Letters and Papers
July 1539, 21-25

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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'Letters and Papers: July 1539, 21-25', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 566-574. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75878 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Contents

July 1539

21 July.
R. O.
S. P. 1. 559.
C's Letters.
392.
1293. CRANMER to CROMWELL.
Has overseen the primer (fn. 1) sent by Cromwell and noted faults worthy of correction. Would have amended other things if the book had been committed to him before it was printed; but they are slight and the book itself very good. Croydon, 21 July. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
21 July.
R. O.
Rymer,
XIV. 660.
1294. NEWSTEAD PRIORY.
Surrender of the house and all its possessions in cos. Notts, Linc., and Derb., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 21 July 1539, 31 Hen. VIII. Signed by John Blake, prior, and 11 others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II. 33.]
Seal much broken.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 2, No. 16] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, elk., King's commissioner.
21 July.
R. O.
1295. SIR HENRY SAYVYLLE to CROMWELL.
Sends a prisoner by order of the Lord President and other of the Council. My lord's servant has the declaration of his acts. Pounteffrett Castyll, 21 July. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
21 July.
R. O.
1296. GUISNES.
Articles of complaint presented by the King's subjects and tenants of the county of Guisnes to the Council assembled there on 21 July 31 Hen. VIII., viz. Lord Lisle, Lord Sandes, Sir John Wallop, Sir Thos. Palmer, John Rokwood, and others of the Council.
These articles were presented on 16 July to Thos. Lawrence, constable of the castle of Guisnes, and to Hugh Pole, chief porter, to be presented to Lord Sandes. The fault is in Henry Palmer, vice bailly, because he will give no redress. For lack of justice everything is out of course and good order.
1. Murder of John Machon, an Englishman born, by Bawdewyn _ (blank), a Picard, who met him in a beerhouse at Bucholt in Picardy on 6 May last. Details given. Henry Palmer, at the suit of Mons. Darbretayn, released the murderer.
2. List of strangers, murderers and thieves, in Campe parish, Balingham, Anderne, Guisnes, St. Blasis, Pyttam, Bonynges, Harnelingham, Scalys, Sentarcas, Froyton, and Calkewell, who are permitted to dwell there by Palmer. They are accused of stealing the tenants' crops, and the King's firewood, intermarrying with English subjects, &c. Sir John Butler, the commissary, keeps a concubine at Pyttam and has stored and threshed his grain in the church. The names of jurates of each place are appended.
3. List of owners and numbers of sheep, 3,400 in all, going upon the King's "drysis" for which Palmer will have 1d. each; and 105 horned beasts in the forest and "drysis" at Cambe and Guisnes, for each of which he will have 6½d. Account of wood delivered out of the King's forests by Adryan Fokery, by Palmer's command.
ii. Examination of Nicholas Pikering before Lord Sandes, Sir Thos. Palmer, John Sandes, deputy of Guisnes Castle, Thos. Lawrence, constable, and Guisnes pursuivant, on Saturday 19 July 31 Hen. VIII.:—Is a native of Guisnes, but went five years ago to live in Picardy. Wished to return but licence was refused by Hugh Pole. Served the French king in his wars, and when the war was over was allowed by Palmer to return and taken as his servant.
iii. Complaint of the King's subjects and tenants of Guysnes, St. Blasys, Buccarde and Campe, to Lord Sandes and the Council, that Palmer has taken away their commons and "drysis," which have been theirs since Guysnes was English without payment for herbage till lord Vauxe was captain, and charged a farthing a sheep, which was remitted in the Lord Admiral's time. Lord Sandys took it the first year, but the tenants remonstrated. Palmer now says he has taken the commons and "drysys" from the King's surveyor for 15s. gr. a year and demands 1d. for sheep and a groat for other beasts, "poll over hede." They have lately been commanded not to sell their cattle, but they have no pasture but these "drises" which are now taken away.
iv. Complaint of John France, of Andern, English born, that Guishert Loyes, stranger born and tenant to Hen. Palmer, keeps from him seven acres of land in Campe.
v. Complaint of the widow of John Cooke, of Campe, being dispossessed of land by Palmer.
vi. Statement by Lisle, Sandes, Wallop, Sir Thos. Palmer, Rokwood, and others of the Council, that they examined the tenants concerning these complaints and find them to be true. Signed by Lisle, Sandys, Wallop, Robert Fowler, Palmer, Rokewood, and Wm. Simpson.
