Journal, July 1715
Journal Book R

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1924

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49-65

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'Journal, July 1715: Journal Book R', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 3: March 1715 - October 1718 (1924), pp. 49-65. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81394 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Journal, July 1715

July 1. Present:—Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke.

New England.

Mr. Dummer.

Land bank.

Memorial in writing.

Mr. Dummer attending, according to appointment, he was acquainted that their lordships understood he desired to be heard when anything should be offered to the Board in relation to the erecting a land bank in New England, and that their lordships having received some proposals upon that subject, they were ready to hear what he had to say [fo. 151, 156]; whereupon Mr. Dummer intimated his opinion that Bills of Credit to be issued by any particular society of men, would not have so good a sanction as such Bills, being issued by the government there; and that if there were an advantage to be made by the said Bills of Credit, it would be fitting the publick should reap the benefit preferable to any select company; and after some further discourse with Mr. Dummer, he promised to bring their lordships a memorial in writing in relation to the said intended Bank [fo. 195.]

New England.

Plantations General.

Memorial.

Duties on timber &c.

A memorial from several merchants relating to a Bill to be brought in Parliament for taking off the duties on Timber brought from America [fo. 157], was read; and directions given for preparing the draught of a Repn. thereupon.

Nevis.

General Hamilton.

Majr. Dunbar.

Capitulation broke by the French.

Major Dunbarto make affidavit.

General Hamilton attending with Major Dunbar, and being asked several questions in relation to the capitulation of Nevis, Major Dunbar said that after the inhabitants had surrendered themselves to the French upon articles of capitulation, Monsr. D'Iberville immediately broke the said articles and disarmed all the gentlemen of the island, and kept them in custody, some in the Church, others on board of his ships, and after having kept them so three or four days, he then demanded all their negroes, and continued burning several of their houses, notwithstanding the said capitulation. That the inhabitants not being able to recover their negroes they being retired into the mountains. He drew up other articles, which he forced the inhabitants to sign the 8–19 of April, 1706, upon threats of being otherwise sent to the mines among the Spaniards, in which articles it was agreed that they should deliver to him 1400 negroes in three months, or an hundred pieces of eight for every negro wanting, and he obliged himself by the said article to commit no more depredations there; notwithstanding which he daily took off negroes on board of his ships, and several houses (particularly Sr. Wm. Stapleton's) Coppers Mills &c. were burnt. After some further discourse with Major Dunbar upon these matters he was desired to make an affidavit of what he knew thereof, which he promised to do accordingly.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse for exports of woollen manufacture.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse to move the Commrs. of His Majesty's Customs, that this Board may have, as soon as conveniently may be, an account from the Searchers office, of the woollen manufactures exported to foreign parts in the years 1711 and 1712.

Leeward Islands.

Sufferers.

Debentures to Mr. Buttler.

Mr. James Buttler attending and his powers of attorney being examined the three debentures numbered 503, 587, and 655, for some of the sufferers at Nevis and St. Christophers, were delivered to him.

Virginia.

Letter from Mr. Taylour.

Memorial from Commissioners of the Customs against an Act about persons bearing office.

Representation ordered.

A letter from Mr. Taylour, Secry. to the Lords Commrs. of His Majesty's Treasury, dated the 24th of the last month, together with a memorial from the Commrs. of the Customs against an Act of Virginia, relating to persons not bearing offices there, till after three years residence, were read, and directions given for preparing a Repn. [fo. 156] to his Majesty upon the said Act.

July 5. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

New England.

Mr. Banister summoned.

Ordered that Mr. Banister [fo. 158] have notice to attend the Board between ten and eleven of ye clock tomorrow morning.

Colonel Burges opinion about land bank.

to bring his thoughts in writing.

Colonel Burges attending [fo. 152, 222], their lordships had some discourse with him in relating to the Land Bank proposed to be erected in New England, wherein he declared his opinion much to the same effect as Mr. Dummer had done, the first instant, particularly that the advantage to be made of such a project ought rather to accrue to the governmt. of New England, than to particular persons; and Colonel Burges being desired to bring his thoughts thereupon in writing [fo. 195], he promised to do it accordingly.

Virginia.

Representation Act about 3 years residence to bear office.

The draught of a repn. [fo. 155, 158] ordered to be prepared the 1st instant, upon an Act passed in Virginia, the 23rd of Octr., 1705, relating to persons not bearing offices there till after three years residence, was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Plantations General.

New England.

Representation.

Naval stores.

Duty on timber.

The draught of a representation [fo. 153 v. infra] likewise ordered to be prepared the 1st instant, relating to the incouragement for bringing naval stores from America, and particularly to the taking off the duties upon timber imported from thence, was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Supply of necessaries for garrisons.

A letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope [fo. 151] of the 3rd instant, relating to the future supply of necessaries for the garrison at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia and Placentia in Newfoundland, was read, and directions given for preparing an answer thereto.

July 6. Present:—Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Plantations General.

New England.

Representation about Naval stores.

Duty on timber.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

The draught of a representation [v. supra] mentioned in yesterdays minutes, relating to the incouragement for bringing naval stores from America, particularly the taking off the duties upon timber imported, was signed, as likewise a letter for inclosing the same to Mr. Secry. Stanhope.

Virginia.

Representation on Act about 3 years residence to bear office.

The draught of another representation, mentioned likewise in yesterdays minutes, upon an Act passed in Virginia the 23rd Octr., 1705 [fo. 156, 277] relating to persons not bearing offices there till after three years residence, was signed and sent to ye Council office.

New England.

Mr. Banister about Land bank.

Woods.

Naval stores.

Indians fishery.

Promises a memorial.

