Letters and Papers
March 1539, 6-10

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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'Letters and Papers: March 1539, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 177-195. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75850 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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March 1539

6 March.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
173.
447. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
Sent Jesse with letters and Martyn to overtake him with other letters, stating that he was desired to tarry till Chappuis arrival, with his answers to divers things moved by the Duke (fn. 1) , Mons. Dolstrate and Mons. de Lykirke. Was taken to Mons. Dolstrate's this morning where were Mons. de Molemboys and Mons. de Lykirke. They suggested that Wriothesley should either be conducted to the frontier and exchanged for their ambassador or wait till he had presented his fellow. Objected that this showed a distrust in the King's honour and he would rather tarry a prisoner here than be led a prisoner through the country. To this they said that he took them amiss. Replied that if they feared for their ambassador, there was the ambassador in Spain to "countervayl" Chapuis, and he offered if he was allowed to leave honestly in the morning, that he would not pass Newporte till his fellow wrote that he was arrived. They said they doubted not the Queen would be satisfied and he should come in the afternoon to take his leave, but afterwards the secretary Rombold came to put him off, as the Queen had received news and was occupied. Hears that "Pole would leave his hat to be a king," that there are some practises in Ireland, and that something should be attempted about Calais. Brussels, Thursday night late, 7 March. (fn. 2)
"I have sent for Mr. Vaughan, whereof I am sorry." It is written here from Chapuis that the King has commanded him to tarry upon pain of his life.
Hol. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxo Mr. Wryothesley; with the addition in another hand: Vaughan, Selenger and Hutton.
6 March.
R. O.
448. SUBDEAN and CHAPTER OF WELLS to CROMWELL.
Mr. Tregonwell and Mr. Peter have been lately with them to take so much of their jewels and plate they think expedient to the King's use. Cromwell being the head and "tuitorie" of their Chapter, send him an inventory by Richard Eryngton, one of the Chapter, of what they have taken. Ask him to be a mediator to the King, if he thinks any of it may remain to the honour of God and the necessary use of the Church. The Chapter House, 6 March. Signed: "Your humble and obedient orators, the subdean and chapter of Wells."
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
6 March.
R. O.
449. BONNER to CROMWELL.
Considering the tenor of his letters by Goughe and Thadeus, thinks it better to write, though he cannot send the resolution and answer that is further promised. Has done what he can to advance the King's desires. Is obliged to learn to dissemble and speak fair, whatever he thinks, which is a great pain. They know their time well and think we neither can nor will deny any part of their desires. If they meant truly, it were expedient perhaps to bear with them, but if they practise for our amity only to deceive us, the King and Council must decide how they are to be used. Wonders what moves the Emperor thus unkindly to do; unless he and the French king being joined in conspiracy with the Pope contend between themselves who shall do most valiantly to gratify him. Reminds Cromwell of the obtaining his warrants, post money and diets. Melune, 6 March, 12 o'clock.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
6 March.
R. O.
450. BONNER to CROMWELL.
As he has laid out much money in posts, in sending letters from Wyatt, in the King's affairs at Suessons and St. Quyntynes, and in sending letters to Wrisley and Vaughan, asks that the enclosed warrant may be signed and sent to Brian Tuke. Asks him also to procure the augmentation of his diets. Leaves to him the remission of the first fruits of Hereford, which he hopes for in part, or at least longer days to pay Wants a cipher, and leave to use a secretary such as Wm. Honnyng. Melune, 6 March, 12 o'clock.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
6 March.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
169.
451. BONNER to CROMWELL.
Encloses, with "this other packet," letters from Castillon, who, with the ambassador of Ferrara dined with him to-day. He says an ambassador will go to England but cannot say who, or when. If the French can get their desires of the Emperor it is not to be looked for that we shall get much from their friendship. Castillon, forgetting what he said yesterday, told Bonner that he showed Francis the letter Bonner had sent him touching Cardinal Pole, and the King said he had heard nothing of his coming, but if it were true, he should know in three days, because he had heard nothing from M. de Tarbes for eight days. Asked Castillon what he thought the French king would do if Pole came and attempted anything touching the censures. He first said Francis would not agree, and afterwards that if Pole came it was to be supposed that the Emperor and he were of one accord. Asked him if he thought the French king would admit a traitor to England for the sake of the bp. of Rome or the Emperor. He was confused and said that on account of the duchy of Milan they must study to gratify all parties. He told Bonner also that the Duke of Orleans should go either to Spain or to meet the Emperor nearer. It is reported that the Emperor will go to Flanders and the French king conduct him through France. Castillon sent Bonner word that he should speak with the King, and that he will not forget to set forth all things for the best. Thinks he speaks over much to do a great deal. Asks Cromwell to send back Nicholas Norey, the bearer, whom he cannot spare. Sends him now, instead of Thadeus, only because he would be loth to detain him to his hindrance. Melune, 6 March, 4 p.m. Signed.
Pp. 4. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
7 March.
R. O.
452. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Wrote a few days past enclosing letters from my lord Privy Seal and the Council, to which I hope you will make speedy answer. I have received your letter by Donyngton and trust to bring the commission for the Friars with me. Indeed, I never thought to depart until I had determinate answer both for the Friars and the 400l.; but, as I have written, if there is any likelihood of war there is no hope for the 400l. Please write me what to show my lord Admiral as your will for the redemption of the Forest and for Porchester. If you write Mr. Pope some gentle letter I think he will pay your annuity due at Lady Day next. You should promise him two pieces of wine. Touching Soperton, Mr. Lyster has written his mind and he will not be anything liberal. I would gladly bring you some money, for if this 400l. take not place you will have great lack. The King departs towards Dover on Tuesday next, and lies there three days and two days at Sandwich, and within twelve days returns home by the same way, i.e. by Gravesend and Rochester, Sittingbourne and Canterbury. My lord Chamberlain goes over within eight days, and also the earl of Hertford and divers other come to Calais. I will bring my lady's psalter with me. London, 7 March.
Keep this news somewhat secret until you hear more.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
R. O.453. [JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.]
After closing this letter, "I learnt that the treasurer of the King's House shall be made Lord Sen John and that Sir William Farr shall be lord Fytzhyw (fn. 3) and that Mr. Comptroller shall be made also a lord, but whereof I do not know; and this shall be done on Sunday next."
In John Husee's hand, p. 1.
