Journal, February 1752
Volume 60

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

264-282

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'Journal, February 1752: Volume 60', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 9: January 1750 - December 1753 (1932), pp. 264-282. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81851 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Journal, February 1752

Monday. February 3. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville. Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Barbados.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse inclosing copies of the letters and papers lately received from Mr. Grenville, Governor of Barbados, relative to the evacuation of the Neutral Islands, having been prepared pursuant to the preceding minutes, was laid before the Board agreed to, transcribed and signed.

Nova Scotia.

Their lordships pursuant to the minutes took into further consideration the draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the dispute between William Baker and Chauncy Townshend. Esquires, and the said draught being agreed to was ordered to be transcribed.

Tuesday, February 4. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville. Mr. Fane, Mr. Oswald.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the victualling for the troops and settlers in Nova Scotia, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 29th of January, was laid before the Board, agreed to, and ordered to be transcribed.

Trade.

Africa.

The draught of a report to the Earl of Holdernesse upon the memorial of the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa relating to the building a fort at Anamaboe, having been transcribed pursuant to the minutes of the 31st of January, was laid before the Board and signed.

New Jersey.

Mr. Partridge, agent for the province of New Jersey, attending, was called in and he represented to their lordships that he thought it his duty to lay before their lordships the present distressed state of affairs in that province.

That the Legislature of New Jersey did in the last June sessions of their general Assembly pass a Quota Bill into an Act in order to tax the people for support of government and pay the debts of the colony upon which the people had since chearfully given in an account of their rateable estates.

That in the September Session following they passed several Acts and that a good agreement seemed to subsist between the Council and Assembly until the Bill for levying the tax had passed the House of Representatives and being sent to the Council and by them sent back with a long train of amendments, which were directly contrary to what the Council passed into a law but last June in the Support Bill, that by one of those amendments they exclude the House of their privilege of appointing an agent at Great Britain, by which amendments the liberties of the people are attacked, which hindered this Bill from passing into a law, whereby the Support Act passed last June is of no effect, because no tax to pay it can be levied.

That the affairs of that unhappy colony are thus perplexed, the Governor in great want of his support, the people impatient that they cannot be permitted to support Government and pay their just publick debts which are increasing upon them.

Mr. Partridge then laid before the Board a memorial relative to the state of the Council in that province.

He then recommended to their lordships William Morris and Samuel Smith, Esquires, both of the Western Division of the province, as proper persons to supply any vacancies which may happen in the Council and then withdrew.

Wednesday, February 5. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.,

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the dispute between William Baker and Chauncy Townshend, Esquires, having been transcribed pursuant to the minutes of the 3rd instant, was laid before the Board and signed.

New Jersey.

Their lordships took into consideration the state of affairs in his Majesty's province of New Jersey, and the following papers were read, viz.:—
Letter from Mr. Belcher, Governor of New Jersey, to the Board, dated at Burlington, the 8th of August, 1751, relative to the state of the Council there and the Boards's having refused his recommendation.
Letter from Mr. Belcher, Governor of New Jersey to the Board, dated at Burlington, the 21st of October, 1751, inclosing the two following papers, viz.:—
Copy of a bill of indictment found against Lewis Morris Ashfield, Esquire, in August, 1751.
Copy of Governor Belcher's message to Lewis Ashfield, Esquire, relating to his unfitness to be admitted a member of his Majesty's Council in the province of New Jersey. Dated at Burlington, the 24th September, 1751.
Letter from Robert Hunter Morris, Esquire, Chief Justice of New Jersey to the Board, dated January 30th, 1752, relating to the state of the Council in that province and the persons recommended by him and inclosing:—
General Codrington's opinion with respect to three councillors not being admitted to act.
Five affidavits relating to Mr. Ashfield.
Deposition of Samuel Tucker as to the character of William Morris, Esquire, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for the county of Hunterton in New Jersey, dated the 2nd November, 1752.
Certificate of Mr. Warrell, Attorney General and Notary Publick in New Jersey, as to the character of Samuel Tucker, dated 4th November, 1751.
Amendments to the Support Bill by the Council of New Jersey.
Attested extracts from the Journals of the Councils in New Jersey relative to the Governor's refusing to admit Mr. Ashfield to be a member of the Council there, and to the dispute between the Council and Assembly upon the Tax Act.
Copy of those parts of the Support Act amended by the Council, October, 1751.
Printed votes and proceedings of the General Assembly of the province of New Jersey, held on Tuesday, the 10th September, 1751.

