Henry VIII
January 1544, 16-25

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

Year published

1903

Pages

17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

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'Henry VIII: January 1544, 16-25', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 19 Part 1: January-July 1544 (1903), pp. 17-28. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=80294 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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January 1544, 16-25

16 Jan.34. Bishopric of Worcester.
See Grants in January, No. 19.
16 Jan.35. William Babthorpe to Mr. Lentall, Auditor of the attainted lands in Yorkshire.
R. O.Requests him to ask Sir Ric. Suthewell and Sir Thos. Moyle to order the delivery of the evidences pertaining to the manor or grange of Flotmanbye, late belonging to the attainted monastery of Bridlington, which Babthorpe has purchased (fn. 1) of the King. The evidences are in the keeping of my lord President, at Watton. Suggests that the Surveyors should appoint Thos. Wentworth and Marmaduke Falkes to make the search. Asks him to send the counterpayne of the dimission of the farm of Flotmanbye made by the prior of Bridlyngton to Charles Butre, or else a copy of the enrolment. Newcastle upon Tyne, 16 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
16 Jan.36. Deputy and Council of Ireland to Henry VIII.
R. O.Heretofore petitioned him to write to the French king for redress to bearer, Walter Pyparde, farmer of the late house of St. Mary beside Dublin, who was robbed at sea by Bretons, in time of peace, of merchandise to the amount of 1,250l. st. After six years in plea, he obtained sentence against his adversaries, received 100l. in part payment and was appointed to have the rest by a certain day, the rather at the contemplation of Henry's "said letters"; but his factor was meanwhile, "upon certain untrue suggestions of heresy, laid in prison." On his delivery the factor was again in these last wars apprehended and remains in sharp prison. The writers, having (as commanded) appointed to the earl of Desmond, for his repair to Parliaments and Councils, part of the manse and demesnes of St. Mary Abbey, whereby bearer at the expiring of his term therein must resort to another farm which he has on the borders of the Irishry (where he will be at great charges for defence and for entertainment of the "confyners" resorting thither), beg that he may have some licence for transporting grain or leather out of England and some further estate in &c. his said farm upon the Borders. Kilmaynan, 16 Jan. 35 Henry VIII. Signed by St. Leger, Alen, Ormond, George abp. of Dublin, Edward bp. of Meath, Aylmer, Brabazon, Lutrell, Bathe and Cusake.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
16 Jan.37. Deputy and Council of Ireland to Henry VIII.
R. O.At the Deputy's coming hither, the King admitted Mr. Basenet, dean of St. Patrikes by Dublin, to be one of the Council here, who has since served diligently without fee or reward and does not intend "to be a craver for his service"; but, having two brethren here serving in the wars, he begs the King to give them two parcels of land in the marches of Leynster, amongst the Byrnes, valued at 57s. 9d. yearly by the survey, or else to let him purchase the same or have it in fee. Dublin, 16 Jan. 35 Hen. VIII. Signed by St. Leger, Alen, Ormond, the bps. of Dublin and Meath, J. of Gormanston, P. of Trymleteston, Brabazon, Travers, Aylmer, Lutrell, Bathe, Cusake and Houth.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
17 Jan.38. Chapuys to Granvelle.
R. O.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 10.]
The messenger being in a hurry, this is only to advertise receipt of Granvelle's letters by Don Loys de Avilla, who arrived here yesterday late. Conferred together and decided thàt he ought to visit the King, which he has done this after dinner, and was very welcome both to the King, the Queen and the Princess. Has only time to write that Don Loys's coming has been to the increase of this King's affection to the Emperor and the effect of the coming enterprise. Has received the Emperor's letters of the 3rd inst. concerning the three points proposed by this King's ambassador. This King and his Council seem satisfied with the Emperor's excuses, at least they show no resentment. Perhaps they hope that Don Fernando will obtain their requests. Until they have other news, will not broach the matter; but told Don Loys what to say in case the King had mentioned it. Regrets that he could be of no service to Don Loys. London, 17 Jan. 1544.
Fr. Modern transcript of the original at Vienna, p. 1.
18 Jan.39. Chapuys to the Prince of Spain.
Add. MS.
28,593, f. 297.