7 March.
R. O.
454. Sir ANTHONY WILLOUGHBY.
John Doddesworth, keeper of Warder Park in the parish of Dunhed St. Andrew, Wilts, servant to Sir Ant. Willoughby, aged 74, examined 7 March 30 Henry VIII., says that 20 years ago, being servant to Robt. lord Broke, he laboured to lord Broke for the keeping of Warder Park, and Broke sent deponent from Bere Ferrers, Devon, with a letter to Sir Ant. Willoughby to give the said office to deponent. At Wilton, Wilts, found Sir Anthony who next day rode to Warder, put out Walter Turnour, then keeper, and put in deponent.
Large paper, p. 1. Endd.: Concerning Sir Ant. Willoughby.
7 March.
R. O.
455. RALPH EARL OF WESTMORELAND to CROMWELL.
Was lately informed by a draper who had a ship in Scotland that there were three Scotch ships driven by tempest into the Shealys (Shields) in one of which was an English priest (fn. 4) who had, in Scotland, railed and spoken rebellious words of the King, my master. Sent some of his servants to apprehend him, who took not only him, but a monk (fn. 5) and a friar of Ireland, with writings and letters directed to the bishop of Rome. The priest has confessed himself to be one of the company that broke Hexham prison and escaped to Scotland. Sent the men and their writings next day to my lord President and the Council. Sent back his servant to stay the ship till their pleasure was known, and the servant found other writings. Brauncepeth, Friday, 7 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Anno xxxo.
7 March.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
176.
456. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
This afternoon the Duke, Dolstrate and Likirke came to desire him to stay until their ambassador arrived or at least until the Queen could inform the King that the English ships were not detained with any evil intent; and they had heard that their ships and merchants in England were arrested. If Wriothesley consented, their ambassador should leave for England tomorrow. They asked him to write of their good inclination and the Emperor's resolution to entertain the amity. Replied as he had the day before that the King's orders were absolute, and repeated his offer of not passing Newport till he heard his fellow had arrived. Complained of the delay in giving him an answer and the nonfulfilment of Likirke's promise to give him the warrants for the despatch of the ships. If the ships depart tomorrow the merchants will have lost some 5,000 marks by the delay. The English are in a different position to other nations, having a special treaty of intercourse. Required them to procure leave for him to depart that night or the next day, otherwise he would leave tomorrow before noon unless he were prevented. They endeavoured to induce him to stay until the Queen heard again from England, but he adhered to his determination. On leaving they said that no ambassadors had been evil handled here, though Mons. de Pratt had been ill used in England and his letters broken up. (fn. 6) The Duke is going to Henaulte. On leaving he desired Wriothesley to tell the King he was a man of peace and would remain his servant as he was his poor kinsman.
Hears that Pole is coming into these parts "to declare that he would be a King." "If he come whiles I shall be here and shall be able to do anything I know I shall surely to the pot." The young duke of Cleve is either dead or dying, it is thought from poison. "This is the charity of Rome." Urges Cromwell to advise the King to beware who comes near him and to remember "the K ... the duke of Saxe and th ..."
Cromwell must take heed and himself also. Brussels, Friday 8 March, (fn. 7) 11 p.m. Asks him to send back the bearer.
Hol. Slightly mutilated. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
7 March.
Calig. E. II.
(191).
B. M.
457. [BONNER to MONTMORENCY.]
According to your promise I have been hoping for a reply in my master's affairs either by your letters or by Mons. de Castillon. Will you at least procure me an interview with the King, your master, touching that and the coming of cardinal Poole, who is expected here shortly to solicit against my master, as he has done to the Emperor? I think in this the King your master will show his friendship to mine according to the treaties touching rebels. Melune, 7 March. Signed (by Bonner): "lambassadeur Dangleterre."
French, p. 1. Add.
7 March.
Wegener,
Aarsberetninger IV.
Suppl. p. 11.
458. JAMES V. to CHRISTIAN III.
Commending Alex. Lyel. Edinburgh, ad nonas Marcias, 1538. (fn. 8)
Latin.
7 March.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI. 55 b.
B.M.
459. JAMES V. to the CARDINAL OF CARPI.
Asks him to obtain the substitution of the name of John Erskyn, 13 years of age, in the place of that of Thos. Erskyng of Brechin, in the faculty granted to the latter by Clement VII., to hold benefices under age. Edinburgh, Non. Martii.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
7 March.
Ribier, I. 405.
460. GRIGNAN, FRENCH AMBASSADOR at ROME, to MONTMORENCY.
* * * The Pope does not know what to think of the negociations between the King and Emperor, nor of the journeys the L'Esleu d'Auranches has made. I have assured him that there is nothing but what was carried by M. de Brissac, which he has seen. I much fear he may know by way of Spain the affair of England, which has been sent here, and distrust us for having concealed it. * * * Rome, 7 March, 1539.
French.
7 March.
Add. MS.
28,591,
f. 60.
B.M.
461. AGUILAR to CHARLES V.
About the enterprise. His Holiness is still suspicious of France, and afraid of the affairs of Germany and England in the Emperor's absence. Thinks, however, he and the Venetians only wait to see if the Emperor will really come and take the command.
* * *
The Lutherans seem still to be raising men against the Catholics. As to England, the Pope still demands that the Emperor should forbid commerce, since the French king offers to do so if the Emperor ask him. Moreover, his Holiness seems to suggest that it would not be well that Francis had that honour which properly belongs to the Emperor. Replied that the Emperor had no lack either of will or zeal, but the matter depended upon the resolution taken about the enterprise and about Lutheran affairs.
* * *
The French ambassador lately showed Aguilar a letter from his master instructing him to communicate fully to him all his ideas, and said the French king and the Emperor had pledged one another to make no confederation or alliance with the King of England, by marriage or otherwise, except by mutual consent. Aguilar said he had instructions also to confer freely with the French ambassador, but had no specific instructions as yet about England; and till they arrived it was agreed to keep the matter secret. The ambassador afterwards had an interview with the Pope, in which he says he only spoke generally about remedy of the outrageous conduct of the King of England. Rome, 7 March, 1539.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 24. The original partly in cipher. See Spanish Calendar VI. I. No. 42. (fn. 9)
8 March.
Ribier, I. 401.
462. HENRY VIII. to FRANCIS I.
Our ungrateful rebel Renaud Pole, calling himself cardinal, a traitor to us and to the Crown of England, has lately declared his traitorous intention of going to the Emperor, you, and other Christian princes, to provoke them against us, and publish certain iniquitous censures of the bp. of Rome. The Emperor having declared, like a good brother and ally, that he would certainly not violate his treaties with us because of the said censures, the said Pole has left Spain in great discontent and is going to you for the like causes. We wish therefore to intimate as we have done long ago, that the said Pole is our rebel and traitor, and so are certain his servants Branceter and Throgmorton, and other their adherents and accomplices; also to request you not only to refuse them audience, (as you did, at our request, the last time he presumed to come to your kingdom, as legate, for which again we thank you) but also arrest the said Pole, Branceter, Throgmorton, and other traitors whom the bp. of Hereford our ambassador with you shall name, and send them hither as the treaties between us require; sending them under such guard as our ambassador shall desire, at our expense. We have good hope that as the Emperor has observed the treaties you will do the like. Palace of Westminster, 8 March, 1539, 30 Hen. VIII.
