V. The Achilles
Letters - 1757

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Navy Record Society

Publication

Author

D. Bonner-Smith (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

173-193

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'V. The Achilles: Letters - 1757', The Barrington Papers, volume 1: Publications of the Navy Records Society, vol. 77 (1937), pp. 173-193. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=79641 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Letters - 1757

To the Secretary of the Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1488)

Achilles, at Harwich. 23rd of April, 1757.

Sir,
I arrived here yesterday with the remains of the Norwich's People that were able to come, and which the Tenders could not stow. I was obliged to leave some at the Hospital at Chatham so bad that they were not capable of going with me, but I hope when they recover, their Lordships will be so good as to indulge me with them.

There are two or three of the Achilles's People (that were not able to go with the rest to the Norwich) at the Hospital here. I should therefore be glad to have their Lordships' directions how they are to be disposed of: whether they are to be sent to the Norwich when they recover, or to remain in the Achilles. . . .
I am, &c.,
Saml. Barrington.

To the Secretary of the Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1488)

Achilles at Harwich. 25th of April, 1757.

Sir,
Mr. I'Anson, (fn. 1) second lieutenant of His Majesty's Ship under my command, being ordered to hold a Rendezvous at the Horse and Groom in Lambeth Marsh, and his presence at the Ship being necessary, I beg you will move their Lordships for an Order for breaking it up, and repairing to the Ship.
I am, &c.,
Saml. Barrington.

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

Lord Harry Powlett being directed to send Sixty Land Men from His Majesty's Ship Princess Royal in a Tender to Harwich in order to serve as part of your complement, you are hereby required and directed to receive and enter them accordingly; and then to proceed with the Ship you command forthwith to Plymouth, where you are to receive on board the Vanguard's Men that are ordered to be discharged into the America and bring them to the Downs where you are to remain for further Orders. Given under our hands the 9th of May 1757.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles, Harwich.Wm Rowley. E. Boscawen. Carysfort.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

By Henry Harrison, Esq., RearAdmiral of the Red Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

The Lords of the Admiralty having ordered me to cause the first Ship bound to Spithead to carry thither a Detachment of two Lieutenants and eighty Men which Colonel Durore at Plymouth is directed by the Secretary at War to hold in readiness to embark; You are hereby required and directed to receive them on board His Majesty's Ship under your command accordingly, and carry them to Spithead, when you proceed thither, victualling them at the usual allowance while they continue with you. Dated on board the Duke in Hamoze 23 July 1757.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.H. Harrison.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hullock.

By Thomas Broderick, Esq., Admiral of the White Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty having observed that not only the general purport of their Orders, but frequently particular parts thereof, have been inserted in the News Papers, the preventing of which is of the utmost importance to His Majesty's Service,

You are therefore hereby required and directed, whenever you receive any Orders or Directions either from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty or any other your Commanding Officer, to keep the same as secret as possible, and to make them known to those only who are to execute them; and you are likewise to enjoin any Officer or others to whom you may give any Orders or Directions, that they do not disclose or discover the same on any account, unless the nature of the Service shall require it, and then to do it with proper caution.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Barfleur at Spithead 27 July 1757.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.Thos. Broderick.

By command of the Admiral, Robt Hardy.

By the Hon. Edward Boscawen, Vice-Admiral of the Red Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

You are hereby required and directed immediately to proceed with His Majesty's Ship under your command to Portland Road, and having convoyed from thence to the Needles His Majesty's Ship the Southampton, You are then to cruize between Portland and Beachy Head six days and then return to Spithead.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at Spithead this 27th of July 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Edward Boscawen.

By command of the Admiral, Alexr McPherson.

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Sir Edward Hawke, Admiral of the Blue Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet, and follow his Orders for your further proceedings. Given under our hands the 5th August 1757.

