advowsons of vicarages of Brusyerd, Sutton, and Bulmer, and all other possessions of the monastery in Brusyerd, Cramford, Badyngham, Butley, Ashe, Bargham, Swyftelyg, Rendham, Pesenhale, Wynston, Alderton, and Sutton, Suff., Suthrepps and Hargham, Norf., Baberham, Camb., and Bulmer, Essex, and elsewhere in England. 17 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII.
Acknowledged, same day, before Fras. Cave, LL.D., King's commissioner.
17 Feb.
R. O.
312. CHATTERIS ABBEY.
Warrant for a pension of 15l. to Anne Gayton, abbess of Chaterys, dated 17 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII., with note that similar warrants are to be made for the following, viz., Elene Smythe, Eliz. Haspelond, Marg. Vasye, Marg. Skele, Mary Graye, Agnes Hygdon, Anne Rede, Elenore Hutton, Eliz. Gye, and Johanna Bate, nuns, amounts from 4l. to 40s.
Latin, parchment, p. 1. Endd.: Irrot.
17 Feb.
R. O.
313. NICOLAS [SHAXTON] BP. OF SALISBURY to CROMWELL.
Marvels that Master Hylles makes so much labour for the farm of the parsonage of Odyham, seeing that he told Master Davy, the bp.'s servant, who has just title therein, he cared not for it. Remembers that Dr. Parker, late chancellor, said he was offered 50l. for the fine of it. It is unreasonable for Hylles to desire it, as if it was not worth a groat, from a man who has almost no other living. It is not true that Hylles has had the farm during two other incumbents' times, for the woman who will have it till Lady Day in Lent, had it for 40 years and more, which is more than four incumbents' times. Has spoken to his servant, who says that as he has no other house he cannot leave it without great detriment and loss, which he trusts Cromwell will not desire. Supposes, however, he will leave it if Hylles will appoint him some other farm in exchange. This was given by chapter seal before Shaxton's coming. Asks Cromwell to allow his servant to retain the farm. Ramesbury, 17 Feb. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
17 Feb.
Harl. MS.
2115, f. 111,
B. M.
314. KING'S TENANTS AT OVERWHITLEY.
A list of "such of the King's tenants in his lordships of Overwhitleys and Cogeshull with the money the (they) granted to give to the repair of Budworth before Sir Piers Dutton, kt., the King's steward of Halton, at Berterton, 17 Feb. 30 year H. 8."
In a modern hand, pp. 3.
18 Feb.
R. O.
315. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
By bearer, Henry Vernham, I send packed in a "maunde" 1 qrt. ling, which cost 35s. (I could get no "great orgall lyng" under 15l. or 16l.) and half a hundred stockfish costing 10s. The "maunde" and packing cost 8d., and cartage and wharfage 4d. I trust it will prove good, for it is old ling. I tried to get a firkin of great eels, but all were gone before your letter came, and there are none but Shafte and Pymper eels which are but small. For your other affairs I can write nothing new. London, 18 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
18 Feb.
R. O.
316. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I now send by Henry Vernham the cloth sack, with sheets, that Nich. Eyer brought with the cushions; also a maund containing 1 qr. old ling and ½ hundred stockfish. The ling cost 35s. and the stockfish 10s. Mr. Manchester says that the say shall not be put in the quilts because it will breed moths. He thinks the quilts will be finished before Easter. The velvet is dyed but not yet dry owing to this wet weather. When finished I will deliver it to Mrs. Baynham. London, 18 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
Cott. Appx.
xxviii., 171.
B. M.
317. SIR ADRIAN FORTESCUE.
"The inventorie of all moveable and unmoveable perteignynge to Sir Adrian Foskewe's howse," made 18 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII
First of plate, both "white plate" and gilt; then of articles "in the further house next the garner"; in the wardrobe, including some "in a great cipres chest there" and "in a great joined press there"; in the entry; in the great chamber at the nether end of the hall; in the inner chamber; in the brushing house; in the hall; in the parlour (various hangings and carpets described, 2 large andirons, a fire-fork, a fire-pan, and a pair of tongs, some stools, "a round table of cipres and a piece of counterfeit carpet upon it"; also "a painted table of the Epiphany of Our Lord"); in the chamber over the parlour (hangings, beds and bolsters, &c., and "a great standard with divers apparel belonging to the lady Foskewe"); "in the inner chamber there"; in the cellar; in the buttery; in the butler's chamber; the priest's chamber; the low parlour; the horsekeeper's chamber; in the next chamber; in the cook's chamber; the chamberlain's chamber; the larder; "the bultinge house"; the fish house; the garner; the barns and the carter's stable. Cattle; 6 kine and 2 "weuers", one boar and 13 hogs, one "catery horse" and 2 horses for the saddle, the one bay and the other black.
