Historical Collections
January 1643

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History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Rushworth, John

Year published

1721

Pages

102-127

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'Historical Collections: January 1643', Historical Collections of Private Passages of State: Volume 5: 1642-45 (1721), pp. 102-127. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=80732 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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Contents

A Declaration of the Lords and Commons for Defence of Hertfordshire, &c. January 2. 1642/3.
A Proclamation prohibiting the Buying or Disposing of any the Lading the Ship called the Sancta Clara, lately brought into Southampton.
A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, for securing of Warwick, &c.
A Declaration and Ordinance of the Lords and Commons in Parliament, for the Defence and Preservation of the Inhabitants within the County of Lincoln, and Peace and Quiet of the said County.
An Order of both Houses for the Removing the Prisoners out of Lincoln Castle, and for the speedy fortifying of the same.
The Humble Petition of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons of the City of London
A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, that no Ships make any Voyage to Newcastle,
Two Orders made by the House of Commons in Parliament assembled, January 16, 1642/3.
An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament for the Assessing all Men of Ability within the Counties of
His Majesty's Letter and Declaration to the Sheriffs and City of London, January 17, 1642.
A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, for the Prevention of a Design pursued by Sir Ralph Hopton and his Adherents in Cornwal and Devon.
An Ordinance of both Houses for the Assessing of Malignants in the said County of Somerset, and the Parts Adjacent.
The Copy of a Letter from the Lord Fairfax to the Speaker, and read in both Houses, January 26, 1642/3.
Footnotes

A Declaration of the Lords and Commons for Defence of Hertfordshire, &c. January 2. 1642/3.

Whereas great Forces of Papists, and other ill-affected Persons are now in actual War against the King, the Parliament, and the whole Kingdom; and Part of those Forces being now drawn to Brill in the County of Buckingham, and other Places adjoining, have according to their Usage, plunder'd, robb'd, pillag'd and murther'd divers good Protestants thereabouts; and threaten to march into the County of Hertford, and other Counties that way, there to commit the like Outrages, and barbarous Cruelties as they have done in Places where they have formerly been.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, being most desirous to prevent these Miseries, and to suppress the Authors of them, for the better effecting thereof, do hereby desire all well-affected Persons of the County of Hertford, and other Counties and Places adjoining, forthwith to raise all such Forces of Horse and Foot as they can make, and to march with them to Aylesbury in the County of Buckingham, or to such other Places as they shall be directed by Order from both Houses of Parliament, or from the Earl of Essex Lord General, and to join with and assist the Forces raised by Authority of Parliament, for the Defence of themselves, their Families, and Estates, and the true Protestant Religion, and for the Suppressing and punishing those Forces at Brill, and all other their Adherents, notorious Enemies to the King and Kingdom: And such well-affected Persons of the County of Hertford, or any other Counties or Places whatsoever, that shall join with and assist the Forces raised by Authority of Parliament, for the Purposes above mentioned, shall therein do a very acceptable Service to the Commonwealth, and shall be assisted and protected by the Power and Authority of Parliament.

By the King.

A Proclamation prohibiting the Buying or Disposing of any the Lading the Ship called the Sancta Clara, lately brought into Southampton.

The King's Proclamation about a Spanish Ship, Jan. 2. 1642/3

Complaint having been made unto his Majesty by Don Alonzo de Cardenas, Ambassadour from the King of Spain, That a Ship called the Sancta Clara, belonging to the said King and his Subjects, hath been lately treacherously brought to Southampton by one Capt. Bennet Strafford; and others from Sancto Domingo, the said Ship being laded with Silver, Cocheneal, and other Wares and Merchandizes, to a very great Value. And the said Ship and Goods being by the said Ambassadour arrested, and the said Bennet Strafford apprehended, whilst a suit for the said Ship and Goods is depending in the Court of Admiralty, the Silver (Part of the Lading of the said Ship to a very great Value) hath been disposed of contrary to Law, without any other Security given for the same, then the empty Name of Publick Faith, which without his Majesty cannot (as is well known to all the World) be engaged, or if engaged without his Majesty, is not valid, or to be relied on for Satisfaction. And it is further complained by the said Ambassadour, That the Cocheneal, and other Merchandizes formerly sequestred at London and Southampton, albeit they are not perishable, but have rather encreased in their Price and Value, are likely to be sold against the Will of those who pretend to be the Owners, (Parties to the Suit depending in the said court of Admiralty) which is alledged to be apparently against the Rules of Law, and Practices of that Court in such Cases. His Majesty well weighing what may be the ill Consequences of such injurious Proceedings, manifestly contrary to the Law, and the Articles of Treaty between the two Crowns; and plainly foreseeing how heavily it may light upon such of his good Subjects who have Estates in Spain, and how destructive it may prove to the Trade and Commerce of his Subjects, doth hereby not only expressly charge and command the Judges of his Admiralty, and all other whom it may concern, to proceed in a Business of such a Value and Consequence, with Care, Expedition, and according to Justice; both doth also expressly prohibit all Persons, of what Condition soever, upon pretence of any Order or Warrant from one or both Houses of Parliament, or any Authority derived from thence, to buy, meddle with, or dispose of any Part of the said Cocheneal, or other Goods or Merchandizes belonging to the said Ship, until the Propriety thereof shall be judicially decided and determined, upon pain of his Majesty's high Displeasure, and of being responsible and liable to the Payment and Satisfaction for whatsoever Damage shall happen to any of his Majesty's Subjects, whose Goods or Estates shall for that Cause be imbarqued or seized in Spain.

Given at the Court of Oxford, the Second Day of January in the Eighteenth Year of his Majesty's Reign.

God Save the King.

A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, for securing of Warwick, &c.

The Lords and Commons now in Parliament assembled, being certainly informed, that Papists, and other wicked and ill-affected Persons, have traiterously combined together, and entred into Association, and have raised, and daily do raise great Forces, both of Horse and Foot, in several Counties of this Kingdom, and have plundered, spoiled, and destroyed Multitudes of his Majesties good Subjects, and if not timely prevented, will utterly subvert, and destroy the true Protestant Religion, (which is their chief Design) the Laws of the Land, the Priviledges of Parliament, and the Liberty of the Subjects: The said Lords and Commons do declare, That they hold it a Thing most fit and necessary for the present State of this Kingdom, and for the better securing of the County of Warwick, and City and County of Coventry, and of the County of Stafford, and City and County of Litchfield, and the Parts adjacent to the said Counties; and do accordingly order and ordain, That the Lords Lieutenants, and the Committees of Parliament hereafter named (that is to say) for the County of Warwick, and City and County of Coventry, Sir Peter Wentworth Knight of the Bath, Will. Purefoy, Esq; Godfrey Bosvile Esq; John Barker Esp; William Jesson Esq; the prevent Major of the City of Coventry, John Hales Esq; Anthony Stoughton Esq; Thomas Boughton Esq; William Colemore Esq; George Abbot Esq; and Thomas Basnet Alderman; and for the County of Stafford, and City and County of Litchfield, Sir Hugh Wrotesly Kt. and Bar. Sir Charles Egerton Kt. T. Crompton Esq; Edward Manwayring Esq; Thomas Parkes Esq; John Skrinsley Esq; Gerard Shrinsley Esq; Edward Leigh Esq; Richard Broughton Esq; Matthew Moreton Esq; Richard Payot Esq; George Parker Esq; Humphrey Wickley, Rowland Cotton Esquires, Walter Grasvenor Esq; Richard Flier Esq; Francis Collier Esq; Richard Bowyer Esq; Ralph Rudier Esq; the Major of Stafford for the Time being, Edward Broughton Gent. John Birch Gent. Philip Jackson Gent. Henry Stone Gent. John Swinefield Gent. They Bayliffs and Sheriff of the City of Litchfield for the Time being, John Bourne Gent. Richard Baxter Gent. and all Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Serjeant-Majors, and other Captains and Officers, and all other well-affected Persons inhabiting within the said several Counties, Cities, and Parts adjacent, shall and may associate themselves, and mutually aid, and succour, and assist one another, in the mutual Preservation and Defence of themselves, and the Peace of the said Cities and Counties from all Rapine, Plundering, and Spoilings of the said Papists, and ill-affected Persons. And it is further ordered, ordained, and declared, That the said Lord-Lieutenants, Committees of Parliament, Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Serjeant-Majors, Captains, and other Officers, have Power and Authority to raise Forces of Horse and Foot, and to lead them into any Place which shall be fitting and convenient, and to give Battel, and to fight with all such as are, or shall be raised to levy War against the Parliament, and all other Forces raised without Authority and Consent of both Houses of Parliament, that make any Insurrection and Plunder, or destroy his Majesties good Subjects, and them to invade, resist, suppress, subdue, and pursue kill, and slay, and put to Execution of Death, and by all Means to destroy as Enemies to the Kingdom, and to perform all Things else needful for the Preservation of the Safety, and Peace of the said Cities and Counties, and Parts adjacent, observing from time to time such other Directions and Commands as they shall receive from both Houses of Parliament, or from the Earl of Essex Lord General, and that the said persons, and other Inhabitants for so doing shall be saved and kept harmless by the Power and Authority of Parliament. And the said Lords and Commons taking into their serious Consideration the Necessity of appointing a Commander in Chief over the Forces which are, or shall be raised in the Cities and Counties aforesaid, or any of them, for the Service aforesaid, in regard that by particular Commission already granted to Persons in the said several Counties, there was no Power given to lead Forces out of their own Counties; It is ordered and ordained, That the Lord General the Earl of Essex, shall be desired to grant a Commission to Robert Lord Brook, to Command in chief as General of all the Forces, raised or to be raised in the said Cities and Counties, and Parts adjacent, and to have Power to lead, command and carry the same to such Places within the said Cities and Counties, and Parts adjacent, as he shall think fit for the Defence thereof; and likewise Power to give the same Order and Instructions in his said Excellency's Absence, for regulating the Soldiers which are or shall be under his Command, as his said Excellency hath given to his Army, and to use Martial Law to compel Obedience thereunto, as Occasion shall require; and also Power and Authority to make and appoint all Officers for levying, conducting, and leading the said Forces as he shall think fit.

