Journal, October 1718
Journal Book T

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1924

Pages

431-445

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'Journal, October 1718: Journal Book T', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 3: March 1715 - October 1718 (1924), pp. 431-445. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81434 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Journal, October 1718

October 1. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Their Lordships took into further consideration Col. Kane's proposals [fo. 419] relating to the Island of Minorca, mentioned in yesterday's minutes: And some observations upon the respective Articles of his said proposals, were agreed and ordered to be transcribed; and a letter for transmitting the same to Mr. Secretary Craggs, was immediately drawn up and signed.

New York.

A letter from Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New York to the Board, dated the 7th of July, 1718, was read, and also the following paper therein referred to, vizt.:—
Extract of an additional instruction from Her late Majesty to Brigadier Hunter, dated the 21st of February, 17 10/11, relating to building a Fort.

Another letter from Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New York and New Jersey to the Board, dated, also the 7th of July last, transmitting the Old Seal of New York and relating to Counsellors in New Jersey, was read.

A third letter from Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New York to the Secretary, dated likewise the 7th of July, 1718, relating to Mr. Mulford and the Acts of Revenue there, was read.

A letter from Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New Jersey to the Board, dated the 11th of July, 1718, transmitting the Old Seal of that province and rectifying a mistake about Mr. George Deacon, one of the Council there, was read.

A letter from Brigadier Hunter to the Board, dated the 14th of July, 1718, transmitting an abstract of the Imports from the Western Islands and also Naval Office Lists from the province of New York, which said letter was read, and the accounts were laid before the Board and are as follows, vizt.:—
Account of Madera Wines imported into New York from Midsummer, 1715, to Midsummer, 1718.
Naval Officers Lists of Ships, entered and cleared from 25th March, 1718, to 25th June following.

An extract from a letter from Brigadier Hunter Govr. of New York to Mr. Philips, Agent for that province, dated the 7th of July, 1718, was read, as were likewise the following papers therein referred to concerning Mr. Mulford's complaints &c.
Petition of the Inhabitants of Suffolk County to Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New York, relating to an address signed by them to His Majesty concerning the Whale Fishery there.
Address of several Inhabitants of New York to His Majesty, for a redress of their grievances under the Administration of Brigadier Hunter. As also
Representation of the Council and General Assembly of New York, to the Lords of the Committee for hearing appeals from the plantations in favour of Brigadier Hunter against the complaints of Mr. Mulford and others.

Trade.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, [fo. 376] Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, dated the 5th February 17 17/18, transmitting, as desired, an Account of the Exports of East India prohibited goods from this Kingdom to Ireland, Guernsey, Jersey and to the plantations, which said letter was read, and the Account inclosed laid before the Board.

A letter from the Secretary to Sir Edward Gould [fo. 416] signifying their Lordships desire to be informed whether there is a Duty or Extraordinary Primage raised on all goods imported at Leghorn in British ships, by the English Factory there for defraying the National Charges, as directed in the Minutes of the 23rd of last month, was signed.

October 2. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

A representation from the British Factory at Oporto, [fo. 412, 427] dated the 18th of May, 1715, was read.

A letter from Mr. Thomson, Consul at Algier, to the Board, dated the 18th of July, 1715, relating to the declension of the British Trade there, and the reason thereof, was read.

Plantations General.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs [fo. 425] for His Majesty's pleasure, whether the Commissions for trying Pirates in the West Indies may not now be sent thither by the first opportunity, was signed.

October 3. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Massachusets.

A letter from Mr. Bridger [fo. 418, 431] Surveyor of His Majesty's Woods in North America, to the Board, dated at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, the 26th of August, 1718, complaining of the destruction of large Mast Trees in His Majesty's Woods there, was read. Whereupon ordered that the above mentioned letter from Mr. Bridger and another lately received from him on the same subject, with the papers therein referred to, as likewise a copy of his Commission and Instructions as Surveyor of His Majesty's Woods on the continent of America, together with the Charter granted by King William and Queen Mary, to the province of the Massachusets Bay and a copy of the 29th article of His Majesty's instructions to Col. Shute for that Government relating thereto, be sent to Mr. West to be perused and considered by him, that their Lordships may discourse with him thereupon.

Antegoa.

Mr. Francis Carlisle of the Island of Antegoa [fo. 437] attending with Mr. Rowland Tryon and Mr. Nivine, Agent for that Island, presented to the Board a Memorial praying that he may supply a vacancy in the Council of Antegoa by the death of Col. William Thomas there, was read; and their Lordships agreed to take the same into consideration at a convenient opportunity.

Trade.

A letter from Mr. Herne, Consul at Alicant, to the Board, dated the 15th of July N.S. 1715, with an account from the Factory of the State of their Trade, was read.