Further, in the old house beside the buttery and in the brewhouse.
II. At Sir Adrian Foskewe's lodging beside the Black Friars in London. In the parlour; in the buttery; in the hall; in the kitchen; in a chamber over the kitchen; in the street chamber; in the study chamber; in the chamber at the stair-head; in Sir Adrian Foskewe's own chamber; in the inner chamber; and in the cellar.
III. "Item, at Mr. Maddox' house in Cheapside, a chest with evidences."
Pp. 15. Endd: The inventory of Sir Adrian Fortescue's goods.
19 Feb.
R. O.
318. DR. W. CAPON to CROMWELL.
In order to accomplish Cromwell's letters of 24 June, to him and the fellows of Jesus College, asking for a lease of the parsonage of Great Shelford for Geo. Frevell, student in the Temple of London; sends a lease of the said parsonage "with a glase wyndowe" therein, so that Cromwell may put in what name he pleases, the lease to take effect after the years of the old lease are expired, which will be seven years from Michaelmas next. Jesus College, Cambridge, 19 Feb. Signed: "W. Capon, priest."
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo. Dr. Capon.
19 Feb.
R. O.
319. [SIR] JOHN JERNEGAN, and Others, to CROMWELL.
In Leystofte rode, Suffolk, are divers ships, English and foreign, laden with wheat, malt, barley, &c., to be, much of it, conveyed to out of the realm. Some "colour it by their cockets," some have no cockets, and one has a cocket for the conveyance of barley and malt, which the writers think is more than the customer might lawfully give him. A restraint was lately sent down by the King and Council against carrying corn and malt out of the country. However, so much has been conveyed out both before and since, that if it goes on as it has been since Christmas there is like to be a scarcity. Send a breviat of the cockets and the names of the ships containing the number of the grain and the names of the masters and owners of both ships and grain. Restraint is made of those without cocket or licence. Leystofte, Ash Wednesday, 30 Henry VIII. Signed: John Jernegan: John Harvy of Oulton: John Jettour: John Botolff: Gregory Payn.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal of England. Endd.
R. O.2. Certificate that on 19 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. there came before Sir John Jernegan and John Harvey, commissioners of the peace in Suffolk (here follow names of persons who have shown cockets dated January and February relating to grain shipped in various ports for delivery in London and elsewhere within the realm, or who have no cockets; in all 17, the last being Wm. Greffe, who has a cocket from the customers of Lenn 3 Feb. ao 30, for grain for foreign parts). Ends: The grain before rehearsed is about 2,671 qrs.
Large paper, p. 1.
19 Feb.
R. O.
Rymer, xiv.
629.
320. POLLESHOO or POLESLOWE PRIORY.
Surrender (by Eleanor Sidenham, prioress, and the convent) of the house and all its possessions in cos. Devon, Cornw., Wilts, and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. Chapter-house of Polsloo, 19 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 37.]
Seal broken.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 3, No. 7] as acknowledged before Wm. Petre, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pensions appointed to the late prioress and nuns of the surrendered house of Polslow, Devon, 20 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII., viz.:—
Eleanor Sydnam, prioress, 30l.; Anne Carewe, sub-prioress, 106s. 8d.; Alice Sawyer, Ibott Crede, Joan Holwyn, Joan Kelley, Abys Worthy, Austys Ruswyll, Elsabeth Benett, Jane Heton, Thomasine Carew, Elsabeth Assheley, 4l. each; Radygund Tylley and Dorothy Cooke, 3l. 6s. 8d. each. Signed: Thomas Crumwell: Jo. Tregonwell: William Petre.
