V. The Achilles
Letters - 1759

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Navy Record Society

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Author

D. Bonner-Smith (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

235-283

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'V. The Achilles: Letters - 1759', The Barrington Papers, volume 1: Publications of the Navy Records Society, vol. 77 (1937), pp. 235-283. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=79643 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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Letters - 1759

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to proceed with His Majesty's Ship under your command, and the Adventure (whose Captain is directed to follow your Orders), and cruize for six weeks from one hundred and twenty to one hundred and fifty leagues to the westward of Scilly, for the protection of the Trade of His Majesty's Subjects, and the annoyance of the Enemy; at the expiration of which time, you are to return with both Ships to Plymouth and remain there till further Order.

Given under our hands the 9th February 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed Boscawen. Geo. Hay. Gilbt Elliot.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

By Henry Harrison, Esq., ViceAdmiral of the Blue, &c.

Having ordered Captain Hughes of the Tamer and Lieutenant Henshaw in the Anson Cutter to put themselves under your command, you are hereby required and directed to proceed immediately with the Ship you command and the said Frigate and Cutter off Brest, to procure as well as you can the state of the Ships of War in that Port; and if a number of them be observed there, you are to dispatch the Anson Cutter with an account of them hither, or the first port she can make in England, from whence the Lieutenant is to forward it by express to the Secretary of the Admiralty, leaving Captain Hughes in the Tamer to cruize off Brest and observe the Enemy's motions, which you are to direct him to do with his utmost vigilance, and whenever he may discover any alteration in their situation proper for the knowledge of the Lords of the Admiralty, to make the best of his way to the nearest English port, and send their Lordships an account by express, continuing only three weeks at sea, and then return into Plymouth Sound for further Order. But if no Ships should be seen in Brest Water, and you gain no intelligence of any being ready or almost equipped for the sea, in the Harbour or Road, you are to return hither both the Frigate and Cutter immediately.

So soon as you have dispatched to the Lords of the Admiralty the necessary information, you are to make the best of your way with the Ship you command to cruize on the Station prescribed by their Lordships' Order, which you will herewith receive; and in case you should not be able to look into Brest in less than six days after you put to sea, you are at the end of that time also to proceed to your Station, leaving directions as aforesaid with Captain Hughes.

Dated on board the Duke in Hamoze the 13th February 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington (fn. 1) of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.H. Harrison.

By command of the Admiral, John Hullock.

Signals
When I would speak with the Captains of any of His Majesty's Ships or Vessels undermentioned, I will put abroad a Pendant as against that Ship or Vessel's name; If with a Lieutenant, the same Signal and a Weft with the Ensign; And for a Boat without an Officer, the Weft will be hoisted only half Weft [sic] up.

Red.White.Blue.Yellow.Place where.
TamerAnson, CutterMain top mast head

If I would have you chase on any Quarter of the Compass, I will make your Signal and the Signal for seeing a Sail in that Quarter.

When I find a favourable opportunity of looking into Brest and would have you make the best of your way in as close as you can, I will make your Signal and hoist a Dutch Ensign in the Mizen Shrouds.

If I would have you come within hail of me I will hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Ensign Staff and Ship's Signal.

For the Tamer only.

When I think proper to part from you, I will hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Top Gallant Mast head, and fire a gun.

For the Anson only.

When I hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Top Gallant Mast head, you are immediately to put yourself under the command of Captain Hughes of His Majesty's Sloop Tamer, and follow me no longer. For all other Signals I refer you to Lord Anson's Signals. Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles 14th July 1759.

To Captain Hughes of the Tamer.S. B.

Lieutenant Henshaw, Anson Cutter.

By the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

You are hereby required and directed to take upon you the charge and command of the Kingston, a retaken Brigantine by His Majesty's Ship under my command, and forthwith to proceed with her to Plymouth, and deliver her into the care of Mr John Lloyd, Clerk of the Survey there; When he has no further service for you on board, you are to acquaint Admiral Harrison that you have three Men, belonging to the Kingston, which you are to send on board of her, and to desire that he will be so good as to let you remain on board the Duke until my arrival at Plymouth.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at sea this 5th March 1759.

To Mr Leonard Thickpenny, hereby appointed to take charge and command of the retaken Brigantine Kingston.S. B.

By Captain Samuel Faulkner, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Windsor.

Additional Signals
By Day
1st
The Signal to be made for seeing a sail in the

Upon seeing a sail.
which when I answer by hoisting a French Jack at the Ensign Staff, you are to lower as many times as you shall see strange Ships.

NE is a French Jackat the Mizen Peek
NWDutch Jack
SEFrench Jackat the Ensign Staff
SWDutch Jack

2nd

To chace.

To the NE is a red FlagIn the Mizen Shrounds
NW is a Flag half blue, half white
SE is a yellow Flag
SW is a Flag half red, half white

3rd
To chace on any quarter of the compass (though you see nothing.).; Upon discovering strange ships.
When I would (though I see nothing) have you chace on any Quarter of the Compass to look out, I will in addition to the Signal for the chacing on such Quarter, hoist an English Jack in the Mizentopmast Shrouds, then you are to chace as far as Signals may be discovered; and in case you see one or more Ships you are to hoist a Dutch Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head, and point to the Ship or Ships so seen, which I will answer by hoisting and lowering mine as often as you do. Then you are to chace unless I make the Signal for calling of you in.

4th
To go right ahead at such distance as plainly to discover signals.; To keep at the same distance right astern.
When I would have you go right ahead of me and keep at such a distance as plainly to discover Signals, I will hoist a Flag with a blue Field and a red Fly, at the Foretopmast head, and make the Signal for speaking with the Captain; and if to keep the same distance right astern of me, I will hoist a yellow Flag at the Mizentopmast head.

5th
To tack when in chace.
If in chacing upon a wind and I would have you to tack, I will put abroad the Pendant for speaking with you, and hoist a red and white checquered Flag at the Foretopgallant mast head, if you are before the Windsor's beam; and if abaft it, I will hoist the same Signal at the Mizentopmast head; and fire a Gun, if the Signal should not be observed immediately.

6th
To make more sail.
When I would have you make more sail, I will put abroad the Pendant for speaking with the Captain and hoist a blue Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head.

7th
If an enemy of superior force.
If you discover the Chace to be an Enemy, you are to give me notice by hoisting a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Peek and fire two Guns; and if you believe you shall be able to come up with her without losing company, you shall then hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Mizentopmast head and fire two Guns; and in case you should discover your Chace to be of superior force to yourself, or more in number than I am acquainted with, you will then hoist a white Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head and fire Guns, till I answer by firing one Gun.

8th
If in chacing an enemy I should not take notice of your signal.
If at any time in chacing you discover your Chace to be an Enemy and I shall not take notice of your Signal in that case directed, you are to make the Signal for seeing a Fleet, provided the Chace is of superior force to yourself.

9th
If a man of war or privateer.
If your Chace proves to be a Man of War or Privateer, you will let me know by hoisting a blue Ensign at the Foretopgallant mast head.