Ordered that the Secretary write to Mr. Martin [fo. 443], Inspector General of His Majesty's Customs, for an account of the total quantities of Coffee, Tea, Pepper, and Calicoes imported into this Kingdom and re-exported in each of the following years vizt.:—1699, 1700, 1701, 1713, 1714, and 1715, as also for an account of the total value of the Drugs (rated in the book of rates), that have been imported and re-exported in each of the said six years.

New York.

Mr. West attending, their Lordships proceeded in considering the Acts undermentioned, passed at New York in 1714 and 1715, which were severally read, and their Lordships directed to be noted on the said Acts as expressed under the titles of each respective Act, vizt.:—
Passed in 1714.
An Act for regulating Fences for the several Cities and Counties within this Colony. No objection.
An Act for incouraging the Indian Trade at Albany. Expired.
No objection.

Passed in 1715.
An Act for the better explaining An Act of General Assembly passed in 1714, entituled An Act for paying the several sums of money claimed as debts of this Colony to the several persons therein named and to make and inforce the currency of Bills of Credit to the value of £27,680, also to make void all claims from this Colony before 1st June, 1714, and to prevent this Colony from being in debt for the future. To be confirmed.
An Act for laying a Duty on Goods sold by Auction &c. No objection.
An Act for preserving of Oysters. No objection.
An Act declaring John Stoss free from the Duty of Tonnage.
No objection.
An Act for building a County House &c. in Dutchess County.
No objection.
An Act for incouraging Navigation. No objection.
An Act for reviving the Militia Act. Their Lordships resolved to read the revived Act itself, passed 1st Anne.
An Act for the Treasurers paying several persons therein named and for paying the Excise in arrear to the Treasurer.
Has had its effect.
An Act for continuing an Act for appointing Commissioners, to let to Farm the Excise &c. Expired.
An Act for repairing the County House &c. of Ulster. Has had its effect. No objection.
An Act for relieving the Inhabitants of South Carolina from the Duties on Goods, Slaves &c. which they shall import in six months. Has had its effect. No objection.
An Act for the better repairing the Fortifications of Albany &c.
No objection.
An Act for destroying Wolves in Orange County. Expired.
No objection.
An Act for reviving An Act to prevent the running away of Negroes to the French. Their Lordships resolved to read the revived Act itself, passed, 4th Anne.
An Act for repairing the Fortifications of Schenectedy etc.
No objection.

Ordered that an Act passed in New York, the 5th of July, 1715, for a General Naturalization together with Sir Edward Northey's report (N. York B6. Nr. 104) and opinion dated the 1st April, 1718, as also an extract of several letters from Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of that Province, relating to the Act above mentioned, be referred to Mr. West [fo. 432], and that he be desired to give their Lordships a draught of such alterations as he may think proper to be recommended to Brigadier Hunter to be passed into a new law.

October 7. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Massachusetts.

Two letters to Mr. West [fo. 418, 425, 445], the one upon which Mr. Bridger, Surveyor of the Woods on the continent of America, writes relating to the waste committed in those Woods, the other [fo. 431] relating to an Act of Naturalization at New York, were agreed and ordered to be sent.

Virginia.

A letter from Col. Spotswood, Lieut. Govr. of Virginia to the Board, dated the 14th August last, was read, and the papers undermentioned, therein referred to, were laid before the Board, vizt.:—
Minutes of Council of Assembly from the 23rd April, 1718, to 10th July following.
Journal of the House of Burgesses from 23 April to 10th July, 1718.
Four Acts passed in Virginia, the 23rd April, 1718.
Minutes of the Council of Virginia from the 12th November, 1717, to 30th July, 1718.
Copies of Acts with extracts of the Governor's Commissioner and Instructions relating to the Collation to Ecclesiastical Benefices in Virginia.
Six Proclamations issued by Col. Spotswood, Lieut. Govr. of Virginia in the years 1717 and 1718.
Naval Officers Lists of Ships and Vessels importing and exporting Goods and Merchandises from the Madera or Western Islands to and from Virginia between 25th March, 1715, and 25th March, 1718.
Lists of Grants of Land from June, 1710, to June, 1718. Account of His Majesty's Revenue of Quit Rents from 25th April, 1717, to 23rd April, 1718.
Account of the Revenue of 25. per Hogshead from 25th October, 1717, to 25th April, 1718.
Whereupon directions were given for preparing the Draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs [fo. 108, 445] upon what Col. Spotswood proposes about settlements to be made at the Lake Erie, and in the passes of the great Mountains on the back of Virginia.

New York.

A Representation for repealing An Act passed at New York the 4th of September, 1714, entituled An Act for shortning of Law Suits and regulating the practice of the Law, was signed.