Mr. Banister, attending as he had been desired [fo. 156, 169], their lordships had some discourse with him in relation to the Land Bank proposed to be erected in New England, the preservation of the woods and production of other naval stores there, and the gaining the Indians to our interest as likewise concerning the Fishery on that coast, upon which several subjects Mr. Banister promised to bring their lordships a memorial in writing.

Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Necessaries for the Garrisons.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Secry. Stanhope, in answer to his of the 3rd instant, relating to the future supply of necessaries for the garrisons at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia and Placentia in Newfdld. being prepared according to order, the same was agreed and directed to be transcribed.

July 7. Present:—Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Newfoundland.

Nova Scotia.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Necessaries for the Garrisons.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope agreed yesterday in answer to his of the 3rd instant [fo. 157] relating to the future supply of necessaries for the garrison at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia and Placentia in Newfoundland was signed.

July 8. Present:—Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke.

Carolina.

Virginia.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope about insurrection of Indians.

Letter to Lords proprietors of Carolina.

A letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope, of the 7th instant, transmitting to the Board two letters, one from Mr. Craven, Governor of Carolina dated the 23rd of May last, the other from Colonel Spotswood, Govr. of Virginia, dated the 27th of the same month, relating to hostilities committed by the Indians in Carolina was read, together with Mr. Craven's and Col. Spotswood's said letters; whereupon a letter was immediately writ to the Lords proprietors of Carolina [fo. 163], inclosing copies of the last mentioned letters, and signifying this Boards desire of an opportunity to discourse with them thereupon any morning the next week that their lordships shall appoint.

July 12. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Insurrection of Indians.

Letter from the Lords proprietors.

The letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope [fo. 159, 180] of the 7th mentioned in the minutes of the 8th instant, with the two letters inclosed, relating to an insurrection and hostilities committed by the Indians in Carolina were read, as likewise a letter from the Lords proprietors of that province upon the same subject, dated the 8th of this month.

New England.

Letter from Mr. Bridger answer to charges against him.

A letter from Mr. Bridger late Surveyor General of the Woods on the continent of America, to the Secry., dated the 5th instant, with answers to the several charges against him [fo. 143, v. infra], was laid before the Board, and part thereof being read, their lordships agreed to proceed in the further consideration of that matter tomorrow morning.

July 13. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

New England.

Mr. Bridger's letter in answer to complaints.

The remaining part of the letter from Mr. Bridger, late Surveyor of the Woods on the continent of America, mentioned in yesterdays minutes [v. supra, 174] in answer to the several charges against him was read, as likewise the following papers therein referred to vizt.
Papers therein referred to.
Mr. Bridger's letter to Colonel Dudley Govr. of New England, dated the second of Decr., 1714, nominating his deputy surveyors of the Woods, and Col. Dudley's approbation of them.
Letter from Colonel Dudley to the Secry. in favour of Mr. Bridger, late Surveyor of the Woods in America, dated the 12th January, 1714–15.
Col. Dudley's order for Mr. Bridger's having a guard to visit the Woods in New Hampshire, dated the 29th Decr., 1714.
Repn. from several merchts. &c. in favour of Mr. Bridger, whom they desire may be re-established Surveyor of the Woods on the continent of America.

Mr. Bridger summoned.

Whereupon ordered that Mr. Bridger have notice to attend the Board on Friday morning next.

Nova Scotia.

Order of Council.

Letters and papers from Major Caulfield.

An Order of Council of the 17th of June, 1715, transmitting to this Board a letter from Major Caulfield Lieut. Govr. of Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia, to the Lords of the Council, dated the 12th of January, 1714, with the following papers, relating to the proclaiming King George in that province, was read, the said papers being most duplicates of those transmitted with Major Caulfield's letter to this Board of the same date, and mentioned in the minutes of the 29th of last month vizt.
Protestation signed by the French at Annapolis, recognizing King George their lawfull sovereign.
Four proclamations of King George by the Govr. officers and inhabitants of Annapolis and other parts of Nova Scotia.
Oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration taken and subscribed by the officers, soldiers, and inhabitants of Annapolis and other parts of Nova Scotia.

Bermuda.

Order of Council.

Colonel Bennet's instructions.

The copy of an Order of Council of the 30th June, 1715, upon a Repn. of the same date, approving the draughts of instructions for Colonel Bennet, Lieutenant Govr. of Bermuda, was read.

Carolina.

Lord Carteret and several Carolina gentlemen.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Insurrection of Indians &c.

The Lord Carteret [fo. 160], one of the Lords proprietors of Carolina, then coming to the Board, with Mr. Kettleby, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Shelton, the letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope of the 7th instant, mentioned in the minutes of the 8th referring to the Board two letters, one from Mr. Craven, the other from Col. Spotswood, relating to an insurrection and hostilities committed by the Indians in Carolina, was again read; whereupon the Lord Carterct acquainted the Board, that the Lords proprietors had petitioned his Majesty for some assistance towards the preservation of the said provinces, which they are unable to support of themselves, the minority of two of the proprietors making it impossible to raise money by mortgaging their Charter, that their said Charter will be a virtual security for what his Majesty shall please to advance them in arms, ammunition and other necessaries for the defence of the province, tho' it will not be so to any private persons; that besides what is mentioned in the Lords proprietors letter of the 8th instant, they were informed that six small field pieces or rather some harquebusses were necessary to be sent as soon as possible, and his lordship desired the Board would please to represent to his Majesty the extremities to which the Colony is reduced, and what his Majesty may fitly do for their present relief.

Mr. Johnson observed that tho' Carolina is at present under proprietors, it is a frontier to the Colonies under his Majesty's immediate government, and therefore he hoped his Majesty would please to send the supply of arms &c. as desired.