T. Browne Cler. Parliamentorum.

Die Sabbathi, Januar. 7, 1642–3.

A Declaration of both Houses of Parliament shewing the Necessity of a present Subscription of Money and Plate, for further Supply of the Army.

The pressing Necessities of this Kingdom caused and daily multiplied by the traitorous and bloody Counsels and Attempts of whose pernicious and desperate Counsellors still about the King, and protected by him, while they more and more manifest their implacable Enmity to our Religion, the Parliament, and Peace of all his Majesty's good Subjects and Dominions, have been such, and so many, as have compelled us the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, to borrow more and far greater Sums of Money upon the Publick Faith (besides those which we ourselves advanced for the Preservation of our Religion, the Being (as well as the just and undoubted Power and Priviledges) of Parliament, our Laws and Liberties, from most apparent Destruction, then at first we intended and to be longer in repaying the same (which we still unanimously resolve shall be fully paid back with Interest) then heretofore we permitted. And altho' we be now preparing and expediting sundry Propositions to be humbly and speedily presented to his Majesty for an honourable and firm Settling of the publick Peace, without more Effusion of Christian Blood; yet no rational Man can be ignorant of the further Necessity of providing more Treasure, as well for Support of the Army raised by Authority of Parliament, until the King shall vouchsafe graciously to condescend to our just and necessary Requests; As for the full Payment of all such Sums of Money as already are, or further may be due, and Arrear for the necessary Provision of Arms, Ammunition, and Pay of the said Army, until their Disbanding and Return home to their several Countries (according to the Times to be limited for that Purpose) that so they may not be occasioned, through Want of Pay, to plunder, to, or pillage by the Way homewards, after their Discharge and Dismissed.

Upon these Grounds alone we might very well recommend to the good Affections and Zeal of all good Men within the City of Londo, and throughout the Kingdom, a new Advance and Loan of a very large and Considerable Sum of Money, left (while all we have is now in more imminent Danger than ever) not only all the Moneys already lent, but all those Treasures of our Religion, Laws, and Liberties (which ought to be more precious to us then our whole Estates and Lives, which we have solemnly devoted to the Defence of this Cause) be utterly lost for want of some further Supply to close and perfect the Work in a safe and honourable Way, whereby all these may be saved, and the Moneys already advanced for this Service, be in due Time fully repaid.

But when we consider further, That (notwithstanding all his Majesty's Protestations, Declarations, and Proclamations to the contrary) not only a great Number of known Papists are entertained and imployed in his Majesty's Army, who have actually levied War against the King and Parliament; but Commissions have issued under the Great Seal of England, to the Earl of Worcester, and to the Earl of New-castle, by means whereof many Thousands of Professed Papists (whose very Principles of Religion do ingage them to Rebellion, and shedding the Blood of all Protestants, and therefore ought not, by the Laws, to be entrusted with Arms in their own Houses, nor to come within the Verge of his Majesty's Court) are gathered into great Bodies, and do actually bear Arms against the King, Parliament, and Kingdom, and have plundered, robbed, pillaged, and murthered very many of his Majesty's good Protestant Subjects in the Northern Parts, besides sundry other Places of this Kingdom; which Armies of Papists do daily encrease by the Accession of many Arms and Popish Commanders from foreign Parts, arriving at New-castle and other Ports, and joining themselves with those professed Enemies to our Religion, and to the Laws made to guard it, and to suppress or prevent their frequent Treasons and Rebellions; and that it is notoriously known, that the Rebels in and about New-castle, under the Command of the Earl of New-castle, do lay very great Impositions upon every Ship lading of Coals exported thence for the Use of the City of London, and other Places of this Kingdom; and if these Impositions be not paid, Stay is made of their Coal-ship, and some of them are compelled over Sea, to fetch in more Men, Arms, and Ammunition, to furnish the said popish Army against us and our Religion, by which Means a great Dearth of Coals must inevitably befal the poor People in and about London, that probably may occasion many dangerous Tumults and Commotions, while the said popish Army is advancing toward London, with Hope that by this and other their devilish Artifices, they may find all in combustion here, whereby they may, with less Resistance, pillage and sack this City, cut the Throats of all Men of Estates, and ravish their Wives and Daughters without Difference (for Papists, in such Cases, never make Difference between Friends and Enemies;) yea, so insolent and barbarous are those bloody Enemies become, that (while some Men in these Parts do causelessly murmur and complain if any Thing, altho' it amount not to the 30th Part of their Estates, be required of them for their own Preservation, as well as for the publick Safety) these popish Rebels violently seize upon the Persons of so many Men of Quality and Wealth as they can, although no Enemies to their Cause, and compel them to redeem themselves; some at One thousand Pounds some at Two thousands Pounds, some at Three thousand Pounds a Man, inforcing others to bring in large Contributions to the Supply of their Army, even to the One-half and more of some of their Estates, and exacting the same with such Rigour, that the Miseries under which their Friends, as well as others, do groan and mourn, without Relief or Pity, cannot be sufficiently expressed. Upon all which Considerations we cannot but declare, That we have just Cause to suspect, that however they abused his Majesty so far, as to obtain such illegal Commissions to levy Forces upon Pretence of assisting his Majesty; yet, having gotten Power and Strength into their Hands, they will not lay down their Arms, even when his Majesty shall have laid down His, unless they may give Laws to the King and Parliament, for Toleration of their Superstition and Idolatry, and the Abrogation of all Laws made against it, but will proceed with Fire and Sword to root out our Religion, and all the profess it, as they have already begun, and still proceed to do in Ireland; if there be not a good Provision of Treasure to maintain and support our Army, not only during the Time of Treaty, but until such Time as the said popish Army be dissolved, and the Papists sufficiently secured from Ability and Opportunity to disturb that blessed Peace and Settling of our Religion and Laws, which now, thro' God's Blessing, may be happily obtained, as it is unseignedly and earnestly desired by us. We therefore the Lords and Commons now assembled in Parliament, for the more speedy and effectual Provision of Moneys to be imployed in quenching this unnatural and bloody War now kindled, not only in the Heart, but in almost all Parts of this Kingdom at once, by those Papists, Persons popishly affected, Traitors and Delinquents about his Majesty, (who have already made this flourishing Nation to become a Field of Blood) have, in the first Place begun a new Subscription, and again Assessed our selves towards the Raising of such a considerable Sum of Money, as of Necessity must be forthwith advanced for the Purpose aforesaid, albeit many of us be exceedingly prejudiced in our Estates, by plundering, pillaging, and forced Contribution to those Enemies of the King and Kingdom in Places where any of our Estates lie, and our respective Lands are situated, besides the great Charge and Losses sustained by our long Attendance upon the Publick Service of the King and Kingdom: and having by this our Example recommended this Work to be further advanced and carried on by all others, who are touched with any Sense of Piety to God, and their native Country, now in a Flame, or of Zeal to the true Religion professed among us, or of Conscience in making good their solemn Protestation and Vow already made to Almighty God, we do further order and require, That the several Persons hereunder named, or any three or more of them, do forthwith summon all the Inhabitants, and other Resiants within—which they, or any three, or more of them shall think fit to be summoned: and do likewise repair unto the several Houses or Places of Abode of all the Inhabitants, and other Resiants or Sojourners within the said—which they, or any three, or more of them shall think fit to be repaired unto; and in the Name of both Houses of Parliament, do give hearty Thanks to so many of them (whether summoned or repaired unto) as have already contributed, by Way of Loan or Gift, any Money, Plate, Horse, or Arms, according to the Propositions of both Houses of Parliament heretofore published in that Behalf; or otherwise, assuring all and every of them, that the said Houses are very sensible of their Alacrity and Duty therein, and do resolve to be as careful of their Safety, Welfare, and Reimbursement, as of their own, and to live and die with them in this Cause: and likewise, That the said Persons hereunder named, or any three more of them, do acquaint not only those, but especially the Rest of the said Inhabitants who have not yet contributed, with the further urgent Necessity of new Subscriptions for Plate and Money, still pressing beyond former Expectation, and accordingly desire and stir up them, and every of them, to under-write, in a Book provided for that Purpose, (and wherein their Names shall be registered whether they under-write or no) such Sums of Money and Plate as may testify their real and further Performance of their late Protestation and sacred Vow to Almighty God, and of their Readiness to join with the Rest of the well-affected Party of the Kingdom, and with us the Lords and Commons, who are resolved to pursue this Work with our Lives, Persons, and Estates, for their Preservation as well as for our own. And because the Success of this further Levy of Money depends much upon the speedy bringing in thereof: It is therefore further Ordered, That all such Persons as shall hereupon subscribe as aforesaid, be desired by the Parties imployed to take their Subscriptions, instantly to bring in one fourth Part of the said Money and Plate, subscribed by each of them respectively, to the Treasurers for Money and Plate formerly appointed in the Guildhall, London, who shall there upon give Receipts for the same in Manner and Form already used: And that the Second fourth Part of their said Subscription be likewise brought in to the Persons and Places aforesaid, at the End of one Month next after their Subscriptions: And the Third fourth Part be accordingly brought in at the End of the second Month after their said Subscriptions: and the last Payment at the End of the third Month next after their said Subscriptions. And for the Ease of such Men so subscribing, whose Occasions will not permit them to make their several Payments at Guildhall, at the Times aforesaid, it is further Ordered, That the said Parties imployed to take their said Subscriptions, or any two or more of them, shall demand and receive of the said Persons subscribing, the several and respective Sums so subscribed and in arrear and unpaid by the Space of fix Days after the several Times of Payment, shall be respectively commenced and expired, and shall give Acquittances for the same in Manner and Form appointed and used upon the former Subscriptions of Money and Plate, For all which, both Houses of Parliament do hereby ingage the publick Faith of the Kingdom, That they shall be repaid with eight Pounds per Cent. Allowance for the fame, according to the said former Propositions. And if any Thing not mentioned in this Declaration and Order, may conduce to the more effectual promoting of this new Subscription, and the Receipt thereof, the same is hereby referred to the Wisdom and Care of the Committee of Lords and Commons for Advance of Money and other Necessaries for the Army, to be prosecuted and improved with Effect.