October 8. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

A letter from Sir Edward Gould of the 6th instant, in answer to one relating to a duty raised by the British Factory at Leghorn on Goods imported there in British Shipping, was read; whereupon some directions were given for preparing an answer to Mr. Secretary Craggs's letter mentioned in the minutes of the 23rd of the last month, upon the extract of one from Mr. Henshaw, Consul at Genoa, relating to a National Duty imposed there likewise by the Factory on Goods imported into Genoa, in British ships.

New York.

A Memorial from several Merchants trading to New York praying the Board to report upon An Act of that Province for raising money by way of Bills for payment of Debts, was read; whereupon ordered that they be acquainted with their Lordships having had the said Act under consideration, and writ to Brigadier Hunter, Governor of the said Province, concerning it, and that as soon as his answer is received, which is shortly expected, the Board will represent their opinion to his opinion to His Majesty upon the said Act.

Mr. West then attending, their Lordships proceeded to take into consideration the Acts undermentioned, passed at New York in the years 1715 and 1716, and agreed and ordered to be noted thereupon as expressed under the title of each respective Act vizt.:—

Acts passed in 1715.
An Act to oblige the Inhabitants in each particular Ward in New York to make good their Quota of all Publick Taxes.
No objection. To lye by probationary.
An Act to exempt Hannah Martin &c. from payment of Taxes for twelve Negroes imported, &c. No objection. Has had its effect.
An Act for discharging Capt. Peter Vanbrugh &c. concerning the provisions and other stores of War formerly in their hands. No objection.
An Act continuing an Act for the easier partition of Lands in joint Tenancy or in common. Has had its effect.

Acts passed in 1716.
An Act for the Treasurers paying to His Excellency 1025 oz.
of Silver Plate. Has had its effect.
An Act for destroying Wolves and Foxes in West Chester County. No objection. To lye by.

October 9. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Antigua.

A letter from Mr. Barrington to the Secretary, [fo. 426, 443, 446] dated 4th inst., desiring him to move the Board, that John Yeamans Esqr. may supply the present vacancy in the Council of the Island of Antigua by the death of Col. William Thomas, was read; and an answer thereto agreed and ordered to be sent.

Newfoundland.

Their Lordships taking into consideration the draught of a Representation, relating to Trade and Fishery at Newfoundland, ordered that the Secretary write to Mr. Burchet to signify the Boards desire of speaking with Capt. Passenger and Capt. Wade on Thursday morning next, and that he will acquaint them therewith or give notice where they may be writ to if in England.

Trade.

A letter from Mr. Pointz, Consul General at Lisbon, dated 17th September, 1718 N.S. in answer to one from the Secretary for an account of our Fish Trade there, was read, and directions given to the Secretary for writing to him thereupon.

October 10. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney.

Newfoundland.

A letter from Mr. Burchet, Secretary to the Admiralty [fo. 438, 447], dated yesterday, signifying that he had writ to Capt. Passenger and Capt. Wade to attend this Board according to their Lordships desire, was read.

Trade.

A letter from Mr. Russell, Consul at Sevilla &c. dated at Cadiz, the 25th July, 1715, relating to the British Trade there, was laid before the Board with the papers undermentioned therein referred to, being duplicates of what Mr. Russell mentions in his said letter to be sent to the Secretarys Office, vizt.:—
Propositions of the Factory of Cadiz for the security and encouragement of the British Trade to Spain and its Dominions.
Remarks on the new Treaty of Commerce with Spain sent from Cadiz to the Lord Viscount Bolingbroke the 3rd June, 1714.
Representation of things necessary to be laid before His Britannick Majestys Ambassador to his Catholic Majesty for redress relating to the British Trade.
Representation of the Consul and Merchants of Sevilla and St. Lucar, relating to the state of British Trade there.

And the said Representation of the Consul and Merchants of Sevilla and St. Lucar was read.

A letter from Sir Martin Westcomb, Consul at Cadiz, dated the 7th of July, 1715, with an Account from that Factory of the State of their Trade, was likewise laid before the Board.

New York.