Hon. Capt. Barrington, Achilles.Anson. Geo. Hay. Gilbt Elliot. J. Forbes.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

You are hereby directed and required to demand from the Agent to the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded Seamen at Hazlar one hundred and ten pounds of portable broth, putting it to the charge of the Purser of His Majesty's Ship under your command as a Store, directing him to keep it in a place which the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have ordered to be fitted up in the Bread Room for that purpose, and to issue it to the Sick only, by demands to be made from time to time by the Surgeon, certified by your attestation, and to account to the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded Seamen for the expence thereof, producing such demands from the Surgeon as vouchers for it, and making affidavit that he only issued the Broth in that manner, and the Surgeon likewise making Oath that he never made such demands but for the use of the Sick.

You are likewise to direct the Surgeon to make very nice and particular Observations on the effects of it on the Sick, more especially those aflicted with the Scurvy, and report to them at the end of every cruize their opinion of its efficacy and utility. For which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at Spithead this 12th of August 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Signals
When I would speak with the Captain of any of His Majesty's Ships or Vessels undermentioned, I will put abroad a Pendant as against that Ship or Vessel's name; if for a Lieutenant, the same Signal and a Weft with the Ensign; and for a Boat without an Officer the Weft will be hoisted only half Staff up.

Red.White.Blue.Yellow.Place where.
DublinBurfordAlcideHunter CutterMainTopmast head
BarfleurTorbayNamurHawke SloopFore
Royal GeorgeMagnanimeChesterfieldRussel TransportMizen
MedwayAmericaAchillesJames & HenriettaStarboardTopsail Yard Arm
CoventrySouthamptonDunkirkGood Intent (I)Larboard
Royal WilliamNeptuneRamilliesRoyal UnionStarboardFore Topsail Yard Arm
Princess AmeliaJasonPostilionMaria TheresaLarboard
BeaverPelicanCormorantProvidence IncreaseStarboard Mizen Topsail Yard Arm
Medway BussThetisProserpineCharlesLarboard
InfernalPlutoFiredrakeLarkStarboard Main Yard Arm
Canterbury BussEscortSt. Michael CutterGood Intent (2)Larboard
AlexanderStarboardFore Yard Arm
Larboard

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at Spithead this 7th September 1757.

Honble Captain Barrington, Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Line of Battle
The Magnanime to lead with the Starboard and the America with the Larboard Tacks on board.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.Division.
Firedrake3MagnanimeHon. Capt. Howe70700Charles Knowles, Esq., ViceAdmiral of the Red, &c.
Escort2BarfleurCapt. Graves80700
Hunter Cutter2NeptuneCharles Knowles, Esq.90770
Capt. Galbraith
Infernal3TorbayHon. Capt. Keppel74700
Bomb Tenders2Royal WilliamCapt. Taylor84770
Pluto4AchillesHon. Capt. Barrington60420Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath and Admiral of the Blue, &c.
Beaver2NamurCapt. Denis90750
Chesterfield2RamilliesSir Edward Hawke, Kt.90780
to repeat signalsCapt. Hobbs
Southampton1Royal GeorgeCapt. Buckle100870
Postilion4MedwayCapt. Proby60420
Proserpine3BurfordCapt. Young70520
Canterbury Buss4DunkirkCapt. Digby60420Thomas Broderick, RearAdmiral of the White
Cormorant3DublinCapt. Rodney74600
Coventry3Princess AmeliaThomas Broderick, Esq.80665
Capt. Colby
Pelican3AlcideCapt. Douglas64500
Medway Buss4AmericaHon. Capt. Byron60420

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at Spithead this 7 September 1757.

Honble Capt. Barrington, Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Memorandum.
When the Admiral goes into Port, he will make the Signal for the Ships to spread in a Line of Battle one Ship ahead of another, at a distance of ½ a mile; which distance each ship is to be very careful exactly to observe; and the Frigates at such a distance as to avoid any confusion.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

You are hereby required and directed, as soon as the Land Forces are landed, to use the utmost dispatch in landing the detachments of Soldiers and Marines borne as part of your Ship's Complement or otherwise, with their accoutrements, two days' provisions at whole allowance ready dressed, and four days undressed, directing your Purser to take a proper receipt from the Commanding Officer of each detachment, for the same. For which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 15th September 1757.