B. M.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 12.]
Wrote by Don Alonso Manriquez. The Emperor has since sent hither Don Fernando de Gonzaga with power, in which the writer was also named, to treat and conclude for the enterprise of next summer; and it has been concluded that the Emperor and King shall be in person, with their armies, in the realm of France by 20 June next, going, the Emperor by Champaigne and the King by Picardy, towards Paris. Although the first treaty of amity capitulated that they should enter only with 20,000 foot and 5,000 horse, it is now capitulated that each army shall be of 35,000 foot and 7,000 horse, 60 pieces of artillery, 4,000 gastadores and 100 boats (barquetes) to make bridges. The King makes all haste to fulfil this, if not hindered by affairs of Scotland which do not go very prosperously for him. The earl of Lennox (Conde Linos), whom he expected to turn against France and take his part, has changed purpose, because the French have at last kept their promise to him and also made him great offers (grandes partidos). To secure the Scottish frontier when he is out of the realm or in &c. France, the King asks the Emperor for some Spanish arquebusiers and in recompense has agreed to contribute 20,000 ducats for the enterprise which the Duke of Savoy and Marquis del Gasto might make, while the King of France is occupied against their armies, advancing upon Lyons by way of Dauphiné and Savoy. Don Luis d' Avila, the bearer, will tell the rest.
Spanish, pp. 8. Modern copy from Simancas, headed: Copia descifrada de la carta del Embaxador de Ynglaterra a su Alteza, de xviii de Enero de 1544.
18 Jan.40. Chapuys to Covos.
Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 13.
To the same effect. London, 18 Jan. 1544.
18 Jan.41. Suffolk and Tunstall to the Council.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 231.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii., No. 150.
Enclose a letter of Wharton's and a letter of Alex. Pringle's forwarded by the captain of Norham. Pringle's letter "unciphereth all the feigned King's friends, if it be true, as we fear it to be," for hitherto his advertisements have been true. Angus and Sir George Douglas have not sent for their month's wages, "which we think their consciences will not suffer them to do "; and we have no word from any of them since they set forward. Suffolk has sent for the three deputy wardens with whom to devise two great raids, in West and East, if weather serve. In these raids neither the Douglas and his friends nor the Maxwell and his shall be forgotten. Enclose the declaration of Mr. Uvedale's account, showing what remains. Suffolk has stayed the payment of the wages of Angus and Douglas and Robert Maxwell, and the 100l. yet undelivered to the sheriff of Ayr, until he is advertised of the demand of the same. Darnton, 18 Jan. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.: 1543.
R. O.2. Declaration made by estimation of John Uvedale, treasurer appointed for payment of my lord Lieutenant and his retinue of 100 men, the earl of Angwishe and George Douglas and all others the garrisons and watchmen on the Borders.
Showing that, at his declaration sent to the lord Lieutenant on 15 Dec. last, he had (including 107l. 8s. 8d. in refuse gold and 166l. 13s. 4d. in two bills of prests to the earl of Rutelande and Sir Robt. Bowes) 1,058l. 19s. 8 1/2d.; and received, on 11 Jan., at Darnetone, from Thos. Gefferey, 3,000l. Whereof:—
Paid to my lord Lieutenant and his retinue for two months to 12 Feb. next, 466l. 13s. 4d.; to Angwishe and Douglas, with 7l. 4s. unpaid last month, for one month to 14 Jan., 214l. 8s.; to the garrisons, 1,078l. 9s. 4d., and 137 watchmen 127l. 17s. 4d., for one month ending 14 Jan.; to Petrua Franciscus, trumpeter, 4l. 4s. for two months to 11 Feb.; in prest to the garrisons and watchmen for 14 days to 28 Jan., 603l. 3s. 4d.; to my lord Lieutenant for rewards to spies, etc., 15l. 5s.; and to sundry persons for conveying the said 3,000l. from Darnetone to Newcastell, 3l. 18s. 2d.
Angus and Douglas have not yet sent for their wages for this present month.
There remains this 18th Jan., 1,645l. 5s. 1 1/2d.
The monthly charges of my lord Lieutenant, Angwishe, Douglas, the garrisons and watchmen consume 1,648l. 19s. 4d. Signed: Jo. Vuedale.