Mr. West attending, their Lordships took into consideration the Acts undermentioned, passed at New York in 1716 and 1717, which were severally read, and ordered that they should lye by, vizt.:—
An Act nominating Commissioners to let to farm the Excise through the Colony.
An Act for discharging Col. Kilian Van Renseluar, Major Dirick Wessels and Mindert Schuyler Esqrs. of the City of Albany, for and concerning the provisions, ammunitions &c. formerly in their hands belonging to this Colony.
An Act for the repairing of the Fortifications of the City of Albany and providing them Military Watches with fire wood.
An Act to inable the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York to raise the sum of £500 for altering the course of the Common Sewer at the end of the Broad Street and for cleansing and scowering the Dock of this City.
An Act for laying a Duty on Goods sold by Auction &c.
An Act reviving an Act, entituled An Act for encouraging the Indian Trade at Albany.
An Act for annexing that part of the Manor of Levingston which now lies in Dutchess County to the County of Albany.
An Act for exempting the Pink Charlotte from paying the Duty of Tonnage.
An Act declaring a Sloop now upon the Stocks in the Colony of Connecticut, belonging to Mr. Jacob Moene, free from the Duty of Tonnage.
An Act to clear a Sloop upon the Stocks in the province of New York, belonging to Col. Johnson, from the Duty of Tonnage.
An Act declaring a Sloop called the Good Intent, built at Newport in Rhode Island, belonging to Messrs. Benjamin Faneril, Thomas Bayeux, Andrew Tresneau, David Minevielle, free from the Duty of Tonnage.

October 14. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Leeward Islands.

Ordered that Col. Matthew, [fo. 437, 446] Lieut. Govr. of the Leeward Islands, and Mr. Edward Byam be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with them on Thursday morning next.

Trade.

A letter to Sir Isaac Newton [fo. 378, 455] to remind him of that writ to him the 6th of August last for an Account of Coynage, was agreed and ordered to be sent.

An Account of Calicoes, Coffee, Pepper and Tea, imported and exported in six years [fo. 427], vizt.: the 1698, 1699, 1700, 1712, 1713 and 1714, being received from Mr. Martyn, Inspector General of the Customs, was laid before the Board.

Mr. Ingram's and Mr. Ashurst's [fo. 374 and 456] answers to several queries sent them relating to the Clandestine Exportation of Wool, was read, and their Lordships agreed to consider thereof again tomorrow morning. In the meantime, ordered that Mr. Minett, mentioned in the said answer, be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with him this day, sev'ning, and that Mr. Ingram be desired to bring with him, to their Lordships at the same time as many of the other persons, to whom he refers in the same answer as can conveniently attend.

A Memorial from several persons concerned in the Woollen Manufacture relating to the Clandestine Exportation of our wool, and the mischief and ill consequence thereof, and praying that care may be taken to suppress it, dated at Stirbich, the 12th September, 1718, was read.

Mr. Richard Terry's Certificate [fo. 443, 456] that there is a Woollen Manufactury set up at Versailles, and above two hundred English persons employed therein; that English Wool is very plentiful in France, and that he knew several English owners and smugglers there, dated the 5th September, 1718, was read.

October 15. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Bladen.

Massachussetts.

A letter from Mr. Lowndes [fo. 431, 454] dated the 9th inst., signifying the Lords of the Treasury's desire of the opinion of this Board, upon the inclosed copy of a letter from Mr. Bridger, Surveyor of the Woods on the Continent of America, relating to His Majesty's right to the said Woods, and to the waste committed there, was read, together with the said copy of Mr. Bridger's letter; whereupon directions were given for preparing an answer to Mr. Lowndes.

New York.

Virginia.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs [fo. 433] inclosing an Extract of Brigadier Hunter's letter of the 7th of July and of Col. Spotwsood's letter of the 14th August last, both relating to the communication the French have made from the River of St. Lawrence to that of Mississippi, for His Majesty's pleasure thereupon, was agreed and signed.

New England.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, inclosing several accounts of the Imports and Exports to and from New England for three years ending at Midsummer, 1717, was read, and the said Accounts laid before the Board.

October 16. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Pulteney.

Antegoa.

Col. Matthew, Lieut. Genl. of the Leeward Islands, and Mr. Edward Byam, attending as desired [fo. 443, 437] their Lordships enquired of them, concerning the character and age of John Yeamans Esqr., recommended by Mr. Barrington to be a Member of His Majesty's Council in Antigua; whereupon Col. Matthew said, he had no personal acquaintance with him but that he knew the said Mr. Yeamans was a person of good family and estate, related to several of the most considerable Gentlemen in the Leeward Islands, and had been educated here in England; Mr. Byam represented to the Board, that he was very well acquainted with Mr. Yeamans abovementioned, and said he was Grandson to the late Lieut. Govr. Yeamans, of a very good character and about 24 or 25 years of age.

The Gentlemen abovementioned being withdrawn, a letter from Mr. Barrington of the 13th instant to the Secretary, relating to the said Mr. Yeamans, was read, and their Lordships agreed to take the same into further consideration at another opportunity.

Newfoundland.