P. 1.
R. O.3. Another copy of § 2. Signed by Sir Ric. Ryche.
P. 1.
19 Feb.
R. O.
321. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
On ... last the duke of Arscot sent a [servant] to invite Wriothesley and his fellows to supper at his house on Monday to meet the Queen. Went there at the appointed hour between 5 and 6. Describes their reception by the Duchess in her bedchamber, where she was with Madame de Berges and other ladies, and how the Duchess sent for her two sons, "being two t ... gentlemen about the ages of 10 or 12 years," and her young daughter, to welcome them. Were then brought to the supper chamber. Describes it. The [French] ambassador was there. Said to him, "Monsieur, I have much desired to be acquainted with you, and am therefore very glad of this occasion of our meeting. Our masters be good brethren and heartie friends, and methink therefore that we should not be as strangers." Gives further conversation, in which both expressed themselves glad of the meeting and talked together till the Queen came. Men mused to see their friendly fashion, for it is bruited here that the French king will pay no more money, and will either reduce the King to Rome or make war on him. This ambassador is affable and seems wise, and the writer thought best to show they were not on such terms as other men's malice or practises would make them; for whatever they think, they are too wise to adventure themselves in the Bishop's quarrel. Within a while came in the Queen and duchess [of Milan], and supper was brought. The French ambassador sat on the Queen's right hand and Wriothesley on her left. Describes how the duchess of Milan, Mr. Vaughan, Madame de Berges, Madame Degmonde, Mr. Kerne, the countess of Pyn[oye], the prince of Orange, the duchess Darscott, Madame Dolstrate, and the counts Pyn[oye] ... were seated. "In the supper time ... was my carver sundry times, and drank ... times to us all three, one after another ... the French ambassador and me with sa ... now one, now th'other, almost all the ... when she reposed from eating." Thinks 20 garnish of ... would scant have furnished the supper and the banquet after it. Was asked by the Queen how he liked her music, for at her entry the trumpets, sagbutts, and co ... sounded in very good sort, and during supper she had certain of her chapel to sing songs of pleasure. Conversation, in which she said she heard he loved music, and asked him to her house next evening, when he should hear all her "diversities of musick"; he confessed he loved it so well that at his poor house in England he liked to have somewhat of the kind to quicken his dull spirits. "Well," quo' she, "it is an honest pastime and maketh good digestion, for that it driveth away many thoughts." Water was brought, and she washed alone, the French ambassador and Wriothesley dipping their fingers after her in the same basin.
As soon as the board was taken away she rose. Conversation, in which Wriothesley said he would be merrier if he had not lost so much time here, and asked if she had still no news. She replied, None; and said the gentleman who had come out of Spain was a man of this country who was in Africa with the Emperor, and had been sick in Spain ever since, and, fearing to be sick by the way, durst not take charge of the despatch which was ready to be sent; but it could not be long now, and she expected [good] news. (She spoke as though afraid of the French ambassador hearing her _"We need not be much careful [if one of] them trust not perfectly another"). Said it would need good news to compensate for these delays, and it was openly written, from Spain, Germany, and elsewhere, that the Emperor merely practised with the King to gain time, and would at the bp. of Rome's [bidding] do him displeasure. "Jesus, quo' she, [the Emperor], I dare say never meant no such thing." Said he thought the Emperor too wise and honourable a prince, considering the King's puissance and the friendship between their houses, to adventure himself in such an enterprise at any man's pleasure; and, indeed, when Sir John Dudley came to him to signify the birth of my lord Prince, the Emperor offered, if the King wished it, to be a mean between him and the bp. of Rome; if not he would say no more of the matter, and would never consent to anything to the King's dishonour or discontent. She answered that he judged correctly. Replied that he had desired to have his judgment confirmed by some gratuity at the Emperor's hands, and this alliance would have been a good means, but it had lost much of its grace by delay; the Emperor had now made [a new friend] of an old enemy, and cared not whether he made a new enemy of an old friend; the King would marvel they could not keep [both] friends together. She said she trusted to see all three joined in one league. Said he hoped so too, and expatiated upon the King's virtues, &c., and said the King thanked her for her good inclination. "With this came in the Duke and three others, with four ladies marvellously well and richly appointed in a mask. And first the Duke came to the Queen with a stool and a pair of dice, and laid to her rings with two good diamonds. She laid a ring against them, and he lost, as it was his purpose that way to give them. Then went he to the Duchess with the stool and a third diamond, and suffered her also to win it." They then danced, the Queen sitting under the cloth of estate with the French ambassador on her right hand and Wriothesley on her left, with his fellows beneath him in chairs. Afterwards brought her home and took leave, the French ambassador riding together with them as far as the way served.