To the Honble Capt. Barrington, His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Ramillies, 20 September, 1757.

Memorandum.
The Admiral earnestly recommends it to the Captain of each Ship having Marines or Soldiers on board, to see that their Arms are in very great order and all the Firelocks good.

That each Man have two good Flints, and 36 rounds of Ammunition, except the Grenadiers who are to have a double proportion.

That each Soldier and Marine have but one Shirt, one pair of Stockings, and one pair of Shoes in his Knapsack.

That all Soldiers and Marines unfit for duty be left on board.

To direct the Lieutenants commanding the Boats for the disembarkation to be very careful to range their Boats in Divisions, and in such manner that every Regiment may be all together.

As it is more than probable that the disembarkation will only be opposed by Militia, which may easily be dispersed, it is earnestly recommended to all the Marines and Soldiers when directed to attack, to march up vigorously, preserving their Fire until they come very near, so as to do certain execution, and whenever the General orders, that they run in with their Bayonets.

As soon as the Troops shall be possessed of a Post on shore, and the Chief Engineer marked out an entrenchment to secure the Prisoners, heavy Artillery, Powder, and other necessities for the Army, that then all the Tents, Blankets, Watchcoats, Knapsacks, remainder of the entrenching tools, spare Ammunition, provisions, scaling Ladders and Petards, be immediately brought on shore, also the Fascines and Gabions from the Tyloe Tender.

Six days' allowance of Provisions, consisting only of Bread, Cheese, Beef & Pork, to be sent on shore after the Troops are landed.

And as the duty of this disembarkation will be hard on the Boats' Crews, it is recommended that they be relieved as often as possible.

No Marines to be landed that have been in the French Service.

To the Honble Capt. Barrington, Achilles.Edwd Hawke.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required to put yourself under the command of Vice-Admiral Knowles, and follow his directions for your further proceedings. For which this shall be your Order. (fn. 2) Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 21st September 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.Edwd Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

[Undated]

Bentinck'sRedOne White Moon
King's"2 " Moons
Amherst's"3 " "
Kingsley'sWhite. . . . . . .
Cornwallis's"1 Blue Moon
Holmes's"2 " Moons
Loudon'sBlue. . . . . . .
Hodgson's"1 White Moon
Brudenell's"2 " Moons
Light Horse"3 " " Yellow Moons
Horse Ship"3 " "
BuffsRed. . . . . . .
OrdnanceWhite3 Red Moons

By Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of the Honble Captain Byron of His Majesty's Ship America, and follow his directions for your further proceedings. For which this shall be your Order. Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies in Basque Road this 23rd September 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.Edwd Hawke

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue Squadron, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of the Honble Captain Keppel of His Majesty's Ship Torbay, and follow his Orders for your further proceedings. For which this shall be your Order. Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 1st October 1757.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.Edwd Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Signals
When I would speak with the Captain of any of His Majesty's Ships or Vessels undermentioned, I will put abroad a Pendant as against that Ship or Vessel's Name:

Red.White.Blue.Yellow.Place where.
AmericaAchillesDunkirkMain Top Mast Head
TartarCoventryEscortFore Top Mast Head

If with a Lieutenant the same Signal with a Weft at the Ensign Staff; and for a Boat without an Officer the Weft shall be hoisted half Staff up.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Torbay at sea 1st October 1757.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Achilles.A. Keppel.

Line of Battle
The Tartar will lead with the Starboard and Coventry with the Larboard Tacks on board.

Sloops.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.
6TartarCaptain Lockart26200
4AmericaHon. Capt. Byron60420
Escort3Torbay— Keppel74700
4DunkirkCaptain Digby60420
4AchillesHon. Capt. Barrington60420
6CoventryCaptain Scroop26200

Torbay at sea 2nd October 1757.