Ordered that the above-mentioned papers be taken into further consideration to-morrow morning and that the Secretary do write to Mr. Morris, Chief Justice of the province of New Jersey, to desire his attendance upon the Board.

Thursday, February 6. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

New Jersey.

Their lordships pursuant to the preceding minutes, took into consideration the letters and papers relative to the affairs of the province of New Jersey mentioned therein, and Robert Hunter Morris, Esquire, Chief Justice of the said province, attending, as desired, he was called in and being desired to inform their lordships from whom he had received the extracts of the journals of the Council and the votes of the Assembly of New Jersey referred to in his letter to the Board and how the same were authenticated, he acquainted their lordships that he received the extracts of the journals of the Council from Mr. Alexander, one of the said Council, and that they are certifyed by him under his hand and seal to be true extracts of the said journals; that the printed votes of the Assembly were transmitted to him by the King's printer in New Jersey who prints them by order of the Speaker.

Their lordships had then some discourse with Mr. Morris relative to the state of the Council and the complaint of the inhabitants of the Western Division with respect to the inequality of the said Council; and Mr. Morris being asked if it had been the practice that the number for each division should be equal, be said that he apprehended that since the year 1719 no regard had been had to such an equality; that however the inequality was not so great as represented by the Governor, as he had fully shewn in his letter to the Board, in addition to which he beg'd leave to lay before them the following paper:—
Extract of a letter from James Alexander, Esquire, one of the Council in the province of New Jersey, to Robert Hunter Morris, Esquire, dated the 7th of December, 1751, relating to the complaint of the inhabitants of the Western Division of there being an inequality of number in the Council of the said province.

Their lordships then observed to Mr. Morris that the Governor of New Jersey in a late letter to them had informed them that Mr. William Morris and Mr. Smith whom he, Mr. Morris, had represented to them as improper persons to be of his Majesty's Council were men of good character and abilities and well attached to his Majesty's Government and every way qualified for that trust and that several certificates to the same effect had been laid before the Board.

Whereupon Mr. Morris acquainted their lordships that he insisted upon the truth of what he had formerly represented to their lordships with respect to those gentlemen being connected in interest with the rioters.

That Mr. Smith was at this time clerk to the Assembly and son to the man who wrote the two letters laid before the Board by Mr. Partridge, and who upon every occasion appeared against the Government in favour of the rioters.

That with respect to Mr. Morris, the member for the county where his interest lyes, appeared by the minute of the Assembly to have acted in favour of the rioters against the Government.

Mr. Morris further acquainted the Board that the Governor had lately contrary to usage and his instructions appointed the said William Morris to be a judge during pleasure and without the consent of the Council, as would appear from the following paper which he laid before the Board, viz.:—
Extract of a letter from Mr. Alexander to Robert Hunter Morris, Esquire, dated the 19th of December, 1751, relating to the Governor's appointment of judges without the consent of Council.

Their lordships then asked Mr. Morris if he could give them any information with respect to the Governor's having caused an order of the Lords of the Committee of Council relative to the affairs of New Jersey to be entered upon the Journals of the Council.

Whereupon Mr. Morris acquainted the Board that it did appear from a letter to him from Mr. Alexander that this order came from Mr. Partridge to the Assembly, and Mr. Morris then laid before the Board an extract of the said letter, dated the 29th of October, 1751.

Mr. Morris being withdrawn their lordships agreed to take the affairs of New Jersey into further consideration to-morrow morning and ordered the Secretary to write to Mr. Partridge to desire his attendance.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the contracts and victualling for the troops and settlers in Nova Scotia having been transcribed pursuant to the minutes of the 4th instant, was laid before the Board and signed.

Friday, February 7. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Plantations General.

Their lordships being informed that several merchants, planters and others, interested in and trading to his Majesty's sugar colonies in America, were attending and had some proposals to lay before the Board for their consideration, they were called in, and

Mr. John Sharpe acquainted their lordships that himself and the rest of the gentlemen present were a committee appointed at a general meeting of the merchants and planters interested in and trading to the Sugar Islands to attend their lordships and lay before them two or three grievances which at present attend the trade of his Majesty's sugar colonies.