10th
If a prize.
If at a distance and your Chace proves to be a Prize, you will let me know by hoisting a red Ensign at the Maintopmast head.

11th
To give over chace.
When I would have you give over chace, I will hoist a white Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head; and when I would have the Ship on any Quarter of the Cornpass come to me, I will hoist the Signal Flag for Chacing on such Quarter of the Compass at the same place.

12th
To come within hail.
If at any time I should have occasion to speak with you and would have you pass for that purpose within hail under the Windsor's stern and not send a Boat on board, I will put abroad the Pendant for speaking with you and hoist a Flag quartered white and blue at the Mizen Peek.

13th
Intelligence.
If you have any intelligence proper for my immediate knowledge, you will hoist a blue Ensign at the Mizentopmast head, and keep it Flying till I answer by making the same Signal.

14th
To come to a closer engagement.
If at any time while we are engaged with the Enemy, I should judge it necessary to come to a closer engagement, I will hoist a white and blue Flag at the Foretopgallant mast head and fire a Gun. Then you are to engage the Enemy as close as possible.

15th
To keep upon the starboard beam so as plainly to discover signals.
Do. larboard.
When I would have you keep upon the starboard beam of the Windsor, at such a distance as plainly to discover Signals, I will make the Signal for speaking with you, and hoist a Flag checquered red and white, on the Ensign Staff; and if I would have you keep at the same distance upon the larboard beam, I will hoist a white Flag pierced with blue, at the Mizen Peek.

16th
Falling in with a number of the enemy's merchant ships.
In case of falling in with a number of the Enemy's Merchant Ships, and you think you shall lose too much time by stopping to send a Boat on board those you first come up with, you are only to make them haul up their sails, as soon as they have struck, and to hoist a white Flag at the Mizentopmast head as a Signal that you have not sent your Boat on board of them, which the Ship astern of you is to answer by hoisting the same Signal at the Foretopgallant mast head, and is to take possession of the Prizes so left by you.

To be left to the sternmost to collect the prizes.

By Night
1st
If anyone discovers a strange Ship or Ships he shall hoist if in the

NEone Lightat the Mizen Peek
NWtwo Lightsone under the other at the Mizen Pee
SEthree Lights
SWfour Lights

2nd
to chace.
Which when I answer by hoisting one Light on the Ensign Staff, you are to burn as many false fires as you see strange Ships; after which if I would have you chace, I will burn two false fires. And if I myself should discover any strange Ship or Ships and give chace, I will hoist the Signal Lights to shew on what Quarter of the Compass and fire a Gun.

3rd
To know each other coming up with the enemy.
For our better knowing each other coming up with or engaging the Enemy, every Ship is to carry two Lights of equal height at the Mizen Peek, and the headmost one in each Quarter Lanthorn; but the Lights shall only be carried while she keeps sight of the Chace.

4th
To give over chace.
When I would have you give over chace, I will fire two Guns, a smaller space of time from each other than when the Signal is made to anchor.

5th
To tack or wear.
When the Signal is made to tack or wear, each Ship is to hoist a Light at the Mizen Peek, and not to take it in till she is about on the other Tack.

6th
To speak with you.
If at any time in the night I would speak with you, I will shew two Lights, one at each Arm of the Mizentopsail yard.

7th
To speak with me.
If at any time you should have occasion to speak with me, you will shew two Lights, one at each Yard Arm of the Foretopsail Yard.

In a Fog
1st
To alter the course when sailing large.
When sailing large or before a wind and I shall find it necessary to alter the course, if to starboard I will fire three Guns, if to port five; and five minutes after, a Gun each minute for so many Points as shall be altered from the course before steered; so that if only one Gun is fired, one Point only is altered of the course either to starboard or to port.

2nd
To pay away large.
When sailing upon a wind and I shall find it necessary to pay away large, I will fire seven Guns, and five minutes after a Gun each minute for so many Points of the Compass as I shall go from the wind.

3rd
To wear sailing on a wind.
When sailing upon a wind and I would have you wear, I will fire three Guns, when the sternmost and leewardmost is to wear as fast as possible after the Signal is made, and continue the same sail they had on the other Tack.

4th
When I am lying too in a fog, and I should think it necessary to wear and lay too on the other Tack, I will fire three Guns; and as soon as I am wore and brought too on the other Tack, I will fire three Guns more; both firings will be to windward.

For all other Signals I refer you to the General Printed Sailing and Fighting Instructions.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Windsor at sea this 20th March 1759.

To the Hon. Saml. Barrington, Captain of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.S. Faulkner.

By the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

You are hereby required and directed to take upon you the charge and command of Le Comte de St. Florentin, a French Ship of War, taken by His Majesty's Ship under my command, and follow all Orders you shall receive from me for your further proceedings.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at sea this 4th April 1759.

To Mr William Osborn, 1st Lieutenant of His Majesty's Ship Achilles hereby appointed to take charge and command of Le Comte de St. Florentin.S. B.

To the Secretary of the Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1490)

Achilles at Falmouth. 16th April 1759.

Sir,
I have the pleasure to acquaint you of my arrival here, with the Count de St. Florentin of sixty Guns and four hundred and three Men, from Cape Francois bound for Rochfort, commanded by the Sieur de Montay, whom I took on the fourth instant in Lat. 44. 15, sixty leagues to the westward of Cape Finisterre, after a close engagement of two hours, in which I was so fortunate as only to have two Men killed and twenty-three wounded, with my Masts, Sails and Rigging much cut and damaged.

The loss on the Enemy's side was very considerable, having all his Masts shot away, with one hundred and sixteen Men killed and wounded, amongst the latter the Captain with a Musquet Ball through his Body, of which he died two days after.

I have sent express to Sir Charles Hardy, desiring he would send me Jury Masts for the Prize; and when she is fitted, will take the first opportunity of carrying her to Plymouth.

I must beg you will acquaint their Lordships of the very gallant behaviour of my Officers and People upon this occasion, and am &c.
Saml Barrington.

P.S.—Three of my Wounded are since dead, as likewise a great number of the Enemy's.

To the Secretary of the Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1490)

Achilles at Falmouth. 17th of April 1759.

Sir,
Please to acquaint their Lordships that there is on board the Count de St. Florentin lately taken by His Majesty's Ship under my command a Negro, the son of old King Lewis of Mesurada, upon the Coast of Africa, who being on board the Ship when there in a gale of wind, they were drove from thence, and had never after an opportunity of sending him back again. I have not sent him on shore with the other Prisoners, but keep him on board until I have their Lordships' Directions what I am to do with him.
I am &c.
Saml. Barrington.

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Sir Edward Hawke, Admiral of the Blue, and follow his Orders for your farther proceedings; and as soon as the Ship you command is ready for the sea, you are to proceed without a moment's loss of time to Torbay to join Sir Edward, unless you receive Orders from him to the contrary.

Given (fn. 2) under our hands the 15th May 1759.

The Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Plymouth.Anson. Geo. Hay. J. Forbes.

By command of their Lordships, J. Miles, D.S.