French.
ii. Request of the English ambassador in France to the above effect as regards cardinal Pole, quoting the clause of the treaty of Amiens, 18 Aug., 1527 (in Latin) upon which the request is made.
French.
8 March.
R. O.
463. MARGARET MARCHIONESS OF DORSET to CROMWELL.
As your lordship has written for my son Marquis to come up for the determination of my account, I beg you to take some order between us now, or, if you be too busy, let him no longer receive the revenues of those lands which be liable to the wills of my late husband and my lady Cecil, my lord's mother; for he pays no debts, either to the King or to any other, and I am called upon for them every term. Now in my old age I would live in peace. Give credence to the bearer, for if I were able to ride I would have attended on you myself, but I am so troubled I can endure no labor. At Christ-church, my lord Chancellor's house in London, 8 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
464. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
To-day I received your sundry letters. Touching the commission for the Friars, I trust to bring it with me. To-day I was so plain with my lord that he made full promise you shall have the 400l.; but none shall be paid until he be in assurance, which cannot be until next term, and mean-while I am in doubt how you shall furnish your needs. I have been in hand this day for the bows; if I have them they shall be conveyed with the first. I wrote our news here by James Hanckocces, merchant of Ireland. Herewith I send two letters which my lord Privy Seal delivered me with his own hand, giving me great charge with the one of them; to which I doubt not you will make answer. To my lord Admiral I will signify your pleasure for Porchester, and to Mr. Lyster for Soperton. The lord Windsor once offered 50l. for it. There is one I think will give 60l. to take it as Mr. Bonham might have had it. Mr. Scryven would have me make a shift for his money. Told him you trusted to be sped at my lord Privy Seal's hands; but he said he could not tarry so long. As to my departing I cannot say, but I trust not to tarry long after the King leaves this. London, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Good seal.
8 March.
R. O.
465. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have to-day received your letters both from Conway and from John Teborowe. I have delivered Mrs. Green's letter, who has promised to send the silk with the first. Mr. Lee says he has sent the silk and gold long since. I have delivered Mr. Gonson's letters, who promises me the flagon in two days, which I will bring with me or send with the first. Mrs. Frances' waistcoat I will be in hand with on Monday. The pasties of carps are not yet come. I will see them delivered according to your pleasure. I trust, though it be long, to bring the commission for the Friars with me. My lord Privy Seal has made me a full grant to-day of the 400l., but he will certainly pay none till he has recovered the land, which will not be before next term. London, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Endd.: "A writ post diem clausum et extremum. Mrs. Jane."
8 March.
Orig. Letters
(Parker Soc.)
624.
466. JOHN BUTLER and Others to CONRAD PELLICAN and Others.
Have all assembled in London. Write in gratitude for their extra-ordinary kindness. Here ceremonies are still tolerated, but explanations are added, as that holy water is but to remind us of the sprinkling of the blood of Christ, that the bread signifies the breaking of his body, &c. Nothing has yet been settled as to the marriage of the clergy, although some have freely preached before the King on the subject. The mass is not called a sacrifice but a representation of Christ's Passion. All images that are worshipped are removed. You have heard doubtless that the principal supporters of Popery among us have been cut off, viz., the marquis of Exeter, Montague, earl of Salisbury (sic), and that very brave but profligate man, Sir Edw. Nevill. Not long since, too, Nic. Carew, late master of the Horse, was brought to punishment. As he was led to execution, he exhorted all to study the evangelical books, as he had fallen by hatred to the Gospel.
It is said we are to have war with the French, the Italians, the Spaniards, and the Scots at once. "When the secret machinations of the persons above mentioned were reported to the King, he said that he should not sleep at all the worse for it; and on the day after he declared to his privy councillors, that he now found himself moved in his conscience to promote the Word of God more than he had ever done before." The Pope has procured the burning of three English merchants in Spain, and granted remission of sins to whoever shall kill an English heretic. Entreat God on our behalf not to suffer his servants to be trampled on. We have a King of noble spirit and an obedient people.
John Butler would have come to you but for these warlike tidings, which have also kept Partridge from the Frankfort fair. The former might have an honorable post about the King, but he loves the Muses better. Nic. Eliot is studying our municipal law, aided by the King's munificence. Barth. Traheron is in the service of lord Cromwell, and N. Partridge in that of the pious bp. of St. David's. He will be reader in divinity till better provided for. We are all of us as yet unmarried. The abp. of Canterbury promises to write to Bullinger. He is now wholly employed in instructing the people and composing discourses in English to be used by the clergy instead of their parrot Latin. Bibliander's letter has been delivered to the bp. of Worcester, who we think will answer it. London, 8 March, 1539.
Signed by John Butler, Nic. Eliot, Nic. Partridge, and Barth. Traheron.
Addressed to Conrad Pellican, Leo Judæ, Henry Bullinger, and Theodore Bibliander.
Orig. Letters
(Parker Soc.)
623.
467. JOHN BUTLER, NIC. PARTRIDGE, NIC. ELIOT and BARTH. TRAHERON to BULLINGER.
Thanks for his great kindness, especially at their departure. Had a pleasant journey to Berne. (fn. 10) All they have in England is at Bullinger's service. Salutations to Leo Judæ, Pellican, and Theodore Bibliander.
8 March.
R. O.
Rymer XIV.
633.
468. FORDE ABBEY.
Surrender (by Thos. Charde, abbot, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Devon, Dors., Soms., and elsewhere in England, Wales and the marches thereof. 8 March 30 Hen. VIII. Signed by Thomas the abbot, Wm. Rede, prior and 12 others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 21.]
Seal defaced.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 1, No. 30] as acknowledged, same day, before Wm. Peter, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pensions appointed to the late abbot and convent of Forde, Devon, which surrendered 8 March 30 Hen. VIII., viz.:—.
Thos. Charde alias Tybbes, abbot, 80l. (also 40 wain-loads of firewood), Wm. Sherneborne alias Rede, Ric. Exmester alias Were, and John Brydge-water alias Stone, 8l. each, John Newman 6l., John Cosyns, 6l. 13s. 4d., Robt. Ylmester alias Roose and Ellys Olescum alias Potter, 7l. each, John Fawell, Thos. Stafforde alias Bate and Wm. Grene, 106s. 8d. each; Wm. Wynsor alias Hyde, Wm. Denyngton alias Wylshire, and Ric. Kingesbury alias Sherman, 100s. each.
