Journal, May 1710
Journal Book N

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

E. G. Atkinson (editor)

Year published

1925

Pages

146-159

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'Journal, May 1710: Journal Book N', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 2: February 1709 - March 1715 (1925), pp. 146-159. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81225 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Journal, May 1710

May 1. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

New England.

Letter to Col. Dudley.

The draught of a letter to Colonel Dudley, Governor of New England [fo. 412, 426], as directed the 20th of the last month, was agreed, and ordered to be transcribed.

Trade.

Representation.

Lustring Company.

Letter to Earl of Sunderland.

A representation relating to the present state and condition of the Lustring Company [fo. 420], agreed in the minutes of the 27th of the last month, together with a letter to the Earl of Sunderland, inclosing the same, were signed.

Trade to Sweden.

Eastland Company summond.

Their lordships made a further progress in the consideration of the papers in this office [fo. 422, 428], relating to the trade with Sweden, and order'd that the Eastland Company have notice to attend the Board on Thursday morning next.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle.

Translation of King of Denmark's orders to privateers &c.

Herring trade at Hamburgh.

A letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle, of the 28th of the last month [fo. 425, 427], referring to this Board the translation of the King of Denmark's orders and regulations concerning privateers &c., as also some papers from Mr. Wych [fo. 439], relating to the grievances our herring trade lyes under at Hambrough, was read; and the papers referr'd to therein are as follows, vizt.:
Extracts of a letter from Mr. Wych to Mr. Secretary Boyle, relating to the grievances of the British subjects importing herrings at Hamburgh.
The herring merchants’ request to the Senate at Hamburgh.
Copy of Mr. Wych's memorial to the Senate of Hamburgh, relating to the grievances of the British subjects importing herrings there.

May 2. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Monckton.

Ireland.

Mr. Kemy's proposal about a fort in the River Kilmare.

Draught of representation.

The Order in Council of the 20th of April, 1710 [fo. 420, 427], on a proposal from Mr. Kemeys for the building a fort in the river of Kilmare on the south-west coast of Ireland, together with all the papers relating thereto, mentioned in the minutes of the 27th of the last month, were again read, and directions given for preparing the draught of a representation thereupon.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle.

King of Denmark's orders about privateers.

Letter to Sir Charles Hedges.

Herring trade at Hamburgh.

The letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle [fo. 424, 429], relating to the King of Denmark's orders and regulations concerning privateers &c., mentioned in yesterday's minutes, was again read, as also the papers therein referr'd to, whereupon ordered [vide infra] that a copy of the said regulations be sent to Sir Charles Hedges, and that he be desired to inform their lordships how far these instructions may be agreable to the treaties now subsisting between the two Crowns, and how far the methods of proceeding in the Admiralty Courts there may be injurious to our merchants. Their lordships at the same time agreed to speak to the Eastland Company, when they shall attend the Board on Thursday next, touching that part of Mr. Secretary Boyle's letter, relating to grievances our herring trade lyes under at Hamburg.

New England.

Letter to Col. Dudley.

A letter to Colonel Dudley, Governor of the Massachusets Bay [fo. 424], agreed at the last meeting, was signed.

May 4. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Monckton.

Trade.

Letter to Sir Charles Hedges.

King of Denmark's orders about privateers.

The draught of a letter to Sir Charles Hedges [vide supra, fo. 443], inclosing a copy of the King of Denmark's orders and regulations, relating to privateers, as directed at the last meeting, was agreed and order'd to be sent.

Goods thereby declared contraband.

Their lordships taking into consideration the 5th article of the aforesaid regulations, whereby all sorts of corn, ground and unground, bread, salt and tobacco in neutral ships, are declared to be contraband, a letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle [fo. 424] with the Board's observations thereupon, was signed.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle.

Ireland.

Kemy's proposal.

Fort on Kilmare.

Representation.

A representation on Mr. Kemy's proposal for building a fort in the river of Kilmare in Ireland [fo. 425], mentioned in the minutes of the 2nd instant, was signed.

Jamaica.

Letter from Brigadier Handasyd.

A letter from Brigadier Handasyd, Governor of Jamaica, dated the 25th March, 1710 [O. fo. 23], was read, and the papers therein referr'd to were laid before the Board, and are as follows, vizt.:
Papers therein referrd to. Accounts of the duties demanded on prize goods in Jamaica.
Copy of an address from the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to her Majesty [fo. 442], praying to be exempted from the payment of the duties on prize goods, directed by the Act of Parliament for encouraging the trade to America.