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of George Bridges Rodney, Esq., RearAdmiral of the Blue, and follow his Orders (fn. 3) for your further proceedings.

Given under our hands the 8th June 1759.

The Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead.Anson. Gilbt. Elliot. J. Forbes.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to bear me and my Retinue as part of the Complement of His Majesty's Ship under your command. Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead 20th June 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By command of the Admiral, Thoms. Atkinson.

Line of Battle
The Isis to lead with the Starboard and the Deptford with the Larboard Tacks on board.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.Division.
Aurora4thIsisCapt. Wheeler50350George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue
Vestal
Basilisk
Mortar
Boreas"Norwich" Darby50350
Blast
Fly
Gramont
Furnace
Unicorn"AchillesGeorge Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, Hon. Capt. Barrington60435
Firedrake
Wolf
Juno"ChathamCapt. Lockhart50350
Carkass
Aeolus
Brilliant"DeptfordCapt. Holwall50350

The Frigates while the Ships of the Line are engaged, are to distress the Enemy where they can most conveniently fall in, and by raking their Van and Rear.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead 25 June 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By command of the Admiral, Thomas Atkinson.

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue.

You are hereby required and directed to receive Colonel Desaguliers and Captain Smith (being Officers belonging to the Artillery) with their Retinue as per margin, (fn. 4) on board His Majesty's Ship under your command, and bear them on a Supernumerary List for victuals only during their continuance on board you.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at St Helens, 26th June 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles. By command of the Admiral.G. B. Rodney.

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed with all dispatch possible to demand and receive on board His Majesty's Ship under your command, one flat bottom Boat with everything necessary for her. (fn. 5)

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead 27 June 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

By command of the Admiral, Thos. Atkinson.

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

Mr Robert Simonton (fn. 6) and Mr George Farmer (fn. 7) belonging to His Majesty's Ship under your command, the former being appointed 6th Lieutenant of the Duke and the latter 2nd Lieutenant of the Aurora, you are hereby required and directed to make out proper Pay Lists for them and transmit them, without loss of time, to the Navy Board.

Given under our hands the 29th June 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Portsmouth.Anson.
G. Hay.
Gilb. Elliot.

By command of their Lordships, J. Milnes, D.S.

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

Whereas there is on board His Majesty's Ship under your command a quantity of Red, White and Blue Pendants, each with Crosses, and being in want of plain ones, you are hereby required and directed to order as many of them to be converted (by taking out the Crosses) as will make two plain ones of each colour.

Given under my hand on board H.M.S. Achilles at St Helens 30th June 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of H.M.S. Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to keep His Majesty's Ship under your command in constant readiness for action, and your Boats manned and armed with [? fire] (fn. 8) grapnels in them, who when any of the Bombs being attacked or an appearance of it, are immediately to go to their assistance.

Given under my hand on board the Achilles at sea 3rd July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By command of the Admiral, Thos. Atkinson.

By Geo. Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to lend from His Majesty's Ship under your command, six good, able, sober Men belonging to the Gunner's Crew, to assist in working the Mortars on board the Basilisk Bomb.

Given under my hand on board the Achilles at sea, 3rd July 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By command of the Admiral, Thos. Atkinson.

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to use the utmost dispatch in completing the Provisions and Water of His Majesty's Ship under your command to ten or twelve weeks, and then proceed to sea, in company with the Juno, whose Captain is directed to follow your Orders, and endeavour to join Admiral Sir Edward Hawke, whose Rendezvous and Signals are enclosed, and follow his Orders for your further proceedings. Given under our hands this 10 July 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson. Gilb. Elliot.
J. Forbes.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

Sir Edward Hawke's Rendezvous
The Rendezvous is eight leagues W.S.W. from Ushant where they are to cruize for me eight days; and not meeting or hearing from me during that time, to return to Torbay for further Orders.
A Copy—J. Clevland.

Private Signals
Observed by the Squadron under the command of Admiral Sir Edward Hawke.

By Day
In case of meeting, the Ship to windward shall haul up her foresail and clew up the mizentopsail, the Ship to leeward shall answer by lowering the maintopsail and mizentopsail; Then the Ship who first made the Signal shall hoist a Blue Ensign at the main topgallant masthead and an Union Jack at the fore topgallant masthead; The other shall answer by hoisting a St George's Ensign at the foretopgallant masthead and an Union Jack at the mizentopmast head.

By Night
The Ship to windward shall shew three lights in a triangle thus [diagram] at the mizen peek and two lights of equal heights in the mizen shrouds; The other shall answer by shewing three lights in the fore and three in the mizen shrouds of equal height; Then the Ship which made the first Signal shall burn three false fires and the other shall answer by burning two.

If within hail, he who hails first shall ask: What Ship's that ? And he who is hailed shall answer: God save the King. Then he who hailed first shall reply: Great Britain. The other shall answer: God protect.
A copy—J. Clevland.

By the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

In pursuance to an Order from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, you are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command and follow all such Orders as you shall receive from me for His Majesty's Service.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead 13 July 1759.

To Captain Phillips, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Juno.

Memorandum

Juno's Signal is a red Pendant at the Maintopgallant mast head.

Signal for seeing a Sail in the

NE is aFrench Jackat the Mizen Peek
NW " "Dutch Jack
SE " "French Jackat the Ensign Staff
SW " "Dutch Jack

Which when I answer by hoisting a French Jack or the Ensign on the Ensign Staff, you are to lower as many times as you see strange Ships.

When I would have you chace on any Quarter of the Compass I will make the Signal for seeing a sail in that Quarter, and your Pendant.

When I would have you come within hail of me I will make your Signal and hoist a Swedish Ensign at the Mizen Peek.

For all other Signals I refer you to the General Printed Instructions and those already given you by Rear-Admiral Rodney.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead 13th July 1759.
Saml Barrington.

N.B. Signals in the night will be made without Guns if possible.

To Capt. Phillips, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Juno.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command and strictly follow and obey all such Orders and Directions as you shall from time to time receive from me for His Majesty's Service; sending me twice a week when in port, and by every proper opportunity when at sea, an account of the state and condition of His Majesty's Ship under your command. For which this shall be your order. (fn. 9)

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 20th July 1759.

Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Line of Battle

The Mars to lead with the Starboard and the Torbay with the Larboard Tacks on board.