Lord Carteret desired to bring what he has further to move in writing.

The Board then desired my Lord Carteret would please to let them have in writing any further particulars he should think necessary to move his Majesty for, on this occasion.

July 14. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Mr. Secretary Stanhope about present state of Carolina.

Lord Viscount Townshend.

Board go to the Lords of the Cabinet Council.

Letter to Lords proprietors of Carolina, with queries.

Mr. Secry. Stanhope came to the Board, who had some conference with him in relation to the present state of Carolina, and the relief to be given to that province upon the invasion and hostilities committed by the Indians, after which the Lord Viscount Townshend coming likewise to the Board, he acquainted them that the Lords of his Majesty's Cabinet Council desired their attendance at his lordships office, whereupon the Board went accordingly, and being returned a letter was immediately writ to the Lords proprietors of Carolina with several queries [fo. 163, 170], for their answers in writing tomorrow morning, and desiring their lordships will please to come to the Board at the same time.

Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland.

Letter to Mr. Pulteney, establishments at Annapolis and Placentia.

Effective men.

Clothing.

A letter to Mr. Pulteney his Majesty's Secry. at War [fo. 179] desiring copies of the establishments of the garrisons at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia and Placentia in Newfoundland, as likewise copies of the last accounts he has received of the effective men in each of the said garrisons, and what clothing remains in the stores there, not delivered out to the soldiers, was signed.

New England.

Carolina.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Banister, Byrd and Shirrif summoned.

Ordered that Mr. Banister, Mr. Byrd and Mr. Shirrif [fo. 167, 169] be desired to attend the Board tomorrow morning.

July 15. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Virginia.

Mr. Byrd about hostilities committed by the Indians.

Mr. Byrd [fo. 166, 175, 191], one of the Council of Virginia, and lately arrived from thence, attending as he had been desired yesterday, and being asked several questions, in relation to the hostilities lately committed by the Indians on Carolina, he said, that the Yamansees and Charakees were two most powerful nations in those parts, that they with the other Indians on the back of our plantations, as far as New England, might make in number sixteen or seventeen thousand men, and that if they should jointly attack Carolina, it would be impossible to prevent their destroying that province, Charles Town being the only place fortified, the rest of that province being all open country, and the settlements dispersed at great distances, he said, that this misfortune was in a great measure owing to the Carolinians themselves, for their traders have so abused and so imposed upon the Indians in selling them goods at exorbitant prices, and receiving their peltry at very low rates, that they have been thereby very much disgusted. That the Carolinians over greedy of the profit, thus made by this trade, went so far as to pass a law in their assembly, prohibiting the Virginia traders from any commerece with these Indians, under pretence the said Indians lived within the limits of their charter, besides which they have incouraged their neighbouring Indians to make war upon one another, that they may buy the prisoners taken on each side as slaves; these they have sent to the other plantations, and particularly to New England, and there sold, who after some time having been there, have made their escape, and coming home have declared what had happened to them; this with the impositions upon them in trade, has so alienated them, that he thought it would be very difficult to make a peace with them, but especially to get them re-united in friendship with us. He added that these attempts of the Indians, had never yet happened but against proprietary governments.

In relation to Virginia, he said that they were there in no apprehension of the said Indians, they having always well treated them, besides, that the militia of that province consisted of about ten thousand men. That the whites were about one hundred thousand in all; that about two years ago they received from her late Majesty, arms and ammunition for 300 men, and tho' they were not in a condition to send them from Virginia to the assistance of Carolina, yet he hoped they should be able to defend themselves from any attempts made upon them by the said Indians without assistance from hence.

Mr. Banister.

New England.

Indian slaves.

Mr. Banister also attending [fo. 166] and being asked some questions upon the same subject, he said much to the same purpose, as Mr. Byrd had done, in relation to the ill treatment given by the Carolinians to the Indians and particularly to their selling the Indians taken in war, for slaves, which had like to have proved of such ill consequence to New England, by the Indians frequently falling upon them, that the assembly there was obliged to pass a law prohibiting the buying or selling of any Indians for slaves.

New England.

Memorial from Mr. Banister.

Mr. Banister [fo. 158, 198, 201] then presented to the Board a meml. in answer to several queries, verbally proposed to him the 6th instant.

Essay on the trade of New England.

And he further presented an essay on the trade of New England, &c. which their lordships agreed to consider at the first opportunity.

Carolina.

Lord Carteret and Mr. Ashley.

Letter from Lords proprietors.

Condition of the province.

Answers to queries.

The Lord Carteret and Mr. Ashley [fo. 166], two of the Lords proprietors of Carolina, coming to the Board, as desired, a letter from their lordships in answer to the queries sent them yesterday, relating to the present condition of that province and relief to be sent them, was read; and their lordships entering into conference thereupon, the Lord Carteret was pleased to say in relation to the 2nd query, that the effects they had lately received from Carolina were rice, and might be disposed of for about four hundred pounds sterling, which they were willing should be applied towards paying the arms now proposed to be sent. That 1500, or even 1000 musquets, cannot be immediately furnished here, but by his Majesty's Office of Ordnance, and if the government think fit to give them credit on this occasion, their said effects will be so far a security towards the payment of them. That they are not sure of being supplied with arms and ammunition from New England and New York &c. to which places the assembly of Carolina have sent the value of 2500 pounds, as mentioned in their lordships answer to the said 2nd query, and therefore they desire credit from his Majesty, who will always have an equitable demand on the said proprietors, and have that influence over their Charter which no private person can; nor for that reason will any such persons lend money upon the said Charter. His lordship being then asked if Carolina was not already indebted to Virginia for assistance, upon a former occasion, he said it was, but he knew not exactly how much; however he did not doubt but that they should make Virginia amends, and likewise be able, after the present exigence, to repay his Majesty, and the publick, what should be now advanced. His lordship hereupon took notice that Col. Spotswood acted prudently as Govr. of Virginia in sending assistance formerly to Carolina, it being better to fight an enemy at a distance than within his own government. As to provisions the lords proprietors were of opinion there would not be occasion to send any to Carolina from hence.