Signed: Jo. Tregonwell: William Petre.
P.1.
R. O.3. Another copy of § 2. Signed by Sir Ric. Ryche.
8 March.
Close Roll,
p.5, No. 35.
Rymer XIV.
636.
469. NEWHAM ABBEY.
Surrender (by Ric. Gille, abbot, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in co. Devon and elsewhere in England, Wales and the marches thereof. 8 March 30 Hen. VIII. Acknowledged, same day, before John Tregonwell, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Pension list of Newham Abbey, Devon, assigned 9 March 30 Hen. VIII., payment for the first quarter to be at Lady Day next, viz.:—.
Ric. Gylle, abbot, 44l.; Robt. Cogan, prior, 6l. 13s. 4d.; Wm. Westmester alias Fante, 6l.; Wm. Pedo, sub-prior, and Thos. Whyte, 106s. 8d. each; John Baker, John Roper, and Thos. Male, 5l. each; John Riche, and Ralph Alford, 4l. 13s. 4d. each. Signed: Thomas Crumwell: Jo. Tregonwell: John Smyth.
P. 1.
R. O.3. Another copy of § 2. Signed by R. Ryche.
P.1.
8 March.
Spanish
Calendar,
VI. I.
No. 43.
470. COUNCIL of the REGENT OF FLANDERS.
Proces verbal of what passed between Wriothesley and the deputies of the Queen Regent, from the 4th to the 8th March.
Among other proposals of Secretary Wriothesley was one that the King, seeing that the cause for Chapuys' recall had ceased, wanted him to remain in England, or that another ambassador should be sent in his place, lest people should think the old friendship diminished. The Queen said she was ready to send another and had appointed the dean of Cambray, of which "Messire Thomas" was glad. The Queen, however, perceiving the sudden change of the English policy in the recall of Messire Thomas, and that his two colleagues had left for Gueldres, as travellers, and fearing the Imperial ambassador had been detained in London, determined to amuse the English ambassador with delays and excuses; but the latter threatened to quit without leave, said Chapuys was not restrained, though the King had asked him to remain till the arrival of his successor; moreover that there was an English ambassador at the Emperor's court (fn. 11) not inferior to Chapuys, and it was not fair to keep two for one. On this the Queen courteously sent the ambassador a deputation, viz. Arschot, Count Hoochstraste and Liedekercke, to induce him to remain, who three or four times in vain attempted to persuade him that the delay in granting his application was not owing to mistrust, but for the reason he himself suggested, lest people should tbink matters were no longer on the footing they were between England and the Emperor. The ambassador protested he would obey no request to remain but only a written order, which would be his excuse to the King, but at last he was induced to say till he heard from his master.
All this was owing to Chapuys having three days ago sent one of his servants with an insignificant letter, but with a verbal message to say that, having asked an audience of the King and being referred to the Privy Council, he told them that the Queen desired his presence on business of the Emperor's, and, having private business of his own as well, he desired the King's leave to go over. The councillors promised to let the King know, and two days later one of Cromwell's secretaries told him the King thought he ought to delay his departure till he had news from the Emperor, or his successor had arrived; and Chapuys, fearing the follies of the country, requested the Queen to detain Wriothesley by plausible pretences till he should come. The messenger says the English ports are closed and it was with great difficulty that he himself got over. He says he had heard that all merchants of the Emperor's countries had been arrested in England—a strange rumor, which would itself justify the detention of the English ambassador, but the latter says he knows nothing of it, and thinks it may have arisen from the complaint of the English that their ships were not allowed to leave the Low Countries. This was owing to an order issued some time ago to vessels of all nations not to leave the ports of Flanders till a selection had been made of those wanted for the crusade against the Turk. The ambassador at the time asked for the release of the English ships, as by the commercial treaties with England six months' notice should have been given, and the Queen at once agreed, protesting however, that the prohibition had been only made for war in behalf of Christendom.
Fr.
8 March.
Theiner, 608.
471. JAMES V. to PAUL III.
Thanks the Pope for making the bp. of Mirepoix (David Beton) a cardinal at his request. Linlitgw, viii. id. Martii 1538.
Lat.
8 March.
Theiner, 608.
472. JAMES V. to CARD. FARNESE.
Thanks him for assisting in the promotion of the abp. of St. Andrew's. Latinus Juvenalis, to whom Farnese writes that he had given a message for James, is detained by Francis I. in France. James now sends the abp. of St. Andrew's into France to learn the message and to treat with Francis. Linlitgw, viii. id. Martii 1538.
Lat. A mutilated copy will be found in Royal MS., 18 B. VI. 54, B.M.
8 March.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI. 54 b.
B. M.
473. JAMES V. to CARDINAL SYMONETTA.
Was pleased to hear by Symoneta's letters, received on 4 Feb., of the honourable mention the Pope made of him in the Senate. Respected him before he became Pope. The archbp. of St. Andrew's, whom he has voluntarily raised to the cardinalate, has been tried in public and private business, and will be useful to the Church in these turbulent times. Thanks Symoneta for his services. Linlytgw, 8 id. March.
Lat., copy, p. 1.
8 March.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI. 54 b.
B.M.
474. JAMES V. to CARDINAL GHINUCCI.
Received his letters prid. non. Feb. Expresses his gratitude at the promotion of the archbp. of St. Andrew's to the cardinalate. He has deserved well of James and Scotland, and will certainly deserve well of the Holy See. Will repay the Pope's kindness by love and obedience, according to the custom of his ancestors. Linlythgw, 8 id. March 1538.
Lat., copy, mutilated, p. 1.
8 March.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI. 55.
B.M.
475. JAMES V. to SILVESTER DARIUS.
Received at the same time his two letters, one narrating the Pope's doings during the past summer, the other [about the promotion of the archbp. of St. Andrew's]. Both James and the archbp. will act towards him according to his deserts. Linlytgw, 8 id. March.
Lat., mutilated, p. 1. Copy.
8 March.
Royal MS.
81 B. VI. 55.
B. M.
476. JAMES V. to the CARDINAL OF CARPI.
Received both his letters together. Thanks him for his services concerning the promotion of the archbp. of St. Andrews. Linlytgw 8 id. March 1538.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
9 March.
Harl. MS.
6074 f. 56 b.