N.B. When the Hero shall return to the Squadron, she is to lead with the Larboard Tacks on board in room of the Torbay. The Torbay is to fall in between the Dorsetshire and Ramillies, the Monmouth between the Magnanime and Dunkirk, and the Windsor to fall in between the Fame and Bienfaisant; and in that case the Commanders of these three Ships are to put themselves under the command of the Admirals of the respective Division accordingly.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.GunsMen.Division.
Colchester3MarsCaptain Young74600Sir Charles Hardy, Kt., ViceAdmiral of the Blue, &c.
4AchillesHon. Capt. Barrington60420
3BelliqueuxCapt. Saumarez64500
Proserpine3HerculesPorter74600
Saphtre2UnionSir Charles Hardy90770
Capt. Evans
3FameHon. Capt. Byron74600
Pallas3BienfaisantCapt. Balfour64500
2DukeGraves90750
4AnsonWhitwell60420
3TempleShirley70520
Thames4FirmReynolds60420Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, &c.
Pluto3MonmouthHon. Capt. Harvey64480
4WindsorCapt. Clevland60420
1Royal GeorgeCampbell100880
3DorsetshireDenis70520
Acteon, to repeat signals in her absence the Swallow sloop2RmtlhesSir Edward Hawke90780
Capt. Taylor
3MagnanimeRt. Hon. Lord Viscount Howe74700
Rochester4DunkirkCapt. Digby60420
Melampe3RevengeStorr64480
4MontagueLendrick60420Francis Geary, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the White, &c.
Southampton3EssexJohnston64480
4DefianceBaird60420
3ResolutionSpeke74600
Minerva2SandwichFrancis Geary, Esq.90765
Capt. Norbury
3ChichesterCapt. Willett70520
Venus4NottinghamMarshall60400
Coventry3TorbayHon. Capt. Keppel74700

Memorandum
The Achilles's Station in the Line of Battle is between the Mars and Belliqueux. And her Signal is a Red Pendant at the Starboard Maintopsail yard arm.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.E. Hawke.

Additional Signals
I
If upon seeing an Enemy, I should think it necessary to alter the disposition of the Ships in the Line of Battle, and would have any two Ships change stations with each other; I will make the Signals for speaking with the Captains of such Ships, and hoist a Flag checquered red and blue on the Flagstaff at the Mizentopmast head.

2
If any Ship in chace should discover the Chace to be a Dogger, Galliot, Hoy or any other small Vessel belonging to Neutral Powers, they are not to chace so far from the Fleet as to run any hazard of separation.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 20th July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

In room of Articles 5th and 6th of the Additional Fighting Instructions by Day; It is my direction that this be observed, viz:

Memorandum.
When sailing in a Line of Battle, one Ship ahead of another, and I would have the Ship that leads with her Starboard or Larboard Tacks on board to alter her course in order to lead down to the Enemy; I will hoist a Dutch Jack under my Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head and fire two Guns; Then every Ship of the Squadron is to steer for the Ship of the Enemy, that from the disposition of the two Squadrons must be her lot to engage.

Notwithstanding I shall keep the Signal for the Line ahead flying making or shortening sail in such proportion as to preserve the distance assigned by the Signal for the Line, in order that the whole Squadron as near as possible may come to action at the same time.

Lord Anson's Additional Fighting Instructions to be inserted after Article the 4th in the Additional Fighting Instructions by Day.

Whereas it may be necessary for Ships in a Line of Battle to regulate themselves by bearing on some particular Point of the Compass from each other, without having any regard to their being abreast or ahead of one another;

You are hereby required and directed strictly to observe the following Instructions viz:

When the Signal is made for the Squadron to draw into a Line of Battle, at any particular distance, and I would have them keep North and South of each other, I will hoist a red Flag with a white Cross on the Flagstaff at the Mizentopmast head and fire a Gun.

When I would have them keep East and West of each other, I will hoist a blue and white Flag at the Mizentopmast head and fire a Gun.

When I would have them bear from each other on any points in the NE and SW quarters, I will hoist a red Flag with a white Cross in the Mizentopmast Shrouds to shew the Quarters of the Compass, and for the intermediate Points I will hoist on the Flagstaff at the Mizentopmast head when they are to bear

N b Eand S b Wone Common Pendant
NNEand SSWtwo Common Pendants
NE b Nand SW b Sthree Common Pendants
NEand SWa Dutch Jack

And I will hoist under the Dutch Jack when I would have them bear
and fire a Gun with each Signal.

NE b Eand SW b Wone Common Pendant
ENEand WSWtwo Common Pendants
E b Nand W b Sthree Common Pendants

When I would have them bear from each other on any of the Points in the NW and SE Quarters, I will hoist a blue and white Flag in the Mizentopmast Shrouds, to shew the Quarters of the Compass, and distinguish the intermediate Points they are to form on, from the North and South, in the same manner in the North East and South West Quarters.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 20th July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Additional Fighting Instructions

1
When the Squadron shall be sailing in a Line of Battle ahead, and I shall put abroad the Signal for the headmost and weathermost Ships to tack first, and the Ship that leads to continue to lead on the other Tack after she shall be about; It is my directions that as soon as the headmost Ships in stays, shall have hauled Maintopsail, and the next Ship to her got her stern open, she also shall put in stays; and that every Ship in the Squadron do observe the same method, according to their several stations in the line, in order to preserve the distance assigned by the Signal that shall be flying.

2
Whereas many and great inconveniences may arise from every particular Ship in the Squadron strictly preserving her situation in the Line, either immediately at the beginning of, or during an Action, in cases where the whole of the Enemy's Ships shall not be in a direct, or strict Line, or their Van, Centre or Rear shall alter the position they were first in; You are to observe, that as soon as I shall have led on the Squadron, so as to be within the distance I shall think proper to engage at, the moment I hoist the Signal for Engaging, I will haul down the Signal for the Line; When you are hereby required to continue engaging the Ship of the Enemy that shall be immediately opposed to you, in such close manner, according to her position, as will best enable you to take, sink or destroy her; in either of which if you succeed, you are to go to the assistance of the next of the King's Ships engaged ahead or astern of you, as you shall judge most necessary; on the whole having a particular regard to the 21st Article of the General Printed Fighting Instructions.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 16 July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

In case of being obliged to follow the Enemy through the Passage of Fontenay, its soundings &c are as follows:

From the Rock called La Vielle to the Rock called Les Chats is East and West two miles.

From the Vielle to the Grand Stevenet is NNW and SSE about three miles.

The Passage is between the Vielle and the above-named two Rocks. The depth of water is from 15 fathoms to 20 and 23 fathoms. Rocky.

You may sail within a Musquet Shot of each Rock with great safety.

When you are abreast of the Bec Du Ras you must steer WSW out to sea.

In coming in from the Southard the Marks are a small Rock, off Carnavan Point, on with the Cape de la Chevre.

The Rock Vielle lays close to the Bec du Ras. All rocky ground in the Passage. A very strong Tide that runs NNE and SSW, but close to the Rocks it runs in different Veins.
E. Hawke.

Directions for the Reception of H.R.H. Prince Edward (fn. 10) when he shall arrive in the Hero.

The Hero, after having made the Signal for knowing each other will hoist an Union Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head and fire a Gun, when (in case the Squadron should not be already formed by Signal) every Ship is to close as fast as possible in their respective Stations, then hoist out the Barge, and each Captain to repair on board the Admiral's Ship of his Division.

Soon after the Hero shall have brought too, which I have directed her to do at a mile's distance, either to windward or leeward as she shall happen to fall in, I will hoist a Flag striped blue and white at the Foretopgallant mast head, when I will put off from the Ramillies followed, according to seniority, by the Captains of my Division, the ViceAdmiral followed in like manner by his Division on my starboard quarter, and the Rear-Admiral by his on my larboard quarter, every Commander leaving directions to man Ship, as soon as a Dutch Jack shall be hoisted at the Foretopgallant mast head of the Hero.