In relation to the 3rd query it was observed to the said proprietors that transport ships to be sent from Carolina to fetch what men his Majty. might think fit to order for Carolina, from any of the Northern Colonies, would have too long a voyage, and come too late for the intended service. Whereupon the lord Carteret said that the proprietors did not desire any men, but if the King would send some, merchant ships might be found here to transport them, but that the proprietors were not able at present to hire such ships themselves, and therefore they prayed credit from the government to inable them to do it. It was then desired of them to signify what number of men would be necessary, the Lord Carteret said about 500 would be sufficient. But the said proprietors declaring that they expected the officers who should command the men to be sent from hence, should be subject to the directions of their Govr. of Carolina, the Board took notice of the difficulty that would arise at his Majesty's officers submitting to the orders of any person not in immediate commission from him; As to the subsistence of any men to be sent to Carolina, the lords proprietors declared they did not doubt but the province would maintain them for the time they should have occasion to be there.

Supplies desired by the Lords proprietors.

In further answer to the fourth query the Lords proprietors desired 300 barrils of powder, 1500 musquets with bayonets, 40 Cohorn mortars with hand granadoes, and said that the demand for the present service would not amount to £5000.

About surrender.

of the government.

And upon the 5th query relating to their lordships surrendering the govnt. of the said province, they said they were willing to do it, for an equitable consideration and not otherwise. That they thought any particular proprietors surrendering his right, would be to advance the interest of the rest. That their lordships ancestors had been at very great expence in settling and improving this Colony, which in Customs on the product thereof had been of considerable benefit to this Kingdom, there being annually produced in Carolina, as the Lord Carteret informed the Board, 3,000 tuns of rice, one third of which is spent in the country, and the customs on the other two thirds imported here, amount to 10,000l. per annum, or a greater profit to this nation, if the said rice be re-exported by the returns, fifty thousand deer skins, the duties whereof are one thousand pounds, besides great quantities of pitch tar, and other naval stores. That their quit rents amounting to about 2000l. per annum that country money are applied to the payment of the Govrs. salary (which is 300l. per annum) and for maintaining the other publick officers in that govnt. That a duty is raised in Carolina of a penny per skin exported, which is applied to the maintenance of the clergy there. That in 1707 when Carolina was attacked by the French, it cost the province twenty thousand pounds, and that neither his Majesty, nor any of his predecessors had been at any charge from the first grant to defend the said province against the French or other enemies.

Nova Scotia.

Accounts of clothing.

Mr. Shirrif attending, as he had been desired, presented to the Board sevl. accounts of the clothing received and delivered out at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia for that garrison and of those remaining there the 8th Octr., 1714.

New England.

Mr. Bridger to attend again.

Mr. Bridger likewise attending [fo. 161, 180] and their lordships having not time at present to enter again into the consideration of his affairs, he was desired to attend again on Tuesday morning next.

July 16. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Mr. Kettleby, Johnson &c.

Insurrection of Indians.

These gentlemen desire to be under the king's immediate protection.

Mr. Kettleby, Mr. Johnson and several Carolina planters [fo. 199] merchants and masters of ships, lately arrived from thence attending, they represented to their lordships the extremities to which that province is now reduced, by the general insurrection of the Indians [fo. 167, 179] the inhabitants for the most part being driven into Charles Town, and being then asked what might have occasioned this defection of the Indians from the British interest, some of them said, that the want of good governmt. among the Indian traders might have given provocation. That trade being at present under no good regulation, and the laws which are made not being observed. That the Spaniards at St. Augustin, and the French at Mobil, have instigated and incouraged the Indians to fall upon us, which among other reasons they were persuaded of by one Mr. Brailsford an English gentleman being very ill used at St. Augustine. And the French having taken another one, Mr. Hughs prisoner within the charter of Carolina. It was on this occasion further observed that the French king had granted to one Monsr. Croisat, a tract of land within the British dominions of which Dr. Cox had formerly a grant from the Crown of Great Britain; being further asked if they knew not of some abuses of the Indians committed by the British subjects by raising differences among them, and afterwards purchasing Indians as slaves, they said they had formerly heard of taking Indian slaves, but not of late, and those not among the Indians our friends. That the great debts due from some of the Indians to our traders being about 50,000l. was one cause of their insurrection, thinking thereby to clear the said debts. And that to prevent contests with them, it would be well if the law made there against trusting of Indians were strictly put in execution. That the planters in Carolina are not above one thousand five hundred men fit to bear arms; and being now unable to reap their crops can't hold out above six months unless supplied. That their Plantations being distant from each other, the Indians come in the night and surprise them, never fighting in open field. And upon enquiry of them what force would be necessary for the defence of the province, they said that five hundred men in fifty small forts well disposed at the heads of rivers, with fifty half pay lieuts. each to have ten men under him in the said forts would effectually prevent the incursions of the Indians. Whereupon their lordships desiring to know how such forces would be maintained, or if they were willing to contribute anything towards transporting them. These gentlemen said, they could not offer any particular means, but that they hoped as subjects of Great Britain, their effects and interest in Carolina would be protected by his Majesty, and that the Parliament might be induced to make provision for that purpose. That being apprehensive they should be always in danger under the lords proprietors, who they thought had been ready to surrender the Govnt. to his Majesty, they desired to be under his Majesty's immediate protection, and wished the interest of the said lords proprietors might be reconciled to that of the publick.