And lastly, it is ordered, That this Declaration and Order be printed and published.

J. Browne Cler. Parliamentorum.

A Declaration and Ordinance of the Lords and Commons in Parliament, for the Defence and Preservation of the Inhabitants within the County of Lincoln, and Peace and Quiet of the said County.

The Lords and Commons now in Parliament assembled, being certainly informed, That Papists and other wicked and ill affected Persons, have traiterously combined together, and entered into Association, and have raised, and daily do raise great Forces both of Horse and Foot, in several Counties of this Kingdom, and are at this present in a great Body together, under the Command of William Earl of New-castle in the Counties of York and Nottingham, and where they have plundered, spoiled, and destroyed Multitudes of his Majesty's good Subjects, and if not timely prevented, will utterly subvert and destroy the true Protestant Religion (which is their chief Design) the Laws of the Land, the Privileges of Parliament, and the Liberty of the Subjects; the said Lords and Commons do declare, That they hold it a Think most fit and necessary for the State of this Kingdom, and for the better securing of the County of Lincoln, City of Lincoln, and County of the same, Towns Corporate, and Parts adjacent to the said County, and accordingly Order and Ordain, That Francis Lord Willoughby, Lord Lieutenant of the said County of Lincoln, and the Committees of Parliament for the Propositions of Subscriptions of Mony, Horse, and Plate for the said County, City of Lincoln, and County of the same, the High-Sheriff of the County of Lincoln for the Time being, the Mayor of Boston, Alderman of Grantham and Soake, and the Alderman of Stamford for the Time being, and all Bailiffs of Liberties and Towns Corporate within the said County, and all Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Serjeat-Majors, and other Captains and Officers, and all other well affected Persons within the said County, City of Lincoln, and County of the same, and Parts adjacent, shall and may associate themselves, and mutually aid and succour, and assist one another in the mutual Preservation and Defence of themselves, and the Peace of the said County of Lincoln, City of Lincoln, and the County of the same, and all other Towns Corporate within the said County, from all Rapine, Plundering, and Spoilings of the said Papists, and ill affected Persons, as well under the Command of the said William Earl of Newcastle, as any other of his and their Adherents. And it is further Ordered, Ordained, and Declared, That the said Lord-Lieutenants, Committes of Parliament, Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Serjeant-Majors, Captains, and other Officers, have Power and Authority to raise Forces of Horse and Foot, and to lead them into any place which shall be sitting and convenient, and to give Battel, and to fight with all such as are, or shall be raised to levy War against the Parliament, and all other Forces raised without authority and Consent of both Houses of Parliament, that make any Insurrection and Plunder, or destroy his Majesty's good Subjects, and them to invade, resist, suppress, subdue, and pursue, kill, and slay, and put to Execution of Death, and by all Means to destroy, as Enemies to the Kingdom, and to perform all Things else needful for the Preservation of the Safety and Peace of the said County, City of Lincoln, and County of the same, with the Rest of the Towns Corporate within the said County and Parts adjacent; observing from Time to Time such other Directions and Commands as they shall receive from both Houses of Parliament, or from the Earl of Essex Lord General, or the Lord Fairfax, General of the Forces in the Northern Parts, with whom the said County of Lincoln is already associated; and that all the said Persons and other Inhabitants for so doing, shall be saved and kept harmless by the Power and Authority of Parliament: And the said Lords and Commons taking into their serious Consideration the Necessity of appointing a Commander in Chief over the Forces, which are or shall be raised in the said County, City, and County of the same, for the Service aforesaid; in regard that by particular Commissions already granted to Persons in the said County, there was no Power given to lead Forces out of their own County, it is Ordered and Ordained, That the Lord General, the Earl of Essex, shall be desired to grant a Commission to such a Person as he shall think fit to command in Chief, as General of all the Forces raised, or to be raised in the said County and City of Lincoln, and County of the same, and Parts adjacent, and have Power to lead, command, and carry the same to such Places within the said County, City of Lincoln, and Parts adjacent, as he shall thank fit, for the Defence thereof; and likewise Power to give the same Orders and Instructions in his said Excellency's Absence, for regulating the Soldiers, which are or shall be under his Command, as his Excellency hath given to his Army, and to use martial Law to compel Obedience thereunto, as Occasion shall require, and also Power and Authority to make and appoint all officers for levying, conducting, and leading the said Forces, as he shall thank fit.

The Instructions to the Lord Willoughby, Lord Lieutenant of the County of Lincoln, and the Committees of Parliament there, being in Effect the same with those given to Warwick before-recited, are therefore here omitted.

An Order of both Houses for the Removing the Prisoners out of Lincoln Castle, and for the speedy fortifying of the same.

Die Lunæ, Junar. 9, 1642.

It is this Day Ordered by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, That the High Sheriff of the County of Lincoln, for the Time being, one . . . . Smith Goaler and Keeper of the Castle of Lincoln, shall be forthwith required to remove his Prisoners out of the said Castle of Lincoln, to some safe and secure Place; and for the present (if a more convenient House cannot be had) the said Smith is hereby authorised to remove his said Prisoners to the Bishop of Lincoln's House, near the said Castle, commonly called the Bishop's Palace, and to resign and deliver up the said Castle into the Hands of the Earl of Lincoln, or such as he shall appoint for the safe Keeping of the said Castle, and better security of the City of Lincoln.

Joh. Browne Cler. Parl.

To the King's most Excellent Majesty,

The Humble Petition of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons of the City of London

A Petition from the City of London, presented to the King at Oxford, by a Committee of Aldermen & Commons.

Sheweth,
That the Petitioners, your Majesty's most humble and loyal Subjects, being much pierced with the long and great Divisions between your Majesty and both your Houses of Parliament, and with the said and bloody Effects thereof both here and in Ireland, are yet more deeply wounded by the Misapprehension which your Majesty seemeth to entertain of the Love and Loyalty of this your City, as if there were some Cause of Fear or Suspicion of Danger to your Royal Person, if your Majesty should return hither; and that this is made the unhappy Bar to that blessed Reconciliation with your great and most faithful Council, for preventing that Desolation and Destruction which is now most apparently imminent to your Majesty and all your Kingdoms.

For Satisfaction therefore of your Majesty, and clearing of the Petitioners Innocency, they most humbly declare, (as formerly they have done) that they are no way conscious of any Disloyalty, but abhor all Thoughts thereof; and that they are resolved to make good their late solemn Protestation and sacred Vow made to Almighty God, and with the last Drop of their dearest Blood, to defend and maintain the true reformed Protestant Religion, and, according to the Duty of their Allegiance, your Majesty's Royal Person, Honour and Estate, (whatsoever is maliciously and falsely suggested to your Majesty to the contrary) as well as the Power and Priviledges of Parliament, and the lawful Rights and Liberties of the Subject; and do hereby ingage themselves, their Estates, and all they have to their uttermost Power, to defend and preserve your Majesty and both Houses of Parliament from all Tumults, Affronts, and Violence, with as much Loyalty, Love and Duty, as ever Citizens expressed towards your Majesty, or any of your Royal Progenitors, in their greatest Glory.

The Petitioners therefore, upon their bended Knees, do most humbly beseech your Majesty to return to your Parliament (accompanied with your Royal, not Martial Attendance;) to the End, that Religion, Laws, and Liberties may be settled and secured, and whatsoever is amiss in Church and Commonwealth, reformed by their Advice, according to the fundamental Constitution of this Kingdom; and that such a Peace may thereby be obtained, as shall be for the Glory of God, the Honour and Happiness of your Majesty and Posterity, and Welfare of all your loyal Subjects, who (the Petitioners are fully assured) whatsoever is given out to the contrary, do unanimously desire the Peace herein expressed.

And the Petitioners shall ever pray, &c.

Michell.

His Majesty hath graciously considered this Petition, and returns this Answer.

The King's Answer.

That his Majesty doth not entertain any Misapprehension of the Love and Loyalty of his City of London. As he hath always expressed a singular Regard and Esteem of the Affections of that City, and is still desirous to make it his chief Place of Residence, and to continue and renew many Marks of his Favour to it; so he believes much the better and greater Part of that his City is full of Love, Duty, and Loyalty to his Majesty, and that the Tumults which heretofore forced his Majesty for his Safety to leave that Place, though they were contrived and encouraged by some principal Members thereof (who are since well known, tho' they are above the Reach of Justice) consisted more of desperate Persons of the Suburbs, and the neighbouring Towns (who were misled too by the Cunning and Malice of their Seducers) then of the Inhabitants of the City. He looks on his good Subjects there, as Persons groaning under the same Burthen which doth oppress his Majesty, and a wed by the same Persons who begat those Tumults, and the same Army which gave Battel to his Majesty. And therefore as no good Subject can more desire from his Soul a Composure of the general Distractions, so no good Citizen can more desire the Establishment of the particular Peace and Prosperity of that Place, by his Majesty's Access thither, than his Majesty himself doth.