B. M.
477. CREATIONS OF PEERS.
Account of the creation of Sir Wm. Pawlet, lord St. John, Sir John Russell, lord Russell, and Mr. Wm. Parr, lord Parr, 9 March 30 Hen. VIII. (fn. 12) The three barons were created at Westminster after the sacring of the King's high mass. Garter bore their letters patent before them from the pages' chamber, lord Clinton followed lord St. John bearing his robe, he being led between lord Cobham and lord Dacres of the South; then Clarencieux bearing the robe of lord Russell, who was led between the lord Sturton and the lord Windsor. "Then Norrey, in default of a baron, bore the robe of lord Parr, led by the lord Waintworth." They then proceeded to the Chamber of Presence, where they were commanded to put on their robes, and from that in due order to the King and received their patents not read. Their styles were proclaimed afterwards at the second course as they sat at dinner. Fees to heralds given.
Pp. 2.
Add. MS.
6113 f. 91.
B. M.
2. Account of rewards given by lords St. John, Russell, and Parr upon their creation, 9 March 30 Hen. VIII., at Westminster, to heralds, gentlemen ushers, sewers, cooks, "boilers," "squillery," "woodyard," musicians, &c. (29 items).
P. 1.
9 March.
R. O.
478. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
As for the 400l. I can write no more than I have done this day by Hopton's brother, i.e., that my lord Privy Seal will not part with it without assurance made which can nowise be before the term. As for the Friars, I hope to bring the commission with me, and if the Master of the Ordnance fail you for the 20 bows, I will try to get them myself and also to know my lord Admiral's answer for Porchester. The saying is that there shall be a blockhouse made with all speed at Calshottes Point. This day Sir John Russell was made lord Russell, Sir Wm. Paulet, lord St. John, and Sir Wm. Parr, lord Fytzhywe (fn. 13) ; Sir Wm. Kyngston, treasurer, and Sir Thomas Cheny, comptroller of the King's House. Who shall be vice-chamberlain and captain of the Guard I do not know. To-day it was showed me in secret that Mr. Richard Cromwell goes shortly to Calais. Now the King lies on Tuesday at Greenwich, and so forth on his journey to Dover. I will depart as soon as I may. London, 9 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Deputy of Calais.
9 March.
R. O.
479. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I send the silk and Mrs. Greue's letter by Mr. Bird, of Calais. I have written to-day about my Lord's suits by Hopton's brother. My lord Privy Seal will not part with the 400l. till the surance be made, which cannot be before next term. The pasties are not yet come. I hope they will arrive before my lord leaves for Dover. I shall be to-morrow in hand with the waistcoat, and also fetch the flagon and speed me hence as soon as I can. This day Sir John Russell was made lord Russell, Sir Wm. Paulet lord St. John, and Sir Will. Parre lord Fitzhugh; (fn. 14) Sir Will. Kingston treasurer to the King's house, and Sir Thos. Cheny controller of the same. Who shall be vice-chamberlain and captain of the Guard I know not. London, 9 March.
Mr. Richard Cromwell is going shortly to Calais.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
9 March.
R. O.
480. ROBERT KYNGE [ABBOT OF THAME AND OSENEY] (fn. 15) to CROMWELL.
Has, with all haste, sent to Oseney to know the town and shire wherein is the benefice of Mr. Edwards, of Herford, late incumbent there; which known, he will with all "festination" send Cromwell "the presentation thereof with a window." Will learn if any others be vacant; and be always at Cromwell's command. "Fro your own poor house of Thame," 9 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
St. P. v. 151.
481. THE COUNCIL OF THE NORTH to CROMWELL.
Of a French ship driven to take refuge lately at South Shields, in which were an English priest, Sir Robert More, who came from Chichester and was lately imprisoned at Hexham, and two Irishmen, a monk, (fn. 16) and a friar found hidden in the "howle"; arrested by the order of the earl of Westmoreland. There were also found slanderous letters from rebels in Ireland to the bp. of Rome and the traitor Pole; (fn. 17) which they send, with the said two traitors. Send also Sir Robert More and his examination. He told the Earl's servants who brought him to York that the King and all his subjects were heretics. Examined some packets of correspondence of Scotchmen with Dieppe, Paris, and Rome, including papal bulls, which they have returned considering the amity with France and Scotland, allowing the ship to depart. Among them were letters of the abbot of Melrose, that no papal bulls should take effect in Scotland without leave of their prince. Examined also the letters of the persons rescued from a small vessel lost last week on the coast of Holderness. Found that they merely concerned commerce and returned them. Only two persons were drowned, the one an Englishman, once a friar Observant, the other a Fleming. York, 9 March. Signed by the bp. of Llandaff, Dacre, Magnus, Tempest, [Sir] M. Constable, Thos. Fairfax, Will. Babthorp, Rob. Chaloner, and Jo. Uvedale.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
482. GREY FRIARS, Scarborough.
Survey and rental of the site and gardens of the Friars Minors of Scarborough, surrendered 9 March 30 Hen. VIII.
Total, 5s. 4d. Signed: Per me Hugonem Fuller, audit.
Lat., pp. 2. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
483. WHITE FRIARS, Scarborough.
Similar survey of the Carmelite friars at Scarborough.
Annual value, 10s. Signed: Per me Hugonem Fulier, audit.
Lat., p. 1. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
484. RICHARD LEE to [CROMWELL].
Has received a letter from Mr. Solymon, bidding him make a rate of what needs to be done for the assurance of Calais, and expressing surprise that he has not sent for the timber to Knell Wood. Reminds Cromwell that he has already told him of the great necessity of timber, and lack of money. Has sent as many ships as he found in the haven. Has no crane, and asks what he should do for one.
The captains of Guisnes, Hampnes, and Risebank will inform Cromwell what repairs they need. Sends a book of what is necessary for the town and the sluice All the carpenters here cannot do the work in four months. Calais, 9 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
9 March
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
183.
485. WRIOTHESLEY to CROMWELL.
After writing on Friday night, by Parker, Likirk came to bid him speak to the Queen on the morrow. After some discussion, then and with Rumbold next morning, swore he would put his foot in the stirrup as soon as it struck one, if not sent for. The dean of Cambray, who is going to England as ambassador, came to dine with him. He is a tall man, somewhat gross, and of a good, plain sort. Was sent for at one to come to the Queen, with whom were Mons. Dolstrate, Mons. St. Pye, and others. Details the interview verbatim. She praised Wriothesley highly for his conduct and desired him to stay, which he said he could not do for fear of displeasing the King, but at last consented to do so on her commanding him and writing to that effect to the King. Wishes the King would fall in love now with Chapuis and friendly keep him there. Believes they think he knows some hollow hearts in England. Does not forget what was said by him after the insurrection. Advises Cromwell to let him alone for a season and revoke his fellows, keeping Chapuis in a friendly way and "looking well to him for starting." Asks for some augmentation of his diets, having spent much more than his diets and posts.