As I shall remain but very little time on board the Hero, only the Commanders of the three Divisions to go on board her, the Captains preparing to return to the Ramillies in the following order:

Captain Young of the Mars to lead in his Barge, taking a sweep either to windward or leeward of the Squadron as most convenient, so as to give every Ship an opportunity to cheer His Royal Highness as he passes.

Sir Edward Hawke in his Barge with his Flag flying.

Next, His Royal Highness with his Flag hoisted.

Then, Sir Charles Hardy with his Flag.

Then, Rear-Admiral Geary with his Flag.

Then all the Captains of the Squadron in their respective Barges in a line according to seniority.

In going on board the Ramillies, I shall take a large sweep in order to give the Vice- and Rear-Admirals and all the Captains (if possible) time to enter on the opposite side, in order to be ready to receive His Royal Highness at his coming on board.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 19th July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By the Hon. Augustus Hervey, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Monmouth.

Pursuant to an order (fn. 11) you will receive herewith from Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to follow such orders as you shall receive from me. For all Signals you are referred to those you have received from Sir Edward Hawke which shall be made on board the Monmouth when necessary.

N.B. Your Signal will be made with a White Pendant [at] the maintopmast head.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Monmouth off Brest Harbour this 22nd July 1759.

The Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

Memorandum

Monmouth off Brest, the 27th July 1759.

Whenever I make the Signal for anchoring together with a Flag quartered Blue and Yellow over the Anchoring Colours:

The Achilles is to endeavour to anchor due west of the Monmouth at four cables length distance.

The Colchester is to anchor at that same distance due east of the Monmouth.

The Juno between the Monmouth and the Shore.

The Cutter will have directions to ply two miles to the eastward of the Colchester.

When in the night I would have the Boats to come on board me manned and armed, I will hoist three lights of equal height where best to be seen; And if Long Boats also, one light at some distance over those three lights.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

Memorandum
As the Montague is returned to the Fleet, I would have the Achilles take the Montague's Station and the Colchester the Achilles's, in those Instructions for sailing in for Conquet Harbour; and where the Juno's name is, the Coventry's to be put.

Dated on board the Monmouth off Brest this 27th of July 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

Memorandum (fn. 12)
1st
Whenever I stand in for Conquet Harbour with the Signal for the Line flying, the Achilles is to follow the Monmouth, and the Dunkirk to follow the Achilles at as reasonable a distance as shall (from the situation of the place) be judged necessary for the Ships to work in: And to place themselves as near the Forts as the Pilots possibly can with safety in the following manner:

2nd
The Monmouth will go up as high as the Rocks will admit and lay against the two Forts on the north point of Conquet Harbour.

3rd
The Achilles to lay against that Fort on the south point of Conquet Harbour, and also to batter the Ships at the entrance of it, till the Boats go to them.

4th
The Dunkirk against the Batteries on the north side of the little bay called La Vie de Bouteille.

5th
When I make the Signal for Boats manned and armed, two Boats with an Officer are to go from each Ship on board the Coventry, and to keep the others ready manned and armed alongside, taking care to have some materials in them for setting fire to the Shipping; and to receive Captain Burselem's orders.

6th
Whenever the Monmouth hoists a yellow Pendant at the Foretopmast head, not the Flagstaff, the Boats are to put off from the Coventry and other Ships, and endeavour to cut out or destroy the Enemy's Shipping that shall lay at the entrance of Conquet Harbour. Every Officer to be strictly enjoined that when they have boarded the Enemy's Ships, they are to set fire to them effectually, if they find they cannot speedily get them out, and to return to the Coventry or their proper Ships, as they can best reach either; but should a white Pendant be let fly at the Mizentopgallant Flagstaff, the Boats are to return immediately.

7th
And when I haul down the Signal for engaging, every Ship will make the best of her way out, whether at anchor or not, and either weigh or slip as the Captain shall judge best.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Monmouth off Brest Harbour 28 July 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

Addition to Lord Anson's Fighting Instructions given out the 28 May last
If when sailing in a Line of Battle on any particular point of the Compass, I should think proper to alter my Course, I will make my intention known by the following Signals, viz:

If I would alter my Course to starboard, I will hoist a Spanish Flag on the Flagstaff at the Topmasthead and fire a Gun; If to port, I will hoist a Flag striped blue and white at the same place and fire a Gun. And after this Signal has been repeated, I will fire one Gun for every point of the Compass that I alter my Course; Then every Ship in the Line is to alter his Course immediately without waiting for the number of Guns being repeated.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 3rd August 1759

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.E. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Line of Battle (fn. 13)
The Mars to lead with the starboard, and the Hero with the larboard Tacks on board.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.GunsMen.Division.
Minerva3MarsCapt. Young74600Sir Charles Hardy, Kt., ViceAdmiral of the Blue, &c.
4KingstonParry60400
3BelliqueuxSaumarez64500
3HerculesPorter74600
Pallas2UnionSir Charles Hardy90770
Capt. Evans
Proserpine3FameHon. Capt. Byron74600
4AchillesBarrington60435
2DukeCapt. Graves90750
Actœon4MontagueRowley60420
3BienfaisantBalfour64500
4FirmCapt. Reynolds60420Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, &c.
2FoudroyantTyrell80700
Saphrie3DorsetshireDenis70520
3TorbayHon. Capt. Keppel74700
Venus, to repeat signals2RamilliesSir Edward Hawke90780
Captain Taylor
Pluto3MagnanimeRt. Hon. Lord Howe74700
3MonmouthHon. Capt. Hervey64480
1 Royal GeorgeCapt. Campbell100880
Melampe4AnsonWitwell64420
3RevengeStorr64480
Swallow4DunkirkDigby60420Francis Geary, Esq., RearAdmiral of the White, &c.
3TempleShirley70520
Thames4DefianceBaird60420
3ChichesterWillett70520
Southampton2SandwichFrancis Geary, Esq.90765
Capt. Norbury
3ResolutionSpeke74600
3EssexO'Brien64480
Colchester4NottinghamLendrick60400
Juno3HeroHon. Capt. Edgcumbe74600

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 25 August 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.E. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, &c.

Having received orders, the first convenient opportunity off St Mathew's Point, to proclaim in the face of the Enemy the late glorious Victory obtained by His Majesty's Arms under the command of His Highness Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick, over the Army of the French King commanded by Marshal Contades;

You are hereby required and directed, when I shall hoist a blue Flag with a red Cross, at the Foretopgallant mast head, to fire twenty-one Guns from His Majesty's Ship under your command, beginning as soon as the second Gun shall be fired from the Rear-Admiral. For which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this 27th August 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Memorandum
Whenever I make the Signal for all Lieutenants in the night, and at the same time hoist a light at the Mizen Peek, every Officer is to come on board me, in his Ship's Barge, manned and armed.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Monmouth off Brest 26th September 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

Memorandum
A Midshipman and two good Seamen with their Arms complete and 14 days' provision, to go on board the French Corvette prize called the Mercury.