Pp. 27.
R. O.2. Copy of the above.
Pp. 28.
23 July.
R. O.
1297. JOHN [HILSEY], BP. OF ROCHESTER, to CROMWELL.
Reminds him of the order to be taken for sermons at the Cross; for, since Parliament, he could get none to preach a sermon there but himself or one of his chaplains, except one day only that Dr. Byrde preached. Sends a book for the sermons, for him to sign and send to the bp. of London who can make provision for preachers better than any else. Many refrain to preach there, because he has not the order thereof. When Hilsey or any of his preach there, they are so untruly reported that they dare not preach any more there. A chaplain of his who preached there last Sunday is cited to appear before the bp. of London on Friday next. Trusts he has not preached against God's laws and the King's. On Sunday next, for lack of another, must preach there himself, with more fear than ever he did in his life. Lambhethe Marshe, 23 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 July.
R. O.
1298. CROMWELL to LORD LISLE.
Has examined the depositions made by Wallop and others, of the variance between Mr. Porter and Mr. Palmer, of which the importance was not so great as was represented. Warns Lisle against being too credulous. Cannot "allow Palmer's fashion," if he said Mr. Porter was not so diligent to serve the King as he was to find fault; yet, as Palmer was light in utterance, so Mr. Porter, being one of the King's council there, should have suffered the punishment to be done by the Council, and not have proceeded in his fume to revenge himself and give him a blow. He knows what danger may occur in a frontier town by such behaviour. But as the dispute occurred in hot blood, hopes it may pass over. Sends Palmer back, and desires Lisle and others of the Council to reconcile them, that all strife may be put an end to between them, as both are good servants to the King. If on impartial consideration Lisle thinks that Palmer should be punished, remits the same to him, if it be not with too much rigor. Lisle and the Council are appointed there to promote union. What will he think if he is troubled with such trifles? In matters of such small importance they must use their own discretion for maintaining due order. Union in such a town is the strongest fortress. Guildford, 23 July 31 Hen. VIII. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add. Endd.
R. O.1299. [LORD LISLE to CROMWELL.]
I have received your Lordship's letter of 23 July, showing the continuance of your goodness, by advising that I and others of the Council here should endeavour to make friendship between Mr. Porter and Harry Palmer, and if we find Palmer punishable, you remit it to our discretion, without using extremity. You write that the King keeps us here, for men of activity and discretion, to continue and augment concord in this his town and marches, and to redress such light matters without troubling him and the Council, and that we should consult together on all matters of small importance, and charitably proceed to heal diseased members rather than cut them away without necessity. I and all the Council here are glad you have taken note of the depositions made by Wallop and others here, concerning the variance between the forementioned Mr. Porter and Harry Palmer, whose doings, according to your Lordship's judgment, we allow neither party, and shall use our best efforts to reconcile them with charity. We send, for our discharge, a book put up to us by the inhabitants of the county of Guisnes against Harry Palmer, referring the further ordering to your Lordship. We beg you will give commandment to the said Harry to reform himself hereafter and "not to take upon him as he hath done in your Lordship's name, and presuming so highly upon your good favour." I thank you heartily for your good counsel, which I will follow to the best of my power.
Draft, pp. 3. In the hand of lord Sandes' clerk. Endd.: A copy of my lord Privy Seal's letter. On the back are also the following memoranda: Spears:—Geffre Lovedaye, John Brown. Vynteners:—Wm. Stevyns, John Sheperd, Wm. Merche, John Gavell, Hugh Fyllcokes. Constables:—Richard Ussher, Benett Pellham.
23 July.
R. O.
Kaulek,
117.
(The whole
text, with
immaterial
omissions.)
