Letters and Papers
July 1539, 11-15

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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'Letters and Papers: July 1539, 11-15', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 554-561. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75876 Date accessed: 22 September 2014.


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July 1539

[11 July.]
R. O.
1249. SIR ANT. BROWNE to CROMWELL.
The King has sent your Lordship the books (fn. 1) you spoke to him for and heartily prays you "to se sat fourch with convenyant spyd." Written at Otland, where your lodging is ready, this Friday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
11 July.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
662.
1250. FOSSE PRIORY.
Surrender (by Agnes Marre, prioress, and the convent) of the house and all its possessions in cos. Linc., York, Ntht., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 11 July 1539, 31 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 21.]
Seal multilated.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 2, No. 14] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, clk., King's commissioner.
11 July.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.
667.
1251. HAYNINGS PRIORY.
Surrender (by Joan Samford, prioress, and the convent) of the house and all its possessions in cos. Linc., York, and Ntht., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 11 July 1539, 31 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 22.]
Stained. Seal broken.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 2, No. 21] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, clk., King's commissioner.
12 July.
R. O.
1252. SIR RICHARD GRAYNFELD to LORD LISLE.
Gave lord and lady Lisle's commendations to the King, with my lord Chamberlain's and Sir John Wallop's. The King asked me about Calais, and when I came from thence. I answered that all was meetly well. The King then rode hunting. Shortly after I heard that I had been accused of opposing the King's injunctions. I answered, those that so reported should be found liars; for since my coming to Calais, I had said and done nothing to repent of. Tell my lady that my cousin Anne [Basset] is merry and I was so bold as to bring her to my wife, whose bedfellow she was four or five nights when I was in Court. I visited her in her lodging, with Mrs. Metas, who was very kind to her. The King has allowed me to leave on business and I hope you and the Council will see to my office in my absence. I desire that Pounder, my servant, may have Loveday's place, who, I hear, will not return. Mr. Controller is satisfied with the arrangement. London, 12 July. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: my lord Deputy. Endd.
12 July.
R. O.
1253. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Delivered his letter to my lord Privy Seal, who said it required no hasty answer. I left with him Mr. Long and Mr. Rawlyns by whom I think he will write to you. I have not been able to conclude with Mr. Acton till tonight, and he is riding into Worcestershire tomorrow. Messrs. Harrys, Rolles and Marvyn can tell you what sort of a man he is. "He is finest piece that ever I met withal, yet he is now sure lapped for your annuity." I was obliged to bring a Master of Chancery to his house, for he would not go thither. I think there are few men, if they knew his conditions as well as I, that would gladly meddle with him. Mr. Wryothesley has promised you a nag. Mr. Broke has not yet delivered your gelding. You will herewith receive a book of the statutes, which is one of the first. I have fair words from Mr. Pope, but no money. Mr. Harrys is chosen serjeant-at-law. London, 12 July.
Next week you shall know how Hare and his accomplices speed. Bearer can show what has passed hitherto.
Hol., p. 1. Sealed. Add.
12 July.
R. O.
1254. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I sent your sleeves by Worth. Today I delivered to Vernam your carpet, who says he has found a man who can dress it to your mind. Mr. Harys is chosen a serjeant at the law. He is surely an honest man. I heard today both from Mrs. Katharine and Mr. George, who were merry and in good health. London, 12 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
12 July.
R. O.
1255. PHILIP CALTHORP.
Receipt by Philip Calthrop from John Pepys, of South Creke, Norfolk, merchant, of 5l. 10s. for a year's rent of "my fouldecourscalled the Mersshecours in Burneham Overe." 12 July, 31 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Endd.