These gentlemen being then asked in case the King should send soldiers, how they should be subsisted with provisions, they answered that for this present year, the Indians having so destroyed the country, there can be no rice planted and by consequence the country could not pretend to subsist them, for the first year after their arrival. And if it should be found necessary for the soldiers to remain more than a year, they hoped the country would then be induced to find them with provisions.

To draw up what they have to offer in writing.

Upon the whole of this discourse, these gentlemen were directed to draw up in writing, what they had to offer upon the forementioned several heads, and present it to the Board on Monday morning next.

July 18. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Mr. Kettleby &c.

Memorial of present state of the province.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Mr. Kettleby [fo. 175, 191], with several other gentlemen of estates in Carolina, and merchants trading thither, attending, they presented to the Board a memorial relating to the present miserable condition of that province, and what is necessary to be sent for their relief, which was read; whereupon the draught of a letter to Mr. Secry. Stanhope [fo. 160], in answer to his of the 7th instant upon this subject, was prepared and ordered to be transcribed.

Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland.

Letter from Mr. Pulteney.

Establishments of garrisons.

A letter from Mr. Pulteney, his Majesty's Secry. at War [fo. 166], dated the 16th instant, inclosing a copy of the establishments of the garrisons at Annapolis Royal and Placentia, pursuant to the letter writ him the 14th of this month, was read.

July 19. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Carolina.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Present condition of the province.

Indians.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Secry. Stanhope, prepared yesterday, in answer to his of the 7th instant [fo. 160, 179], relating to the present miserable condition of Carolina by an insurrection of the Indians, was signed.

July 20. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

New England.

Mr. Bridger about his answers to charges against him.

Mr. Smith's offer to engage for a sum of money to renew Bridger's commission.

Mr. Bridger attending [fo. 174, 195] and being desired to explain himself, upon his answers to some of the charges against him for misbehaviour, when surveyor of the woods on the continent of America. He said as to the 3rd charge about the taking £50 of Mr. Mico for permitting a ship to load masts without licence from the Crown, that he never had taken any money. In relation to the &c. in his answer to the 4th article, whereby he seems to point at something he could say concerning Brigadier Hunter of New York, he declared that he meant nothing by it against the said Brigadier, and only meant some small services he had done which did not deserve mentioning. Upon what is alledged in Mr. Bridger's answer before-mentioned concerning his present competitor for the employment of surveyor of the woods offering to engage for the renewal of his Commission, if he would lodge a sum of money in a goldsmiths hands, he was urged to name the person, but a first seemed unwilling to do it, tho' he afterwards said it was Mr. Smith. That no particular sum was mentioned. That he meeting Mr. Smith at a coffee house, Mr. Smith told him that for a hogshead of wine, he would put Mr. Bridger in a way to obtain his Commn And taking the said Bridger then out, he then said to him the word abovementioned.

Mr. Smith explaining himself.

Mr. Smith then being sent for, he declared to the Board, that in friendship to Mr. Bridger, he advised him, that the only way to make Col. Burges, Govr. of New England, in his interest, was to convince the said Col. Burges it was his interest, but that this advice was from himself and intirely unknown to the Govr. As to any sum of money, or the hogshead of wine Mr. Smith said he never mentioned any to Mr. Bridger that he remembers.

Barbados.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Offices of treasurer and storekeeper.

Sir Charles Cox, Mr Sharpe, and others summoned.

A letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope, of the 11th instant, relating to the disposal of the offices of treasurer and storekeeper at Barbadoes was read; whereupon ordered that Sir Charles Cox [fo. 183] who brought the said letter to the office, be desired to attend the Board at ten of the clock tomorrow morning, and Sir Robt. Davers, Col. Sharpe, Col. Walker, and Mr. Rowland Tryon at that hour on Friday morning next.

Plantations General.

Warrant for new seals.

The draught of a warrant to Mr. John Roos [fo. 141], for preparing new seals for his Majesty's Colonies of New Hampshire, the Massachusets Bay, New York, New Jersey, Virginia, Jamaica, Barbadoes, the Leeward Islands and Bermuda, being laid before the Board, the same was agreed and signed.

July 21. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Barbados.

Sir Charles Cox.

Offices of treasurer and storekeeper.

Mr. Palmer and Colonel Yeamans summoned.

Sir Charles Cox attending [fo. 182, 185], as he had been desired, their lordships inquired of him, whether the offices of treasurer and store-keeper at Barbadoes mentioned in Mr. Secry. Stanhope's letter read yesterday, had been heretofore granted by the Crown; he said he did not know that they had; and he added, that the leaving the disposal of such imployments to the assembly there, had occasioned most of the disputes and differences which had happened in that island; and Sir. Charles acquainting the Board that Mr. Henry Palmer and Col. Yeamans could give some information in that matter [fo. 186] ordered that they be desired to attend the Board at ten of the clock tomorrow morning.

Nova Scotia.

Letter to Major Caulfield.

The draught of a letter to Major Caulfield, Lieut. Govr. of Annapolis in Nova Scotia [fo. 188], was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Leeward Islands.

Mills.

Debentures.