Dated on board the Monmouth this 29th day of September 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.A. Hervey.

(P.R.O., Ad. I, 92) By Sir Edward Hawke, (fn. 14) K.B.

Whereas the destroying all or part of the Enemy's Frigates and Transports in the river Morbian is of the utmost consequence, and it has been represented to me, that there are on board the King's Ship Achilles two Frenchmen, in whose honesty Captain Barrington can confide, who have undertaken to carry Frigates as far up in Vannes and Aurey, as where the Enemy's Transports lie.

You are hereby required and directed to take under your command His Majesty's Ship Achilles, and by every practicable means in your power, with the Ships, Frigates and Fireships under your orders, attempt the destruction of the Enemy's Frigates and Transports in the abovementioned Rivers. For which this shall be your order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at Sea this 8th October 1759.

To Captain Duff, of His Majesty's Ship Rochester.E. Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

Memorandum

The Watch Word

SundayAnson
MondayBoscawen
TuesdayElliot
WednesdayHay
ThursdayHunter
FridayForbes
SaturdayStanley

The Guard to begin at the Junior Officer and so regularly on to the Senior.

He whose Guard night is over, is to send and acquaint the next Officer in seniority.

If anything remarkable happens, the Captain of the Ship whose Guard night it is, is to report it to me next morning.

If the Guard Boat sees any danger, she is to make it known by firing one Musquet and burning two false fires, upon which the Ships nearest her are to send immediately to her assistance.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Rochester in Quiberon Bay October 11th, 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Achilles.Robert Duff.

By Robert Duff, Esq., Captain of His Majesty's Ship Rochester.

In addition to the General Printed Sailing and Fighting Instructions, you are hereby required and directed to observe and follow the Additional Signals and Instructions given you by Sir Edward Hawke when made from the Rochester.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Rochester in Quiberon Bay 12th October 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Robt. Duff. (fn. 15)

(P.R.O., Ad. I, 92) At a Council of War held on board H.M.S. Rochester in Quiberon Bay, October 15th, 1759.

Present: Captains Duff, Reynolds, Barrington, Roddam, Digges, Lockhart, Moore, Drake, Philips, Hotham, Jacobs, Griffith, Johnston, Keeler.

Sir Edward Hawke's Orders of the 8th inst. to Captain Duff being read;

Collibrean, one of the Pilots that came in the Achilles, was examined, and declares himself ignorant of the Channel into Morbian; and that Jacque Renault, in coming through the Toignouze passage, asked him often for the marks through the said passage, who replied he would readily tell him, if he knew them.

Jacque Renault, Captain Barrington's Pilot, being likewise examined, declares he cannot pilot any of His Majesty's Ships farther up the river Aurry than opposite to St Michael, which is four miles from where the Vessels loaded with provisions lay. And that he cannot carry any of His Majesty's Ships farther than within two leagues, from where the Transports lay in the river Vannes.

He has equivocated in regard to the dangers going into the Harbour's mouth, in so much that sometimes he said there was rocks, and at other times declared there was none.

Then the question was put: Whether Jacque Renault, Captain Barrington's Pilot, after what appears above, and his having run the Achilles on the Gouivas Rock, when he had declared himself acquainted with the Toignouze passage, and voluntarily took charge of the ship through that passage, ought to be trusted with the piloting His Majesty's Ships into the Rivers Vannes and Aurry, to destroy the Enemy's Frigates and Transports lying there.

We are unanimously of opinion that Jacque Renault is not to be trusted, in piloting His Majesty's Ships into the Harbour of Morbian.

Robert Duff.

John Reynolds.

Samuel Barrington.

Robert Roddam.

Dudley Digges.

John Lockhart.

Matthew Moore.

Francis S. Drake.

Henry John Philips.

William Hotham.

Maxn Jacobs.

Walter Griffith.

James Johnston.

Robert Keeler.

Commodre Duff To Admiral Sir Edward Hawke, K.B. (P.R.O., Ad. I, 92)

Sir,
On the 11th inst. I was honoured with your Orders dated the 8th inst.

It is with very great concern I acquaint you how much reason Captain Barrington has to be sorry for having placed so much confidence in the two Frenchmen he recommended to you as qualified to pilot His Majesty's Ships up the rivers Vannes and Aurry to where the enemy's Frigates and Transports lie.

About ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 11th inst. the Achilles, in coming through the passage of the Toignouze in charge of those pilots, ran upon the Gouivas Rock and received so much damage that, as she lies at anchor, she makes twelve foot water in an hour.

The Chatham, who had no Pilot on board and was following the Achilles, nearly escaped being on the same rock, by instantly hauling her wind and standing to the N.W.

The damage the Achilles has received making it necessary to send her immediately to England, and judging it very hazardous to let the Achilles go to sea without other ships in company, I have ordered the Actœon and Gibraltar to proceed with her, which I hope you will approve of.

I have the honour to be, &c.Robert Duff.
On board the Rochester
in Quiberon Bay,
October 18th, 1759.
Robert Duff.

By Captain Robert Duff, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Rochester.

Whereas the damage His Majesty's Ship Achilles, under your command, received on the nth instant by running upon the Gouivas Rock, makes it necessary to send her to England, and it being hazardous to let her go to sea without Ships in company.

You are hereby required and directed to proceed forthwith to the first port you can fetch in England, taking with you His Majesty's Ships Actœon and Gibraltar, whose Captains have my directions to follow your Orders.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Rochester in Quiberon Bay 18th October 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Robt. Duff.

By the Hon. Captain Samuel Barrington, Commanding His Majesty's Ship Achilles.

Whereas His Majesty's Ship Achilles under my command is in a very leaky condition, in case it should increase so as to be thought necessary to quit the Ship for the preservation of the People's lives, I will make the following Signals:

By day I will hoist the Ensign half staff up and fire two Guns.

By night three Lights in a triangle thus [blank] at the Mizen Peek, and two Guns.

In a fog Guns until you discover me.

You are then to get as near me as you can, sending all your Boats as fast as possible to my assistance.

If I would have you come within hail of me, I will make your Signal and hoist a Blue Flag with a yellow Cross at the Mizen Peek.

For all other Signals I refer you to the General Printed Instructions and those already given you by Sir Edward Hawke.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles in Quiberon Bay 18 October 1759.
Saml Barrington.

To
Capt. Jacobs .. Actœon. Capt. Griffith . . Gibraltar.

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

Whereas, (fn. 16) upon our observing the frequent delays in the proceedings of His Majesty's Ships for want of Pilots, we directed the Navy Board to consider of methods proper to be taken to supply His Majesty's Ships with Pilots in a more regular and certain way; and the said Board having reported their opinion that the number of Pilots, on the whole, is not equal to the demand of the present Public Service, occasioned in a great measure, by the practice of employing two Pilots on board His Majesty's Ships on services which formerly used to be performed by one only; and as this is an abuse which not only occasions an unnecessary expence, but may be otherwise attended with very bad consequences; You are hereby required and directed never to take more than one Pilot on board His Majesty's Ship or Vessel under your command, unless any particular service you shall be employed upon, shall be of such nature as to render it absolutely necessary for you to have more.