12 July.
R. O.
1256. DR. LONDON to the CHANCELLOR OF THE AUGMENTATIONS.
Certifying that he has taken the surrender of the house ensuing and assigned pensions which he begs the Chancellor to ratify. Lincoln, 12 July 31 Hen. VIII.
ii. Pensions assigned to the late religious of the monastery of Fosse, Linc.:—Agues Marr, prioress, 33s. 4d., Alice Curston, Kath. Amyas, Grace Wisse, Agnes Wilkyn, Jane Bilbye, Joan Osgorbye, Cecily Stuarde, 16s. 8d. each. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
12 July.
R. O.
1257. MERIONETHSHIRE.
Grant by Owen ap Jevan ap Owen to John ap Holl Vychan, both freedmen (lib't) of the King, of tenements called Bache y Llymerye and y Plase in yr Heleke and land in Pennaran, commote of Penllene, co. Meryoneth. Pennaran, 12 July, 31 Hen. VIII. Signed: Ex. per me Johem. Pakyngton, justice.
Latin. Endd. as: enrolled at the session of Merionethshire held at Carnarvon on Monday after the feast of the Visitation of St. Mary 31 Hen. VIII.
July.
Longford
Castle
MS.
1258. CROMWELL to LORD HUNGERFORD OF HAYTESBURY.
Has received his letters touching the misdemeanour of Sir Nich. Balam priest, late monk of Henton. Is to commit him to gaol till the coming of the justices of assize into those parts. "I h[ave ca]used your bo[ok of] depositions taken against [Hen]ry Champ[neys to] be delivered to Mr. Chancel[lor] of the Augmentations, because the matter apper[tai]ueth to tha[t Cour]t, to the intent he may proceed t[herein] as the ca[se sh]all require." Has written to Mr. Arundell to see Hungerford recompensed if he has suffered any injury. As to your request for the purchase of the manor of He[nton] and other [part]es of the same I shall be glad to fu[rther?] you therein when the time shall serve. Oteland,.. July. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
13 July.1259. BISHOPRIC OF BANGOR.
See GRANTS in JULY, No. 35.
13 July.
R. O.
Kaulek, 112.
(The text
nearly entire,
commencement in
abstract.)
1260. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
[London], 13 July :— Went to Hampton Court and spoke with the King, confining himself strictly to the instructions in Francis' letters of the 8th, especially as regards the continuance of amity between Francis and the Emperor, which Marillac has always confessed, always adding that Francis intended to treat of nothing against England. Henry showed no great satisfaction at this, believing, as he has found in the past, that his security would be greater if Francis were always in discord with the Emperor than if things succeed as intended ; for then he might have to fear a union of Francis and the Emperor against him, —the thing which had led him to make those preparations for war, from which he has now desisted. As to the news of the Levant, was much questioned by the King, this point being the second maxim which seems the harder for him to digest, because, if things were pacified there no obstacle would remain to Francis and the Emperor executing their designs against him. Marillac replied that there had been no difficulty in proposing a general truce with the Christian powers, but it was not yet accorded by the Turk. Mentioned, en passant, the intention of Francis to visit Picardy to repair places damaged in the late war, but said nothing of the general musters or preparations by sea, feeling assured the news would arouse Henry's suspicions more than ever, when now he thinks himself in surety. It will be time enough to inform him when he hears of it otherwise. The mere mention of Francis' going into Picardy has made him alter his own intention of going north to the frontiers of Scotland, and he will not go more than 30 or 40 miles away from this town, going from place to place for the pleasure of the chase.
This King's replies have been always gracious and amicable, and the writer can trace in him no sign of any design against Francis, by whom he has far more fear of being abandoned than he has any desire to leave him. The best argument that he has now no intention of doing harm is that those who were lately in arms are returned home, the foreign ships in the King's pay delivered and the prohibition of export taken off. Also the lords of the kingdom have returned home from the Parliament, not to collect men as formerly, but to their pleasures and domestic affairs, having left here the King, their master, with scarce 100 horses in his train. Besides it would be impossible for the English, who have now got out of the way of war, to levy men with complete secrecy. Concludes therefore that the assembly of ships at Portsmouth and the fortification of landing places was only for defence. To these considerations might now be added the distrust in which this King is still held by his people on account of religion, in which he makes daily changes. At this last Parliament, to repair past errors and satisfy the people and the Christian powers, who might take occasion to attack him, he has restored all the ancient opinions and constitutions, except obedience to the Pope, and the abbeys and churches, of which he has taken the revenues. Two bishops, principal authors of the new doctrines, for refusing to subscribe to edicts have been deprived of the bishoprics. (fn. 2) They have still time to revoke what they have preached if they wish to save their lives. This shows that the King proposes to provide for the security of his statés rather than make new enemies, much less attack France, the most united, the greatest and the strongest kingdom that ever was; this King being, as all the world knows, far from reckless. Writes thus that Francis may not incur useless expense for distrust of the English.