Capt. Passenger and Capt. Wade [fo. 439, 466] attending, as desired, their Lordships had some discourse with them concerning the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland, wherein among other things, they respectively said in substance as follows, vizt.:—Capt. Passenger said, that he had formerly transmitted to this Board, a true state of the Newfoundland Trade and Fishery, which in his opinion could not be carried on to the advantage of this Kingdom without first preventing the great abuses committed at Newfoundland by Commanders of Ships and other persons from New England. —That chiefly by means of so many men being carried from Newfoundland to New England, fishermen are become scarse and as he had been informed by Mr. Newman of Dartmouth, the hire of one of the men well skilled in the Fishery, is from 16 to 18 and sometimes £20 for the season, which is six or seven months.— And Capt. Wade as well as Capt. Passenger agreed, that by the great quantity of rum and other liquors brought to Newfoundland the Fishermen and Seamen grow debauched, run in Debt (tho' the best rum was sometimes at 2s. 3d. per Gallon there) and take but few fish.— That the Masters of Ships from this Kingdom often carry Goods to the planters, which last trust the Seamen and Fishermen by a credit allowed by the said Masters, so that such men save nothing in the voyage. These Gentlemen being particularly asked their opinion, what methods might be most proper for preventing the practices of the New England men at Newfoundland and the Seamen and Fishermen being carried to New England; they said that Bonds might be taken at the Ports the Masters of Ships clear from in this Kingdom with sufficient penalties in case they bring not back the same number of men they carried out (death only excepted). And Capt. Wade proposed a Govr. or Commander in Chief in a small Ship of War at Newfoundland to remain there in Winter as well as Summer.—That no Rum should be permitted to be brought to Newfoundland or to any plantation but from the place where rum was made. And he added that it would be well if no Rum were allowed to be carried to Newfoundland, but what had first been landed in Great Britain, for which when re-exported a Drawback might be allowed.—That such Commander at Newfoundland should have a power to seize such Ships as he should find trading contrary to Law, or with such men on Board as ought to return to this Kingdom; and both the said Gentlemen concurred, that Planters at Newfoundland are a detriment to the Fishery. In relation to Ships and Boats, fishing rooms, Capt. Passenger said, that when he was at Newfoundland, no body there could inform him which they were. And as to the Flakes, the planters often placed them too near to those employed by the Fishing Ships; and they both agreed it would be necessary that no man should be allowed more ground, than he exactly occupies. Capt. Wade proposing a Register to be kept in each Port or Harbour at Newfoundland after the Ships arriving there &c.: Capt. Passenger was of opinion, nobody there was capable of it, or fit to be trusted. They both confirmed to their Lordships that the Woods in Newfoundland are very much rinded and destroyed, so that men must now go five miles to get Wood for stages; and as to the several rules prescribed for the better carrying on the said Fishery, the Act of Parliament relating thereto is very defective, assigning no penalties, or power for putting the same in execution. The quantity of Fish taken last year, Capt. Passenger said, was much larger than in any one year for these seven years past, tho' they wanted a third of the number of Boats employed in the preceding year. And Capt. Wade added that the Fisherman who go from Tinmouth being diligent and following the old methods of Fishing, catch now 300 Quintals of Fish where others have not above 80 or 100 Quintals. And these Gentlemen said that the Fishermen of Dartmouth continue to fish on shares which excited the diligence of the Fishermen and was best for them as well as the Merchants. As to the ill curing of Fish, Capt. Passenger and Capt. Wade concurred with what Mr. Pointz writes in his letter from Lisbon, mentioned in the minutes of the 9th instant, about blasting instead of curing Fish, as did Capt. Passenger concerning the Fish being often spoiled for the Market, which is taken on the Banks off Newfoundland, tho' Capt. Wade seemed of another opinion and thought likewise as to Fish being eaten out with Salt, that a Fish would receive no more Salt than its due; on this occasion these Gentlemen were asked what they had heard or knew of Salt upon Salt; and Capt. Passenger said he had heard nothing of it and thought some salt too strong of itself.— Capt. Wade informed their Lordships that the Dutch carry Salt for their Herring Fishery from Lisbon, and make it over again in Holland to take off the corrosive quality; and both these Gentlemen agreed, that the Dutch practise a method of Bleeding all their Herrings as they take them, which we do not.— And they thought this might be one reason why the Herrings cured by the Dutch are preferable to what we do.— Their Lordships returning again to the subject of Newfoundland, inquired what number of Publick Houses were there, to which Capt. Passenger answered there were not above one or two, but what sold some sort of liquor, and they both declared those Publick Houses a nuisance to the Trade and Fishery.— These Gentlemen being further asked, whether the people who remain at Newfoundland would not be prevailed with to remove to Nova Scotia, they answered that those people were in Debt, had no effects, and subsisted only by Fish and that they could not say whether they would remove to Nova Scotia, even upon Incouragement, tho' the said Captains agreed there was a good Fishery on the coast of Nova Scotia.

Capt. Passenger and Captain Wade being withdrawn, their Lordships agreed to proceed in the further consideration of the draught of a Representation relating to the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland on Thursday next.

