Henry VIII
September 1534, 1-5

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1883

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'Henry VIII: September 1534, 1-5', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 7: 1534 (1883), pp. 433-445. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=79335 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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September 1534, 1–5

1 Sept.1123. The Dukes of Lunenburg.
See Grants in September, No. 1.
1 Sept.1124. Visitation of Religious Houses.
See Grants in September, No. 2.
1125. Cromwell's Remembrances.
R. O.Of John Antony for my lord of Canterbury, 300l. Of Sir Thos. Ponynges, 300l. Of my lord of Suffolk, 200l. Of Chr. Jenney, 420l. Of Edw. Shelley, 1,000l. Of the prior of St. Oswald's, 100l. Of the abbot of St. Albans, 100 marks. Of Sir Alex. Ratelyffe, 40 marks. Of Sir Thos. Tempest, 200l. To send to young Trappis for 18l.
In Cromwell's hand, p. l. Endd.: Certayne sommes of money.
1126. [Katharine of Arragon to Cromwell.]
R. O.My good friend (especial amigo), you have laid me under great obligation by the trouble you have taken in speaking to the King my lord about the coming of my daughter to me. I hope God will reward you, as you know it is out of my power to give you anything but my goodwill. As to the answer given you that the King is content to take her to some house near me, provided I do not see her, I beg you will give him my hearty thanks for the good he does to his daughter and mine, and for the peace of mind (descanso) he has given me. You may assure him that if she were but a mile from me I would not see her, because the time does not permit me to go visiting (que yo ande en vistas), and if I wished it I have not the means (por faltarme aparejo para ello). But you may tell his majesty it was my wish that he should send her where I am, as the comfort and cheerfulness she would have with me would be half her cure (seria media salud para ella). I have found this by experience, being ill of the same sickness, and as my request was so reasonable and touched so greatly the honor and conscience of the King, I did not think it would be denied me. Do not forbear, I beseech you, to do what you can that it may be so. I have heard that he had some suspicion of her security,—a thing so unreasonable that I cannot believe it entered into his heart, nor do I think he has so little confidence in me. If such a thing be assumed, I beg you to tell his majesty it is my fixed determination to die in this kingdom; and I offer my person as security that if such a thing be attempted he may do justice upon me as the most traitorous woman that ever was born.
Spanish, p. 1.
Otho, C. x.176.
B.M.
2. English translation of the preceding. Mutilated.
Printed in Hearne's Syllege, at end of T. Livius' Henry V., 107.
1 Sept.1127. The Prior of the Charter House of Henton to Henry VIII.
R. O.I have subscribed and sealed a certain profession, as you commanded, by Mr. Leyton, begging you on my knees to accept it, and I will defend the truth against all that oppose it. Henton, 1 Sept.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
1 Sept.1128. Sir Francis Bryan to Lord Lisle.
R. O.Has received his letters about a dispute between his lordship and young Wetell, who claims the spear's room that John Cheynye had by a bill signed for a spear's room on the next advoidance; whereas Lisle, has given it to one Wenebanke, who has done the King good service. Has examined Wetell's signed bill. It is not for Hyfell's room only, as Lisle supposes. Has spoken to the King about it, who wishes Wenebanke to be allowed to continue till his further pleasure be known. Wetell says Lisle's letters are not true. Advises him to send over an honest man with a bill signed by those who heard what passed between them. Woodstock, 1 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.: The first of September anno 1534.
2 Sept.1129. William Butt to Cromwell.
R. O.According to the King's pleasure, as expressed by your letter, I came to my lady Mary this day at 7 o'clock, whom I find in mean state of health, but at the beginning of her old disease. I have caused her mother's physician to be sent for with the potycarye. The cause of this rumor by the ambassador, as I can learn, comes of two things: that she being diseased in her head and stomach, my lady Shelton sent for Mr. Michael, who gave her pills, after which she was very sick and he so much troubled that he said he would never minister anything to her alone; and thus signified sharply to the ambassador. Another cause was that the ambassador's servant, coming to know how she did, was not suffered by the lady Shelton to see her. Honuesdon, 2 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
1130.— to Dr. Butt.
R. O.Sends him the letters he wrote to Mr. Secretary unsealed, that if the doctor thinks good they may be sealed and delivered, otherwise to break them. Wishes to be shortly advertised of the contents, “for seeing I shall go I would make all things ready, so as no blame be laid in me for my negligence, if I once knew what I should prepare.”
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At the Court.
3 Sept.1131. Christopher Mores to Cromwell.
R. O.I received your letter the 2nd Sept. A gunner of my company has died of the reigning sickness. I recommend John Porter, who has a signed bill for a vacancy, as a fit person to succeed. I had rather have one Englishman, as he is, than five strangers, for gunner's work. London, 3 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
4 Sept.1132. Cromwell to the Mayors, Customers, &c. of Southampton, Portsmouth and Poole.
R. O.Desires them to assist Geo. Whelpeley and John Brawne, who are going into those parts on the King's business. London, 4 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.: My mr. letter for George Whelpley.
[5 Sept.]1133. Richard Abbot of Tynterne to Cromwell.
R. O.I received your letters this Saturday by Rob. Helyatte, servant to John Wynter of Bristowe, in which you desired me to attend you at Court. I will not fail to do so on Friday, begging you to respite me till Monday for the honor of this high feast of our Blessed Lady. (fn. 1) Tyntern, Saturday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.

Footnotes

1 Nativity of B.V.M., 8 Sept. The octave would expire on Monday in 1534.