Mr. Mills attending, and his powers of attorney, from two of the sufferers at Nevis being examined, the debentures numbered 479, and 482 were delivered to him.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse for accounts of Customs.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse to desire he will move the Commrs. of his Majesty's Customs, for the following accts. as soon as may be, vizt.
1st. Account of the gross produce of the Customs inwards and outwards for 6 years, from Christmas, 1708 to Christmas, 1714.
2nd. Account of the subsidy outwards and inwards.
3rd. Account of the drawback of the subsidy.
4th. Account of the subsidy paid on all wines.
5th. Account of the drawback on all wines.
6th. Account of the subsidy on those plantation goods, which were kept separate from the general account.
7th. Account of the drawback thereon.

Mr. Martin summoned.

Ordered that Mr. Martin, Inspector General of his Majesty's Customs, be desired to attend this Board tomorrow morning.

July 22. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Barbados.

Sir Robert Davers about offices of treasurer and storekeeper.

Sir Robert Davers attending [fo. 183], their lordships took again into consideration Mr. Secry. Stanhope's lre. which was read the 20th instant, relating to the offices of treasurer and store-keeper of the island of Barbados and Sir Robt. being asked how those offices used to be disposed of, he said, they had always been given annually by the assembly of that island; that the said treasurer and storekeeper had no salary but from the assembly, and if a treasurer were appointed by patent from hence, he would probably send a deputy, and such deputy might take an opportunity of going away with the publick treasure of the island. That the assembly would not pay such officers not named by themselves, and therefore he thought it would be best that the places abovementioned should be left to be disposed of as at present.

Colonel Yeamans and Mr. Palmer on the same subject.

to bring their thoughts in writing.

Persons summoned.

Colonel Yeamans and Mr. Henry Palmer then attending [fo. 183], as they had been desired, and being asked their opinion and what they knew concerning the said imployments, they said those places were always disposed of by the assembly, who now allow the treasurer £500, and the store-keeper £200 per annum. That the assembly would think it a hardship not to have the nomination of the officers they maintain. That the excise and the other duties in the island amounted to about £20,000 per annum, and that the money raised had been some times misapplied. That in their opinion it would be better the said officers were appointed from hence, and to be accountable both here in Great Britain, and to the Council and Assembly in Barbados. These gentlemen were then desired to consider further of this matter with any other persons they should think fit, and to bring their thoughts in writing thereupon on Tuesday morning next, which they promised to do accordingly; and Mr. James Aynsworth, Mr. Thomas Stewart, and Col. Thomas Palmer [fo. 189], being named as persons well acquainted with the affairs of Barbadoes, ordered that they be desired to attend the Board at ten of the clock on Tuesday morning next.

Colonel Sharpe late President and Mr. Walker about the said offices.

Colonel Sharpe, late President of the Council of Barbados, and Mr. Walker, both lately arrived from thence, now coming to the Board, they were inquired of as the other Gentlemen had been, relating to the said offices of treasurer and store-keeper of that Island, whereupon Col. Sharpe said, that the office of treasurer, had been a bone of contention in Barbadoes, the Govr. on the one hand indeavouring to get some of his friends named, and those who are not in the Govrs. interest struggling for theirs. That the Assembly would think it a hardship were the office disposed of by the Crown, since in that case the Assembly might think they could not call the treasurer to account. That the excise in Barbadoes amounted from 3 to 4 or £5000 per annum. And that the money appropriated for the fortifications had always been laid out by direction of, and accounted for to the Council and Assembly.

Present state of Barbados.

Colonel Sharpe to give his thoughts in writing about repeopling the Island.

Upon this occasion, Colonel Sharpe was asked concerning the present state of the Island, who said it was very much dispeopled there being at present not more than 4000 white men fit to bear arms, tho' twenty years ago the militia consisted of ten thousand men, and the negroes now at Barbadoes are about 50,000. He was then desired to let their lordships have his thoughts in writing how that place might be better peopled, which he promised accordingly.

Mr. Walker's opinion concerning the said offices.

Appointing officers by the Crown.

Revenue of Barbados.

Militia &c. to give his thoughts in writing.

Mr. Walker expressed himself to the same purpose as Col. Sharpe in relation to the said offices of treasurer and store-keeper, and he further added that he was of opinion it would be a publick benefit, if all officers in Barbadoes were appointed by ye Crown. That the excise and the duty of five shillings per head on negroes amounted to 5 or £6000 per annum. That the militia were now but about 4 or 5000 and he attributed the decrease of people in Barbadoes to the barrenness of the soil there, and the war with France. Whereupon he was then likewise desired to give their lordships his thoughts in writing what method might best be used for repeopling the said Island.

Nova Scotia.

Letter to Major Caulfield.

The draught of a letter to Major Caulfield, Lieut. Govr. of Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia [fo. 183], agreed yesterday was signed.

July 25. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Trade.

Letter from Lord Viscount Townshend.

Netherlands.

Count Konigsegg's Declaration.

Answer.

A letter from the Lord Viscount Townshend [fo. 192], dated this day, with the draught of a declaration offered to be signed by Count Konigseg, the Emperors Minister, relating to the British trade, in the Netherlands, for the opinion of the Board thereupon, was read, and the draught of an answer was accordingly prepared and ordered to be transcribed.

July 26. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Barbados.

Mr. Palmer and others.

Memorial about treasurers place.

Duty of excise.

Fortifications unrepaired &c.

The Island in debt.