Modern copy from Colbert MS., pp. 5. French.
13 July.
R. O.
Kaulek, 114,
(The text
nearly entire.)
1261. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
[London], 13 July :—Finding by his last despatch by the bearer, whom he sends back at once, that disquieting information has been received likely to put the King to great expense, has written to the King, as Montmorency will see, that this King has no intention but to preserve the amity, which he is really afraid to lose, knowing it to be more necessary for him than ever. Montmorency will also see the mode he has followed in communicating news from Francis, thinking it undesirable to cause unpleasantness at present, especially as matters are quite otherwise than M. was informed. This King never made any proposition for a war with France on pretext of the pension, unless it was in secret at the Privy Council, and it is unlikely that such a thing could have been resolved in such an assembly without people having some knowledge of it, as they had of everything which was concluded. The chief matter put forward by this King was to complain of the Pope, who tried to recall the Emperor and king of France from his alliance to make war on him, under pretext that the English were all heretics and infidels ; and to prove the contrary he asked that the opinions which one ought to hold in religion should be determined, in order that each should know what to believe, and that the Christian princes might know what the Holy Father put forth against him was not true : nevertheless, to oppose the attempts of His Holiness and his adherents, he demanded money to provide for the safety and liberty of his subjects, and that as an example justice should be done on those who had plotted treason to the Crown. As to religion, they have determined according to old opinions, except as to obedience to the Holy See and restoration of abbeys ; as to aid in money they have passed with great difficulty the article mentioned in his last ; and as to the punishment of rebels and traitors they do as his letter to the King will show. It is true that the common people, seeing this great preparation, and having already arms in their hands, said that if the French did not come to attack them they would cross into, France, and also that they did not pay them their due. Such vain words did not seem worth writing, proceeding as they did from ignorant people who, as hereditary enemies, think when they take up arms it can only be to invade France. Was recently speaking with Cromwell of the amity of the two Kings, when Cromwell said that the Emperor and Pope had indeed tried hard to move this King against Francis under pretext of the pensions, but he would never consent. Observed that the people, however, commonly said their master was going to make war in France on account of the pensions, and that so it had been determined by Parliament. He replied with a great oath that such a proposal had never even been mooted. This has been confirmed by others who have given Marillac minute information of what has passed in Parliament, and he believes those who have reported otherwise either followed the vulgar rumour or did it, "pour faire entrer de bonne heure le Roy (fn. 3) en jeu."
As to the invasion of France by Germans subsidised by this King, the more he examines the matter the less he believes it, seeing the discontent in which the ambassadors left and the manner of the English, who are not to be tapped unless under absolute compulsion (qui ne sont pour foncer silz n'en sont de ce faire entierement contrainctz). Although this King is said to be in parley for a marriage with the duke of Cleves, and other proposals might have been put forward ; still, the writer cannot see that he is about to execute anything against France at present. These preparations were for defence, not attack, for which also it is not the season.
As to the sports and follies against the Pope made on land ; there is not a village feast nor pastime anywhere in which there is not something inserted in derision of the Holy Father ; and it seems, under correction, superfluous to write of them. Of the combat of the galleys, because it was in presence of the King and got up by his Household, Marillac said a passing word.