Yesterday morning the Queen sent to remind him to be at supper [at] 5, at which hour a gentleman brought him to the gallery where supper was. "At supper I wa[s seated] on the right hand of the Queen just ... and the French ambassador on the left hand; next me sat the Duchess, (fn. 6) and next [her sat] Mr. Kerne; on thother side the Duchess [of Arschot] satt next the French ambassador [and next her] Mr. Vaughan." The Queen carved [several] times during supper and drank and entertained them. After supper talked with the Duchess, and told her she should be happy if those who ought to be her best friends hindered her not by their coldness; perhaps too much credit was given to malicious tongues. She said she would accuse nobody. Said he would not desire it; but those folks were untrue who reported hardly of the King. "I shall ever take him," quo' she, "for a noble prince." Said she would never find the contrary, and as "she is in fear of the Queen" expressed a hope that they would have some opportunity of talking together more familiarly, and took leave. Never liked her beauty so much. "It were pity that she should be bestowed where she could not like, only to serve the present purpose of others." The Queen then went into the hall with the French ambassador on her right hand and Wriothesley on her left. Would have liked better if she had done the like before. Thinks she has been instructed to make much of them outwardly in order to lull their suspicions. Had "fighting at the barriers," in which the duke of Arskott, the countie Pynoye a[nd Mons.] de Cornet (fn. 7) Mons. Dolstra[te's son] and heir, were challengers. Afterwards the prince of [Orange], Mons. Disten, Mons. Conde, and others came in in a mask richly appointed. Then were two more masks and a mask of musicians—two lutes, a recorder, a rebeck, and a vyall—"the fyneliest that ever I heard." The prizes of the barriers were then given, the first to Mons. de Flagile, a sober honest gentleman of the Emperor's privy chamber, the second to the duke of Arscote. Brought the Queen back to the gallery where there was a fresh banquet, and he sat on the Queen's right. After a short time passed more in talking than eating, the Queen retired and they took leave. Rode home- wards with the French ambassador as far as their ways lay together. Thought it his duty to write all this; but as there are trifles mingled with things of weight, durst not write immediately to the King.
Forwards a letter from Mr. Wyatt to Cromwell received yesterday, with but two words to himself directing him to forward it. Opened it but found it in cypher, and so can only guess that the matter is not good, for men only write in cypher things that are either very good or very bad "and of the goodness I have no great [hope]." Doubtless Cromwell k[nows of] the election of the new duke [of Venice]. Cannot get his name, "he is [of the house] of Lando."
The diet at Frankford in Germany has resolved "to maintain ... opinion in religion" against all; [and it] is thought that the Lansgrave [will do some] exployte against the bishop of [Mentz.]" "Of Themper-[or] ... che ... at Bayona"; but no doubt Cromwell is better advertised of this out of France. Some men here think it is not concluded, and that both the meeting and the marriage (fn. 8) may miss; but they begin to keep things here very secret and look earnestly upon men that resort to us. Vauldrye has been with me again about his horse. I said that as yet I had no answer, no doubt through the negligence of the secretary. His wines are worth 8l. to 10l. a tun where they grow: a chain of the value of the wines would be a meet reward for him. I cannot obtain the Queen's congé [touching] Leighton, but he is ready to go to England for his purgation, and I will send him shortly with Mr. Knyght, together with the depositions against him. Joye and Phi[lips] I can hear nothing of. I [beg] to hear from you before my departure hence whether I am to "follow my first [instructions] in leaving of Mr. Vaughan he[re as] ambassador resident." They are here at a stay what to [do] with the ships taken up; and the English merchants are afraid [of pirates]. Thinks three or four of the King's [ships] should scour the [seas] "or else that an English thief or twain [should] be banished to meet with them that ... same ..." Bruxells, 19 Feb. Signed, but most of the signature lost.
Pp. 15. Slightly mutilated, and one edge of each leaf injured by damp. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. and also superscribed: "Haste: haste: pour lez affaires du Roy Dangleterre."
19 Feb.
R. O.
322. EDW. CARNE to CROMWELL.
Though I have no news of importance, yet as Mr. Locke this bearer is going thitherwards, I write to you how we have been banquetted here with the Queen this Shrovetide. On Monday last we were invited to the duke of Ascot and there supped with the Queen and all the lords and ladies of this Court. On Tuesday we were invited to her. At both places she treated us very honourably, as you shall see by Mr. Wriothesley's letters, but I can hear no towardness in our charge. I beg your remembrance for some money; but for Mr. Wriothesley's goodness I had wanted long ere this. As soon as I receive I pay to the steward for the household and get none myself. I have sent to Mr. Godsalfe to receive for me such as you shall give. Bruxeles, 19 Feb. 1538.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Dr. Kerne.
20 Feb.
R. O.
Rymer, xiv.
634.