Large paper, p. 1. Headed: "Newcastell upon Tyne, xv [iii] die Januarii anno xxxvo H. viijvj."
18 Jan.42. James Earl of Ormond and Ossory to the Council.
R. O.
St. P., iii. 487.
Lately surrendered the right he had by the King's letters patent in the castle and manor of Dungarvon that the King should be intitled thereto by Act of Parliament, whereby his right and his wife's right as heir general to the earl of Desmond should be barred. This he did freely; yet some, without respect thereto or to the charges and adventure which his father and he sustained in its recovery, argue that his patent was insufficient and intend to charge him with the receipts since the date thereof, because of a proviso in the grant that they should first recover the possession for the King. The King granted the said castle and manor to his father and him, with 100l. yearly out of the revenues (which never extended to that sum) when they were yet in possession of the earl of Desmond, the King's rebel; and at sundry times his father and he besieged the castle, and had been eight days at the siege thereof when Sir Wm. Skeffington, then Deputy, to get the praise himself, came to their camp with a few soldiers and ordnance. Because his father and he had not won it before Skeffington came, it is affirmed that the grant took no effect, although the intruders delivered possession to the writer. (fn. 2) The winning and keeping, apart from the danger of his life, have cost him over 100l. st. His ancestors since the beginning of Edw. II.'s reign, as the King's chief butlers, enjoyed certain prisewines, and at the resumption of grants by the Crown, in Poninges's days, by another act, Thomas then earl of Ormonde was restored to all that he lost by that resumption, which is forthcoming exemplified under the King's seal. Some think that exemplification insufficient without the original, which was stolen by a false fellow, Nangle. As for a liberty which he and his ancestors have enjoyed in co. Tipperarie, as the earls of Desmond do in Kyerry, doubtless the Council "woll thinke inconvenient that fer fett titles, or argumentes by extremytie of lawe, shulde be used against his Majesties faithfull subjectes to deprive theme from that they have so long inherited without clayme or disturbance." Dublin, 18 Jan. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.: 1543.
19 Jan.43. Anthony Cave to [John Johnson?].
R. O."J'hus. At [Ty]ckfford, the xix in Januarii 1543":—Commendations to my cousin your bed fellow. I have received your letter and perceive you have done nothing with Mr. Pulteney, who would not have you come to him; also what is done at Sybbertoffte, and that old Morton will offer me his wools. Pray send word what price wools bear about you, and what you and Harryes and other buyers pay. I perceive that you think to take a farm of Mr. Bryknell's, and am sorry that you will settle so far from this. Herewith I send a letter in your favour to Mr. Bryknell. He and I are smally acquainted, but I know him and I think he knows me.
By your servant, I received some diaper. I would be glad to have my other Hasborowe cloth, and to hear that my salmon of the Mase were bought. Now that you have written what herring you have appointed for me, I know how to appoint myself. I understand that the finer piece of Hasbroke cloth is at London, but not the coarser. My cousin Flecton shall be with you before Candlemas to bring you hither. Signed.
P.S.—Asks him to send word what Morton's wool and his son's is like, and to let Crips' boy come hither shortly.
P. 1. Add. illegible.
19 Jan.44. Arran to Henry VIII.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 234.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii., No. 152.
Epp. Reg. Sc.,
ii. 181.
After many breaks in this realm since the decease of our Prince, finally, the matter is so dressed that all the noblemen are brought to perfect concord, and agreed to act like true subjects both for its defence and "to kepe the samyn fra besines, gif honest and resonable wayis may be hard (sic)." We send bearer to desire safe-conduct for Robert bp. of Orknay, Walter lord Sanct Johnnis, Schir Johnne Campbell of Cawder and Schir Adam Otterburne, or any two of them, whom we intend, by advice of the whole noblesse, to direct "to your Grace for declaratioun of sic thingis as ryndis heichlie to the comoun weill of baith thir realmes." Trusts the King will grant this, as the treaties thus to be made by the assent of all will be kept here; and "mekle besines" shall be removed. Edinburgh, 19 Jan. 1543. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Sealed. Endd.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 160b
.B. M.
2. Letter-book copy of the above. Copy, pp. 2.
19 Jan.45. Arran to Suffolk.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 233.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii., No. 151.
Epp. Reg. Sc.,
ii. 183.