As Montmorency asks him to report the progress of the fortifications, mentioning the preparations in France for defence and attack, everyone who has seen the ramparts now being made testifies to their rapid progress. Knows that 90 ships of war were assembled at Portsmouth, and 10,000 men to man them, who have since been dismissed, but may be easily reassembled, as it is likely they will be when it is known that Francis does the like on the coast of Normandy. As to Rochepot's affair, after several subterfuges on the part of our adversaries, both parties have put their reasons in writing, and these were presented to the Council the day before yesterday ; so he expects a brief expedition of it ; which being had, Marillac will send back Dampont fully instructed.
French. Modern copy, pp. 6.
13 July.
R. O.
1262. HIERONYMUS ZUCCATUS, the Venetian Secretary, to CROMWELL.
Thanks him for two packets of letters sent on separate occasions. Would not have failed to visit him if there had been occasion. Hears from France that Gritti and Catelmo, ambassadors of the Signory, had arrived at Constantinople and communicated their commission with the ambassador of France, and made report to Venice. After having spoken with the Turk, which would be 3 or 4 days after their arrival, they would send a post in all possible diligence, and they expected matters would take a good turn, although the Turkish fleet, which would be of 300 sails, half of them galleys, should issue through the straits of Constantinople through all the month of May. The report in France of a marriage between the Emperor and Madame Margaret, daughter of Francis, is not true : neither M. Brisach nor any other was to go into Spain on such a mission. London, 13 July, 1539.
Italian, p. 1. Add.
13 July.
R. O.
1263. GEORGE ROLLE to LORD LISLE.
Lord Daubeney has sent him a message that if Lisle will suffer him to sell and fell Warham wood, he will not meddie with Bekynholte wood. Thinks, however, Lisle had better provide for him 40l. or 50l., which Roger Gifford says would satisfy him, letting him have at least 20l.in hand, with a gentle letter. Intends to go into Devon on St. Anne's day. London, 13 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
13 July.
R. O.
C.'s Letters,
390.
1264. CRANMER to LORD LISLE.
I have received your letters of 7 July, and your others dated the _ of _, with which were certain depositions. As to the latter, process shall be made as justice requires. I will do my best to get a discreet parish priest, and also a learned man to be my commissary, though learned men are not willing to live continually beyond sea without great stipend. I will instruct him, according to your request, to suffer none to preach out of his own cure without authority either from the King or me. Those persons who read the Bible during divine service, do much abuse the King's intent in his injunctions, which permit the Bible to be read, not to allure multitudes, but privately for the amendment of the lives both of readers and of hearers who cannot themselves read,—not that any such reading should be used in church as in a common school, expounding the Scriptures, except by such as have authority. Other readers are to read nothing but the plain text, and, if any question arise, to resort to authorised preachers. This I pray you, in the absence of my Commissary, to publish in all the churches there. Croydon, 13 July.
P.S. in his own hand.: Send me any other articles you have made against Rauff Hare or Broke, especially since the King's pardon. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.: My lord of Canterbury's letters, my lord of Chichester's letters, (fn. 4) concerning the curate, (fn. 5) Raff Hare, [and the barber of Marke] (fn. 6) and Broke, and for reading the Scripture.
R. O.2. Modern copy.
Pp. 4.
13 July.1265. SIR THOS. PALMER to CROMWELL.
Harry Palmer has written to Cromwell to complain of Sir Thos. Credence for bearer. Offers him an ambling mule. Calais, 13 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
[This was placed by mistake in Vol. XIII., Pt. I. No. 1,371, as of the year 1538.]
13 July.
R. O.
1266. ANTHOINETTE DE SAVEUSES to LADY LISLE.
I sent you two letters in May, the last informing you that the workwomen, who were to make these coifs are dissatisfied, and write that I sent them 45 sous less than they asked for the 5 dozen bonnets that I last sent you. Nevertheless, I sent (je luy envoiey) all I had from you without keeping back a halfpenny. I knew well that the demand was unreasonable; yet I wrote to her to complete the work as you had ordered me, promising that I would pay for them. But they have sent me word they prefer doing their great work, because they can sell it with less difficulty. I send you your bonnet, which I have received, but I have no other work at present. Dunkirk, 13 July.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
14 July.
R. O.
1267. SIR JOHN DUDLEY to CROMWELL.
I beg you will help me into the commission of the Marches. "I have spent a great deal of my life and my youth in the Court about my master, and is now drawing homewards where I trust to make an end of my life in God's service and his." 14 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal. Endd.