323. EXETER, HOSPITAL OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST.
Surrender of the house and all its possessions in Exeter and in cos. Devon, Soms., Cornw., and elsewhere in England, Wales and the marches thereof. 20 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by Ric. Harrys, master or prior, and two others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 20.]
Seal injured.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 5, No. 31] as acknowledged, same day, before Wm. Peter, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pensions appointed to the late master and brethren of the surrendered house of St. John's, in Exeter, 20 Feb. 30 Hen. VIII., viz.:—
Ric. Harrys, master, 16l. 13s. 4d.; John Broderydge and John Scates, 3l. 6s. 8d. each. Signed: William Petre: John Smyth. Subscribed: "T. xjo die Maii ao xxxjo H. VIII."
P. 1. Endd. with draft commencement of the pension warrants.
R. O.3. Another copy of § 2. Signed by Sir Ric. Ryche.
P. 1.
20 Feb.
R. O.
324. DR. TREGONWELL, DR. PETRE, and JOHN SMYTH to CROMWELL.
Since last writing have taken surrender of the houses of St. John's in Wells, St. John's in Bridgewater, Athellney, Buckland Monialium, Tawnton, Dunkiswell, Chanonlegh, and Polslowe, in all which they have found as much conformity as might be desired, except that in many they found great waste, and many leases lately passed, which they have stayed and called in again. Having now received the commission, in which Pollard is joined with them, will divide into two parties, and hope thus to make an end before the Annunciation of Our Lady, whereby the half-year's rent shall remain to the King. Ask his pleasure touching Bruton and Henton, to the despatch of which they shall be ready by the return of this messenger. Exeter, 20 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
20 Feb.
R. O.
325. THE ABBESS AND NUNS OF ELNESTOWE to CROMWELL.
Your lordship has been pleased to write to us for a lease to be made to Mr. Holcrofte, of the grange and parsonage of Wilstamsted, and also for the sealing of a pair of indentures which, we find, mention not only the grange and parsonage, but our manor and other lands there. Have sealed them, nevertheless, trusting that you will see we take no hindrance thereby. Elnestowe, 20 Feb. Signed: Elezabeth Boyvill, abbes, and hir systers.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: "Anno xxxo."
[ Feb.]
R. O
326. RIC. LAYTON to CROMWELL.
Today I learned, from a scholar that came straight from Lovayne, that 300 ships were being laden with horse, guns, and other artillery, to sail where they shall be commanded by the Emperor, now in the beginning of Lent. The lord Camfere of Seland, the admiral, to be conductor, and all prisoners, sturdy beggars, and men without masters in Flanders are to serve the galleys. Some say they will sail towards Greece, some towards Denmark to reinstate their natural king and the Emperor's nephews. (fn. 9) In every town of Flanders men be set on work upon artillery. Philippes is servant to the duke of Clevers, and has not been in Louvain since September; then he crossed the mountains into Italy, and is thought to be there still. I was here this afternoon to have declared the premises, but found you so busy that I write them to you now in Thaccar's chamber.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao 30o.
20 Feb.
Add. Ch.
12,776.
B. M.
327. CARDINAL BETOUN.
Grant, ad feodi firman seu emphiteosim, of certain lands by Card. Beton, as commendatory of Abirbrothok, and the convent there, 20 Feb. 1539. Signed by Beton and 22 others.
On parchment. Two seals lost.

Footnotes

1 Roland Bourke. See Vol. XIII., Pt. i., No. 114.
2 Supposed in the State Papers to be Dominick Tirrey, bishop of Cork and Cloyne; but this bishopric is not in O'Brien's country. Killaloe is more likely, as the bishop about this time is said to have been Richard Hogan, a Grey Friar, who died, according to Cotton's Fasti in 1538 or 1539. It is commonly said that he succeeded Terence O'Brien in this bishopric in 1525; but this can hardly be, as one James Glas is mentioned as bishop of Killaloe in 1528. See Vol. IV. No. 4302. It is not clear who was the bishop of Killaloe in Vol. VII. No. 1573.
3 John Hutton.
4 Exeter, Montague, &c.
5 The abbot of Westminster.
6 Of Milan.
7 This seems to be an error. Cornet is not a Belgian title; but baron d'Escornaix was a secondary title of Charles count de Lalaing, the elder brother of Philip de Lalaing, count of Hoochstraeten. The person intended may have been Philip de Lalaing, son and heir apparent of Charles count de Lalaing.
8 Of the duke of Orleans.
9 Meaning apparently the Count and Countess Palatine.