Directs bearer to the King for things which "ryndis heichlie" (tends highly) to the quietness of both realms, and prays Suffolk not to suffer him to be stopped. Edinburgh, 19 Jan. 1543. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Sealed. Endd.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 161.
B. M.
2. Letter-book copy of the above.
Copy, p. 1.
19 Jan.46. Cardinal Betoun to Henry VIII.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 236
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii, No. 153.
Being advertised, by the King's writings to the Governor and otherwise, that the King thinks he has been contrarious to his pleasure and the peace between him and his pronece, thinks it his duty to declare his part in this. Whatever has been said, he was as desirous as any subject of either realm to entertain concord between Henry and his late King; and Henry knows what "entres" he has had since in handling the business of this realm, and what division has been, and how, at his earliest opportunity, he showed Sir Ralph Sadler at great length his part in all. There is now perfect obedience to the Queen and Governor, with unity amongst all the nobles, so that the Governor writes presently for safe-conduct to certain noble personages to resort to Henry to treat. Begs Henry to believe that he is inclined to labour for his contentation, in so far as may stand with his duty to his Sovereign lady, the Governor and the common weal of the realm. Edinburgh, 19 Jan. Signed: Cardall off Sanctandr.
P. 1. Add. Sealed. Endd.: 1543.
[19?] Jan.47. The Queen of Hungary to Chapuys.
R. O.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 33.]
By other letters has written about the safe-conducts of these parts which the English are unwilling to observe. Has since learnt that some ships laden with herring, having safe-conduct to go into France and fetch wine, are arrested in England. This is unfortunate both for the merchants and for this country, which is in want of wine, and she hoped to get a good quantity from France by means of the said herrings; which, &c. although victuals, cannot be kept for the summer and are useless unless disposed of in time. Also the herring fishers, if they cannot issue the herrings, will refrain another time from the expense of preparation for the fishery, which would damage the country in general. If wines cannot be had in France she will be much hindered in furnishing the wines for the army to be made next season. Sends him a letter of credence to the King, upon which to get his consent that the safe-conducts of these parts may be observed by his people; and she will reciprocally order that his safe-conducts may be observed. It is important for the Emperor's service that the said safe-conducts be observed on account of the profit from them, which is requisite to the present necessities of the war. If the King will nowise consent that anyone may trade in France upon safe-conduct, Chapuys shall require him at least to send back the ships without detention, so as not to lose the merchandise; which, considering the safe-conduct, he could not maintain to be forfeited. In this he ought to make no difficulty, although it will be a great loss to the poor merchants.
Fr. Modern transcript of the original minute at Vienna, pp. 2. Original headed: "A l'ambassadeur de l'Empereur en Engleterre du ixe de Janvier (fn. 3) 1543."
20 Jan.48. Deputy and Council of Ireland to Henry VIII.
R. O.
St. P., iii. 489.
According to the King's letters lately sent by John Parker, the Deputy's secretary, have consulted upon their former device signified to his Majesty concerning Christes Churche in Dublin, and perceive from the Abp. and others that the yearly value does not pass 160l. 6s. 8d., and that it is the metropolitan church in the name of which much of the Abp.'s lands are held. The mayor and brethren in the name of the commons of the city, hearing somehow of the proposal to change the college into a parish church, made instant suit that, as there are no other colleges of the King's new erection in the whole realm, it might remain as it is, or their city would be "totally defaced and disparaged." Are thus moved to change their former purpose, trusting otherwise to "invent some things of good value" to set forth their former device, which seems necessary. Dublin, 20 Jan. 35 Hen. VIII. Signed by St. Leger, Alen, George abp. of Dublin, Aylmer, Brabazon, Luttrell, Bathe, Cusake and Basnet.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
20 Jan.49. Mary Queen of Scots to Paul III.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 160b.
B. M.
Epp. Reg. Sc.,
ii. 180.
With the advice of James earl of Arran, tutor of herself and realm, begs that Isabella, Cistercian prioress of North Berwick, who is spent with years and long administration, may resign the priory to Margaret Home, nun there, retaining the fruits, honors and re-entry. Makes this request the more readily because of the probity of the said Margaret and the distinguished deeds of her noble and powerful family in resisting the daily attacks of their English neighbours. Edinburgh, 20 Jan. 1543.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
20 Jan.50. Mary Queen of Scots to the Cardinal of Carpi.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 160b.
B. M.
Epp. Reg. Sc.,
ii. 179.