Trade.

A Letter from Sir Randolph Knipe, relating to our Trade with Denmark, Norway and through the Sound, being communicated to the Board by Mr. Pulteney, was read, and their Lordships resolved to take into further consideration at another opportunity.

Virginia.

The draught of a letter from the Secretary to Mr. Attorney General, upon what Col. Spotswood, Lieut. Governor of Virginia, writes relating to prorogation of Assemblys under adjournment &c. and to the collation of Ministers to Ecclesiastical Benefices, was agreed.

Massachusetts.

The draught of a letter from the Secretary to Mr. Lowndes [fo. 445, 473] in answer to his of the 9th instant, relating to His Majesty's Woods in America, was also agreed.

Oct. 17. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Sir Isaac Newton, Master Worker of His Majesty's Mint [fo. 443] presented to their Lordships the two Accounts of Coinage undermentioned, vizt.:—
An account of the Monies of Gold and Silver coined annually in His Majesty's mint in the Tower of London since the year 1709, from Christmas, to Christmas.
An Account of the Gold monies coined since Christmas, 1717, to the 23rd of July, 1718, inclusive.

New York.

Mr. West attending, the two Acts of New York undermentioned which have been revived and continued by other Acts passed in that Province in 1715, were read, to which their Lordships had no objection, vizt.:—
An Act for settling the Militia of this Province and making it more useful for security and defence thereof and for repealing of all former Acts heretofore made in this Province relating to the same. Passed in 1702.
An Act to prevent the running away of Negro Slaves out of the City and County of Albany to the French of Canada, passed in 1705.

Oct. 21. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Mr. Ingram, attending [fo. 444, 467] according to appointment, with several persons undermentioned to whom the said Ingram refers in his answer to several queries relating to the exportation of Wool &c. they were severally called in and upon examination declared as follows, vizt.:—

Elizabeth Vanhirgirken said she was married in Sweden, and her late husband, something above two years ago was imployed in a Woollen Manufacture there which has been set up there about ten years and still subsists under the direction of a Noble Man named Ereuspets; that since her husbands death that Business is managed by another. That they have a Fuller and Packer there and make chiefly coarse cloth for the Swedish Army but some of a middling sort. That they bought English Wool of one Mr. Wightman, a native of Scotland, residing at Stockholm; but as to the price given for Wool or what the Cloth in Sweden was sold at, she said she knew it not, being unacquainted with the Trade.

George Cape said he was a Wool Comber, and 16 or 20 years ago was imployed in his Trade in Scotland, and then saw Wool publickly shipt off at Leith, which had been brought out of England and that one Wightman transported English Wool thence under the name of Scots Wool. And that the Wool wrought up by the said Cape was of the finest sort and made into Stockings at Edinburgh. That he now combs Wool in Spittle Fields only for the Frame for Stockings, and said he was informed many Frames have been lately set up in France for the same Manufacture. And that 300 men are now imployed in and about Calais in combing Wool, and named one Townsend that has gone thither to work. The said Cape being asked how he thought the carrying of our Wool to France might best be prevented, he said, the shipping imployed in that Service did but little good, and, that in his opinion this evil practice would best be remedied by Officers at Land and a strict prohibition against Wool unwrought being Waterborn. That the Wool exported hence is generally in the Fleece, and such is as proper for making Says and Serges in France, it being too dear for the Owlers when combed; that the French and other Foreign Manufactures of Wool must fall, if we could keep our English Wool and that of Ireland at home, with our Fullers Earth, there being no Wool in Europe, except Spain, so good as ours, and no Fullers Earth abroad, but what is sent from this Kingdom.

Jasper Chappel, a seafaring man, acquainted their Lordships that arriving about 16 or 18 months ago at Bourdeaux, in a vessel that came from Lisbon with Salt, he saw three ships from Ireland come into Bourdeaux full laden with Wool, Yarn and Provisions, one of which ships, he understood belonging to Dublin, and that he saw upwards of 40 or 50 packs of the said Wool unloaden.

Mr. Crossland, who said he formerly belonged to the Office of the Commissioners for sick and wounded, attending in behalf of Mr. Minet; he said Mr. Minet was indisposed and desired to be excused coming to the Board; whereupon the said Crossland being asked several questions, he acquainted the Board, that whilst he was in the said office, during the late War, he had in his custody one Disque, a Frenchman who lived at Boulogne, and was concerned in two Gallies, sometimes as a Privateer and sometimes carrying on the Owling Trade, as divers others he formerly knew. That the said Disque was taken in a Privateer: that he understood they hired ships by the year since the Peace to carry Wool from Scotland and Ireland to France. And Mr. Crossland further said he was informed about a year ago by Mr. Minet (who goes yearly in the summer to France to settle accounts &c.) that there was then a glut of English Wool at Calais, so that those that had the disposal of it were forced to carry it further into the Country.