Extract about condition of men-of-war sent to Mr. Burchet.

Merchants summon'd.

Duties on prize goods.

Letter to Mr. Carkess about duties collected at Jamaica by Act of Parliament here.

Whereupon ordered that paragraph C and F of the said letter, relating to the said condition her Majesty's men-of-war there are in, and to two French men-of-war being in those parts, be sent to Mr. Burchet for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty; further ordered [fo. 430] that Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Colonel Lloyd, and Colonel Long, have notice to attend the Board to-morrow morning, in relation to what he writes in the said letter about the high duties paid on prizes at Jamaica, and that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse [fo. 435], to know how the duties collected in that island, by virtue of the Act for the encouragement of the trade to America, are accounted for here, and how the same are apply'd, and whether those duties were payable there before the passing the said Act.

May 5. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Monckton.

Trade.

Eastland merchants.

Trade to Sweden.

Mr. Wordsworth and several Eastland merchants attending as they had been desired [fo. 424, 430], Mr. Secretary Boyle's letter of the 21st of April last, mentioned in the minutes of the 25th of the same month, was read. And these gentlemen being asked whether the King of Sweden's edict of 1695, whereby all strangers were forbid staying longer than four months in a year in Sweden, was still in force, they said that it was, but had not of late been put in execution; however, while it remain'd unrepealed, they might be subject to it at any time whenever that Court should think fit to revive it. Being asked if there had been any new duties laid in Sweden upon foreign ships or goods since 1697, they said they had heard of none, and as to the duties payable there by free ships, half free ships, and foreign ships, they said they remain as they were formerly. Then the account of the grievances in Sweden, complained of in 1698 (entred in Trade A, folio 37), being read, these gentlemen said the same are still continued, but not in that part of the Swedish dominions that lyes in Germany. They added that if their lordships would consult the Swedish merchants, they would be able to give more particular information, and Mr. Wordsworth promised to give notice to some of them to attend the Board on Tuesday next.

King of Denmark's orders about privateers.

Their lordships then communicated to these gentlemen [fo. 425, 438], the King of Denmark's orders and regulations relating to privateers, mentioned in yesterday's minutes; whereupon they said [fo. 441] they had received a copy thereof from their factors, and would lay before their lordships on Thursday next, their observation thereupon.

Trade.

Dr. Robinson and Mr. Jackson.

Trade with Sweden.

Ordered that Dr. Robinson and Mr. Jackson be desired to come to the Board [fo. 428, 431], that their lordships may discourse with them, in relation to the trade to Sweden, on Tuesday next in the morning.

Jamaica.

Merchants.

Address about hardships on privateers by duties demanded for prize goods.

Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Colonel Lloyd, Colonel Long, Mr. Harris and others concern'd in Jamaica, attending, as they had been desired [fo. 428], the address from the Governor, Councill and Assembly of that island, in relation to the hardships their privateers lye under, by reason of the duties demanded there upon prizes (mentioned in yesterday's minutes), was communicated to them; whereupon they said that some while ago they had presented to her Majesty a petition from the merchants and planters here, as also another from the masters, owners of ships and merchants there, both which were referr'd to the Lord Treasurer, that Colonel Beckford's demanding the whole duty, under colour of the British Act for encouraging the trade to America, was what had intirely put a stop to their privateers, and had drove away their seamen, insomuch that of 3,000 register'd seamen that were there the last year, there was not now so many as would man two sloops; that if Colonel Beckford demanded no more duties by virtue of the British Act, than so much as would remain after the allowance of drawbacks upon the exportation of the same goods here, and which is plainly intended by the preamble of the said British Act, it would in a great measure relieve them, though not wholly, for that French wines and brandy have no drawbacks on their re-exportation here. However, as they beleived that the duties demanded by virtue of the British Act were not appropriated for any funds, her Majesty might remit the same, if she thought fit; they added that they did not complain of the duties laid by the Act of that island, they being, as they beleived, the same as formerly.

These gentlemen being withdrawn, ordered that the secretary compare the Jamaica Act with those of former years, to see whether there be any difference in the said duties.

May 9. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Monckton.

Trade.

with Sweden.

Mr. Jackson Commissary there.

Grievances complain'd of by merchants.

Mr. Jackson, her Majesty's Commissary at Sweden, attending [fo. 430, 436], as he had been desired the 5th instant, the purport of Mr. Boyle's letter of the 21st past, relating to the state of our trade with Sweden, was communicated to him, and the grievances of the English merchants in Sweden complained of in the year 1698 (entred in Trade A, fo. 37), were read; whereupon he said that the execution of the edict of 1695, forbidding foreigners to stay in Sweden longer than 4 months in a year was suspended, and, in all probability, would not be revived during the war.