1300. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
Guildford, 23 July:—Being recently arrived here in Guillefol, 25 miles from London, where the King was making some sojourn for the chase, withdrew with him to communicate Francis' good news and learn his, when he entered into terms of such consequence that Marillac will write them exactly as he heard them, and as he was charged to communicate them.
This is the substance. An overture had been made to him elsewhere of such importance that he was in great perplexity whether to keep it to himself or reveal it to Francis. He had to consider on the one hand that while purposing to do the office of a brother and friend, Francis might think his intention was to put him at discord with the Emperor, or to prevent the treaties of amity taking effect, and might take his advice otherwise than was intended. On the other hand, although these seemed sufficient reasons for silence, yet, not to fail in his duty of amity, he would like to find means to satisfy both; that is, to do the office of a friend without fear of being misunderstood. Therefore, if Francis wishes to hear what he has to say, let him write a letter with his own hand, promising not to communicate it elsewhere, and to exact a like promise from any ministers to whom he should communicate it. Under these conditions this King will show him means to recover Milan without any expense. As this would seem a great advantage to Francis, and at all events it can do no harm to know the answer, wishes instructions how to proceed. The King reiterated that he desired an early reply, as he is entertaining those who made him the overture as best he can, and to defer long would make them suspicious and entirely break this design.
French. Two modern transcripts, pp. 3 each.
23 July.
R. O.
Kaulek,
118.
(Abstract.)
1301. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
With reference to the substance of his letter to Francis, it would be impossible to show greater signs of being in earnest (parler de plus grande affection) than this King does. If Francis approves of this conception and writes the required letter it should be in general terms, so that it might be seen elsewhere without prejudice to French affairs. Would also have this King deliver in writing what he should declare, which was one of the chief instructions Marillac had on coming hither, in order that he may not deny it afterwards.
Hopes to send D'Ampont back in two or three days at latest. Rochepot's affair being remitted to men of letters, our adversaries, by intelligences and corruption, had done so much that the whole council of London concluded against us. However, the affair having since been debated by the Privy Council, Marillac's reasons have been found so pertinent that most of the principal ministers are for us, and if what they promise is done (and the King has commanded that we should be gratified as much as possible) we may have good hope. These fine doctors have been summoned to answer Marillac's reasons and sustain their own, and to-morrow he expects the affair will terminate to our advantage. Guillefol, 23 July.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 3.
23 July.
R. O.
1302. SIR WM. EURE and SIR JOHN WEDDRYNGTON to CROMWELL.
Upon receipt of the King's letters to them, Sir Cuthbert Ratclif and Robt. Collingwood, they laboured to accomplish the King's commands, and now, by this bearer, have written to the King of their proceedings and sent articles of their opinions "anents the same" (copies enclosed). Wetherinton, 23 July. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Sir John Wetherington for matters of Tyndall.
[23 July.]
R. O.
St. P. V. 132.
1303. [EURE, and Others], to HENRY VIII.
Have received the King's letter dated Oatland, 10 July inst., blaming them for negligence in obeying a former letter from the Council, for redress of the attemptate of Tynedale and the taking of Sir Reynold Carnaby. Never intended that it should be so lightly pardoned as the King supposes. Have taken order to resist the Tyndale men's malice till their return from the Council at York, putting certain gentlemen of the country, the King's pensioners, to excessive charges, which they complain they cannot bear long, and have travailed with the Tyndales for the deliverance of the said Sir Reynold and others taken with him, whom they refuse to give up. The offenders, now increased to 100 men, all take one part, and will not restore them unless they have their pardons, both for those who slew Roger Fenwick and for those who attempted to take Sir Reynold Carnaby, nor will they meet with any man in Northumberland till they see William Carnaby and Lewis Ogle. Besides this, Gerard Charlton, called Topping, presumptuously said he had given an answer at Harbottle which might and should serve us. Have endeavoured to get hold of Sir Reynold by bribery, but to no effect. Have thought it well to article their opinions about these Tyndales, which they enclose, signed with their hands. Will accordingly attend on the lord President at York on the 28th inst.