Mr. Ashurst attending, promised to bring to their Lordships some letters he had received in confirmation of several things set forth in Mr. Ingram's and his answer and memorial, relating to the running of Wool &c.; and upon discourse with him concerning the illegal practices on the coast of Kent and Sussex, he said he knew officers appointed to prevent the running of Wool and prohibited goods, since the late Capt. Baker, were obliged to prosecute offenders at their own charge; whereas Capt. Baker had better success, when the Crown was at the expence of Prosecutions.—That Mr. Wyat the Solicitor whom these new Officers are obliged to imploy makes them such large Bills that they are discouraged from prosecuting, tho' they dare not complain.—That formerly three or four informations were entered at the Exchequer for 6s. 8d. whereas Mr. Wyat now charges 30s. for each information. That he was of opinion the Owling Trade was not to be prevented, but at the expence of the Crown, except the King's Moiety of Forfeitures were likewise given to the Prosecutor. That the Law in other respects he thought already sufficient; one Witness being allowed to convict.

Mr. Ingram being then desired to acquaint some of the Commissioners, who acted pursuant to the Act of Parliament passed in the Reign of his late Majesty King William for preventing the Exportation of Wool that the Board would be glad to speak with them on this day Sevennight, he promised to do it accordingly and attend with them.

Oct. 22. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Pulteney.

Trade.

Upon further consideration of Mr. Secretary Craggs' letter [fo. 416, 470], of the 9th of last month, with an extract of one from Mr. Henshaw, Consul at Genova, relating to a national duty to be laid there on English Shipping towards the support of a Chaplin and other publick uses, their Lordships gave directions for preparing an answer to Mr. Secretary's said letter.

Plantations General.

Two letters to the Secretary from Mr. Basket, His Majesty's Printer, [fo. 181] dated the 14th and 18th instant, about the Laws of the Plantations he is about to print, were read, whereupon ordered that the Secretary return Mr. Basket the printed book of New York laws and send the first volumn of the Acts of Bermuda to be printed at the same time.

Bermuda.

Mr. West attending the Book of Bermuda Acts from 170 3/4, to 17 13/14 were delivered to him by Order to the Board to be perused for printing with the rest.

New York.

Their Lordships then proceeded to consider the Acts of New York undermentioned, passed there in the year 1717 which were severally read, vizt.:—
An Act to inable Mary the widow and Executrix of John Corbet, deceased, to convey and assign a certain dwelling house and tenement and the ground thereunto belonging, situate and being on the west side of the Broad Street in the City of New York.
An Act for building a County House and Prison in Dutchess County.
An Act reviving an Act entituled An Act for the better settling the Militia of this province and making it more useful for the Security and defence thereof and for repealing all former Acts heretofore made in this province, relating to the same.
An Act for regulating the Ferry between the City of New York and the Island Nassaw.
An Act for the restraining the taking of extravagant and excessive Usury.
An Act for explaining and rendering more effectual An Act for preventing, suppressing and punishing conspiracy and insurrection of Negroes and other Slaves.
An Act to incourage the destroying Foxes and Wild Cats in King's County, Queens County and County of Suffolk.
An Act for paying the Executors of Tho. Codrington Esqr. the arrears due for his service in General Assembly from 14th June, 1705, to the 17th September, 1708.
An Act exempting the Snow or Vessel called the Leghorne from paying the duty of Tonnage.
An Act exempting the Sloop Mary and Hannah from paying the duty of Tonnage.
An Act for paying Johannes Jansen, David Provost and Leonard Lewis Esqrs. the arears due to them for their services in the General Assembly as representatives for the City and County of New York.
An Act reviving an Act prohibiting all persons but John Permiter and his assigns to make Lamb Black during the space of five years.
An Act to invest the property of a certain dwelling house and ground thereto belonging, in the City of New York, in Daniel and Christopher, the Sons of Daniel Robert deceased.
An Act for the further inabling Thomas Whitehead to sell and dispose of some part of the Lands devised to him by his Father.
An Act to prohibit the exportation of Raw hides from this Colony.

And their Lordships gave directions for writing the Brigadier Hunter, Govr. of New York, upon the foresaid Act for explaining and rendering more effectual, An Act preventing suppressing and punishing conspiracy and insurrection of Negroes.

Oct. 23. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Pulteney.

Newfoundland.

Their Lordships took again into consideration the draught of a Representation [fo. 447] relating to the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland and made a further progress therein.