Mr. Palmer attending [fo. 186] with Mr. James Aynsworth, Colonel Thomas Palmer, and Mr. Thomas Stewart, as they had been desired the 22nd instant, they presented to their lordships a memorial relating to the disposing of the treasurers place in Barbadoes wherein they represented that it would be for the advantage of that Island, if the said treasurers place were dipsosed of by his Majesty here, which was read; and in discourse with these gentlemen, they said, that the duty of excise on strong liquors, which is appropriated to the fortifications, amounted one year with another to about six thousand pounds; and that they believed it was not laid out as it ought, for that the fortifications were not repaired, the guns out of order, and the matrosses were not regularly paid; that the accounts of the said excise were audited by a committee of the Council and Assembly, but not laid before the Assembly and they observed that the Govrs. had in effect the nomination of that committee, for they always have a great influence upon the choice of assembly men, and by consequence of the committee for auditing accounts. However that be, the Island was at present near twenty thousand pounds in debt, which they thought could not happen if the revenue was duly applied to the uses for which it was given. They added that the storekeeper passed his accounts before the Council. That if care was taken, they should have powder enough (and to spare) for the use of the Island, every ship being obliged to pay the Island one pound of powder for every ton, but a great deal is lavished away in unnecessary salutes, and in other occasions of mirth.

Decrease of white men, whence occasion.

to bring their thoughts in writing about peopling the Island.

Then being asked the reason for the decrease of white men in Barbadoes; they said that they believed it proceeded in part from the non execution of the Act for the settlement of the militia in that Island, whereby every owner of twenty acres of land was to send one white man into the foot militia of that Island, unless he serve himself, and every owner of an hundred acres to send one white man and a horse. Then these gentlemen [fo. 194] being desired to give their lordships in writing their thoughts of what might be proper to be done for the better and speedy peopling of the Island, they promised to do it accordingly.

Carolina.

Virginia.

Mr. Byrd and Mr. Crawley.

Insurrection of Indians in Carolina &c.

Mr. Byrd attending with Mr. Crawley [fo. 167, 213] lately arrived from Virginia, and being asked some questions in relation to the insurrection of the Indians in Carolina, Mr. Crawley said that he believed the Yameses who consist of about three hundred men, were the occasion of the said insurrection, for that the Indian traders had very much misused them; that he had seen the said traders frequently take from them their hogs, poultry, corn and other provisions, as they wanted it, and had only paid the Indians for it, what they thought fit, and if they offered to scruple at that, they would beat and abuse them. That he has heard they have frequently debauched the Indians wives and daughters, and that when they would not consent, they have proceeded so far as to force them. That they have made the said Indians carry their burthens, thro' the woods for little or nothing, and beat and abused them when they scrupled it. He added, that he believed the Indians now combined against Carolina, might be in number about 15,000 men.

Trade.

Netherlands.

Letter to Lord Townshend.

A letter to the Lord Townshend [fo. 189, 194] in answer to his lordship's mentioned in yesterday's minutes, relating to our trade in the Austrian Low Countries, was signed.

Post meridiem. Present:—Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Trade.

Netherlands.

Cabinet Council.

General Cadogan.

Tariff of 1680.

Imperial minister's declaration.

Duty of Vat Gelt.

Free brokers at Bruges.

Their lordships being sent for, went to a Committee of the Cabinet Council, after which General Cadogan coming to the Board, he acquainted them that the Imperial Ministers had signified the Emperor's willingness to grant to the subjects of Great Britain the real benefit of the tariff of the 21st Decr., 1680, in the Austrian Low Countries, tho' they thought the naming that tariff expressly might have ill consequences at present in those parts; that all goods from Great Britain are understood to be upon the foot of the said tariff, except the variations made by the several ordinances, published since the battle of Ramilies, whereof an account had been formerly transmitted to the Board [Bundle N. N. 252] and as to those articles in the variation, wherein we are most aggrieved, he said the declaration offered now to be signed by Count Konigseg, would relieve us, except as to butter, which it would not be proper for us to mention, being already more favoured in that article than the Dutch; that he had procured the duty of Vat Gelt upon our goods to be taken off, and had obtained that our merchants might have the priviledge of being free brokers in the city of Bruges.

2nd letter to Lord Townshend.

General Cadogan being then withdrawn their lordships immediately agreed and signed another letter to the Lord Viscount Townshend [fo. 192], upon the subject of the forementioned declaration offered by Count Konigseg.

July 27. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

Barbados.

Mr. Palmer &c. Memorial.

Treasurer's place in Barbadoes.

Upon further consideration of the memorial presented yesterday by Mr. Palmer, and other Barbadoes merchts. [fo. 190] relating to the appointment of a treasurer in that Island, a letter to Mr. Lowther upon several subjects, relating to his government, was agreed and signed.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Mr. Burgoyn Registrar of trading ships to attend.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commrs. of his Majesty's Customs, to desire Mr. John Burgoyn, Deputy Registrar General of all trading ships [fo. 198] may attend this Board any morning except Saturdays and Mondays.

Plantations General.

Circular letter about accounts of revenue and stores of war &c.

Ordered that circular letters be prepaid to the Governors of his Majesty's several plantations [fo. 204], requiring them to transmit duly, from time to time, the accounts of the revenue, arising in their respective governments, and stores of war and of the application thereof.

New England.

Plantations General.

Memorial from Bridger about qualifications of a surveyor.

A memorial from Mr. Bridger [fo. 180, 201], relating to the qualifications necessary for a surveyor of the woods in America [fo. 196], was read; and ordered that the other papers in this office relating to the same subject, be laid before the Board tomorrow morning.

July 28. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

New England.

Letters to Colonel Burges and Mr. Dummer.

Land bank.

Ordered that letters be writ to Col. Burges and Mr. Dummer, to remind them of their promise to lay before the Board their thoughts in writing in relation to the bank proposed to be erected in New England [fo. 153, 156]; and to acquaint them that unless what they have to offer be received in a few days, their lordships will be obliged to report upon that matter without it [fo. 200.]

New England.

Plantations General.

A surveyor of the woods &c.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

Representation from Mr. Cummings.