ii. The articles of the opinions of Sir William Eure, Sir John Woddryngton and Sir Cuthbert Ratclif, knights, and Robert Collyngwod, esquire, for the suppressing of evil demeanour of those of Tyndale. Considering the boldness of the inhabitants of Tyndale in taking their keeper, Sir Reynold Carnaby, and refusing to set him free, think that extreme measures must be taken, as follows:—1. That a proclamation be made before Michaelmas that all the inhabitants of North Tyndale who wish to be reputed loyal shall by a certain day avoid the bounds of the same, man, wife, and child, and all shall have freedom to pass except those guilty of the slaughter of Roger Fenwick or the taking of Sir Reynold Carnaby. 2. That about Michaelmas, when the corns and hay be gotten, the rebels be invaded by the warden of the East Marches on the north side, the warden of the Middle Marches on the south, and the warden of the West Marches on the west; and all the Tyndale folks found, either wife or child, to be taken to gaol at Newcastle, and the men so taken to be executed at once. 3. That the King shall write to the king of Scots to take such order with his wardens and the keeper of Liddersdale that none of the rebels of Tyndale be reset within his realm. 4. That he should order the officers of the Middle Marches, the keeper of Riddesdale, the bailiff of Hexham, and the deputy warden of the West Marches to see that the inhabitants of Tyndale be not relieved at the markets of Hexham, Morpeth, Carlisle, or elsewhere. 5. That the district be garrisoned after the "rode" by sharp men from parts not nigh Tyndale. If the inhabitants be not expelled, rebels will be relieved.
Copies. Add. at head.
23 July.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI., 60.
B. M.
1304. JAMES V. to CHRISTIAN KING OF DENMARK.
Writes in behalf of William Forester and Patrick Gardiner, Scotch merchants, whose ship was taken by Christopher Druntssen, a pirate, in the Voundfurd, and retaken by a ship of Bergen. Requests that it may be restored to them. Edinburgh, 10 kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. Copy.
23 July.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI., 60b.
B. M.
1305. JAMES V. to the MAGISTRATES of BERGEN.
To the same effect. Edinburgh, 10 kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. Copy.
23 July.1306. JAMES V. to the GOVERNOR of the TOWN and CITADEL OF BERGEN.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI., 61:
B. M.
To the same effect. Edinburgh, 10 kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. Copy.
23 July.
R. O.
1307. EDMUND BONER to LORD LISLE.
Although all things that are good and honest ought to be sent to him, having nothing of novelty, sends "this present, which of late was here imprinted." "The anatomy of the man is judged here to be done exquisitely. The anatomy of the woman pleaseth me not so much; how-beit Mr. Bekinsall that is married and hath had but one child, telleth me that that is the figure of women in their travail; to whose judgment, because I am ignorant, I leave the matter, thinking that he took consultation with some midwife touching his sentence." Sends a turquoise for Lady Lisle. The French king is 10 leagues hence, at Bekosew, hunting daily. In 10 days he will go to Chantilly to christen the Constable's son, and after hunting there seven or eight days, he will go to Ville Cotreye, "where he doth build." Some say he will afterwards go to Lafaire and Compiegne. Some think he is going to Heding, but I do not think be will go so far. Paris, 23 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
23 July.
Brady's Episc.
Succ. I. 32.
1308. BISHOPRIC of SALISBURY.
23 July 1539 :— His Holiness gave the administration of the church of Salisbury in England to Gaspar card. Contarini; with retention of everything; rent _ (blank); tax 4,500.
Lat. Printed from a Barberini MS.
23 July.
Vatican MS.
1309. ARCHBISHOP CROMER.
Note that in Consistory 23 July 1539, the Pope suspended George abp. of Armagh, who is publicly defamed of heresy, until he shall clear himself, and meanwhile deputed the administration to Dominus Vuaucop or Vuarcop, (fn. 2) clk., S.T.M., of the diocese of St. Andrews.
Latin, from a modern transcript in R. O.