Encloses the consent of Isabella, Cistercian prioress of North Berwick, and Margaret Home, nun of the same, by which the prioress has appointed &c. to resign her priory, retaining the fruits and the right of re-entry. This has the consent of the said Margaret and the approval of James earl of Arran; and she desires the Cardinal to obtain the due completion of the affair. Edinburgh, 20 Jan. 1543.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
21 Jan.51. The Privy Council to Suffolk.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 247.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii., No. 154.
Have received his of the 18th and 19th inst., with the letters he received from Sir George Douglas. The King marvels at the disloyal and untrue dealing of Angus and Sir George and the rest that have received such inestimable benefits at his hand; for the just revenge whereof he means, with God's help, to make their punishment known to all the world. And, first, Suffolk shall, as he has devised, cause two notable raids to be made out of hand, in East and West; sparing none of the Douglasses' friends, but causing Coldingham, Cobberspith and all lands of the Douglasses and Maxwells and their friends to be harried with fire and sword, and all that cannot be brought away destroyed; "and so raid upon raid," as time shall serve.
Draft in Wriothesley's hand, p. 1. Endd.: Mynute to the duke of Suffolk, xxjo Januarii 1543.
21 Jan.52. Chapuys to the Queen of Hungary.
R. O.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 15]
Has received her letters of the 11th inst., in answer to which he can say no more than she will see by the copy of his letters to the Emperor. Has had no leisure hitherto to answer what she wrote before touching "le personnaige, etc."; and, besides, has often written of his dexterity, quickness of wit, good doctrine and aptitude for divers charges. Has experienced his affection to serve and need not speak of particulars, seeing that so many personages about her will recognise his conditions better in one day than Chapuys would in ten years, especially Mons. de Praet, to whom he has oftener spoken than to Chapuys. Cannot however omit to recommend him.
As to writing for delivery of munitions of war, has conformed to her command; but has not always been able to refuse those of the Council and others who could do the Emperor service, telling them, however, that his letters are of no use. London, 21 Jan. 1544. (fn. 4)
Fr. Modern transcript from Vienna, p. 1.
22 Jan.53. Thomas Gold.
R. O.Confessions of Eliz. Mongumberey, servant to Thomas Gold, made to him on the 17th, 18th and 22nd Jan. 35 Hen. VIII., touching her stealing certain money and jewellery belonging to her master. Among persons named are her uncle, John Egerton, implicating Ric. Flynt, "the singing man of Seynt Bartilmews the Spittell," and Barnard Coll, goldsmith. Signed: Rychard Dey: Will'm in Cordall.
Pp. 2.
22 Jan.54. The Queen of Hungary to Chapuys.
R. O.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 16.]
Heard from the viceroy of Sicily, who departed yesterday towards Spires, all that passed with the King of England, especially that King's instance to have the Scots declared enemies here and forbidden to trade. Had already written of this to the Emperor, upon the suit made by the English ambassador here, and the Emperor writes his resolution to Chapuys in the letters (fn. 5) herewith. If there is open war between the two realms the Emperor makes no difficulty about holding them enemies in pursuance of the treaty, as he told Mr. Bryant; and she will make none about publishing it and interdicting commerce, as soon as she learns the opening of the said war, provided that the King will declare the duke of Holstein enemy, who has defied these countries. Where the King's Council requested the Viceroy to require her permission that after the declaration such Scots as should have the King's safe-conduct might trade here, she will very willingly condescend thereto (although it is reasonable that before trading here they should have safe-conduct from hence) provided that the King allows merchants having her safe-conduct to sail the sea secure from his men-of-war and to enter his ports; and she will give reciprocal order here for all who have his safe-conduct. To observe the proclamation against bringing hither merchandise from France (a like edict being, as she understands, published in England) she requires Chapuys to make an agreement with the English, having regard to her letters of the 10th inst., by which, and by the above, his of the 9th are sufficiently answered. The ambassador here resident has as yet made no representation about the safe-conducts. When he does, will answer as above.