But his Majesty desires his good Subjects of London seriously to confider, what Confidence his Majesty can have so Security there, whilst the Laws of the Land are so notoriously despised and trampled under Foot, and the wholesome Government of that City (heretofore so famous over all the World) is now submitted to the arbitrary Power of a few desperate Persons of no Reputation, but for Malice and Disloyalty to him; whilst Arms are taken up, not only without, but against his Consent and express Command, and Collections publickly made, and Contributions avowed for the Maintenance of the Army which hath given him Battel, and therein used all possible Means Treason and Malice could suggest to them, to have taken his Life from him, and to have destroyed his Royal Issue; whilst such of his Majesty's Subjects, who out of Duty and Affection to his Majesty, and Compassion of their bleeding Country, have laboured for Peace, are reviled, injured, and murthered, even by the Magistrates of that city, or by their Directions. Lastly, What Hopes his Majesty can have of Safety there, whilst Alderman Pennington, their pretended Lord Mayor, (the principal Author of those Calamities, which so nearly threaten the Ruin of that famous City) Ven, Foulke, and Manwairing, (all Persons notoriously guilty of Schism and High Treason) commit such Outrages in oppressing, robbing, and imprisoning, according to their Discretion, all such his Majesty's loving Subjects, whom they are pleased to suspect but for wishing well to his Majesty. And his Majesty would know, whether the Petitioners believe, That the Reviling and Suppressing the Book Common Prayer, (establish'd in this Church ever since the Reformation) the Discountenancing and Imprisoning godly, learned, and painful Preachers, and the Cherishing and Countenancing of Brownists, Anabaptists, and all Manner of Sectaries, be the Way to defend and maintain the true reformed Protestant Religion? That to comply with and assist Persons who have actually attempted to kill his Majesty, and to allow and favour Libels, Pasquils, and seditious Sermons against his Majesty, be to defend his royal Person and Honour, according to the Duty of their Allegiance? Whether to imprison Mens Persons, and to plunder their Houses, because they will not rebel against his Majesty, nor assist those that do? Whether to destroy their Property by taking away the 20th Part of their Estates from them, and by the same Arbitrary Power to refer to four Standers by of their own Faction, to judge what the 20th part is, be to defend the lawful Rights and Liberties of the Subject? And if they think these Actions to be Instances of either, Whether they do not know the Persons before named to be guilty of them all? Or, Whether they thank it possible, that Almighty God can bless that City, and preserve it from Destruction, whilst Persons of such known Guilt and Wickedness, are defended and justified amongst them, against the Power of that Law by which they can only subsist.

His Majesty is so far from suffering himself to be incensed against the whole City, by the Actions of these ill Men, tho' they have hitherto been so prevalent as to make the Affections of the Rest of little Use to him; and is so willing to be with them, and to protect them, that the Trade, Wealth, and Glory thereof (so decayed and eclipsed by these publick Distractions) may again be the Envy of all foreign Nations. That he doth once more graciously offer his free and general Pardon to all the Inhabitants of that his City of London, the Suburbs, and City of Westminister, (except the Persons formerly excepted by his Majesty) if they shall yet return to their Duty, Loyalty, and Obedience. And if his good Subjects of that his City of London, shall first solemnly declare, That they will defend the known Laws of the Land, and will submit to, and be governed by no other Rule; if they shall first manifest, by defending themselves, and maintaining their own Rights, Liberties, and Interests, and suppressing and Force and Violence unlawfully raised against those and his Majesty, their Power to defend and preserve him from all Tumults, Affronts, and Violence: Lastly, If they shall Apprehend and commit to safe Custody the Persons of those four Men, who enrich themselves by the Spoil and Oppresion of his loving Subjects, and the Ruin of the City, that his Majesty may proceed against them by the Course of Law, as guilty of High Treason, his Majesty will Speedily return to them with his Royal, and without his Martial Attendance, and will use his utmost Endeavour, that they may hereafter enjoy all the Blessings of Peace and Plenty, and will no longer expect Obedience from them, then he shall, with all the Faculties of his Soul, labour in the Preserving and Advancing the true reformed Protestant Religion, the Laws of the Land, the Liberty and Property of the Subjects, and the just Priviledges of Parliament.

If notwithstanding all his, the Art and Interest of these Men can prevail so far, that they involve more Men in their Guilt, and draw that his City to sacrifice its present Happiness and future Hopes to their Pride, Fury, and Malice, his Majesty shall only give them this Warning, That whosoever shall henceforward take up Arms without his Consent, contribute any Money or Plate, upon what Pretence of Authority soever, for maintenance of the Army under the Command of the Earl of Essex, Of any other Army in Rebellion against him, or shall pay Tonnage and Poundage, till the same shall be settled by Act of Parliament; every such Person must expect the severest Punishment the Law can inflict; and in the mean Time his Majesty shall seize upon any Part of his Estate within his Power, for the Relief and Support of him and his Army, raised and maintained for the Defence of his Person, the Laws, and this his Kingdom: And since he denies to his Majesty the Duty and Benefit of his Subjection, by giving Assistance to Rebels, which by the known Laws of the Land is High Treason, his Majesty shall likewise deny him the Benefit of his Protection, and shall not only signify to all his foreign Ministers, that such Person shall receive no Advantage by being his Subject, but shall by all other Way and Means proceed against him as a public Enemy to his Majesty and this Kingdom.

But his Majesty hopes, and deputes not, but his good Subjects of London will call to Mind the Acts of their Predecessors, the Duty, Affection, Loyalty, and Merit towards their Princes, the Renown they have had with all Posterity for, and the Blessing of Heaven which always accompained those Vertues, and will consider the perpetual Scorn and Infamy which unavoidably will follow them and their Children, if infinitely the meaner Part in Quality, and much the lesser Part in Number, shall be able to alter the Government so admirably established, destroy the Trade so excellently settled, and to waste the Wealth, so industriously gotten, of that flourishing City; and then they will easily gather up the Courage and Resolution to join with his Majesty in Defence of that Religion, Law, and Liberty, which hitherto hath and only can make themselves, his Majesty, and his Kingdom happy.

For concurring with the Advice of his two Houses of Parliament, which, with reference to the Commonwealth, may be as well at this distance, as by being at Whitehall, his Majesty doubts not but his good Subjects of London well know how far (beyond the Example of his Predecessors) his Majesty hath concurred with their Advice, in passing of such Laws, by which he willingly parted with many of his known Rights for the Benefit of his Subjects, which the fundamental Constitutions of this Kingdom did not oblige him to consent unto, and hath used all possible Means to beget a right Understanding between them; and will therefore apply themselves to those, who, by making just, peaceable, and honourable Propositions to his Majesty can only beget that Concurrence.

This Petition was presented to his Majesty at Oxford by two Aldermen and four Commoners, viz. Sir George Clarke, Sir George Garret, Mr. Bate man, Mr. Peter Jones, Mr. Rhemes and Mr. Henly, who received the aforesaid Answer thereunto, unclosed under Seal, with express Command, that it should be read at a Common-Hall in London; and his Majesty appointed Henry Heron, Esq; (Son to Sir Edward Heron of Lincolnshire) to go with them to London to fee the same performed accordingly; which was done on Friday January the 13th; at which Time a Committee of Lords and Common was ordered to be present at Guildhall; and after the Reading of his Majesty's Answer, these following Speeches were made.

The Earl of Manchester's Speech.

My Lord Mayor and Gentlemen, you of the City of London, this Assembly can never be looked upon by any Members of both Houses of Parliament, but there must be some Offering of Gratitude made to you, both of Thanks and Acknowledgment for your former Large-hearted Expressions, both of Affection and Care for the Preservation both of the Parliament and Kingdom: The Occasion why my Lords, and these Gentlemen of the House of Commons, are come hither, is this, They have read an Answer to an humble Petition of the Lord Mayor and Common-Council and Citizens of London To his Majesty: In which Answer, they find many wounding Aspersions cast upon Persons of very eminent Authority in your City, and upon others of very great Fidelity and Trust among you. This Answer they do find, as it is printed, to agree with that which the Gentleman from his Majesty hath here read; and they owning themselves equally interested (in all Things that concern you) with you, have commanded (fn. 1) this Gentleman to make some Observations by Way of Vindication, both of the Proceedings of both Houses of Parliament, and of the Proceedings of the City, with this Assurance, That they will never desert you, but will stand by you with their Lives and Fortunes for the Preservation of the City in general, and those Persons in particular who have been faithful, and deserved well both of the Parliament and Kingdom; and they will pursue all Means, both with their Lives and Fortunes, that may be for the Preservation of this City, and for the Procuring of Safety, Happiness, and Peace to the whole Kingdom.

Then Mr. Pym Spake as followeth:

Mr. Pym's Speech.

My Lord Mayor, and you worthy Citizens of this noble and famous City of London, I am commanded by the Lords and Commons, to let you know, that, That in this Answer which hath been published to you, they do observe many Things of great Aspersion upon the Proceedings of Parliament, and very scandalous and injurious to many particular Members of this City, whereupon they think that it becomes them, both in Tenderness of their own Honour, and Respect to you, to take away all these Aspersions, and to let you know the Truth of their Proceedings, which have been full of Honour and Justice, as they stand in relation to their own Duty, and full of Humility and Obedience towards his Majesty, and of Care, for the common Good, and so shall ever be: And they have commanded me to let you know the true Answer to most of those Things that are imputed either to the Parliament, or to the City, by observing some Particulars of this Book which hath been read to you, and to let you know the Particulars of this Book which hath been read to you, and to let you know the Proceedings in their own native Condition, clear from those Misrepresentations which makes them appear in a Quality much different from the Truth; which before I enter into, I am to declare as the Sense of both Houses, That your Petition was so full of Loyalty, Humility, and Obedience, that you might well have expected an Answer of another Kind.

The first Observation I am to make you, is this; that it is said here, That his Majesty was inforced by Tumults to leave the Parliament, and go from Whitehall, and to withdraw himself into those Courses which now he hath taken.

In Answer thereunto, I am commanded to tell you, That there was no Occasion given by the Tumults rising out of this City or the Suburbs, which might justly cause his Majesty's Departure; and you may very well remember, that after his violent Coming to the Commons House of Parliament in that unusual and unheard-of Manner (which was the Beginning of these unhappy Differences) that the very next Day his Majesty came into the City without any Guard, that he was present at the Common Council, din'd at the Sheriffs, and returned back again, with manifold Evidences of Fidelity on the Part of the City, and without any such Expressions as were unbeseeming the Majesty of a King, or the Duty of Subjects: That he resided divers Days at Whitehall, and afterward at Hampton Court, Windsor, and Places adjoining, with small Forces about him, and yet never any Attempt made which might give him any Apprehension of Fear. By all which it is manifest, that this is an unjust Aspersion cast upon this City, that any tumultuous Carriage of yours, was the Occasion of his Majesty's leaving the Parliament, and withdrawing himself to remoter Parts.