And first that it had been a practice for some time past for his Majesty's subjects in the plantations to take up lands and make settlements in islands and colonies belonging to foreign powers, more especially in the Island of Santa Cruz and other colonies belonging to the Dutch and the Danes; that this was a growing evil and seemed to require the interposition of the legislature; that upon full consideration of this grievance in the general meeting, they were directed to propose it to their lordships, as a remedy, that an Act of Parliament should be passed here, to restrain his Majesty's subjects from taking up lands or settling in any islands belonging to foreign powers.

Second, that a pernicious practice had prevailed of bringing sugars of the growth and produce of foreign colonies into our sugar colonies and even into Great Britain as English produce; that this illicit trade was disavowed by the merchants and others interested in the sugar colonies and that they will always be ready to contribute their utmost endeavours to put a stop to it: that it had been under their consideration whether an Act of Parliament might not be passed here for this purpose, but as the different situation and circumstances of each Island might require different regulations, they were directed to propose to their lordships that instructions might be sent to the Governors of the respective colonies to use their utmost endeavours to get laws passed in each Island under their respective governments with necessary regulations and provisions to put a stop to this pernicious practice.

Third, that there was another mischief not arising amongst themselves; that within a few months it had been a trade to import Portuguese sugars from Lisbon directly into Ireland, which had hitherto been supplyed with sugars from Great Britain; that by the laws of trade his Majesty's subjects cannot import sugars of the produce of our own colonies directly into Ireland without first bringing them into England, by which means a great advantage was given to the trade of the Portuguese in this article; that as the Crown of Portugal has laid an absolute prohibition on the importation of our sugars, such a prohibition on our side would be justifiable: that however they were directed to propose, that an Act or clause in an Act might be passed to prevent any sugars whatever being imported into Ireland without first coming to England.

Their lordships then informed the gentlemen present that as these points appeared to them of great national concern they should take the earliest opportunity of considering them with all proper attention and regard, and then they withdrew.

New Jersey.

Mr. Partridge, agent for the province of New Jersey, attending as desired was called in and their lordships acquainted him that it appeared, that an Order of the Lords of the Committee of his Majesty's Council had been laid before the Council of New Jersey in a legislative capacity by their Speaker, said to have been received from the Governor, and as this Board had been informed that a copy of this Order had been transmitted to the Speaker of the Assembly there by him, Mr. Partridge, they thought it their duty as this appeared to them to be a proceeding of a very extraordinary and irregular nature and might be attended with the worst consequences, to call upon him to inform them whether he had transmitted a copy of the said Order and in what manner he obtained it.

Whereupon Mr. Partridge informed the Board that as he thought it his duty to use all possible diligence in informing his constituents of whatever passed in relation to the affairs of the province he had obtained a copy of the Order, not thinking it of a private or secret nature, and had transmitted it to the province; that if he had done wrong he was sorry for it, and hoped their lordships would impute it to inadvertency.

Mr. Partridge was then asked where he obtained a copy of this Order and from whom.

And he acquainted their lordships that he had it from the Council Office, and that it was given him by Charles Dickenson and then he withdrew.

Wednesday, February 12. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Trade.

Africa.

Read a letter from Mr. Stockwell to the Board, dated at Cape Coast Castle, July 23rd, 1751, containing his observations upon the Act of Parliament lately passed for regulating the trade to Africa.

Read a letter from Mr. Thomas Boteler at Cape Coast Castle to Mr. Hill, dated July 23rd, 1751, inclosing letter or remonstrance from Mr. Thomas Boteler, one of the chief agents at Cape Coast, to Thomas Melvill, Esquire, President of the Council there, setting forth the hardships the company's servants will lye under, as well as the trade in general by being restrained from trading with foreigners.

Ordered that the above-mentioned letters be taken into consideration to-morrow morning.

Thursday, February 13. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Trade.

Africa.

Their lordships pursuant to the preceding day's minutes, took into consideration the letters from Messrs. Stockwell and Boteler mentioned therein, and Mr. Hollier, Secretary to the Committee of the African Company, attending was called in and he laid before the Board the following papers:—
Copy of a letter from Mr. John Roberts to the African Company, dated at Cape Coast Castle, 23rd July, 1751.
Copy of Mr. Melvill's letter to the African Company, dated at Cape Coast Castle, July 23rd, 1751.
Copy of the African Committee's answer to Mr. Melvill's letter of the 11th July, 1751.
Copy of the African Committee's answer to Mr. Melvill's letter of the 23rd July, 1751.