24 July.
R. O.
1310. CROMWELL to BONNER.
Yesterday a conference was held on Mons. de la Rochepot's matters between the French Ambassador and Mons. de Dampont on the one side, and certain of the Stylyard and their counsel, and with Dr. Layton, Oliver Leight, Hugh Ryvet, and others on the other part; and it appeared that the matter could not be "renvoyed" to be decided in France. The King, not wholly trusting to the report of the ambassador and Dampont, wishes Bonner to declare the matter to the French king, as appears by his Grace's letters (copy herewith). For his instruction, gives an account of the sending of Soulemont to the French ambassadors, and the conference between them and the Stilliard before him on Sunday, 9 July, (fn. 3) and afterwards before the King at Otelands on Friday following [11 July ?],* and the subsequent proceedings. Sends an "abbreviate" of the doctors' refutation of the ambassador's reasons. My lord of Norfolk never [gave] such sentence as is alleged, and Favour and Milketon never brought the Frenchmen to Whitby. The Ambassador's second reason is not sustained by the treaties. Marvels they should demand the "renvoye" of that cause, as though the King, being an emperor in his dominions, should lack jurisdiction.
It is incredible that a Hamburg merchant ship wherein there were but 9 or 10 men should invade two ships and a brigantine of war, in one of which there were 50 men, and the other 80.
In Soulemont's hand: I am sure you will do your best to accomplish the King's pleasure written to you in his letters of this date. Wishes to know his success in this, and in what Cromwell wrote to him about on Monday last. Ferncham, Thursday, St. James' even 24 July.
The King has given Dampont 40l. reward.
Copy, pp. 3. Endd.: Mynute of my L. P. S. letters to my L. Heref., xxiiij July 1539.
24 July.
R. O.
1311. CROMWELL to MONTMORENCY.
Has received his letters about the affair of his brother, Mons. de la Rochepot. Regrets the King has not been able to do what he wishes. Mons. de Hereford, the King's ambassador, will explain. Hopes he will take it in good part. Farneham, 24 July 1539.
Fr., p. 1. Endd.: Mynute of my L. P. S. letters to the Constable of Fraunce.
24 July.
R. O.
1312. KATHERINE BASSET to LADY LISLE.
My lady Rutland is brought to bed of a daughter who is to be called Katharine, after the duchess of Suffolk. I heard from Mr. Hall, who came this way, that you are in good health. I hope my lord and my lady will go to London about. Michaelmas, when I shall hear more of you: Belver castle, 24 July.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
24 July.
R. O.
1313. SURRENDERS of MONASTERIES.
Certificate of Dr. John London to Sir Ric. Riche, that he has taken the surrender of the house and assigned the pensions underwritten; which, he begs, may be ratified. Nottingham, 24 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
Charterhouse of Bew Vale:—Thos. Woodcocke, prior, 26l. 13s. 4d.: John Langford, 6l.; Wm. Velles, Alex. Lowthe, Edm. Garnett, and Robt. Gowton, 5l. 6s. 8d. each; Nich. Dookener, Thos. Lyghton, and Thos. Walisshe, 5l. each. "Converse and aged men" :—Ric. Wakefilde and Ric. Byrde, 40s. each. Signed. Countersigned by Sir Ric. Riche, as to be passed.
P. 1. Add.: Chancellor of Augmentations.
R. O.2. Certificate of Dr. John London to Sir Ric. Riche, that he has taken the surrender of the house hereafter ensuing and assigned pensions, to begin at Michaelmas, which, he begs, may be ratified. Nottingham, 24 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
Priory of Newstede:—John Blake, prior, 26l. 13s. 4d.; Ric. Kechyn, 6l.; Robt. Sisson and John Bredon, 5l. 6s. 8d. each; John Darfilde, Wm. Bathleye, Geoff. Acrite, Chr. Motteram, and Ric. Hardwike, 4l. 13s. 4d. each; Wm. Dutton, 5l.; Harry Tynker and Leonard Alenson, 3l. 6s. 8d. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Chancellor of Augmentations.