It is affirmed, That the Government of your City hath been managed by a few desperate Persons, and that they do exercise an arbitrary Power.] In answer to which, the two Houses of Parliament give you this Testimony, That you have in most of the great Occasions concerning the Government of the City, followed their Direction, and that Direction which they have given, you have executed, and they must and will maintain to be such as stands with their Honour in giving it, and your Trust and Fidelity in the Performance of it.

It is objected in the third Place, That Contributions have been publickly made for the Maintenance of that Army which did join Battel with the King, and did, by all the Means that Treason and Malice could suggest, endeavour to take away his Life, and destroy his Issue. To this I am commanded to say, That the Design of bringing up the English Armies, the Gathering together of the Cavaliers about Whitehall, the violent Coming to the House of Commons, the King's going into the North, and raising Arms there, are clear Evidence that Violence was first intended, and divers Practices were made against the Parliament, before they took any Course, or made any Preparation to take up Arms for their Defence. For the Danger of his Majesty's Person, they were sorry for it, and did by divers humble Petitions labour to prevent it. And as touching the royal Issue, they have sufficiently declared to the World their good Affections towards them, by the Care they have taken both for the Safety and Maintenance of those who are left here.

It is further expressed in this Answer, That the King demands the Lord Mayor, Mr. Alderman Fowke, Col. Ven, and Col. Manwaring, to be delivered up as guilty of Schism and High Treason.] Concerning which, I am commanded to tell you, as the Sense of both House of Parliament, That this Demand is against the Priviledge of Parliament (two of them being Members of the Commons House) most dishonourable to the City, That the Lord Mayor of London should be subjected to the Violence of every base Fellow, be assaulted, seized on, without due Process or Warrant, which the Law doth afford every private Man; and the you should be commanded to deliver up your chief Magistrates, and such eminent Members of the City to the King's Pleasure, only because they have done their Duty in adhering to the Parliament, for the Defence of the Kingdom; and that it is against the Rules of Justice, that any Men should be imprisoned upon such a general Charge, when no Particulars are proved against them; and this you are to take notice of as the Answer to those Scandals, and to that Disgrace upon my Lord Mayor, and the other Members of the City.

And I am further to tell you, That there is little Cause for his Majesty to make this Demand, Considering that he himself doth, by Force, keep away many accused in Parliament, as my Lord Digby, and many more impeached of High Treason, besides divers other great Delinquents, that stand charged there fore heinous Crimes, all which, by Force, are kept from the due Proceedings, and legal Trial in Parliament.

It is all edged in his Answer, That my Lord Mayor, and those other Persons named, are Countenancers of Brownists and Anabaptists, and all Manner of Sectaries.] To this I am commanded to say, That hereof there is no Proof; it doth not appear that they give any such Countenance to Sectaries, of any Kind whatsoever; and if it did, his Majesty hath little Reason to object it, while, notwithstanding the Profession he hath often made, that he will maintain the Protestant reformed Religion, he doth in the mean Time raise an Army of Papists, who, by the Principles of their Religion, are bound (if Power be put into their Hands) to destroy, and utterly to root out the Protestants, together with the Truth which they profess.

It is affirmed, That Mens Persons have been imprisoned, and their Houses plundered, because they will not rebel against his Majesty.] To this I am commanded to declare, that no Man's House hath been plandered by any direction of the Parliament, but that they have been very careful to restrain all such violent Courses, so far as they were able; and, That they have never committed any Man, but such Men as, by due Information, they Conceived to be seditious Persons, and like to trouble the Peace of the State.

It is objected further, That the Property of the Subject is destroyed by taking away the twentieth Part by an Arbitrary Power.] To this they say, That that Ordinance, doth not require a twentieth Part, bot doth limit the Assessors, that they shall not go beyond a twentieth Part; and that this is done by a Power derived from both Houses of Parliament: The Lords, who have an hereditary Interest in making Laws in this Kingdom; and the Commons, who are elected and chosen to represent the whole Body of the Commonalty, and trusted for the Good of the People, whenever they see Cause to charge the Kingdom. And they say further, That the same Law that did enable the two Houses of Parliament to raise Forces to maintain and defend the Safety of Religion, and of the Kingdom, doth likewise enable them to require Contributions, whereby these Forces may be maintained; or else it were a vain Power to raise Forces, if they had not a Power likewise to maintain them in that Service for which they were raised.

And to this Point I am commanded to add this further Answer, That there was little Reason for this to be objected on his Majesty's Behalf, when it is well known, that from the subjects (which are within the Power of his Army) his Majesty doth take the full yearly Value of their Lands, and in some Cases more; That not only particular Houses, but whole Towns have been plundered by Command and Design; and, That by Proclamations Men are declared to forfeit all their Estates, because they will not obey arbitrary Commands, and this is commonly practiced by his Majesty, and on his Part, and therefore there was little Reason to charge the Parliament with so necessary and moderate a Contribution as the twentieth Part.

It is declared, That the King expects to be kept from Tumults and Affronts.] Upon which I am commanded to observe, That his Majesty's Expressions in his Answer, tend to the Making of a Division in this City, and to the Rasing of a Party which may make some Disturbance in that orderly Government which is now established; both which will certainly prove equally destructive to him and both Houses of Parliament, and more prejudicial to his quiet Abode here, than any Thing that hath ever been acted by the Houses of Parliament, or the present Governours of the City.

They observe further, That in this Answer his Majesty doth profess that he will seize upon the Estates of those that shall contribute any Thing towards the Maintenance of the Parliament's Army, and will put them out of his Projection, and, by his Ministers in foreign States, will take such Course, that they may be proceeded against as Enemies, that is destroyed and spoiled.] To which the Lords and Commons do declare, That this is an Excess of Rigour and Injustice beyond all Example, that particular Men should lose their private Estates here, without Law or judicial Proceeding. And, That our Prince, who owes Protection to the Kingdom, as well as to particular Persons, should suffer the Wealth thereof to be robbed and spoiled by foreign States; upon due Consideration whereof, they hope his Majesty will be induced, by better Counsel, to forbear the Execution, then that by which he hath been perswaded to publish such a Resolution.

Besides these Observations out of the Answer, I am to observe One out of a Narrative that was received from the Common Council, that the King did declare, That he would send some Messengers here to observe your Carriage in the City, and what was done amongst you, the Parliament have just Cause to doubt, that these will be Messengers of Sedition and Trouble, and therefore desires you to observe them, and find them out, and that they may know who they are.

I am, for a Conclusion, to commend to your Considerations, That you fee, by the Proceedings to which the King is drawn by the ill Council now about him, that Religion, the whole Kingdom, this glorious City, and the Parliament, are all in great Danger, and that this Danger cannot be kept off, in all likelihood, but by the Army that is now on Foot; and that the Lords and Commons are so far from being freighted by any Thing that is in this Answer, that they have for themselves, and the Members of both Houses, declared, a further contribution towards the Maintenance of this Army, and cannot but hope and desire, That you who have shewed so much good Affection in the former Necessities of the States, will be sensible of your own, and of the Condition of the whole Kingdom, and add to that which you have already done, some further Contribution, whereby this Army may be maintained for all your Safeties.

A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, that no Ships make any Voyage to Newcastle,

until that Town shall be reduced into such Hands as shall declare themselves for King and Parliament, January 9, 1642/3.

The Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, taking into their Consideration, the Number of Ships and Quantity of Money that is every Year imployed from London, and other Parts and Places of this Kingdom, for the Fetching of Coals and Salt from Newcastle, Sunderland, and Blyth; and finding, that since the Beginning of the present Troubles, that Town of Newcastle being possessed by Forces raised against the King and Parliament, hath been, and is the principal In let of foreign Aid, Forces, and Ammunition, for the Strengthning of that Force that intends destruction to the Parliament, and thereby to the Religion, Laws, and Liberties of this Kingdom; and taking into Consideration, that sufficient Coals may be supplied from other Parts, for the Use of this Kingdom, do declare, That they are inforced, for the Safety of the Kingdom, and for the better hindering of the supporting the said Forces, and for the reducing of the Town of Newcastle, and the Parts adjacent, to yield Obedience and Submission to the Commands of the two Houses of Parliament for the present, to hinder the repairing of Ship to Newcastle, Sunderland, and Blyth, left those Ships and Money which are intended to procure Fewel, for the Supportation of the Kingdom, be improved to give Vigour and Maintenance to the War, raised to the Destruction thereof: For prevention whereof, We the Lords and Commons do ordain, That no Ship, Ships, or Barques, shall, from henceforth make any Voyage for the Fetching of Coals or Salt from Newcastle, Sunderland, or Blyth, or carrying of Corn, or other Provision of Victual, until that Town of Newcastle shall be freed of, and from the Forces there now raised, or maintained against the Parliament, and the Town be reduced into such Hands, and Condition, as shall declare themselves for King and Parliament; and the Masters, Owners, and Sailors of Ships and Barques, are hereby required, not to presume to go that Voyage contrary to this Ordinance: And it is further Ordained and Ordered, That if any Ship, Vessel, or Barque, shall at any Time after the first Day of February next coming, Import, or bring into any Port or Place of this Kingdom, any Coals or Salt laden from Newcastle, Sunderland, and Blyth, or any of them, until further Order be taken by both Houses of Parliament, that every such Ship, Vessel, and Barque, and the Master and Sailors in the same, shall be seized upon, and stayed in such Port and Place where they come in, until the two Houses of Parliament being thereof informed, shall take further Order and Direction therein.

Two Orders made by the House of Commons in Parliament assembled, January 16, 1642/3.