Hon. Capt. Barrington, Achilles.A. Keppel.

If I should find it necessary to change the Torbay's Station in the Line of Battle with the Dunkirk, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain and hoist a yellow Flag at the Mizen Topmast Head.
A. K.

By the Hon. Augustus Keppel, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Torbay.

You are hereby required and directed to send a Midshipman and two good Seamen (such as you can trust) on board an English Ship retaken by His Majesty's Ship Lancaster, for which this shall be your Order.

Torbay at sea 26th of October 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Keppel.

Memo
Captain Barrington is desired to give his Midshipman (fn. 3) an order to command the Ship and direct him in case of separation to make the best of his way to Plymouth and deliver her into the hands of Mr Digory Tonkins.

N.B. The Torbay sends a Quarter Master and three Seamen, as several of her Midshipmen are sick.
A. Keppel.

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Captain Cornish of His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle, and follow his Orders for your further proceedings.

Given under our hands this 16th November 1757.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.
Gilb. Elliott.
J. Forbes.
N. Stanley.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

Signals
When I would speak with any of the Captains of His Majesty's Ships undermentioned, I will cause a Pendant to be put abroad as opposite to that Ship's name; if with a Lieutenant, the same Signal and a Weft with the Ensign; if for a Boat without an Officer, the Weft but half Staff up.

Red.White.Blue.Place.
PembrokeAchillesEssexMaintopmast head
UnionDunkirk. . .Foretopmast head

Line of Battle
Pembroke to lead with the Starboard Tacks and the Achilles to lead with the Larboard Tacks.

Rate.Ships' Names.Captains' Names.No. of Guns.No. of Men.
4PembrokeCapt. Simcoe60420
2Union— Everitt90700
3Sterling Castle— Cornish64480
3Essex— Campbell64480
4Dunkirk— Digby60420
4Achilles— Barrington64480
To chace to theNE a St George's Flagin the Mizen Shrouds.
NW a Dutch Ensign
SE a French do
SW a Blue do

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle at Spithead the 25th of November 1757.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Cornish.

Memorandum
A Tender or Cutter is appointed to carry off the fresh Meat for such Ships as shall be at Spithead twice a week, vizt Mondays and Tuesdays, who will hoist a blue Flag at the Maintopmast head, when every Ship is to send her Boat for their respective proportions.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Prince George at Spithead this 28th of November 1757.

To the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

Signals for seeing Strange Ships

NE an English JackMaintopgallant Mast Head.
NW a French do
SE a Dutch do
SW a Dutch do:if ahead of me, Mizentopmast head.
if astern of me, Foretopgallant Mast head.

And hoist your Ensign as many times as the numbers seen.

N.B. If I want the Ships to spread at two miles distance N. and S. I will hoist a St George's Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head, and every Ship is to take care to close up before night.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle at sea the 10th December 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Cornish.

Rendezvous
In case of separation by bad weather or any other unavoidable accident, the place of Rendezvous is eighty leagues North West from Cape Finisterre; and when you are in that Station, you do not see me or Sir Edward Hawke, you are immediately to proceed into the latitude of 40° 30' North one hundred leagues to the westward of Cape Finisterre, where you are to cruise till you join Sir Edward Hawke or myself.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle off Ushant this 10th day of December 1757.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Cornish.

Monsieur De Kersaing sailed from S. Mary for Cape Francois 20 August at the last of which places the Trade was to rendezvous from Martinico and the ports of San Domingo, and to proceed for France about the latter end of October under the following Convoy:

Intrepide (74), Opiniate (64), Greenwich (50), Sceptre (74, but 36 mounted; has on board a great quantity of Indigo &c), flute L'Outarde (24), and two frigates (each 30), and the Achille, Indiaman (of 54).

All the men of war have on board (more or less) Indigo, Coffee & Merchandize.