R. O.3. Certificate of John London to Sir Ric. Riche that he has taken the surrender and assigned the pensions hereafter ensuing, which, as they must each be at the charge of coming up to London to sue for the assurance thereof, he begs may be granted. Lincoln, 24 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
Nunnery of Irfurthe:—Joan Tompson, prioress, 5l.; Marg. Hattclyffe, 40s.; Joan Dokett, Joan Oldman, Cicely Turner, Alice Chapman, Kath. Morelde, and Ellen Dawber, 26s. 8d. each. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Chancellor of Augmentations.
24 July.
Vesp. F. XIII.
105.
B. M.
1314. P. EARL OF ORMOND AND OSSORY to [CROMWELL].
The late baron of Delvin, besides other faithful and politic service to the King in the last rebellion, found means to have one of his sons made prior of the monastery of Fower, in the frontiers of two Irish countries. Writes in the said prior's behalf, who now repairs to Cromwell, that his house may be saved from the suppression, or at least that he may have an honest man's living. St. James' Even. Signed.
P. 1. Original address copied in modern hand:—To my lord Privy Seal.
25 July.
R.O.
Kaulek, 119.
(Abstract.)
1315. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
Sends back D'Ampont with credence on Rochepot's affair and the good sentiments of this King. Guillefol, 25 July.
French. Modern transcript, p. 1.
25 July.
R. O.
Kaulek, 119.
(Abstract.)
1316. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
Has charged D'Ampont, the bearer, to repeat to Montmorency what this King has said; to be afterwards told to Francis if Montmorency thinks fit. Upon Rochepot's affair, as this King's letters are merely credence for what Marillac shall write, and as the English will write to their ambassador, relates briefly the "party de justice" which they have offered, that it may be seen whether their instructions to their ambassador are to the same effect. The Privy Council having seen the resolution which the "gens de lettres," of London made, to retain the cognisance of the cause here, and on the other hand Marillac's reasoning, offer an expedient to guard against the prejudice to this King's jurisdiction (especially considering the privileges of the Easterlings, who ought to be treated as his own subjects) which would be occasioned if this cause were entirely removed. It is, that they will depute a judge to come to Calais if Francis will depute one to come to Boulogne, to meet in some neutral place on the frontiers and summarily decide the principal affair, which could be finished in less than eight hours with the charters and papers of the ship in question. If it appears that the merchandise belongs to Flemings, as Montmorency's said brother (Rochepot) affirms he can show from the originals, they affirm that this single point wins the cause. If the judges cannot agree, then Montmorency and the duke of Norfolk should add a third person at their pleasure: and the Duke assures Marillac that Montmorency could not name a judge whom he would not accept, for his desire to see the affair settled as Montmorency desires. Thinks, as the affair has been so badly conducted at the beginning, that this should be accepted. Will not repeat the excuses of the Admiral on this affair, saying he never heard of it until now, and the affection he and others displayed; as the bearer who, was present, can tell it.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 3, dated at the head: 25 July. (fn. 4)
25 July.
R.O.
1317. WM. LORD SANDYS and SIR THOS. PALMER to LORD LISLE
I thank you and my lady for the pains you took in reposing with me here at Guisnes, and also for your present of red flesh on Wednesday, and the very fat fallow flesh you have sent to-day. Some had made request to Mr. Porter and me to sell again some grain they have bought out of the Pale, otherwise they will have no small loss. I think regard should be had first to the town and marches, as my lord of Hertford provided, that we be not destitute of provisions, as it will be near the end of October before we get new supplies of grain. We require therefore provision for three months. Your lordship might command a view to be taken of the grain now in the town, and if there be found sufficient, the licence to sell might be conceded. To-morrow night Mr. Porter and I will see you at supper. Guisnes, St. James's day. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Deputy of Calais.

Footnotes

1 As to the primer and the date of the letter itself, see footnote in Cranmer's letters.
2 Robert Wauchope.
3 The dates "Sunday, 9 July," and "Sunday, 15 July" are mentioned in these proceedings; both of which are inaccurate, as the 9th was a Wednesday and the 15th a Tuesday in 1539.
4 Dated by Kaulek 26 July.