His observations on the several articles.

As to the 1st article of the said grievances, relating to foreigners demanding their debts at fairs, he said that was in pursuance of the laws and constitution of Sweden, and what all other foreigners, as well as her Majesty's subjects, are liable to, and as he thought no great hardship in it.

As to the 2nd article, relating to British merchants not being allow'd to rent houses, he said that there were some charges payable by those that rent houses to the poor &c. which was the main reason why the British merchants are generally in lodgings, but that if they should keep houses, the charges would be less upon them than upon the natural born Swedes, and therefore he did not think there was any reason of complaint in that article.

As to the 3rd article, relating to the laying up salt, and putting up their goods in the city warehouses, he said that was a real grievance, but has not been put in execution during the war in the North.

As to the 4th article, relating to the British merchants paying duty for goods not landed or sold in Sweden, he said that when goods were once landed there, there is no drawback upon their exportation, but if masters of ships in their entries do reserve such and such goods to be carry'd elsewhere, no duties will be demanded for such goods.

As to the 5th article, relating to British merchants marrying in Sweden being obliged to swear allegiance, he said he knew nothing of it.

As to the sixth article, relating to the demand of one-third of the estates of British merchants that dye there, he said it was true in fact, and that some British merchants have been rigorously treated on that account, and that it is contrary to the treaty between this kingdom and Sweden; however all other foreigners inhabiting there were lyable to the same.

As to the 7th article, relating to British merchants not being permitted to receive goods at Revell, he knew nothing of it.

As to the 8th article, relating to British merchants selling to burghers only, he said that was pursuant to the laws and constitutions of that kingdom.

As to the 9th article, relating to the time limitted at Riga for selling salt, he knew nothing of it.

As to the 10th, relating to the British merchants not being suffer'd to go up into the country, he said they were not indeed suffer'd to go and trade in the country, but they might have a pass to travel from one place to another.

As to the 11th article, relating to the towns’ dues, he said he was not particularly acquainted with that, but the Customs were settled and the towns’ dues bear a proportion to the Customs; at Stockholm it is 4½ per cent.

As to the 12th article, relating to our woollen manufactures being rated one-third more than those of other nations, he said that all woollen cloths pay about 2s. and 3d. or 2s. and 6d. a yard indifferently, so that our coarse cloths of about 2s. a yard pay as much as the finer cloth imported by the Hollanders of 12 or 15 shillings a yard, which great disproportion has intirely lost the trade for our Northern woollen manufactures.

As to the 13th article, relating to the British subjects being denyed the publick exercise of their religion, he said it was true.

As to the 14th article, he said that at present we have a publick burying place in one of the Swedish Churches at Stockholm.

He added that he did not know of any duties laid upon our trade since the year 1697. That iron ship'd on British bottoms pays in Sweden 10s. per tun, and it pays the same here, when imported in Swedish ships.

Jamaica.

Plantations General.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse. Duties on prize goods.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, of the 6th instant [fo. 428], in answer to one writ him the 5th, relating to the duties payable on prize goods in the plantations, was read, as were also the following papers therein referr'd to, vizt.:
Copy of the Solicitor General's opinion about the duty on prize goods in the plantations.
Copy of a presentment to the Lord High Treasurer, with his order thereupon, relating to the duties on prize goods in the plantations.
Copy of a letter from the Commissioners of the Customes to the officers in the plantations about the duty on prize goods there.
A scheme of the duties payable on prize goods in the plantations.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Explanation of foregoing scheme.

Ordered [fo. 438] that the secretary go to-morrow morning to Mr. Carkesse, to desire an explanation to some particulars in the last above mentioned paper.

Trade.

Swedish merchants about their grievances.

Sir William Benson, Sir Ambrose Crawley, Mr. Wordsworth, and several other Swedish merchants attending [fo. 431, 456], Mr. Boyle's fore-mentioned letter was read, as were also the forementioned articles of grievances.

As to the edict forbidding foreigners to stay in Sweden, they said the same as Mr. Jackson had done.

As to the 1st and 2nd articles, they said also the same as Mr. Jackson, and added that they did not look upon either of them as a grievance.

The 3rd article they said was true, and a great hardship upon them.