Private Signals, by Day

In case of meeting, the Ships to windward shall haul up their Foresail, and lower the Foretopsail and clew up the Mizentopsail; the Ships to leeward shall answer, with the lowering the Maintopsail and Mizentopsail. Then the Ship who made the first Signal shall hoist a Blue Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head, and a Union Jack at the Foretopgallant mast head; the other shall answer by hoisting a St George's Ensign at the Foretopgallant mast head and a Union Jack at the Mizentopmast head.

By Night

The Ships to windward shall shew three lights in a triangle [diagram] at the Mizen Peek and two lights of equal height in the Mizen Shrouds. The other shall answer by shewing three lights in the Fore and three in the Mizen Shrouds of equal height. Then the Ship who made the Signal first shall burn three false fires and the other shall answer by burning two. If within hail, he who hails first, shall ask: What ship's that? The other shall answer: God save the King. The other shall reply: Halifax.

Line of Battle
Pembroke to lead with the Starboard Tacks and the Achilles to lead with the Larboard Tacks.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.
4PembrokeCapt. Simcoe60420
Lizard4MedwayProby60420
2UnionEveritt90770
Southampton3Sterling CastleCornish64480
3EssexCampbell64480
4DunkirkColeby60420
Lowestoft4RochesterDuff50350
4AchillesBarrington60420

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle at sea this 18th of December 1757.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Cornish.

Additional Signals
The answer for seeing a sail.
When the Signal is made for discovering strange Ships, I will answer at the Maintopgallant mast head with the same Flag you hoist, that I may not mistake the Quarter of the Compass you see the Sail in. Then you are to haul down yours, and hoist it again for as many Ships as you see.

Ships chacing on a particular quarter of the compass to leave off chace.
When I would have a Ship or Ships chacing to a particular Quarter of the Compass leave off chace, and join the Fleet, I will hoist the chacing Flag of that Quarter at the Foretopgallant mast head.

For all cruizers.

A red Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head.

To chace to windward 3 leagues.
A St George's Ensign in the Mizen Shrouds. If half that distance, a red Pendant at the same time at the Ensign Staff.

To chace to leeward 3 leagues.
A Dutch Flag in the Mizentopmast Shrouds. If half that distance, a red Pendant at the same time at the Ensign Staff.

To go ahead 3 or 4 leagues.

A St George's Flag at the Flag Staff at the Mizentopmast head. If half that distance, a Pendant over the Flag.

To go astern 3 or 4 leagues.
A St George's Flag at the Ensign Staff. If half that distance, a Pendant over the Flag.

For the whole fleet to chace.
The Chacing Flag for the Quarter of the Compass in the Mizen Shrouds and a blue Pendant at the Mizen Peek.

A particular ship to examine a stranger.
The Signal for speaking with the Captains, and a Dutch Jack at the Ensign Staff.

To prevent ships passing under English or neutral colours.
When you do not speak with them you are to make it known to the next Ship by hoisting a blue Ensign at the Mizen Peek; and in case I do not speak with her myself, or make any particular Ship's Signal to examine her, the last Ship she comes to is to do it.

Discovering the chace to be an enemy.
If you discover the Chace to be an Enemy, you are to make it known by hoisting a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Peek and firing two Guns.

Of superior force.
A St George's Ensign at the Main topgallant mast head and two Guns.

If at any time when I make the Signal for Ships to leave off chace, they should find they come up with the Chace, so as to be able to speak with her and not lose company, they are to hoist a red Ensign at the Mizen Peek and fire a Gun. But if I should repeat the Signal, they are to leave off chace.

Coming up with the chace.

For weekly accounts.

A yellow Pendant at the Mizen Peek.

Night Signals
In fair weather I shall make the Signals directed by the General Printed Instructions with Lights only except in the following cases:

Four Lights of equal height in the Fore Shrouds and one Gun: To brace too with the Starboard Tacks.

Four Lights of equal height in the Mizen Shrouds and two Guns: To brace too with the Larboard Tacks.

Two Guns and two False Fires, one false Fire between the two Guns and one after the last Gun: To make sail after lying by.

