Broxtow Hundred

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

John Throsby

Year published

1790

Page

177

Citation Show another format:

'Broxtow Hundred', Thoroton's History of Nottinghamshire: volume 2: Republished with large additions by John Throsby (1790), pp. 177. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=76818 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Broxtow Hundred.

Broxton. Doomsd. Broculstou wapentac.

There was in the time of King Edward the first, great complaining concerning the farms of Hundreds, so that juries returned their verdicts, which were of ancient farm, and which not, and how much every farmer gave for his bayliwike: at which time the jury found and said, that in the time of Phillip Mark; and Eustace de Loudham, Sheriffs of Nott, and of other Sheriffs in ancient time (viz. King John) the Bayliffs of Brokelstowe gave for having the Bayliwike half a Mark, viz. Morris de Notehall, and other Bayliffs of that time; (fn. 1) and in the time of Sir Robert le Vavasour (which was 20, or 30 H. 3.) the Bayliffs, viz. John Warlett, and other Bayliffs of that time, gave xxs. And afterwards, in the time of Simon de Hedon, Sheriff, the Bayliffs gave for having the Bayliwike four Marks (viz. 43 H. 3.) and in the time of Hugh Babyngton, and Walter de Stirchely viz. 4, vel 5 E. 1.) being Sheriffs, the Bayliffs, viz. Stephen de Darleton, and Tho. de Lee, and Galsr. de Herdeby, for having their Baliwicks gave six Marks, to the great damage of the Country, and yet lost much. And in the time of Gervas de Clifton, then the Sheriff, (viz. betweeen 7 and 18 E. 1.) Aunsell de Gameleston, and William de Tytheby gave, for having the said Bayliwick, nine Marks, with Courtesies, to the great damage of the Country: and this they did to get a living, and only to make the bargain, sold their lands The Jury likewise said that Brokelstowe was an entire Wapentac, yet the greatest part was of the honour of Peverell, and Hugh de Stapleford held that honour of Peverell, by the Charter of King Henry, son of King John, for term of his life, and the Farm of the honour of Peverell was raised in the same manner, as the Farm of the Wapentac to the great damage of the Country.

Footnotes

1 Test. de. Nev. de Firmis Hundr. &c.