Oct. 28. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Mr. Ingram attending according to appointment, [fo. 456, 469] as also Mr. Haynes, one of the Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament in the reign of His late Majesty King William for preventing the exportation of Wool out of this Kingdom, Mr. Ingram acquainted the Board, that Sir Benj. Ayloff and Sir William Ashurst, who acted likewise as Commissioners under the said Act of Parliament, were indisposed, and not able to attend: whereupon their Lordships inquired of Mr. Haynes, what proceedings were had by the said Commissioners ? to which he answered that there were several seizures by the Officers under them and condemnations thereof made, that a journal was kept of the Commissioners proceedings tho' Mr. Busfield having it in his custody had mislaid it, but Mr. Haynes said he had taken some minutes out of it himself, and that the Commissioners desired to know what this Board required of them, upon which they would meet and return an answer. Their Lordships then signified to Mr. Haynes that they should be glad to be as fully apprized as might be in writing of the proceedings of the Commissioners abovementioned, with their thoughts as to the expediency of reviving the said Commission or any other the most effectual methods for preventing the exportation of Wool.

Capt. John Edwards attending, acquainted the Board that he had been imployed by the Commissioners abovementioned for preventing the exportation of Wool and had made many seizures &c. Whereupon he was desired to put into writing and bring to their Lordships what he knew or had to offer relating to that matter.

Barbadoes.

A letter from Mr. Gordon, dated the 23rd inst. inclosing a printed Sermon, preached by him at Barbadoes, with a preface in answer to Mr. Lowther, the Govr's. accusations against him, was read.

Trade.

A letter from Mr. Neilson, Lord Provost of Edinburgh, dated the 18th, in answer to one of the 8th inst. and 15th of August last [fo. 395, 409, 472], relating to the convention with Hamburgh for Herrings, and sending thither a specimen of those caught before St. John Day, was read; whereupon ordered that the several papers in the office on that subject be looked out to be laid before the Board.

Three letters all dated in August last, [fo. 467] relating to the money weekly carried from Deal, Dover, Sandwich and other parts of the Coast of Kent to France for Liquors, were read. Whereupon ordered that copies thereof be sent to Mr. Carkesse for the information of the Commissioners of the Customs, with an extract of Mr. Ingram and Ashurst's answer to queries which relate to that matter, as well as to the exportation of Wool.

Mr. Samuel Winder, Mr. John Adams, and several other Merchants trading to Barbary [fo. 406] attending, presented to the Board a Petition praying that the ship Granadier, may be permitted to go to Barbary for the better accomodating the Merchants to bring off their effects, was read; and the said Gentlemen were acquainted that the Board had already represented to his Majesty what they conceived proper to be done upon former petitions on this subject, referred to their Lordships. And that if His Majesty should be graciously pleased to refer to them any thing further thereupon, their Lordships should consider and report their opinion of it.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs [fo. 462] in answer to his of the 9th of Sept. last, upon a letter from Mr. Henshaw, Consul at Genova, relating to a Duty to be raised on the British Factory there, for support of a Chaplin and other Publick Uses, was signed.

Oct. 30. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

A letter to Mr. Poyntz, Consul General at Lisbon, in answer to his, mentioned in the minutes of the 9th inst., was agreed and ordered to be sent.

A letter from Mr. Brown, Consul at Venice, dated the 10th Sept. 1718 N.S. in answer to one from the Secretary, relating to our Fish Trade there, was read.

A letter from Mr. Fuller, Consul at Leghorn, dated the 23rd Sept., 1718 N.S. in answer likewise to one from the Secretary, relating to our Fish Trade there, was also read.

Whereupon directions were given to the Secretary for writing to the said Mr. Brown and Mr. Fuller to the same effect as the letter abovementioned to Mr. Poyntz.

Several papers relating to our Herring trade to Hamburgh [fo. 469, 473] being according to order laid before the Board, their Lordships took the same into further consideration, and the draught of a letter to the Right Honble. the Earl Stanhope on that subject was prepared and ordered to be transcribed.

New York.

Bermuda.

Mr. Basket, His Majesty's Printer attending, their Lordships had some discourse with him about printing the Acts of New York and Bermuda, and gave him some directions therein; whereupon he promised to dispatch the same as soon as possible.

Oct. 31. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pulteney, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

A letter to the Right Honble. the Earl of Stanhope [fo. 472], relating to a convention with the City of Hamburgh for our Herring Trade, as mentioned in the last minutes, was signed.

Massachusets.

Mr. West attending, their Lordships had some discourse with him upon what the Secretary writ him the 7th inst. by order of the Board [fo. 454], relating to the waste committed in His Majesty's Woods on the Continent of America; whereupon directions were given for preparing a letter to Mr. West to desire his opinion in writing what Woods belong to the Province of the Massachusets Bay and those claiming under them, and what Woods are the right of and reserved to the Crown.