In the 4th article, they agreed with Mr. Jackson, but added that if they did make their entries as Mr. Jackson had mentioned, yet their goods must be re-exported in the same ship that brought them, and if they were once landed, they must pay the custom.

They thought the 5th article no grievance.

The 6th article, they said, was true, and was common to all other foreigners.

The 7th article was formerly as it is set forth, but how it is now they could not tell.

The 8th and 9th articles are still put in execution.

The 10th article is a hardship upon them, for the passes may sometimes be granted, they have been often refused, whereby they have been prevented going to the iron works, to see that the iron they bespeak, be of the goodness and dimension they have agreed for, which has oftentimes proved a great prejudice to them.

They thought there was no great reason of complaint in the 11th article.

The 12th article they said was true, and agreed with what Mr. Jackson had said thereupon, and that these high duties were laid in favour of the Swedish woollen manufactures, which were formerly made of wooll they receive from Scotland; that they don't know of any that has been carried there since the Union of the two kingdoms, only some from Holland.

The 13th article they said was true, and the 14th they agreed with Mr. Jackson.

Trade.

King of Denmark's regulations about privateers.

Merchants’ opinion thereupon.

Then their lordships communicated to those gentlemen the King of Denmark's orders and regulations relating to privateers [fo. 429, 442]; whereupon they said that there were several things in those regulations prejudicial to the British merchants, particularly that article relating to counterband goods, that relating to ships having certificates of what they intend to load back, and that requiring ships to carry their original bills of sale, which were not proper to be trusted at sea; upon which, as also upon their grievances in Sweden, they promised to lay before their lordships their thoughts in writing.

May 11. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

Jamaica.

Duties demanded on prize goods.

The secretary acquainted their lordships that he had been yesterday with Mr. Carkesse [fo. 436], as he had been directed, and that Mr. Carkesse, upon examining several of the articles in the account of duties demanded at Jamaica upon prize goods, by virtue of the Act of the 6th of her Majesty for encouraging trade to America, found that Colonel Beckford, the collector of those duties, had demanded no more than what were payable upon prize goods imported into this kingdom and exported again.

Barbadoes.

Order of Council on petition of Mr. Cowley about settlement of Tobago.

An Order of Council, of the 20th of April last, referring to the Board a petition from Captain Edward Cowley [fo. 447], relating to the settlement of the Island of Tobago, was read, and Mr. Cowley attending, he was desired to bring their lordships what proofs he had for the allegations in his petition relating to the said island, which he promised to do accordingly.

Trade.

Mr. Stratford about the herring trade at Hamburgh.

Mr. Stratford attending, Mr. Secretary Boyles's letter of the 28th of April last [fo. 424, 441] (mentioned in the minutes of the first instant), with the papers therein referr'd to, relating to the hardships our herring trade lies under at Hamburgh, were read; whereupon Mr. Stratford explained the matter as follows:—
That there is at Hamburgh a Company of Fishmongers, called the Schonen Fakrers, who have been settled there with priviledges about 200 years; that neither the British merchants nor others are permitted to sent their herrings imported into Hamburgh, up into Germany, where they might find advantagious markets, but are obliged to sell them to the said Company only, who by consequence buy at their own price; that if her Majesty's Minister there could prevail with the Senate, that the British merchants might send into Germany by the way of Hamburgh such quantities of herrings as they should see convenient, it would be of considerable advantage to our Northern fishery.
Another grievance in that trade is, that after the herrings are sold to the said Company, and the price agreed for, and the herrings in the hands of the buyers, they have men there called Wrakers or Examiners of the goodness of the herrings, appointed by the said Company, to view and examine the said herrings so bought; these Wrakers, depending upon the said Company, do upon their view return the herrings sometimes a quarter, sometimes half or two-thirds faulty, so that when the seller comes to receive his money, there are always considerable abatements made; and therefore he proposed as a remedy that the Senate might nominate and appoint indifferent persons, independant on the said Company, to be Wrakers for the future. He added that this was a proper time to endeavour the redressing of these grievances, for that there is now an Imperial Commission consisting of Ministers of the several German Princes, as the King of Prussia, the Elector of Hannover &c., now sitting at Hamburgh, who have power to alter and regulate things of this nature, whereas the Senate cannot make any alteration in the ancient priviledges of the City of Hamburgh, or of any of the Companies there.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle.

After which the secretary was directed to prepare the draught of a letter to Mr. Boyle thereupon.

May 12. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Monckton.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle.

Herring trade at Hamburgh.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle [fo. 439] relating to the grievances our herring trade lies under at Hamburgh, directed yesterday, was signed.