And the Navy Board having represented (as a hardship the Pilots are liable to) the frequent irregularities they find in the Certificates which the Captains of His Majesty's Ships give them, either by not expressing whether they did any actual service, or only attended on board their Ships; whether the Ships were in port or at sea, during the time they had them on board; where the Ships were employed, and whether as Convoys or Cruizers or on what service, so that much time is often spent before they can have proper explanations to enable them to rate their services; and during which time the Pilots are not only kept out of their pay, but are also frequently detained on an expensive attendance in waiting for it, and lose the opportunity of being otherwise employed; And having proposed, in order to prevent such hardships for the future, that the following forms of Pilots' Certificates may be given by the Commanders of His Majesty's Ships and Vessels, according to the different circumstances for which Pilots are used, to wit:

These are to certify the Principal Officers and Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy, That . . . Pilot Extra, took charge of His Majesty's Ship the . . . under my command on the . . . at . . . from whence he safely piloted her as undermentioned:

For Cruizing Service. On a cruize to . . . (as the service shall happen to be) and was this day discharged at . . .; and I further certify that the service was performed by him in conjunction with . . . another Pilot (if there should be more than one employed) or without the assistance of another Pilot (if the case be so). Given under my hand &c.

For Convoys or Trips. With Convoy to . . . (as the service shall happen to be) and was this day discharged at . . .; and I further certify that the said service was performed by him without the assistance of any other Pilot (if the case be so; or if another was employed, his Name and the reason of employing him to be mentioned). Given under my hand &c.

You are hereby required and directed to be very careful to give Certificates agreeable thereto, to any Pilot or Pilots you may employ on board the Ship or Vessel under your command.

Given under our hands the 29th day of June 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson. G. Hay. Gilb. Elliot.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

To The Secretary Of The Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1490)

Achilles, Hamoze. November 2nd 1759.

Sir,
I have received yours of the 29th past and beg leave to acquaint you that upon my arrival here I immediately, by Commodore Hanway's desire, gave him in writing the particulars of the accident that has befallen my Ship, which he told me he should send express, and where I particularly mentioned that the Ship was, through the ignorance of the Pilot, run upon the Guavas Rock, and which likewise appears in the Council of War held upon the Rochester.

Upon hearing that there was not a Pilot in the Quiberon Squadron that would carry a Ship into Morbihan, where I understood the French Frigates and Transports then lay, I asked my Pilot, who is a Frenchman (whom Captain Hervey got out of Prison at Plymouth) if he was acquainted there. His answer was, that he was better acquainted there, as likewise all the Coast of France, as far as Bordeaux, than he was in the Bay of Brest, where he had been my Pilot constantly for three months, and from his diligence, care and knowledge, I could not but entertain a good opinion of him. I immediately acquainted Captain Hervey of my Pilot's having undertaken, voluntarily and without Fee or Reward, to carry the Achilles into Morbihan, and that he had informed me that there was a Prisoner on board that would take charge of another Ship after me. He immediately ordered me to Sir Edward Hawke, to whom (upon my joining) I carried my Pilot. He seemed greatly to approve of him, having first asked me if I could confide in him, to which I replied, he had been my Pilot in the Bay of Brest for three months, where he had never deceived me, and that I had the greatest reason from thence to confide, both in his honesty and knowledge; and I think I could not give Sir Edward a greater proof of the opinion I had of him, than by desiring he would let me go upon this service, which he readily complied with, and offered the Pilot a considerable Reward, if he carried us safe in. I had no sooner parted from the Admiral, than I sent for the Prisoner, whom my Pilot informed me would take charge of another Ship; but whether through fear or ignorance, I will not pretend to say, he declared himself quite unacquainted, nor could I ever get any other answer from him.
I am, &c.
Saml. Barrington.

These are to certify the Principal Officers and Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy that Jacque Renault, Pilot Extra (belonging to His Majesty's Ship Monmouth) took charge of His Majesty's Ship Achilles under my command in the Bay of Brest the 24th July 1759, where he continued piloting her with great care between the Seams and Ushant, Douarnenez Bay, off St Matthews Point, Cameret Bay and Berthaume, until the 7th October, when he undertook to carry me through the Toignouze Passage on the nth following, but struck on the Gouivois Rock where the Ship received considerable damage; from which time to the date hereof, he had been on board, but has not since had any charge of the Ship.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles in Hamoze this 25th October 1759.
Saml. Barrington.

[Endorsed: Received 14th November 1759]

By George Bridges Rodney, Esq., Rear-Admiral of the Blue, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to discharge me, my Secretary and Retinue, from His Majesty's Ship under your command into His Majesty's Ship Unicorn from the date hereof, and transmit proper Pay List to Commissioner Hughes for the time of their servitude on board you.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Unicorn 15 August 1759.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.G. B. Rodney.

By command of the Admiral, Thos. Atkinson.

Memo.

Barfleur, Hamoze. November 19th, 1759.

It being of very great importance to the King's Service that the Ship you command be speedily equipped for thethat the Ship you command be speedily equipped for the sea, you are to use your utmost diligence in getting her ready accordingly, letting me know when you are not timely furnished with any supply for that purpose, that I may give the necessary directions thereon.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Thos. Hanway.

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain & Ireland, &c.

Whereas from intelligence we have received, there is reason to apprehend that Monsr. Thurot, with a Squadron of 5 Sail of the Enemy's Frigates and a Cutter or two, having some Land Forces on board, may be designed for the West Coast of Ireland: And whereas we intend that His Majesty's Ships named in the margin, (fn. 17) shall proceed to protect that Coast from his attempts, and to endeavour to intercept his Squadron: And we having ordered the Brilliant and Lowestoft to proceed and cruize off Cape Clear till you join them: You are hereby required and directed to take the Nottingham, Vestal and Tamer under your command, and make the utmost dispatch in getting to sea with the Achilles and those three Ships, and proceed off Cape Clear where you are to take the Brilliant and Lowestoft under your command also.

Upon your arrival off Cape Clear, you are to send on shore to Crook Haven, and forward from thence by express to His Grace the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland at Dublin, an account of your arrival and how you intend to proceed.

You are then (after being joined by the Brilliant and Lowestoft) to range along the West Coast of Ireland, as far to the northward as the latitude 55° 00', in quest of the Enemy's aforesaid Squadron, using all means in your power to gain intelligence of them, and exerting your utmost endeavours to come up with them, and to take or destroy them. If you shall not meet with or receive any intelligence of them by the time you reach the latitude 55, you are to range back to Cape Clear, and send on shore to Crook Haven, as well to dispatch accounts to us, and to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, of your proceedings, and to enquire for any Pacquets that may be lodged there for you.

You are then (if you find no directions to the contrary) to range again to the latitude of 55, and back to Cape Clear, and continue to proceed in the like manner for the space of one month after your first arrival off that Cape (unless you shall sooner meet with the Enemy's Squadron, or proceed after them upon good intelligence), and then to make the best of your way with the Ships under your command to Plymouth.