Hears that the Emperor has taken a truce with the Turk for 14 years, and that the Venetians will shortly make their end also with him, if they have not done so. Is informed there is much a [rmour] conveyed to Scotland and that all the main battle of horsemen and munitions shall come thence.
Hears that the king of Denmark has stopped his ports and makes provision for defence, and that the Lansgrave Van Hesse is levying men.
Forgot to write in his last letter that at the end of the interview he asked if they would let him go if his fellow were here. They stayed all at it, and at last Dolstrate said when they made that offer they knew not of the things done in England. Brussels, Sunday, 9 March.
Received this morning Cromwell's letter by Germayn. The ships "avaled downwards" on Thursday. Has written to the merchants to stay, unless they think themselves strong enough for pirates. Apologises for writing without "requesting before."
Hol. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 March.486. EDMOND HARVEL to CROMWELL.
The letter printed as of this date in State Papers, VIII. 191, is of the historical year 1538. See Vol. XIII., Part 1., No. 473.
10 March.
Harl. MS.
282 f. 50.
B. M.
Nott's Wyatt,
511.
487. HENRY VIII. to WYATT.
Thanks him for bringing the affairs of the traiter Pole to such a point that he departed miscontented from thence; also for having such plain conference with the Emperor, Covos and Grandvela, as appears by his letters of the 23rd ult. Wyatt is to obtain an early audience with the Emperor and thank him for his purpose to observe the alliances, and for the refusal he has made to the traitor Pole, to assent to "the inique censures and requisitions of the bishop of Rome lately pronounced injustly." Wyatt shall add that the Emperor's friendly words are far discrepant from the doings of his officers in the Low Countries where, upon Ash Wednesday, by general proclamation at Antwerp and elsewhere, in the Emperor's name, all English ships and the goods therein (being ready to return from the Mart), "and, for color as we understand," ships of other nations too, were detained on pretence that the Emperor wants mariners for his navy against the Turk. Moreover, whereas before that the King's ambassadors had been much made of, the next day, and since, scant any man in the Regent's Court would speak with them or direct them where to attend the Queen, in whom, too, they found a marvellous strange countenance. Since then they have been compelled to pay the excise there, which no English ambassador ever paid before and which amounts to 18d. on every barrel of beer. Besides this, a bruit has been spread throughout the Low Countries and Almain, that the Emperor and the French king, by the bishop of Rome's procurement, would forthwith make war against the King, and that the Emperor's navy was "addressed" to make a sudden invasion. The conjectures, written from Spain, Almain and elsewhere, were that as the Emperor had broken his intended journey against the infidels the navy must be for some other purpose, not the Lutherans, for there ships will not serve, nor the recovery of Gheldres, for that contention is before the Electors, nor against Denmark, for the truce lasts yet a year and a half. The conclusion then was that it was against England. Never was bruit so constantly affirmed and spitefully uttered, and in the midst of it Mons. Chappuys, the Emperor's ambassador, alleging only the Queen's command, required licence to depart. The King showed him the same bruits and that his departure would lend colour to them, also that he was the Emperor's ambassador and not the Queen's, according to the letters he brought at his coming hither, and that the custom was never to revoke resident ambassadors without letters unless some other were sent to supply the room; yet nevertheless, knowing it to be the Emperor's pleasure that he should depart, the King would not detain him, but gave him kindly leave and liberally rewarded him. These rumours of war, arrest of ships, strangeness to ministers, preparations, and the requisition of Chapuys, ran abroad everywhere, and for the indemnity of English merchants the King has had to arrest the ships of Flanders, and also of Spain (for in sundry parts of the sea coast of Spain English subjects are much molested at the instigation of slanderous preachers suborned thereto by the bp. of Rome's adherents, without the Emperor's consent). Wyatt shall shew the Emperor that he ought not to marvel at the arrest of his ships, but consider how much more he would have done in like case. Does not write the rumors and dealings half so bad as they are; it is a strange banquet after a treaty of marriage.
Has perused the answer made to Wyatt in writing concerning the stricter amity and the alliance with the duchess of Milan, that they will not proceed without the bp. of Rome's dispensation, &c. Wyatt shall tell the Emperor that the King and the bishop of Rome are on such terms, that, in that case, there can be no further treaty. Cannot delay his marriage as age comes on apace upon him. Would have been glad to increase his amity with the Emperor but, as it is, will for his part observe that amity and alliance which existing treaties import. Intends shortly to send thither Richard Tate and to give Wyatt leave to return. Westm., 10 March 30 Hen. VIII. Signed at the head.
Pp. 5. Add. Endd.: "By Nicholas, the courier, to Toledo."
10 March.
Harl. MS.
282, f. 187.
B. M.
Nott's
Wyatt, 347.
488. CROMWELL to WYATT.
Has received his letters by Nicholas, the courier, and by his servant Rudston, and all other contained in the catalogue at the end of those by Nicholas the courier. The King's letters now sent will show how well his diligence is accepted, and also the suspicions aroused by the sending of those ships from Flanders into Spain and the arrest of ships in Flanders, albeit Mr. Wriothesley has since sent word that on Wednesday last the Queen Regent and Council sent him four warrants for the delivery of the ships; but as yet they be not arrived. The unkindness shown to Mr. Wriothesley since Lent is unaccountable. He had good cheer until two couriers arrived from Spain, so it is like that the Emperor ordered it. Wyatt is therefore to seek to know their intentions and what intelligence they have with the French and the bp. of Rome, and send word with his answer to the King's letters. Will despatch Mr. Tate thither as soon as possible. London, 10 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.: by Nicholas the courier to Toledo, 10 March.
[10 March.]
Harl MS.
296, f. 163.
B. M.
489. [HENRY VIII. to CARNE, WOTTON, AND BIRDE.]
* * * and conditions of the said Duchess, and the knowing her to be such as is not to be misliked, ye shall require access unto the said Duke," (fn. 18) and deliver our letters of credence, &c., and say we perceive the evimind of the Emperor towards him and all the princes of the Evangelic sort, at the instigation of the bp. of Rome, and his intention to employ force shortly for the obtaining of Gelders, etc. "We therefore have sent you now to him, not only to advise him friendly on our part to weigh and consider his state," so as to prevent danger, and tell him that if he be well inclined the King would be willing for the old friendship between them to join in a straiter league, offering him (if he be free from any promise) any marriage meet for him in England; or else, the King being free of any promise, if there be in his dominions a marriage meet for him, will be content to confer upon the same if he make overture of the same, and send ambassadors for the purpose with a picture of the lady. You are to note his answer, and, if he seem well inclined, desire to have a sight of his eldest sister, not doubting that if he will fall to reasonable conditions and the King like her, Henry "will be glad to honour his house and family with matrimony with her, and to depart as liberally with her and with so convenient conditions as he shall have cause to be contented." If assured "of some reasonable reciproke" the King will not stick to make a defensive and offensive league with him.