Memorial from Eastland merchants.

King of Denmark's orders about privateers.

A memorial from the Governor and Company of Eastland Merchants [fo. 430], relating to the orders and regulations of his Danish Majesty concerning privateers, was read.

Jamaica.

Address about duties on prize goods.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Their lordships taking into consideration [fo. 427] the address from the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to her Majesty, praying to be exempted from the payment of the duties on prize goods, directed by the Act of Parliament for encouraging the trade to America, mentioned in the minutes of the 4th instant; ordered [fo. 444] that the draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland be prepared thereupon.

Trade.

Letter to Sir William Benson and Sir Ambrose Crowley.

Trade to Sweden.

Danish privateers.

Ordered that letters be writ to Sir William Benson and Sir Ambrose Crawley, to desire that they will let their lordships have on Tuesday morning next theirs and the Swedish merchants’ observations on our grievances in Sweden [fo. 438, 447], as also what they may have to offer on the above mentioned orders and regulations of the King of Denmark touching privateers.

Blackwell Hall.

Factors summond.

Blanket weavers at Witney.

Further ordered that Mr. Pitman and Mr. Reason, Blackwell Hall factors [fo. 405, 444], have notice to attend the Board on Tuesday morning next, in relation to the petition of the blanket weavers at Witney.

May 16. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Letter from Sir Charles Hedges.

King of Denmark's regulation of privateers.

A letter from Sir Charles Hedges, of the 11th instant [fo. 426], in answer to one with him the 4th ditto, relating to the King of Denmark's orders and regulations concerning privateers &c., was read.

Newfoundland.

Letter from merchants at Bristol.

Security of Newfoundland on a peace.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

A letter from the merchants at Bristol [fo. 446], relating to the securing of Newfoundland to her Majesty, in case of a treaty of peace with France, was read; and directions given for preparing the draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland thereupon.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle.

Petition of clothiers in Yorkshire.

Attorney General's opinion.

A letter from Mr. Secretary Boyle, of the 10th instant [fo. 449], referring to their lordships a petition to her Majesty from the clothiers and buyers of wooll and others in the county of York, together with Mr. Attorney General's report thereupon, was read; whereupon ordered that enquiry be made, who is solicitor in this affair, to the end he may have notice to attend the Board.

Jamaica.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Address about duties on prize goods.

A letter to the Earl of Sunderland upon an address from the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to her Majesty [fo. 442], complaining of the great hardships that island lies under, by reason of the duties demanded there on prize goods &c., was signed.

Virginia.

Letter to Col. Spotswood.

A letter to Colonel Spotswood, Governor of Virginia [fo. 447], was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Imports and exports from and to Sweden.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, of the — instant [fo. 419], inclosing an account of imports and exports to and from Sweden for three years last past, was read.

Blackwell Hall factor.

Blanket weavers at Witney.

A factor of Blackwell Hall attending [fo. 442, 446], as he had been desired, in relation to the petition of the blanket weavers of Witney, the said petition was read; whereupon he said that ‘tis true the blankets are not now made up according to the ancient size and weight; that the said weavers, in order to undersell one another, make their said blankets of undue sizes, and that that trade is almost lost; that he and several others had endeavoured to bring the said weavers to an agreement to make their blankets all of the same size, but that they could never effect it; that if the blankets were made up to the ancient size, it would certainly be an advantage by a greater consumption of wooll; that the chief consumption of blankets is at home, and in the plantations, there being but about 200 pair a year exported into other countries in Europe; that if the weavers were incorporated into a Company, they might regulate and ascertain the size and weight of blankets; but whether that would be for the advantage of the Company, he could not tell; for there being no other place in this kingdom where blankets are made to that perfection, which he supposed was caused by the water, they might then monopolize that trade, and keep up the price of their blankets so high, that it would put people upon finding out some other manufacture to serve in lieu thereof; as it happen'd some years ago at Kedermister, where a manufacture of stuffs was set up, and an Act of Parliament past to oblige the manufacturers there to a certain size and goodness; this made the manufacturers sell their stuffs at a very high price, which occasion'd the setting up at Kendall in Westmorland a new manufacture, which was used in lieu of the Kedermister stuffs; which manufacture at Kendall in about 20 years’ time entirely beat out that at Kedermister, and the trade there is wholly lost.

May 17. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Blanket-weavers at Witney.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Their lordships, taking into consideration what had been said yesterday [fo. 444, 449], touching the blanket weavers’ desire of being incorporated into a Company, gave directions for preparing the draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland thereupon.