The One prohibiting, That no Carriers or Waggoners whatsoever, shall be permitted hereafter to go to Oxford, or elsewhere, without special License from the Parliament.

The Other, That any Agent or Servant to any Person that bears Arms against the Parliament, who shall presume to come to Westminster, or reside about London, shall be forthwith apprehended as a Spy, and proceeded against accordingly.

Die Lunæ 16 Januarii, 1642.

It is this Day Ordered by the Commons House of Parliament, That no Carriers, Waggoners, Carts, or Waggons, or Horses laden with any Commodities whatsoever, shall be permitted hereafter to go from hence or elsewhere to Oxford, or any Part of the King's Army, with any Manner of Provisions, without the special License and Authority of this House first had and obtained: And if they do presume, notwithstanding, to go or carry any Things, that them their Persons and Goods shall be seized upon, and kept in safe Custody, till this House take further Order. And Col. Moore is to take Care, that strict Command be given to all the Courts of Guard to make Stay of them accordingly, and to bring the Persons stayed before him, to the Intent they may be brought to this House; and that diligent Search be made for any Moneys that may be carried or concerned by any Person to Oxford.

Die Lune 16 Januarii, 1642.

It is this Day Ordered by the Commons now assembled in Parliament, That if the Agent or Servant to any Person that bears Arms against the Parliament, shall presume hereafter to come to Westminster, or reside here about London, That he shall be forthwith apprehended as a Spy, and be proceeded against accordingly; and all Persons are required to do their Endeavour for the Discovery of such Persons as shall hereafter come to the Parliament House, or Westminster, or any Parts about London, that they may be apprehended accordingly.

An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament for the Assessing all Men of Ability within the Counties of

Northampton, Leicester, Derby, Rutland, Nottingham, Huntington, Bedford, and Buckingham, that have not contributed upon the Propositions of both Houses of Parliament; and they to be Rated and Assessed in like Sort as was the 400,0001. by an Act of this present Parliament, Jan. 16. 1642/3.

The Lords and Commons now in Parliament assembled, being certainly informed, That Papists and other wicked and ill-affected Persons, have traitorously combined together, and entered into an Association, and have raised, and daily do raise great Forces both of Horse and Foot in several Counties of this Kingdom, and have plundered, spoiled, and destroyed Multitudes of his Majesty's good Subjects, and if not timely prevented, will utterly subvert and destroy the true Protestant Religion, which is their chief Design, the Laws of the Land, the Priviledges of Parliament, and the Liberty of the Subject.

The said Lords and Commons having formerly declared, that they held it fit and necessary for the Counties of Northampton, Leicester, Derby, Rutland, Nottingham, Huntington, Bedford, and Buckingham, to associate for the mutual Defence in pursuance of the fame, and for the better preventing of the Spoiling and Plundering of the said Counties, and the Parts adjacent, and to have further Means for the Furnishing of Arms and Ammunition, making of Fortifications, and Payment of the Garrisons, Officers, and Soldiers, and other necessary Charges, that there be forthwith raised in the said several Counties respectively, and in the Corporations, Constablaries, and Parishes thereof, such Sums of Money is shall necessarily be disbursed and dispended for Uses aforesaid; The same Sum to be rated and assessed in like Sort as was the 400,000 l. granted by Act this present Parliament, wherein the Persons who have not subscribed to the Parliament's late Propositions shall be assessed, and their Assessments levied in such Sort, as by the Ordinance lately made for the City of London, and the Parts adjacent, such like Persons are to be assessed, and their Assessments levied. And for the better levying of the said Sums of Money, the said Committee named in the Ordinance of Association of the said Counties respectively, or any Three or more of them, shall or may assess and tax, or cause to be assessed or taxed the said Sums upon the said several Counties, and the Corporations, Towns, Constablaries, and Parishes within the same, in like manner as is aforesaid; and that They, or any three or more of them, nominate and appoint Treasures, Collectors, and Assessors in every the said Counties, for assessing, receiving, and collecting the said Sums of Money, and shall and may grant Warrants under their Hands and Seals in Writing to any Constable or other Officer whatsoever, to raise and levy the said Sums so to be assessed and taxed as aforesaid, upon all such Persons upon whom any such Sums shall be so assessed and set, that do refuse or neglect to pay the same; It shall and may be lawful to and for the said Assessors, or any other Person to whom Warrants by the Committees respectively shall be granted, to levy the said Sums so assessed by Way of Distress and Sale of the Goods of the Persons so assessed and refusing: And if any Person so distrained shall make Resistance, it shall and may be lawful to and for the respective Committees to send any of the Trained Bands or other Soldiers of the respective Counties aforesaid, to compel the said Parties so refusing to Obedience of this Ordinance. And in case no Distress is or may be found, then the respective Committees aforesaid, or any Three or more of them, shall or may commit such Person and Persons refusing to pay as aforesaid, to some common Goal, there to remain until Payment made of such Sum and Sums as aforesaid. For which Sums of Money so rated and levied, and expended as aforesaid, the said Committees shall be accountable to both Houses of Parliament, and to non else.

J. Browne Cler. Parliamentorum.

The Association for Leicestershire, Derbyshire, &c.

Whereas his Majesty, by the Instigation and Advice of divers about his royal Person, hat raised Forces against the Parliament, for the most Part consisting of Papists, notorious Deliquents, and other malignant Persons, and that hereby the well-affected of the Kingdom are ruinated in their Estates, and divers Outrages committed upon their Persons; The Lords and Commons in Parliament do therefore declare, That it is very requisite that the Counties of Leicester, Derby, Nottingham, Rutland, Northampton, Buckingham, Bedford, and Huntington, should enter into an Association for the mutual defence and safety of each other; and that Thomas Lord Gray, Sir Edward Hartop, Sir Arthur Hazelrig, Baronets, Sir Thomas Hartop, Sir Edward Hartop, Kts. [and divers others particularly named] shall be a Committee to meet at such Times and Places as they shall thank fit, for raising of Men, Horses, Arms, Ammunition, upon the Propositions formerly agreed on by both Houses of Parliament, or by any other Way that they shall judge convenient for the Suppressing of the present Rebellion, stirr'd up by the malignant Persons, who desire to subvert the Happiness of this Kingdom; and shall have Power to do all Things necessary thereunto, upon all Occasions to join any Forces raised by Authority of Parliament; and that the Lord Grey, Son to the Earl of Stamford, having Commission from the Earl of Essex, Lord General, shall command in Chief as Major General of the Forces to be so raised, and have Power to lead and carry the said Forces to such Places as he shall think fit; and to subdue, fight with, kill, slay, and imprison all such Persons as shall levy War without the Consent of both Houses of Parliament; and that what Money, Horses, Arms, or Ammunition, shall be contributed by any Person towards this Service, shall be secured to be repaid with Interest, after 8 l. per Cent. by the Publick Faith of both Houses of Parliament, upon the Shewing of an Acquittance or Certificate under the Hands of any four of the said Committee for the Receipt of the said Monies, or Appraisement of the said Horses, Arms, or Ammunition; and the said Moneys so brought in shall be issued forth in every of the said Counties, by the Appointment of any Four of the said Committee of that County where it shall be contributed.

His Majesty's Letter and Declaration to the Sheriffs and City of London, January 17, 1642.

