Launditch Hundred
Longham

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Francis Blomefield

Year published

1809

Pages

14-15

Citation Show another format:

'Launditch Hundred: Longham', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 10 (1809), pp. 14-15. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78616 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Contents

LONGHAM

Is not mentioned in Domesday Book, being part of the great manor of Mileham, and there accounted for.

About the end of Henry the Third's reign, Isabel L'Estrange, Richard le Denys, and Nicholas de Skerning, held lands here of the fee of the lord of Mileham.

In the 15th of Edward I. John L'Estrange had the assise, weyf, &c. of his tenants, and Isabel L'Estrange, widow, in the 34th of that King, conveyed it to Ralph de Bagthorp, and Isabel his wife. Ralph was lord in the 9th of Edward II.

Thomas Gunton, who gave name to this lordship, was found to possess it in the 20th of Edward III. and in the 17th of Edward IV. John de Bokking, who married Cecilia, daughter and heir of William de Narburgh, died seized of it in her right, Richard Bokking, Esq. his son, held it of the honour of Mileham: his will is dated May 24, 1505, and proved November 17, following, appoints Margaret his wife, executrix. (fn. 1)

Catherine, a daughter and heir of Richard, was the wife of John Heydon in the 35th of Henry VIII.

In the 25th of Elizabeth, Edward Leverok, Gent. and Oliver Buckenham, had a prœcipe to deliver to Thomas Overend, and Richard Atkins, Langham Hall, Gunton's, and Newhall, in Longham.

Soon after this it came to Sir Edward Coke, lord chief justice, and the Right Honourable the late Earl of Leicester, his descendant, died lord in 1759.

Richard le Denys (and Sibilla his wife) had an interest in this village in Henry the Third's reign.

Thomas Pottere granted by fine to Robert Pottere, and Claricia his wife, in the 29th of Edward III. the fourth part of a fee, late Deneys, and soon after the said Robert, it was held by James Brice of Thrandeston and Isabel his wife, and of Edward le Blound and Elizabeth his wife, who were coheirs.

Hermerus de Ferrarijs had seized on the lands of a freeman, consisting of half a carucate of land, with one villain and a borderer, half a carucate, and 2 acres of meadow, &c. valued at 5s. per ann. but the soc was in the lord of Mileham, in the King. (fn. 2)

Hermerus was ancestor of the Lords Bardolf.

Robert de Watlington, who gave name to this, was found to hold it in the reign of Henry III. by the 4th part of a fee of the Lord Bardolf.

Jeffrey Brussyard died possessed of it about the 3d of Edward III. and one of the same name was lord in the 3d of Henry IV.

John Fuller had a præcipe to render it to Arthur Scarlet, with a sheep-fold called Prior's in this town.

Soon after this the whole interest came to Sir Edward Coke, and the Earl of Leicester died lord of the whole town in 1759.

The tenths were 2l. 15s.;—Deducted 7s.; Wendling abbey temporalities 9s. 6d.; Walsingham's 1l. 10s.

The church was a rectory valued at 13 marks,

Robert de Kaam, and Joan his wife, John de Florence and Sibilla his wife, coheirs, released by fine to William de Wendling one acre of land, with the advowson; the said William gave it to Wendling abbey, to which it was appropriated, the church being dedicated to St. Peter.

In the 4th of Elizabeth, Arthur Fatter had a grant of the appropriated rectory, possessed by William Futter in the 35th of Elizabeth, and came soon after to Sir Edward Coke, and the Earl of Leicester lately died seized of it, and named the curate.

Footnotes

1 Reg. Rix, Norw.
2 Invasio Hermeri de Ferrarijs— In Lawingham i lib. ho. dim. car. tre. sep. i vill. et i bor. et dim. car. ii ac. p'ti. silva x por. val. v sol. et in hoc. n' com'd. soca in Muleham Regis.