Further, in case they shall [make] any word or motion of the marriage of the lady Mary the King's daughter, or appear to wish for it, in which case only you are to speak of it, you shall say that you have no charge to conclude it, but you are assured if the Duke will send an ambassador fully instructed to conclude those alliances or either of them, "ye shall in such sort accept and embrace the same upon reasonable conditions as the said Duke shall have good cause to be satisfied." If you see occasion you may say in reference to "those rumors and slanders bruited in Flanders and in the Emperor's countries there," although it is not likely that he should undertake so dangerous and costly an enterprise "at the only motion of the bishop of Rome," that the King is reasonably provided as well for a sudden invasion as for a long war. Nevertheless he would be grateful if for the more surety the Duke would send hither to be embarked at some of his ports 100 expert cannoneers for reasonable wages and at the King's cost coming and returning. He can easily spare them "for all the pretence any man doth in his dukedom of Gueldres." You must remember "earnestly to feel always the bottom of his stomach concerning his disposition towards the Gospel or the bishop of Rome, and towards the league of the Princes Evangelic or the Emperor," and to inform the King of everything.
Modern copy, pp. 2. Headed: "Instructions given to the ambassador of H. 8 sent to the duke of Gueldres. Unperfecte in the begininge."
10 March.
Vit. B. XXI.
133.
B. M.
490. CROMWELL to CHRISTOPHER MONT and THOMAS PAYNELL.
"By [the continue of your letters of] the xviij. and xix. of February, addressed uut[o me, I perceive that] as yet ye have no answer to the principa[l points touching] the charge and commission given unto you at [your departure,] saving in one point opened on my behalf unto B[urgartus], vice-chancellor and late orator here for the duke of S[axony], touching certain affinities that the said Duke by the r[eport] of the said Burgartus wolbe glad thereof, and employ [him]self to the uttermost to bring them to good effect." All this I told the King, who accepts your diligence thankfully. We knew what you wrote about the common rumours of war, and are provided here. In Flanders, after long protracting matters, they grow colder every day, and though they make no plain refusal, they make such answers as imply impossibility as the world is, or infinite delays, viz., that for the Duchess' part the matter cannot be concluded without the bp. of Rome's dispensation for nearness of blood, and that a dispensation obtained in this realm would not be sufficient. This is practically a refusal, and as the King is thus free to provide elsewhere, he has appointed Edw. Kerne, Nich. Owton, doctor of law, and Rie. Byrd, ... of his chamber, as his orators to the duke of Clerkes, "for the causes I did [gi]ve you instruction of at your departure," especially concerning the marriage of his Highness, "leaving the other to be conferred of and upon overture or requisition to be made on their behalf."
You shall therefore on the receipt hereof, whether you have any answer of the said Duke thereupon or no, endeavour through Burgartus to have assurance from the Duke's own mouth of his good disposition thereto, and not only show him how the King has sent his said orator to the duke of Cleves, but desire him to use exhortations to the said Duke, as the matter concerns the King's own person. You are also to write to the ambassadors from time to time and take counsel with them. You must see that your letters are committed to sure messengers, and those to the King, if they cannot be safely conveyed otherwise, you shall send to Hamburgh to go by sea, as arrangements have been made for the purpose with some of the Hamburghers, of which you shall be shortly informed by Mr. Barnes, sent into those countries.
You shall further tell the Duke that the King is very anxious to know the effect of the answer of your instructions "forsomuch as of late upon the arrival of that re[bel calling himself] Cardinal Pole into Spain, the Emper[or showed him]self offended, and of no good affection [towards his] Majesty for their sakes, as by the sequel you ... may both conjecte"; for whereas Mr. Wyat, the King's ambassador there, on hearing of the said Pole's coming to the Emperor, requested that he would not admit him into his dominions, his answer was that he being [sent] to him by the bishop of Rome, although he should be his own traitor, yet he could not refuse him an audience, and when Wyat further pressed him, notwithstanding this, to do according to the treaties, he answered with appearance of great anger, that as Henry had given audience to sundry orators sent him by the said Duke and Landgrave, "his rebels, vassals, and enemies of the Catholic Church of Christendom, and also received letters and orators from the duke of Holtz, usurpator of the kingdom of Denmark, by whose means his brother-in-law king Christierne is kept tyrannically in prison," he was equally free to give audience to the said rebel. Which words, though the ambassador made a very just and discreet answer, show clearly the deep hatred he inwardly bears to them and the King and others that profess the Gospel. They must therefore be on their guard for their own defence in case he enterprise anything against England; "praying them to advertise his Majesty with diligence what they will do for his Grace in case he be invaded for the cause of the Faith, or withdrawing from the bishop of Rome, and what contribution and aid they would for a reciproque ask;" and if they will send ambassadors hither to treat they may be assured his Highness will give them an answer well weighed for the common good. If they send ambassadors you are to return with them; otherwise you shall return as soon as they have despatched their business.
Further, to be ready for all chances, you shall deliver my letter to the King's trusty friend Sir Bernard de Mella to provide for the King "200 bumbards for great guns and ordnance, expert in the same, to be sent hither forthwith," and 1,000 or 1,500 experienced hackbushes to be sent afterwards, "as between this and the receipt of your letters it shall be appointed, at the King's cost ... reasonable sold and wages to be sent ... hither, and afterwards returned into those [parts]"; whom we shall cause to be entertained for his sake, so that they shall be glad to serve us. The King has written to the city of Lubeck to advance money for their conveyance and transport, which will be deducted from the 5,000 marks they owe him; but if they delay other provision shall be made for them at Hamburg or elsewhere.
Above all things, you must "inculcate and persuade unto the said Duke" the importance of that grudge which the Emperor bears for the bp. of Rome's sake "against them and other of the Evangelic sort, which they may now easily perceive by that he worketh and goeth about;" and warn them at this diet not to be blinded by fair words and subtle promises.
Since the above was written, it has been thought, "notwithstanding anything written here before, [moti]on shall be made unto the said Barnard de Mella to know [wheth]er he could with a short warning furnish to the King's [Hi]ghness 200 gunners or cannonyers shooters of great pieces and 1,000 or 1,500 hakebushes, if need should require that the King's Highness should occupy them; and, upon warning by his Grace to him given, how soon he shall think he might provide them; and if he cannot furnish the whole, how many he thinketh he may provide; after advertisement whereof, then if it shall be so thought convenient to the King's Majesty, there shall be made provision and order taken at Hamburgh or elsewhere for their sold and wages," with payment for their conveyance hither if need shall require. London, 10 March. Signed.