Trusty and Welbeloved, we greet you well. We received lately a Petition from the Aldermen and Common Council of our City of London, by the Hands of Persons intrusted by them for the Delivery, who found such a Reception from us, as well manifested our Regard to that Body which sent them: Tho' we well knew by whom that Petition was framed, and where perused and examined, before it was approved by those from whom it seemed to be sent; yet, we were so willing to enter into a Correspondence with that our City, and to receive any Address and Application from them, according to the Invitation we had given by our late Proclamation; and were so glad to find that there was yet some Hopes they would look to the Peace and Happiness of that City, and at last sever themselves from any Faction or Dependance which might insensibly involve them in those Calamities they did not foresee, that we returned such a gracious Answer thereunto, so full of Candor and Affection, that the meanest Inhabitant of that our City, if he carefully consider the same, will find himself concerned at it, and that we had an especial Care of his Particular. With this Answer of ours we sent a Servant of our own, in the Company of those who had been so well used here, to require and see that it might be communicated to the whole Body of that our City; not doubting but that both It and the Bringer should receive such Entertaintment there, as might manifest their due Regard of us, and of our Affection to them: But to our great Wonder, we find, that after ten Days Attendance, and suffering a ridiculous Pamphlet to be published in our Name, as if we retracted our former Resolutions, (which Pamphlet we have caused to be burned by the Hand of, the Hangman, as we also require you to see done) instead of that Admission we expected to our Messenger and Message, Guards of armed Men have been brought to keep our good Subjects, to whom that our Answer was directed, from being present at the Reading thereof; and Speeches have been made by Strangers (who have been admitted to the City Councils, contrary to the Freedom and Custom of those Meetings) to blast our said Answer, and to dishonour and slander us, which if our good Subjects there shall suffer, we shall be much discouraged in our desired Correspondences with that our City, and so by the Cunning and Power of those Incendiaries mentioned in our Answer (Alderman Pennington) who, to shew his great Loyalty to us, and his Fitness to be the chief Magistrate of such a City, being informed that a desperate Person there said, That he hoped shortly to wash his Hands in our Blood, refused to send any Warrant, or to give any Direction to any Officer for his Apprehension, (Ven, Fulke, and Man waring) who have plunged that our City into such unspeakable Calamities, in which they would still keep it, to cure their own desperate Condition, our good Subjects there are not suffered to receive our gracious Answer to that Petition; We have therefore thought fit to write these our Letters to you, requiring you the Sheriffs of our said City, to take Care for the Publishing that our Answer (which we herewith send you) to our good Subjects of that our City; And our Pleasure is, That you the Masters and Wardens of the several Companies of our said City, forthwith summon all the Members of your several Companies, with all the Freemen and Apprentices (whose Hopes and Interests are so much blasted in these general Distractions) belonging thereunto, to appear at your several Halls, where you shall cause our said Answer, together with these our Letters, to be publickly read, that all our good Subjects may clearly understand how far we have been from begetting, how far we are from continuing or nourishing these unnatural Civil Dissentions, and how much it is in their own Power to remove the present Pressures, and to establish the future Happiness and Glory of that famous City, and most seriously weigh every Part of that our Answer, as well that which carries Caution in it for the Future, as Pardon for what is past; for, assure your selves, for the Time to come, We shall proceed with all Severity against such who shall incur the Penalty of the Law in those Points, of which we have given them so fair a Warning in our said Answer; and whosoever shall not behave himself like a good Subject in this our Kingdom, shall not, (if we can help it) receive the Benefit and Advantage of being our Subject in any other; but all foreign Princes shall know, That as such Person hath parted with his Loyalty to us, so he must not hope for any Security by us, and to that Purpose we shall henceforward have a very inquisitive Eye upon the Actions of all our Subjects, that some Example may be made, how easy it is for us to punish their Disloyalties abroad, who, for a Time, may avoid our Justice at home. And to the End that none of our good Subjects of that our City may think themselves bound to obey any of the Orders or Commands of the pretended Lord Mayor (whom we have and do still accuse of High Treason, and conspiring to take our Like from us.) It is well known to those Citizens who understand the Charter of that City, (so amply granted by our Royal Progenitors, and so graciously confirmed by us, and of which we presume our good Subjects there do still desire to receive the Benefit) that the said Isaac Pennington was never regularly elected, or lawfully admitted to be Lord Mayor of that our City; that in Truth, Alderman Cordwell was, by the Plurality of Voices, chosen, and that this Man was never presented to, or admitted by us, in such Manner as is prescribed by their said Charter; neither had that Judge, who presumed to swear him, any more Colour of Law or Authority to administer such an Oath to him, then he hath to do the same to Morrow to any other Alderman of the City: And we do therefore hereby declare the said Isaac Pennington not to be the Mayor of that our City of London, and to have no lawful Authority to exercise the same, and that our good Subjects of that our City, ought not to submit to any Orders, Directions, or Commands which shall issue from him as Lord Mayor of that our City, but that the same are void and of none effect. And we do once more require you the Sheriffs of our said City, and all other Magistrates of the Same, in which all our good Subjects of that City will assist you, that you cause the said Isaac Pennington, Ven, Fulke, and Manwaring to be apprehended and committed to safe custody, that we may proceed against them as guilty of High Treason, and principal Authors of those Calamities which are now so heavy upon our poor Subjects of that City, and if not suddenly remedied, will, in a short Time, utterly confound a Place and a People lately of so flourishing an Estimation in all Parts of Christendom. And whereas we are informed, That one Brown a Woodmonger, Titchburne a Linnen-draper, and one Harvey a Silkman, have exercised great Insolvencies and Outrages in that our City, and when many of our good Subjects there have assembled together in a peaceable and modest Manner, to consult about the Peace and Welfare of that City, the said mutinous and seditious Persons have presumed to lead Multitudes of armed Men against them, and by such Force have beaten, wounded, and killed our good Subjects, our Will and Pleasure is, That if the said Brown, Titchburn, and Harvey, or either of them, shall so far neglect our gracious Offer of Pardon, as still to engage themselves in those unwarrantable and seditious Courses, That our Sheriffs of London raise Power to suppress the said Force, and that you, and all our Ministers of Justice, use your utmost Means to apprehend the said Persons, and to bring them to condign Punishment. And we do hereby declare, That it shall be lawful for any of our loving Subjects to resist and oppose the said Persons, if they shall hereafter, in such a warlike Manner, endeavour to molest them, as they would do Rebels and Traytors: And we hope that all our good Subjects of That our much injured City of London, do take notice of our Grace and Favour towards them, in our so freely passing by and pardoning the Offences there committed against us, as we have offered by our Proclamation and our late Answer, and of our very earnest Desire to be with them, and to reside amongst them for their Comfort, Support, and Protection, if they shall, be first providing for their own Security, (in such Manner as we have directed them in our late Answer) give us an Instance that we may be safe there too; and that they do likewise observe, That being by such Violence kept from them, we have done our utmost Endeavour to continue and advance the decay'd Trading of That our City, by permitting and encouraging all Resort and Traffick thither; and therefore, if by the Stopping of Carriages, and Seizing Commodities by other Men, the Commerce and Correspondence be broken between that Place and our good Subjects of other Counties, they will impute that Mischief to the true Authors of it, and look upon us only as not able to help them. Do but your Duties, and this Cloud which threatens a present Confusion will quickly vanish away, and you will enjoy all the Blessings of a happy Nation, to the Which, no Endeavour of ours shall be wanting.

The Parliament forbid this Letter of the King's to be read to the Companies.

Upon the Receipt of this Letter and Declaration the Sheriffs acquainted the Parliament therewith, who ordered that the several Companies should not assemble at their Halls for reading of the Same; and the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs were desired to take special Care to prevent the Same. And some of the Masters of the Companies that were chief Promoters of the Business in opposing the Order of Parliament, were taken into Custody.

A Declaration of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, for the Prevention of a Design pursued by Sir Ralph Hopton and his Adherents in Cornwal and Devon.

A Declaration on against Sir Ralph Hopton Jan. 26, 1642.

Whereas his Majesty, by the advice and Instigation of a wicked Councel about his Person, hath raised Forces against the Parliament, and hath actually made War against his great Councel, and his good dom are ruinated in their Estates, and divers Outrages committed upon their Persons. And forasmuch as Sir Ralph Hopton, and his Adherents, Rebels and Traitors, combining together in pursuance of this most horrid, wicked, and unnatural Design, have levied divers Forces in the County of Cornwal, and in a warlike Manner already entered into the County of Devon, and besieged, robbed, spoiled, plundered, and pillaged divers Towns and Places in the said County, and divers Rapes, Murthers, and other Misdemeanors, have acted and committed upon divers of his Majesty's good Subjects there, and many of them have utterly destroyed. And forasmuch as that now Ruine and Destruction is threatned, not only by that hellish and accursed Crew, but also by the Welch and other Forces raised by his Majesty, and in his Name, to the County of Somerset, and other the adjacent Counties, the said Counties also being in danger by the Invasion of a foreign Enemy; for Prevention whereof, amongst other the said Counties, the well-affected and good Subjects in the said County of Somerset, for defence of themselves and the western Parts, against all such their Enemies, Rebels, and Traitors, having associated themselves, and raised divers Forces both of Horse and Foot, which must be maintained upon the publick Charge; the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, do order, declare, and ordain, That the Receivers for the Subscriptions appointed for the County of Somerset, upon the Propositions for raising of Horse, Money, and Plate, for the Defence of the King, Kingdom, and Parliament, and all Collectors, Sub-Collectors, and others instructed for the Levying and Receiving of the said Collections, and the said Propositions in and for the said County of Somerset, shall forthwith pay in all such Sum and Sums of Money, as by them, or by any of them have been collected and received, and not paid into the Treasures in London, according to the said Ordinance for the Propositions, as aforesaid, unto John Ash, Esq; and Rog. Hill of Taunton, Gent. Treasurers hereby appointed to receive the said Sums so raised and levied as aforesaid, upon the said Ordinance for Subscriptions as aforesaid, to be imployed to the Uses and Purposes limited and appointed by the said Ordinance, for Subscriptions upon the said Propositions, and to no other Use, Intent, or Purpose: And that the said Monies so subscribed, raised, and gathered as aforesaid, shall not be issued out by the said Treasurers hereby appointed, but by Warrant to them made by the Right Honourable the now Earl of Stamford, Sir Joh. Horner, Sir Tho. Wroth, Sir Fr. Popham, Alex. Popham, Hugh Rogers, Chr. Walker, Will. Strode, Rich. Cole, John Frances, John Harrington, John Hippisley, James Ashe, John Ashe, John Pike, Hen. Stamford, Wil. Seaborne, Thomas Hippisley, Hen. Henly, John Preston, Wil. Long, or any Three or more of them, under their Hands and Seals, and as they shall limit, appoint, and declare; and that the Warrant or Warrants of the Persons aforesaid, or of any Three or more of them in Manner as aforesaid, for the Issuing out of the said Moneys, together with the Acquittance or Acquittances from the Person or Persons which shall be appointed by the Persons aforesaid, or any Three or more of them, for the Receipt of the said Sum or Sums of Money according to this Ordinance, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the Treasurers hereby named, for so much as shall be in such Acquittance or Acquittances, for the Issuing-out and Payment of the said Sum or Sums of Money respectively; and that the Treasurers shall not pay any Sum or Sums of Money to be by them received upon any other Direction, Warrant, or Command whatsoever. And further it is ordered and declared, That the said Receivers, appointed by Virtue of the said Ordinance for the Propositions, who were thereby required to pay, or cause to be paid the said Moneys by them received, to the Treasurers in London, named in the said Proposition, for so much of the said Moneys as they shall pay to the Treasurers hereby nominated and appointed for the County of Somerset as aforesaid, having their or either of their respective Acquittance or Acquittances, shall be discharged, any Act or Think heretofore made to the contrary notwithstanding.

Provided that this Ordinance shall not extend to impeach or diminish any Order or Ordinance of both Houses of Parliament formerly made, for disposing of any of the said Moneys, or other orders made to the Town of Taunton, or other Place in the said County of Somerset, having thereby obtained an Allowance for Fortifications out of their own respective Subscriptions and Contributions upon the said Propositions.

An Ordinance of both Houses for the Assessing of Malignants in the said County of Somerset, and the Parts Adjacent.

Die Veneris, 27 Januarii 1642.