14 July.
R. O.
1268. REGINALD MOHUN.
Release by Reginald Mohun of a bond of Nycolas Nycoll and William Carnsuyowe, which he cannot find to deliver. Trerarecke, 14 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
Signed and sealed.
15 July.
R. O.
1269. JOHN GOSTWYK to CROMWELL.
I have committed Jas. Hill to the custody of Mr. Lieutenant in the Tower, to be treated as your lordship has written. He is grieved that the King and you have him in such displeasure, and says the cause of his absence from Court at this time is that he is assured to Mr. Heron's daughter beside Croydon. He would have ridden to Court this morning but for this commandment against him. Since my last I have received no money of the late bp. of Sarum, but he promises a good sum at the end of the week ; so I remain here awaiting my warrants signed by your lordship. Please write to the said late bp. "somewhat quickly" to make speedy payment ; for I hear he delays upon trust that the King will remit his debts. London, Tuesday, 15 July. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 July.
R. O.
1270. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Received yesternight the gelding promised by Mr. Broke. Gave his man 12d. Buck will bring it to Calais. Encloses letter from Mr. Broke. I have told Blysshe to see the gelding Ravon writes about at Bristol. Edw. Russel says that your pleasure is he shall still enjoy Langspers, but you write to me that Shoryer shall have the same, and he has paid Mr. Bonham 10l. At the King's coming to Guildford I will wait on my lord Admiral touching Porchester and Bere. Mr. Marshal is licensed to ride into the country, which will stop your coming over this summer. In a day or two you shall hear "how our folks shall speed." (fn. 7) London, 15 July.
Cannot speed at the Augmentations.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
15 July.
R. O.
1271. SIR JOHN DUDLEY to CROMWELL.
I am constrained to trouble you for two causes:—first, (fn. 8) that some punishment may be done to a lewd person whom I send up, "with whom and his name I am more cumbered than with all the country besides, for they be the greatest hunters and destroyers of the King's game which I have the rule of." He has been taken twice or thrice before, and I have forgiven him, hoping he would have mended. When let off these men get worse and worse, as they did in the old lord Dudley's days. Nothing will help unless some of them be sharply punished by the Council, for which purpose I have sent up one of the chief evildoers. One of my keepers was sore hurt at his taking. 15 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: my lord Cromwell lord Privy Seal.
15 July.
R. O.
1272. HENRY MALET, Priest, to DR. BELLISES.
I had not read the statutes when I wrote my letters for Redman, the printer. Yesternight I perused the statute of abolishing diversity in opinions of certain articles of religion: which, conferring with certain places of Ridleis book, (fn. 9) retracts much of my consent to the open sale thereof in markets. "I dare not be so bold over such statutes as I can with doctors upon Scripture, for of them Ridley's book hath enow with it." Even now came Mr. Redman to my chamber, with letters from Mr. Turnor, shewing his suit is well forward, so that this my prattlement is unnecessary. I beg you to examine my servant of my business and help me. From my bed with post speed. Commendations from Mr. Panell: yesterday we were together. 15 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.

Footnotes

1 Probably some copies of the Statutes passed in the session just concluded. See No. 1253. The Court was at Oatlands on Friday, 11th July, in 1539.
2 Latimer and Shaxton, respectively bishops of Worcester and Salisbury.
3 Kaulek reads "ce Roy."
4 See No. 1290.
5 Wm. Smith, curate of Our Lady church in Calais.
6 Struck out.
7 The case against the Commissary and the others.
8 No second cause is mentioned in this letter. Possibly he intended to have repeated his request for the commission of the Marches. See No. 1267.
9 A commentary on the Ephesians. By Lancelot Ridley, printed by Rob. Redman cum privilegio 1540.