Newfoundland.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Security of it to Great Britain at a peace.

A letter to the Earl of Sunderland [fo. 443, 458], relating to the securing of Newfoundland to the Crown of Great Britain, by the next treaty of peace with France, directed yesterday, was signed.

Barbadoes.

Order of Council.

Petition of Mr. Skene against Mr. Crow.

Extract of letters relating thereto.

Representation to be made thereupon.

An Order of Council, of the 30th of March, 1710, referring to the Board a petition from Mr. Skene, secretary of Barbadoes, complaining of Mr. Crow, Governor of that island, for refusing to obey her Majesty's order, directing him to restore the petitioner to the full enjoyment of his patent &c., was read; as also the extract of two letters from the said Skene to Mr. Rowland Tryon, dated the 19th of June and 29th of November, 1709, relating thereunto; whereupon their lordships agreed to represent the same to her Majesty, and to propose that a clause be added to the instructions to be given the next Governor, requiring him to restore the said Skene to the full and free exercise of his office of secretary in all the branches thereof.

Virginia.

Letter to Col. Spotswood.

A letter to Colonel Spotswood, Governor of Virginia [fo. 444], agreed at the last meeting, was signed.

Trade.

Letters to Sir William Benson and Sir Ambrose Crowley.

King of Denmark's orders about privateers.

Order'd that letters be writ to Sir William Benson and Sir Ambrose Crawley [fo. 442, 450], to acquaint them that their lordships are obliged to speed their report to her Majesty, upon the King of Denmark's orders and regulations touching privateers to-morrow, and that, if they have anything to offer thereupon, they do the same in writing to-morrow morning at farthest.

Barbadoes.

Capt. Cowley about charge in undertaking to settle Tobago.

Captain Cowley attending in relation to his petition, mentioned in the minutes of the 11th instant [fo. 439, 455], praying a recompence for his charge and trouble about carrying on a settlement on the island of Tobago, he laid before their lordships several papers as proofs to the allegations set forth in his said petition, which papers are as follows, vizt.:

Papers in proof of his allegations.

Commission from Nicholas Dupin, Thomas Puckle, Richard Goddard and Joseph Blake, of London, merchants (pursuant to a power from the Baron de Blomberg in behalf of the Duke of Courland), appointing Edward Cowley, esquire, first Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Tobago &c. for life, and to take possession of the island in the name of the Duke, and display his standard &c., to grant commissions to issue out warrants in his Highness's name for calling an Assembly. Dated 15th May, 1699.
Commission from Edward Cowley, esquire, to Mr. William Horniblow, constituting him secretary of Tobago, during the said Cowley's life. Dated the 2nd of January, 1699.
Commission from Edward Cowley, esquire, Governor of Tobago, appointing Eliachim Studholm, esquire, Lieutenant-Colonel of the Regiment of Militia, to be commanded by the said Cowley in that island. Dated the 25th of August, 1699.
Letter from the Lord Lexington to Mr. Cowley, recommending Mr. Francis to serve in the regiment raising by him for Tobago.
Letter from the Marquis of Carmarthen to Mr. Cowley, recommending Lieutenant Richard Thomas to be a major under him at the Island of Tobago. Dated the 8th of September, 1699.
List of commissions given by Mr. Cowley, Governor of Tobago.
Certificate of Charles Mason, that Captain Edward Cowley attended his late Majesty in Holland, in order to receive his said Majesty's commands in relation to the settlement of Tobago, was incouraged to that undertaking by the late Earl of Macclesfeild, and was at considerable expence in his attendance there.

May 18. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Blanket weavers at Witney.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland [fo. 446, 452], upon the petition of the blanket weavers of Witney, as directed at the last meeting, was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Clothiers of Yorkshire &c.

William Ingram attending [fo. 443], in behalf of the clothiers and buyers of wooll in Yorkshire, their petition, mentioned in the minutes of the 16th instant, was read; whereupon being asked several questions, he said that in most of the Northern Counties, as Yorkshire, Westmorland, Cumberland and Darbyshire &c., there never were any sworn winders of wooll, which is the reason that there is great abuses committed; that he himself has often found stones and dirt in the middle of the fleeces; that, if there were sworn winders in those countries, it would in a great measure prevent the said abuses; that the said winders are to be sworn here at London, before the Company of Wooll Staplers; that after the said winders are sworn, they have a licence granted to them from the said Company, which costs them forty shillings; that the pay of the said winders is with victuals 4d. a score fleeces and 6d. a score without; and being desired he promised to bring to the Board on Tuesday next some members of the said Company, with their charter [fo. 453], as also some of the Yorkshire clothiers, who would be better able to explain all that their lordships might have occasion to enquire into; and he was further desired to bring a copy of the proclamation of King James the First for inforcing the statutes relating to the winding of wooll, which he promised to do accordingly.