The Legate, Cardinal Farnese, passed in post without stopping here. He presented a brief exhorting her to aid the Emperor in finding peace with the king of France; and told her that he was despatched to exhort the said princes to peace and had been with the king of France, whom he found entirely inclined thereto, and from whom he brought overtures. He hoped that the Emperor would be inclined to reason and required her aid therein, without, however, declaring the said overtures. She answered that, as a lady, she would very willingly aid towards peace, as she had always done, and she regretted that the king of France had not better considered affairs in the past and observed the treaties, without recommencing the war as he did; and Christendom would not be in such danger and trouble as it now is. Thereupon the Cardinal took leave, to continue his journey; and she at once advertised the English ambassador. Chapuys shall advertise the King of this on her behalf. Has no news yet whether the Cardinal has arrived with the Emperor or what overtures he brings; which doubtless the King will know as soon as she.
Chapuys shall continue to solicit that the ships of herring arrested in England may be released and enjoy their safe-conduct, or the merchants will have inestimable loss. It would be unreasonable that the English should keep the herrings at their own price.
Fr., pp. 3. Modern transcript of the original minute at Vienna, headed: "A l'ambassadeur Chapuys de xxijo de Janvier 1543."
23 Jan.55. Chapuys to the Queen of Hungary.
The letter described in Spanish Calendar, VII., No. 17, as of this date is of the 27th Jan. See No. 65.
24 Jan.56. Mary Queen of Scots to Paul III.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 161.
B. M.
Epp. Reg. Sc.
ii. 183.
By the advice of James earl of Arran, desires the appointment of his brother, the abbot of Paisley, to the bpric. of Dunkeld, now void by the death of bp. George; reserving a pension out of the bpric. of 1,000l. Scots to Alex. Campbel, brother of the earl of Argyle, and (since in this age religion is to be supported not only with dignity but with substance and riches) granting the retention of Paisley to the abbot. Where Robert Crechton, without her commendation, has impudently negotiated the resignation of the said bishopric, she desires his Holiness to forbid this by public edict at Rome, and also to annul anything which has been obtained. Trusts he will protect her privileges; especially as he knows the whole matter from her other letters and those of Marcus Grymanus, the Patriarch. Datum Sterlingi et Tutoris nostri manu signatum, (fn. 6) 24 Jan. 1543.
Lat. Copy, pp. 2.
24 Jan.57. Mary Queen of Scots to the Cardinal of Carpi.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 161b.
B. M.
Epp. Reg. Sc.,
ii. 185.
To further the above suits for John abbot of Paisley, to have the bishopric of Dunkeld, of which the pastor died this January, with the reservation for Alex. Campbel and retention of the abbey, and that Robert Crechtoun may be, as it were, hissed off the stage (tanquam e theatro explodatur). There is a recent precedent for this. A certain blind theologian, (fn. 7) in favour (as things then were) with His Holiness, obtained the monastery of Dryburgh without letters of commendation from the Queen's father, who thereupon severely expostulated with His Holiness until that vain provision was rescinded, and banished the theologian. Reminds him of this that he may see that her privileges take no loss there, where they are in his care, for here she will see that no such attempts are made with impunity. He will remember that a dispensation is necessary for the abbot to put off the monastic habit of the Cluniac order and wear the episcopal. Credence for John Thorneton and James Salmond. Datum Sterlingi et Tutoris nostri manu signatum,* 24 Jan. 1543.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
25 Jan.58. Suffolk and Tunstall to the Council.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 257.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii., No. 157.
Angus's chaplain and secretary, Mr. John Penven, and another servant called Sandy Jerden have been with Suffolk, bringing the letter of credence sent herewith. For his credence the chaplain set forth the progress of Angus and other Scottish lords to Sterlinge, Lythcoo and Lythe, where, after three days' offering battle, appointment was taken (as described in the letters of Davy Irwen, Sir George Douglas and others already sent up); reporting that Maxwell and his son failed them at need. Angus and his brother were as whole in heart to the King as ever, and if the King would send a main army in March before help could come from France or Denmark, he should obtain all on this side the Frithe and have all the Douglasses' friends with him. The secretary said he had credence for the King's own person; and that Sir George and Angus would forsake Scotland and come to the King if he thought they could thereby do better service; and the secretary rouned in Suffolk's ear that Sir George bade &c. him tell Suffolk to give him credence "by the token of a heart written in the end of his letters." In reply Suffolk affirmed information here to the contrary of their sayings, as that all the lords who reputed themselves the King's friends would forsake England, and that Angus told a Scottishman sent to him "that he feared he should have no more ado with England"; but they affirmed that Angus was as wholly the King's as ever. Fearing that Jerden might be a spy upon the priest, Suffolk dismissed them to their lodging; and afterwards sent his chaplain to say that, since the priest carried a secret credence to the King, Suffolk would give him another to show his Majesty. Whereupon the priest came to Suffolk, but affirmed all he had said to be true, repeating what he had said of Maxwell and his son, and adding that he would open to the King what trust was to be given to every one of them.