In Derby's hand, pp. 6. Add. in modern hand on last page: To my loving friend Cristofer Mont and Thomas Paynell.
10 March.
R. O.
491. SIR HUGH POLLARD and WM. PETRE to CROMWELL.
Having taken the surrender of Ford Abbey, went to Montigue priory and found the prior as obstinate as the abbot of Bruton had been. To judge by his answers there had been some privy conference between them. Before their coming he had leased almost all his demesnes to divers persons. Montigue, 10 March. Signed.
In Petre's hand, p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Mr. Doctor Peter.
10 March.
R. O.
492. BISHOP ROLAND LEE and SIR W. SULYARD to CROMWELL.
The time for the King's pleasure to be known for the shire grounds of Wales approaches. (fn. 19) The inhabitants of the same countries (for that the statute thereupon is not thought beneficial to them) have presented certain requests to this Council. Those of Montgomeryshire have sent the bearer, an honest gentleman, Humphrey Lloyde, to petition the King for them. They offer as much money as they can bear and, for your help therein, to you a "loving and thankful pleasure." We beg you to give them audience. Ludlow, 10 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal. Endd.: The bishop of Chester.
10 March.
R. O.
493. BLACK FRIARS, Scarborough.
The survey and rental of the Friars Preachers at Scarborough, 10 March 30 Hen. VIII. Annual value, 15s. 4d. Signed: Per me, Hugonem Fuller, aud.
Lat., pp. 2. Endd.
10 March.
R. O.
Ellis, 3 Ser. iii.
186.
494. RIC. BP. OF DOVER to CROMWELL.
Since leaving Cromwell has received 16 convents of friars into his hands to the King's use. There are still standing about 10 houses in these parts, besides three or four in or near Barwyke. Does not know whether Mr. Lawson has received them or not. Does not wish to go himself, as it is 100 miles out of his way and he would not be home before Easter. If they still stand, asks Cromwell to write to Lawson to receive them, as he has done others. In the diocese of York, the poor men who surrender their houses are hardly ordered by the Bp.'s officers by the Bp.'s orders, and not suffered to sing nor say in any parish church without showing their letters of orders, notwithstanding the bp. of Dover's letters or their capacities. The expense of these letters of orders is more than they can bear. Some must go 100 miles to seek them and then cannot pay for searching the register, and so they come home confounded. Has shown the archbp. of York Cromwell's letter, desiring that those who surrendered their houses should be suffered to sing or say in any church. He made many objections, and said it must be known whether they were priests or no. Told him that those who received the houses made due search who were priests, and made certificate to Cromwell, and he to the King, and by that means their capacities were granted. Desired him to accept these capacities from the King with as much favour as the bp. of Rome's, for which search was never made, but they were straight obeyed. At last he granted that as many as showeth the bp. of Dover's hand should be allowed till their capacities came. There are many put out by other commissions who have not his hand. It would be a charitable deed if Cromwell wrote to the Bp. to send through his diocese warning all curates to suffer such poor men to sing in their churches.
Is now at Scarborough where he has received three poor houses of friars, Black, White and Grey, "so poor that they have sold the stall and partclossys in the churche, so that nothing is left but stone and glass, yet there is meetly good lead," about 40 fother. There are also bells and poor chalices. Will ride, as soon as the weather will suffer, to Carlehyll and Lancaster, and other houses, if there are any in the way. Trusts to see Cromwell on Palm Sunday. 10 March. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 March.
Spanish
Calendar, VI.,
i., No. 44.
495. MARY OF HUNGARY to CHAPUYS.
Is astonished at not yet having heard of his departure from England in pursuance of former letters. Orders him to return as soon as possible. Is sending the dean of Cambray, her almoner, to replace him, that good intelligence may not diminish. He will leave in a day or two. Some time ago, laid an embargo on ships leaving these ports till sailors had been obtained for the fleet, but ordered it to be raised as regards the English at Wriothesley's request. It has now been raised generally, the number of sailors having been made up. Wriothesley desired, some days ago, leave to return to England in obedience to his master's orders; but to prevent misconstruction, especially as his colleagues had gone to Gueldres, urged him to remain till Chapuys' arrival, which, with reluctance, he agreed to do. Has written to the King on the subject. Brussels, 10 March 1539.
French.
10 March.
Cleop. E. v.
230.
B. M.
Strype, Keel.
Mem. I. ii.
No. 105.
496. ERASMUS SARCERIUS to HENRY VIII.
By order of his prince, Will. of Nassau, Sarcerius came to Frankfort a few days ago, and found there, with Philip Melancthon, the King's ambassadors, who on hearing his name asked if he was the Erasmus Sarcerius who published the Methodus. Said he was, and they told him it had been translated into English by the King's command, and said if he wished to write to Henry they would have his letters conveyed. Was unwilling at first to expose to such a Prince his weak erudition, but cannot refrain from expressing his sense of Henry's kindness to scholars. Frankfort, 10 March 1539.
Hol. Lat., pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 Of Arschot.
2 An error for Thursday, 6 March.
3 Husee seems to have been wrong about the title. Sir William Parre, however, was the son of Sir Thomas Parre, whose mother Elizabeth was a co-heir of Henry lord Fitzhugh, and the male line of this Henry lord Fitzhugh had failed after his grandson, George lord Fitzhugh, who was dead in the beginning of the year 1513 (see Vol. I. No. 3819).
4 Robert More. See No. 481.
5 Ruoric O'Spellan. See Vol. XIII. St. II., Nos. 999 and 1164.
6 See Vol. IV. p. 474.
7 Friday was March 7, in 1539.
8 Wegener queries whether this should not be read 153x, i.e. 1540.
9 Headed in the Spanish Calendar as a letter "to the High Commander."
10 So in Parker Society's edition, but qu. a misreading? The letter looks as if written from England about the same time as the last.
11 Wyatt.
12 See GRANTS in MARCH, Nos. 18–20.
13 See Note to No. 453.
14 See Note to No. 453.
15 He obtained the abbey of Oseney in commendam, 22 Dec. 1537. This letter is probably of the year 1538, as it appears that William Edwards, prebendary of Hereford, and rector of Bucknell, Oxf., which belonged to Oseney (see Valor Eccl. II. 160) was succeeded in his prebend by Dr. Coren in January 1537 [–8]? See Hardy's Le Neve.
16 Ruoric O'Spellan. See No. 455.
17 See Vol. XIII., Pt. II., Nos. 999, 1164.
18 The duke of Cleves.
19 See Stat., 28 Hen. VIII. c. 3.