Nevertheless if by reason of bad weather or on any other account I shall judge it necessary, I will make the Signals as directed by the General Printed Instructions.

Discovering strange ShipsNE . . one Lightone under another at the Mizen Peek
NW . . 2 do.
SE . . 3 do.
SW . . 4 do.

which I will answer by hoisting one Light at the Ensign Staff, when you are to burn as many false Fires as you see strange Ships.

To chace.

If I would have you chace, I will burn two false Fires, and if the next Ship to you or the Stranger discovered, I will burn two false Fires more. If I should discover any Ships and give chace, I will hoist the Signal lights for the Quarter of the Compass and Fire a Gun.

To leave off chace.

Three Guns without alteration of Lights.

When the chace is spoken with.

You will let me know by shewing two Lights at the Maintopmast head and firing one Gun.

To speak with the ships ahead.

Three Lights in a triangle at the Bowsprit End and one Gun.

To speak with the ships astern.

One Light in the Mizen Top, and one Light at each Cross Jack Yard Arm and one Gun.

To speak with me.

A Light on each Foretopsail Yard. Arm and a Gun.

In a Fog
On the starboard tacks.

Fire Musquets and beat Drums.

On the larboard tacks.

Fire Musquets and ring Bells.

Sailing large to alter the course.

To Starboard 3 Guns. To Port 5 Guns. And four minutes after a Gun for each point of the Compass I shall go from the Course steered before.

Sailing upon a wind to pay away large.

Seven Guns. And four minutes after a Gun for each point of the Compass I shall go from the wind.

Additional Fighting Instructions
To engage.

A Union Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head.

To lead more to starboard.

When I would have the Ship leading in the Line ahead, lead more to starboard, I will hoist a white Pendant at the Foretopgallant mast head.

To lead more to port.

If to port, a blue Pendant at the same place with one Gun to every point of the Compass I would have you go from the course before steered.

To pursue the enemy's convoy or running ships.

The Signal for speaking with the Captain I would have perform that service, with a yellow Pendant at the Maintopgallant mast head.

By Night
To know each other coming up with the enemy.

Two Lights of equal height as far distant asunder as the Ports of the Ship are where best seen on the hull of the Ship. I will keep one Light besides at the Bowsprit End.

To draw in a line ahead with the starboard tacks.

Two Lights in the Maintopmast's Shrouds, one above the other, and fire one Gun.

Larboard tacks.

The same Lights as in the above Signal and two Guns, the leading Ship to carry one Light in her Mizentopmast Shrouds, the next to her two, and so on to the Centre; the Ship next astern to me to carry one, the next to her two, and so on to the Rear.

When in a line ahead the headmost ship to tack, and continue leading on the other tack.

I will shew two Lights, one under the other, at the Bowsprit End, besides the usual Signal for tacking, and each Ship ahead of me is to repeat it.

N.B. When the Fleet is spread to look out in case of thick weather, I desire you will close the distance without any particular Signal, to prevent loosing company.

The Ship in chace in the night to keep a Light where best seen, as long as she keeps sight of the Chace.

If I should send two or more Ships to windward or to leeward to look out, when those Ships get the proper distance from me, they are desired to spread a league ahead of each other, the Senior Officer to be the headmost, the others to follow according to seniority.

For all other Signals I refer you to those already given and the General Printed Instructions.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Sterling Castle at sea this 19th December 1757.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Cornish.

Footnotes

1 Henry I'Anson (Lieutenant May 5th, 1755).
2 In Hawke's Line of Battle dated September 7th, the Achilles was placed in the Commander-in-Chief's Division. The log of the Achilles for September 21st states: 'At 8 [a.m.] hoisted the Pendant at the Fore Topmast head and were put into the Vice-Admiral's Division.' At 5 p.m. the same day: 'Shifted our Pendant to the Maintopmast head and we are first in Admiral Hawke's Division again.'
3 Barrington sent Mr Robert Simington, one of his Midshipmen.