Whereas Sir Ralph Hopton and his Adherents, Rebels and Traytors, combining together, have levied War against the Parliament, and have, in a warlike Manner, already entred into the County of Devon, and besieged, robbed, spoiled, plundered, and pillaged, divers Towns and Places in the said County, and divers cruel and barbarous Murthers, Rapes, and other notorious Out-rages have committed and done in the said County, upon divers of his Majesty's good Subjects, and many of them have utterly ruin'd and destroy'd: And forasmuch as the like Danger and Destruction is threatned to the County of Somerset, by the said Rebels and Traytors, who have a great Party in the said County of Somerset, that are Persons ill-affected, it is therefore ordered and ordained by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, and by the Authority of the same, That Sir John Horner, Sir Francis Popham, Sir Thomas Wroth, Sir George Farwell, Knights, Alexander Popham, Hugh Rogers, Christopher Walker, John Harrington, John Hippisley, John Francis, Richard Cole, William Strode, John Pine, Henry Henly, John Preston, James Ashe, John Ashe, Henry Stamford, Will. Seaborne, Tho. Hippesley, and Will. Long, Esquires, or any Three or more of such honest, able, and sufficient Persons, as by any Three or more of the Persons aforementioned shall by their Warrants under their Hands, be nominated and appointed Assessors, shall assess, rate, and charge such Person and Persons, Inhabitants or others, residing and a biding in the said County, as are of ability, and have not contributed to the Propositions for the Raising of Horse, Money, or Plate for the Defence of the King and Parliament, formerly agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament; and other such as have contributed, but not according to their Abilities, to pay such Sum or Sums of Money according to their Estates, as the said Assessors, or any Three of them shall think fit and reasonable, so as the same exceed not the twentieth Part of their Estates. And if any Person so assessed shall refuse to pay the Money so to be assessed upon him, in such Manner, and at such Times and Places, as by the said Assessors, or any Three of them, shall be required and appointed, it shall be lawful to and for the said Assessors above named, or any Three of them, to grant Warrants to any Person or Persons under their Hands and Seals, to levy all and every such Sum or Sums so assessed, by any Way of Distress and Sale of the Goods of such Person or Persons so assessed and refusing, restoring the Overplus, if any shall be, to him or them that shall be so distrained; and if any Person so distrained shall make Remittance, it shall be lawful to and for the said Assessors above named, or any Three of them, by their Warrant, to require the Parliament Forces in those Parts, and all other his Majesty's Officers and good Subjects to be aiding and assisting in the Premisses; the said Sums so assessed and levied to be paid unto John Ashe, Esq; and Roger Hill of Taunton, Gent. Treasurers, hereby appointed to receive the said Sums so to be raised and levied as aforesaid, and that the Money so raised shall not be issued out, but by Warrant to the said Treasurers, under the Hands of Three or more of the said Assessors above named, and such Person or Persons as shall be notoriously refractory and disobedient in the Premisses, or have not sufficient to be taken, it shall be lawful for the Assessors above named, or any Two of them, by their Warrant under their Hands and Seals, to commit him or them to some common Goal, there to remain until Payment be made of such Sum or Sums of Money upon him or them so assessed, or to send them up to the Parliament by Ship or otherwise: And for any Act or Thing done, or to be done, according to the Tenor of this Ordinance, they and every of them before named, and all and every other Person or Persons by them imployed in the Execution of the said Ordinance, shall be saved harmless by Authority of both Houses of Parliament.

Die Sabbati 28 Januarri, 1642.

Ordered by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, that this Declaration and Ordinance be forthwith printed and published.

Joh. Browne Cler. Parl.

The Copy of a Letter from the Lord Fairfax to the Speaker, and read in both Houses, January 26, 1642/3.

Sir Hugh Cholmly takes Col. Slings by.; Leeds taken by Fairfax, January 23, 1642–3.

Sir,
It is most necessary that I continue my Relation to you of the State and Condition of the Affairs in this Country, that they may be made known to both Houses, and Provision made for Succours to be sent us, which have hitherto come very slowly, tho' they have made large Expressions of their Care; we have been long destitute of Money to pay the Army, and to supply that Want, I have used all possible Industry, by taking up Money upon Exchange, and by calling upon the Country to supply me for the Present upon the Publick Faith. The Want of Money doth so perplex the Part of the Army here, as, I imagine, the House will not expect any considerable Matter to be done by us, tho', God be thanked, the Forces I send from hence, and are raised by the Country in other Places, are daily acting something to advance the Publick Service. As in the North-riding, where Sir Hugh Cholmly hath carried himself very bravely, giving several Defeats to the Enemy near Malton: And on Monday the 16th of this Month, joining his Forces to Sir Matthew Baynton, they fell upon Col. Slingsby at Gisbrough, where they defeated him and 600 Horse and Foot with him, that had done much Spoil in the North-riding: They wounded and took Col. Slingsby himself, with 140 other Prisoners; kill'd a great many, and recovered 200 Arms with the Place. Amongst the Prisoners taken by Sir High Cholmly at Malton, and here at Gisbrough, it is found that a great Number are Papists; and indeed the Strength of the Enemies will be found to consist much of Papists, and popisbly affected; the Earl of Newcastle granting his Commissions for raising Men, to Papists for the most Part: I have heard of late of Commissions granted to twelve Recusants of these Parts, whose Names I send inclosed, and it is not to be doubted, he walks the same Ways in other Places as well as here, which Courses have so advanced Popery, as I hear, that in York, where many Recusants are settled, Mass is ordinarily said in every Street, and such Affronts offered to the Protestants and their Ministry, as few dare resort to Church; and in other Parts of the Country, I am informed, that, for many Miles together, the religious Ministry are all either fled, or imprisoned; which Persecutions, if they be not timely repressed, will extirpate or much depress the Protestant Religion in these Parts. About Bradford and Hallifax, God hath blessed my Son, and those small Forces, with good Success against the Enemy in several light Skirmishes; and on Monday was Seven-night, he seized on the Lord Savile's House at Howley, and put about 100 Musquetiers into it; and on Tuesday I sent Sir William Fairfax and his Officers with some Arms to raise his Regiment in those Parts; and for his Convoy, I sent what Horse and Dragoons I could spare from hence, directing them to stay with my Son to assist him in his Design against Leeds; and yesternight I received Letters from him, wherein he relates to me, That on Monday last he drew his Forces out of Bradford, and marched to Leeds, where Sir William Savill commanded in Chief; my Son first summoned them by a Trumpet to yield; which being refused, the Assault began, wherein his Men carried themselves with great Resolution, the Town being fortified on all Sides, furnished with two brass Sakers, and managed with 1500 Soldiers, yet they forced an Entry in two Hours Fight, there being not lost on both Sides above sorry Men; but he took four Colours, 500 Prisoners (of which fix are Commanders) and with the Prisoners they took many Arms, the Sakers, and all the Munition they had, which was not much; on our Part we lost 13 Men, and Capt. Briggs and Capt. Lee, both were wounded; and I perceive, that in this Exploit Sir William Fairfax, Sir Thomas Norcliff, and Serjeant Major Forbes, with the Rest of the Commanders, carried themselves very gallantly. The People do observe that Sir William Savill, and the chief Commanders on the other Side, soon after the Fight began, fled by secret Ways towards Pomfrait, and their Men after them by degrees; but, by the Way, Serjeant Major Beaumont was drowned crossing the River, and Sir William Savill very narrowly escaped the like Fate. After Leeds was thus won, my Son writes, that he intended to have marched to Wakefield, where Sir George Wentworth commanded, but was prevented therein by the Enemies Fears, who hearing he had taken Leeds, fled all away from Wakefield to Pomfrait, and left the Town, so he hath sent some Forces to invest and keep that Place: Thus hath God blessed their Endeavours on that Side; and now I am told that Capt. Hotham and Sir John Savill are gone up yesterday with some Forces into those parts, but upon what Design I know not: Yesterday Morning I had some Intelligence, that the most Part of the Forces were marched the Day before out of Doncaster, so I have sent my Serjeant-Major-General with six Companies of Foot to invest that Place, and to leave some Forces to keep it until more Strength come to us out of the Southern Counties, which if it could be hastned hither, might very much advance the Cause, and crush their popish Forces before they be supplied by the Queen's Coming, or that Party in Scotland, which there is some Expectation. I desire you will make known to the House the great Extremities that are put upon me, and that a certain Course may be settled for supplying us with Money for the Entertainment of the Army, in such Season as our Men may be encouraged in the Service, and not fall into a Way of Plundering for want of Pay. My Son, upon the Taking of Leeds, tho' he entered it by Force, yet he restrained his Army from pillaging; so I have ordered that the Malignants, in lieu of the Spoil challenged to be due unto the Soldiers, shall give them a Months Entertainment, which I hope will content both Parties. Yesterday Intelligence was brought to me that the Earl of Newcastle hath drawn down all his Forces from the South Part of Yorkshire, those only excepted that keep the Castle at Pomfrait; for yesterday he marched from Sherborn to York with 36 Colours, 2 Pieces of Cannon, and 45 other Carriages; the certain Cause I do not yet know, but suppose it is to meet the Arms and Munition coming from Newcastle, or to prepare for the Queen's Entertainment at York, which is much spoken of. I shall carry a vigilant Eye upon his Designs, and endeavour to prevent them, so far as can be expected from the Forces under the Command of, Sir,

Your most affectionate Friend and Servant,
Fer. Fairfax.

Selby, Jan. 26. 1642.

The Names of Recusants in these Parts, to whom the Earl of Newcastle hath granted Commissions to raise Forces.

  • Mr. Robert Trapps,
  • Mr. Andes,
  • Mr. Waterson,
  • Mr. Stephenson of Thornton,
  • Mr. Tindall,
  • Mr. Thwenge,
  • Sir John Middleton,
  • Mr. Bretton,
  • Captain Sare,
  • Sir Walter Vavafor,
  • Sir Philip Hungate,
  • Captain Granger.

Die Lunæ, Januarii 30, 1642.

Ordered by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, That this Letter be forthwith printed and published.

J. Browne Cler. Parl.

Footnotes

1 Mr. Pym.