Think that some benefice should be given him out of hand, as promised. As he affirmed the fastness of the Douglasses to the King in heart, and the burning of Coldingham, being Sir George's, might alienate them, Suffolk has countermanded it until the King's pleasure is known, but the raid against the Maxwells shall be done with speed.
At the same time arrived Rosse, herald of Scotland, with letters from the Governor and Cardinal to the King and one from the Governor to Suffolk (enclosed). As the Council wrote on the 20th that, if any came to sue for peace in the name of both parties, they should be sent up, Suffolk opened the letters, to see whether they came from all, and found mentioned in the Governor's letter that the lords on both sides were agreed and sent for safe-conduct for the bp. of Orkeney, lord of St. John's, Sir John Cambell and Sir Adam Ottirburne, or for three of them, to make perfect peace, the subscription being "James Governour, your cousyn, with lefull service." The Cardinal's letter contains his excuse, that he has been wrongly reported. As the Governor's saying that all are agreed is proved by the laying of the hostages of the King's friends, albeit Angus's secretary and servant affirm that they are not agreed in heart and would nowise have these Ambassadors accepted, but the King to enter with a main army—saying also that the hostages and lord Somervell are at large again—Suffolk would not stop the herald.
Perceives by theirs of 22 Jan. that they have despatched Richmond herald to the Parliament of Scotland, to demand the prisoners. Reminds them that the Parliament does not assemble until 18 Feb., and that the Governor told Henry Raye that no answer could be given until then. Is Richmond to go into Scotland before the Parliament?
Jerden, at taking leave, said that Maxwell asked Angus's forgiveness, saying that the reason he caused his son to fail them was to save his head from being stricken off forthwith, and promising never to forsake him. Darn ton, 25 Jan. Signed.
P.S.—Jerden demands the month's wages of Angus and his brother, and is put off with gentle words. Suffolk would know how to answer him.
Pp. 6. Add. Endd.: 1543.
25 Jan.59. Suffolk to the Council.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 250.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
ii. 156.1544.
Perceives by their letters dated Westm., 22nd inst., that Mr. Sadler has declared part of Suffolk's opinion touching the wars, if any be made against Scotland this year. Thought the invasion should be early in the year, so as to destroy the corn now left and let "the sowing of grain, bygge and haver"; and, with the present scarcity in Scotland, no great number could be raised for defence, nor would there be time for help to come from &c. France and Denmark, so that the Scots must either do as the King requires or else the King to waste all betwixt this and the Frythe, and keep Edinburgh, and Stirling and Temptallon and other fortresses, and destroy the rest. For want of grass, the army could hardly enter before the first of May; and, meanwhile, it were not amiss to let the Mershe alone for the relief of the army when it comes. Six weeks would be sufficient time for the army to be within Scotland. Grain for bread and drink must be sent to the Borders for relief of the army in going and coming, and for the King's subjects; for there will be such lack there that, before May, the Borderers will "flee into the land for food." Will send an estimate of the amount required. Gives a long estimate of wine and vinegar (for brew-houses will not serve in Scotland) and carriages for an army of 20,000 men for 6 weeks. Other necessaries are shown in the books that were sent. Considering what charges the King will be at this year in other ways, suggests alternative plans, viz.
To lay 2,000 more men in garrisons, from the beginning of next month for three months, so as to destroy all that is left within 16 miles of the Border and let the sowing of "haver and bygge." The Borderers must then go inland and waste there, so that, if their fishing is prevented, they must run beyond the Frythe for food; and the Scots could not bring an army to invade England through such wasted country. For defence an army of 20,000 men must be ready, and victual laid on the Borders.