Reference on petition of Mr. Cummings to be surveyor of the woods &c.

Representation thereupon.

The several papers relating to the place of surveyor of the woods in America [fo. 195], being according to order laid before the Board, the letter from Mr. Secry. Stanhope, of the 8th of April, 1715 [fo. 202], referring to the Board a representation from Mr. Archibald Cummings, relating to the importance of containing a Surveyor of the woods in New England was read; as likewise a reference from Mr. Secry. of the 5th of May last, on the petition of the said Cummings, for the place of Surveyor of the Woods in North America; whereupon directions were given for drawing a repn. to his Majesty relating to that matter.

Barbados.

Letter from Mr. Lowther.

A letter from Mr. Lowther, Governor of Barbadoes, dated there the 20th of May last was read.

New England.

Barbados.

Jamaica.

Leeward Islands.

Order on representation about sugar plantations.

Bill to be offered in Parliament.

The copy of an Order of Council of the 20th Febry., 1713, upon a representation of the then Board of Trade to her late Majesty [P. fo. 121], relating to the damage, which our sugar plantations suffer, and rum, sugar and molosses sent from Surinam to New England, and directing the Attorney and Sol. General to prepare the draught of a bill to be filled in Parliament for prohibiting such pernicious trade was read.

Nevis.

Proceedings of the French.

Major Dunbar and Mr. Buttler's affidavit.

Letter to Sir Nathaniel Lloyd for answer to queries.

Their lordships then taking into consideration an account of the proceedings of the French at Nevis, whilst they were upon that Island (communicated to the Board by General Hamilton) as also Major David Dunbar's and Mr. James Buttler's examinations upon oath relating thereto, the same were read; whereupon ordered that copies thereof be sent to Sir Nathaniel Lloyd [fo. 202] with the following queries for his answers as soon as conveniently may be vizt.
1. Whether the methods used by Monsr. D'Iberville to compel the inhabitants of Nevis to come into the second agreement do not (by the law of Nations) make the same null and void.
2. Whether the abovementioned infractions on the part of D'Iberville, of the said second agreement do make the said agreement void, and acquit the inhabitants of Nevis from any manner of obligation to perform their part.
3. Whether the persons carried out of Nevis, without their own, or the inhabitants consent, as hostages for the performance of the said agreement, would by the law of Nations be detained after the conclusion of the peace, betwixt her late Majesty, and the French king, since the carrying them off by force makes them prisoners of war.

New England.

Mr. Banister.

State of trade of New England as to species of exports and imports.

Dead freight.

Mr. Banister attending [fo. 169], presented to their lordships a state of the trade of New England as it now stands in 1715, with relation to the species of the exports and imports, which was read; And Mr. Banister being asked what the dead freight might be intime of peace and war respectively, he said in peace it was about one third, and in war about one eighth part.

Trade.

Mr. Burgoyn Register of trading ships.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse for account of ships cleared from England.

Mr. Burgoyn [fo. 194], Deputy Register General of all trading ships attending, their lordships had some discourse with him, and afterwards ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse [fo. 210] to move the Commrs. of his Majesty's Customs for directions to Mr. Burgoyn to lay before this Board, as soon as conveniently may be, an account of the number of ships, that have cleared from England from Christmas, 1709 to Christmas, 1714 [fo. 257] specifying from what ports they have cleared, and to what ports they went, and an account of the tunnage of the said ships, distinguishing the British from the foreign ships.

Carolina.

Mr. Kettleby, Johnson &c.

Ill condition of Carolina by insurrection of Indians.

Mr. Kettleby and Mr. Johnson attending with Mr. Beresford, lately arrived from Carolina [fo. 175, 206, 254], the said Beresford acquainted the Board that the people of Carolina were at present in very bad circumstances, by reason of the Indians, they having destroyed most of the out-settlements of that province. That they have burnt and destroyed all about Edisto River, at the head of which they have appeared 400 in a body, and as great numbers in several other places. That they have so harrassed the province that all the women and children are retired into Charles Town, and the men who are not above 1400, are in arms and defending their out-plantations, as well as they can and endeavouring to keep the Indians from Charles Town. That their men are so fatigued, that unless some succour of men, arms and ammunition be sent them speedily, they will be obliged to desert the province, and that when he came away, they were preparing to leave the same.

July 29. Present:—Sir Jacob Astley, Mr. Molesworth, Mr. Cokburne, Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Docminique.

New York.

Letter from Colonel Nicholson.

Extracts about influence on French on the 5 Nations of Indians.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Stanhope.

A letter from Col. Nicholson with an extract of one from Capt. Riggs, dated at New York, the 11th of June last, relating to the French practices to gain our five nations of Indians to their interest, and the ill consequences thereof to his Majety's. northern colonies of America, if such an attempt should succeed, were read; whereupon copies thereof being prepared, a letter for inclosing the same to Mr. Secry. Stanhope, was immediately signed and sent.

New England.

Colonel Byfield.

Land bank.

Colonel Byfield attending, and signifying that he is going soon for New England, for which reason he desired the dispatch of the Boards report upon the proposals for a Land Bank in that country [fo. 196], he was acquainted that the same would be done with all possible expedition.

Colonel Burges for copy of the proposals for the Land bank.

Col. Burges, Govr. of New England likewise attending, and desiring a copy of the forementioned proposals concerning the said Bank [fo. 151], that he might be the better able to lay before the Board his opinion thereupon, pursuant to the Secrys. letter of yesterday; ordered that he have a copy thereof accordingly.

Memorial from Mr. Banister.

Then a memorial from Mr. Banister in answer to several queries relating to the trade of New England, and to the said Land Bank, was read [fo. 169.]