You are not only to correspond with us and His Grace the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, whenever you get off Cape Clear, but you are also to make use of every other opportunity of sending, both to us and His Grace, constant accounts of your proceedings and intentions, and of all intelligence you shall obtain: And while you shall remain on this service you are to pursue such measures as His Grace may think proper to advise.

Given under our hands the 4th December 1759.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Plymouth.Anson.E. Boscawen.Gilb: Elliot

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

Line of Battle (fn. 18)
The Juno to lead with the starboard, and the Lowestoft with the larboard Tacks on board.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.Division.
Juno (fn. 19) Capt. PhillipsHon. Capt. Samuel Barrington
Brilliant" Logie36240
Tamer4AchillesHon. Capt. Barrington60420
Alarm Cutter4NottinghamCapt. Lendrick60400
Lowestoft" Dean28200

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles in Plymouth Sound 8th December 1759.
Saml. Barrington.

To
Capt. Lendrick of the Nottingham
Hughes . . . Tamer
Lieut. Anningson . . . Alarm Cutter

Memorandum
If I would have any two Ships in the Line of Battle change stations with each other, I will hoist a Flag striped Red, White and Blue, at the Mizen Topmast head, and make the Signal for speaking with the Captains of the Ships I would have change.

If I would have any Ship come within hail of me, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain, and at the same time hoist a blue Flag with a yellow Cross at the Mizen Peek.

For all other Signals I refer you to the General Printed Instructions and those already given you by Sir Edward Hawke.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles in Plymouth Sound this 8th December 1759.
Saml Barrington.

Memorandum
For our better knowing each other, in coming up with or engaging the Enemy, every Ship is to carry two Lights of equal height at the Mizen Peek, and the headmost one in her Stern Lanthorn, but the Lights shall only be carried while she keeps sight of the Chace.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Achilles in Crookhaven 11th December 1759.
Saml. Barrington.

To the Secretary of the Admiralty (P.R.O., Ad. I, 1490)

Achilles in Crook Haven. 10th December 1759.

Sir,
I beg you will acquaint my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty that, as it would be impossible for me to carry on the service I am employed on without Pilots, I thought it necessary to put into this Port, where I am just arrived with His Majesty's Ships Achilles, Nottingham and Tamer, and have sent express to Mr Foxworthy, the Clerk of the Checque at Kinsale, to send me seven of the best Pilots that can be procured for the West Coast.

I have left the Alarm Cutter off Cape Clear to order the Brilliant and Lowestoft in to me; but should the Pilots arrive here before those Ships off the Cape, I will then take the first opportunity of going out and cruizing there for them. However if I should receive any certain Intelligence of the Enemy's being on the Coast, I will proceed after them with the force I already have, which I hope their Lordships will approve of.

I have sent an express to His Grace the Duke of Bedford to acquaint him with my arrival and Orders, and that I proposed ranging the Coast along to the Northward, looking into all the places the Pilots will carry me to, or where I have the least suspicion of the Enemy being. (fn. 20)
I am &c.
Saml. Barrington.

Footnotes

1 Barrington issued his own Orders to Henshaw of the Anson Cutter and John Hughes of the Tamer, dated February 14th, 1759. On February 19th, at sea, he gave Henshaw orders to put himself under Hughes's command and gave Hughes orders to proceed with both ships to Plymouth Sound.
2 On May 9th the Admiralty ordered the Achilles to be refitted at Plymouth. On May 18th the Admiralty ordered Barrington to use the utmost dispatch to join Sir Edward Hawke; but on June 5th ordered him to repair immediately (notwithstanding former Orders) to Spithead and remain there till further Order.
3 Rodney's Order, dated Norwich at Spithead June 9th, 1759, to Barrington, taking him under his command.
4 The two Officers and eight others. For an account of Thomas Desaguliers see the Dictionary of National Biography.
5 On June 30th Rodney ordered Barrington to order his Boatswain (William Hobbs) to deliver one flat-bottom Boat to the Boatswain of the Brilliant.
6 Robert Simonton, Lieutenant June 27th, 1759.
7 George Farmer, Lieutenant May 23rd, 1759. For a notice of his services see the Dictionary of National Biography. Grignion's portrait of Farmer was bequeathed to the National Portrait Gallery in 1927.
8 Either fire or five, the copyist was uncertain.
9 The same day Hawke ordered Barrington to put himself under Sir Charles Hardy for directions.
10 Subsequently H.R.H. The Duke of York (younger brother of King George III). He had intended embarking with Lord Anson. On July 17th, Hawke received a letter from Colonel Brudnell stating that the Prince was at Mount Edgcumbe and anxious to join the fleet. Hawke thereupon sent Captain Edgcumbe orders to receive him on board the Hero. He served in Hawke's flagship, but paid more than one visit to Harvey's Blockading Squadron off Brest where Barrington was serving.
11 Hawke's Order to Barrington to proceed to Conquet Bay and put himself under Hervey is dated July 21st, 1759. Hervey issued to Barrington on the 22nd orders ' (as the Port of Brest is actually blocked up) not to permit any neutral vessel of what Nation soever to enter it, and to direct any such you meet with to stand off the coast'; and also a Rendezvous in case of separation. From time to time, as the composition of his Squadron changed, Hervey issued a revised Line of Battle and Pendant Signals.
12 This is the revised form of a previous Memorandum of Hervey's, dated July 22nd.
13 On September 28th, 1759, Sir Edward Hawke issued a new Line of Battle. Admiral Geary had left the Squadron and his Division was commanded by Commodore Sir William Burnaby (in the Royal Anne).
14 Hawke wrote to the Admiralty, October 10th, 1759: ' On the morning of the 8th I was joined by the Chatham, Captain Lockhart, whom I immediately dispatched to reinforce Captain Duff in Quiberon Bay. In the evening of the same day, Captain Hervey sent the Achilles out to me, with two Frenchmen in whose honesty and honour Captain Barrington declared he could entirely confide. They cheerfully, on promise of a suitable reward, undertook to carry our ships as far up in the rivers Vannes and Aurry, as where the Enemy's Transports lie. I only detained Captain Barrington half an hour, and as his ship's company is in perfect health, detached him directly to Quiberon.' (P.R.O., Ad. I, 92.)
15 Duff also issued to Barrington on October nth an order taking him under his command, and on October 12th his Pendant Signals.
16 Endorsed: Received 22nd October 1759.
17 Achilles, Nottingham, Brilliant, Lowestoft, Tamer, Vestal.
18 Accompanied by the usual Order about Pendants.
19 As the Vestal was not ready, Thomas Hanway, C.-in-C. Plymouth, substituted the Juno and added the Alarm Cutter to Barrington's command.
20 As Thurot was reported to be still in Norway, the Admiralty (on December 26th) ordered the Achilles and Nottingham to proceed to Quiberon to join Sir Edward Hawke. Barrington was directed to order the Brilliant, Lowestoft and Tamer to continue to cruise on the West Coast of Ireland.