Another way is, if the Scots desire truce for two or three months, to let the truce rather be for a year or two; for if they desire it for three months it will only be to get sowing time past and learn what France and Denmark will do for them. Truce for a year or two would serve the King's purpose well, for meanwhile the King and Emperor would bring the French king out of power to help the Scots, who might thereupon agree to the King's wishes. The King's army could revenge any breach of the truce and the scarcity in Scotland would make it impossible to bring an army to invade England. Darnetoune, 25 Jan. Signed.
Pp. 7. Add. Sealed. Endd.: 1543.
Ib. f. 254.2. Estimate of the cost of each of the above ways, showing that the first would cost 44,000l. besides the charges by sea, but would save the l,500l. a month spent in defence of the Borders and leave no need for an army to resist invasion, thus saving 20,000l. The second would cost 9,000l. in three months; but, for the next nine months, no garrison would be needed, thus saving 13,500l., and if the Scots should invade an army of 20,000 men for defence would cost 20,000l. By the third the King would be at no charge, unless the Scots should break truce, when an army for defence must be levied as above.
Pp. 2.
25 Jan.60. Wharton to Suffolk.
Add. MS.
32,653, f. 248.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers.
ii., No. 155.
Coming from him to Carlisle this Friday night, received the enclosed letter from Robert Maxwell. The credence of his man, Dowgles, was to desire Wharton to write to Mr. Broun that Robert Maxwell would keep all his promises to the King, that what "he now did was for the life of his father," and that, with the 50 men in wages, he should the better serve the King. Dowgles said the lords were agreed to send to the King for peace, in the same form (he supposed) as the first peace, and, if it was refused, all would join together; he heard Robert Maxwell say that "without army to invade upon them we could never have our desires;" all the earls had laid pledges except Lenax. Asks what answer to send to Robert Maxwell's letter.
The same Friday, at 7 p.m., received Suffolk's letter enclosing copy of an article in the Council's letter, showing that the King will revenge the untruth of the Scots with fire and sword, and that Wharton shall make raid upon raid against them. Will attend to it. Thanks for kindness showed at Darnton. Carlisle, 25 Jan.
P.S.—On Sunday night Wille Routlege and 13 others burnt corn stacks of the abbot of Jedworth, at Jedworth and at the laird of Langlandes' grange two miles thence. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. (as despatched at 9 p.m.). Endd.: 1543.
25 Jan.61. Charles V. to Chapuys.
R. O.
[Spanish
Calendar,
vii. 18.]
Since he wrote from Cologne, "et approchant ce lieu," Cardinal Farnese arrived, as legate from the Pope, having sojourned some days in France, as Chapuys will have heard. Farnese has had two or three audiences and divers communications with the Emperor's ministers, which are described in the enclosed copy of letters to the ambassador at Rome, together with the answer given him, which is that if the king of France wishes for peace he must first restore what he detains from others and pay his debts. Chapuys may advertise the King of England of this that he may know the Emperor's consideration of him, who has declared it to his ambassador here. Don Fernande de Gonsaga has not yet arrived and there is no news. Worms, 25 Jan. 1543.
Fr. Modern transcript of the original minute at Vienna, p. 1.

Footnotes

1 See Vol. XVIII. Pt. ii. No. 107(67)
2 In 1535. See Vol. IX. No. 626.
3 This date is certainly erroneous. Perhaps the 19 Jan. was intended. The Spanish Calendar places the document 9 Feb. as if the error was in the month; but that date is certainly too late.
4 This date does not agree very well with internal evidence, and the document seems to be out of place. The contents, especially as regards the "personage" here referred to, agree much better with the year 1543 when Chapuys actually did write to the Emperor on the 21 Jan. See Vol. XVIII. Pt. i. No. 63. It will be observed, moreover, that in Oct. 1542 (Vol. XVII. No. 917) Chapuys was desired by the Queen of Hungary not to agree too readily to write for armour from the Low Countries. See No. 65.
5 No 32.
6 This date is in the margin, apparently to be substituted for "Datum ex Edinburgo" which is in the text.
7 Dr. Robert Wauchop.