Regulation of Danish privateers.

Their lordships then took into consideration the orders and regulations of the King of Denmark [fo. 447, 451], relating to privateers, and made some progress therein.

May 19. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Regulation of Danish privateers.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle.

Their lordships took into further consideration the orders and regulations of the King of Denmark [fo. 450], relating to privateers, mentioned in yesterday's minutes, as also the letter from Sir Charles Hedges, and the memorial from the Eastland Company relating thereunto, and made several observations on the said regulations, and gave directions [fo. 454] for preparing the draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle thereupon.

May 23. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Baillie.

Miscellanies.

New commission.

Mr.Baillie.

A new commission under the Great Seal of this kingdom, dated the 12th instant, appointing Mr. Baillie one of her Majesty's Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, was read, and he took his place at the Board accordingly.

Trade.

Blanket weavers at Witney.

Mr. Hall attending in behalf of the blanket weavers of Witney [fo. 449] and being asked several questions in relation to their petition, he said that, as to the annual charge that would necessarily arise from the establishing of a company, it would be very inconsiderable, he thought not above 5l. a year, for that there would be no salaries to pay out of it to officers, except to himself as clerk of the Company, and that would be but 3l. a year; that they had computed that 16d. or 2s. a year from each member of the said Company would sufficiently defray the whole expence, which would not raise the price of the blankets above one halfpenny a pair; that they desired their patent might extend 15 miles up and 15 miles down the river, and to all the rivilets that fall into it within that distance. Then being asked whether an Act of Parliament, regulating the length, breadth and weight of the blankets, under penalties, might not answer the ends they proposed, he said that he apprehended those penalties might incourage informers, and occasion a great deal of charge and trouble; whereas, if they were incorporated into a Company, they could make by-laws of their own, and would see to the due observation thereof; and he promised to bring to their lordships on Thursday next [fo. 456] a memorial in writing upon these heads.

Yorkshire clothiers.

Wooll stapler's patent.

Proclamations about winding wooll&c.

William Ingram, with several of the members of the wooll staple Company attending [fo. 450], they communicated to their lordships a copy of the patent from King Charles the 2nd, dated the 29th of July in the first year of his reign, establishing them a Company, as also a proclamation by the said King, dated the 5th of February, 1663, against the deceitfull winding and folding of wooll; and they further laid before their lordships the draughts of a proclamation approved by Mr. Attorny General to the same purpose. The first of which proclamation was read; and these gentlemen being asked several questions, they said that there were great abuses committed in the winding of wooll, which cou'd only be remedied by sworn winders; that the said winders must come hither to be sworn before the Mayor of the Company, after which they received a licence from the said Mayor, the charges whereof, and of their swearing, comes to about 30 shillings; that the Company do regulate the rates at which those winders are to work for, and would make a by-law to prevent exacting. They added that it would be much more convenient if their Mayor had a power to depute some person to administer the oath to the said winders, for that the Mayor might be out of town, when those people came up to be sworn, and they desired that her Majesty's proclamation might be general to all the counties in this kingdom. These gentlemen being withdrawn, their lordships resolved [fo. 455] to take this matter into further consideration at a convenient opportunity.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle.

King of Denmark's regulations about privateers.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Boyle, inclosing their lordships’ observations upon the King of Denmark's orders and regulations [fo. 455], relating to privateers, was signed.

May 24. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Lord Dartmouth, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Baillie.

Massachusets Bay.

Act about a spurious and mixt issue.

Their lordships took into consideration an Act past in the Massachusets Bay in October, 1705, entituled An Act for the better preventing a spurious and mixt issue, mentioned in Colonel Dudley's letter of the 31st of January last, and read the 20th of April last, and agreed to let the said Act remain as probationary for some time longer.

Trade.

Woollen manufactures in Austria &c.

Letters to Mr. Beare and Mr. Harris.

Their lordships taking into consideration a proposal of the Private Court Chancery of Austria, to the Royal Court Chancery of Bohemia [fo. 407; O.fo. 7], relating to the importation of the English woollen manufactures into those countries, mention'd in the minutes of the 19th of the last month, ordered that letters be writ to Mr. Beare and Mr. Harris, to remind them of the letters formerly writ to them on that subject.

May 25. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Baillie.

Trade.

Yorkshire clothiers petition.

Draught of representation thereupon.

Their lordships, taking into consideration Mr. Secretary Boyle's letter of the 10th instant [fo. 454; O.fo. 1], referring to this Board a petition to her Majesty from the clothiers and buyers of wooll and others in the county of York &c., mention'd in the minutes of the 23rd instant, ordered that the draught of a representation be prepared thereupon.

Barbadoes.

Book from Capt. Cowley about settlement of Tobago.

Affidavit thereupon.

Draught of report on Capt. Cowley's petition.

The secretary laid before their lordships a book brought to him by Captain Cowley [fo. 447; O. fo. 8], wherein the names of divers persons are enter'd, who were to have gone with the said Captain to Tobago, to make a settlement there, as also an affidavit of Joseph Blake, setting forth that part of the said book was the handwriting of the said deponent &c., and that, since the writing thereof, no additions had been made thereto; which affidavit was read, and directions given for preparing the draught of a report on the petition of the said Cowley, mentioned in the minutes of the 17th instant.

Trade.

with Sweden.

Draught of representation.

Letter to Sir Ambrose Crowley and Mr.Wandsworth.

Letter to Mr.Carkess.

Exports and imports from Scotland to Sweden.

Their lordships took into consideration the draught of a representation [fo. 436; O. fo. 2] touching the grievances the British merchants lye under in Sweden, and made a progress therein, and ordered that letters be writ to Sir Ambrose Crowley and Mr. Wandsworth, to desire them to remind the merchants trading to Sweden to lay before their lordships, with all convenient speed, what they have to offer thereupon. And further ordered [O. fo. 2] that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse for an account of the exports and imports from Scotland to Sweden, since the Union of the two Crowns.

Mr. Hall.

Blanket weavers.

Memorial from upholsterers.

Memorial from Mr. Hall about the intended incorporation of blanket weavers.

Mr. Hall attending in behalf of the blanket weavers of Witney, with several of the upholsterers of the cities of London and Westminster [fo. 452, 458], he presented to their lordships a memorial signed by the said upholsterers, setting forth that the trade at Witney is in a decaying condition, by reason the blankets are not made up to the ancient sizes and weight. He also presented to their lordships a memorial signed by himself, setting forth that the money for defraying the charge of the letters patents they desire, is to be raised by a voluntaruy contribution of the said blanket weavers, and that to answer the end of the said blanket weavers it will be necessary to extend the jurisdiction of that Company fifteen miles round the fore-mentioned town of Witney; which memorial[s] were read, and those gentlemen being asked the same question, as Mr. Hall was the 23rd instant, vizt., whether an Act of Parliament directing the length, breadth and weight of blankets under a penalty, would not answer the ends proposed by the said blanket weavers, they said that they only come to complain of the abuse committed in the making of blankets at present; but as for the proper remedy, whether by a charter, or by an Act, they submitt'd it to their lordships.

May 26. Present:—Earl of Stamford, Sir Philip Meadows, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Baillie.

Newfoundland.

Memorial from Mr. Campbell. His petition about his losses.

Mr. Campbell attending, he presented to their lordships a further memorial in relation to his petition to her Majesty [fo. 422; O. fo. 6], touching the losses he has sustain'd in Newfoundland, mentioned in the minutes of the 25th of the last month, which their lordships agreed to take into consideration at a convenient opportunity.

Trade.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland on the petition of the blanket weavers.

A letter to the Earl of Sunderland [fo. 456], on the petition of the blanket weavers of Witney to her Majesty, praying to be incorporated into a Company, was signed.

Newfoundland.

Sir Alexander Cairnes.

Petition from merchants of Biddiford.

Restoration of Newfoundland from the French.

Letter to the Earl of Sunderland.

Sir Alexander Cairns attending, he presented to their lordships a petition from the merchants of Biddiford, praying that the French may be obliged at the insuing Treaty of Peace to restore Newfoundland to her Majesty. Whereupon [fo. 446; O. fo. 1] he was acquainted with what had already been done on a like application from the merchants at Bristol; and he being withdrawn, their lordships gave directions for preparing the draught of a letter to the Earl of Sunderland thereupon.

Journal of the proceedings of Her Majesty's Commissioners for promoting the trade of this Kingdom, and for inspecting and improving her plantations in America and elsewhere, from the first of June, 1710, to the thirty-first October, 1711.