The said papers having been read their lordships agreed to take them into their consideration to-morrow morning, and Mr. Hollier was directed to acquaint the Committee of the African Company that their lordships desire their attendance at the Board to-morrow at ten o'clock, and then Mr. Hollier withdrew.

Friday, February 14. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Trade.

Africa.

Mr. Touchitt, Mr. Poole, Mr. Briscoe, Mr. Scott.

Their lordships pursuant to the preceding minutes, took into consideration the papers relating to the trade to Africa mentioned therein and several of the Committee of the Company of Merchants trading thither attending, as desired, with Mr. Hollier, their Secretary, they were called in.

Their lordships then informed them that they had had under their consideration the letters to the Committee from Mr. Melvill and Mr. Roberts with their answers thereto, and also two other letters to the Board from Messrs. Stockwell and Roberts; that it appeared to them that several of the points contained in Mr. Melvill's letter were too lightly taken notice of in their answers, and that particularly they had signifyed their approbation in the most positive manner of Mr. Melvill's having introduced the culture of cotton and indigo upon that coast, the reasons for which they should be glad to be informed of as it appeared to be upon a new plan of commerce which was a matter of a very doubtfull nature and required a very serious consideration; that the introducing of culture and industry amongst the negroes was contrary to the known established policy of this trade; that there was no saying where this might stop and that it might extend to tobacco, sugar and every other commodity which we now take from our colonies; and thereby the Africans who now support themselves by war would become planters and their slaves be employed in the culture of these articles in Africa, which they are now employed in, in America: that our possessions in America were firmly secured to us, whereas those in Africa were more open to the invasions of an enemy, and besides that in Africa we were only tenants in the soil which we held at the good will of the natives.

Whereupon Mr. Poole acquainted the Board that Mr. Melvill had taken this step entirely upon his own judgment and without any instructions from the Committee; that however upon consideration of the measure it was approved of by the Committee who did not think it necessary to enter into a detail of their reasons in their letter; that their opinion was founded upon the necessity there was for these articles in our English manufactures as Mr. Touchitt, who was well acquainted with the nature of the case, could shew their lordships.

Mr. Touchitt then informed the Board that the Committee did consider that the introducing the culture of cotton in Africa might give some umbrage to the West Indies; that as to indigo, there was none produced in any of the colonies except Carolina; that however the encouragement lately given by the Parliament had not answered the end proposed, the Carolina indigo being bad and but a small quantity produced; that we were therefore obliged to import our indigo from France and Spain chiefly from France; and even France did not encourage the growth of it, so that it sometimes happened they had not enough for themselves; and had actually threatened to prohibit the exportation of it, which would greatly distress our woollen manufacture, and the more so [as] our trade to Spain is chiefly for blue cloth; that the price of indigo in Spain had usually been about 3/6 per pound, but was now risen to 6/6 per pound: that as to cotton it was pretty much under the same circumstances, that we have very little cotton now from the West Indies and that chiefly from the Virgin Islands: that formerly we had cotton from Santa Lucia: that although planters do at first begin with cotton, yet as soon as they are able they always fall into the growing of sugars, which was not to be wondered at as sugars now sold, the muscovado from 35 to 40 shillings the 100 weight, and clayed up to 50; that we now take our cotton at great disadvantage from the Turks and other places, whereas if we growed cotton in Africa the raw materials would be worked up here and sent out again in manufactures to our great advantage.

Mr. Briscoe then observed that as to what their lordships said of it's being impossible to know when this culture would stop, he apprehended it was only intended to teach the art of cultivating indigo and cotton to the negroes about the Forts.

Mr. Poole then observed that as to what had been said with respect to alteration of policy necessity might make it right to alter the principal; and that if no indigo was produced and cotton decreased in the colonies, it might be right to cultivate them in Africa, and that if sugars were suffered to be cultivated in Africa it would enable us to supply all the merchants in Europe; that we ought by all means to distress the French navigation; that formerly the French sugars passed through our colonies by which means we were the carriers of all the produce of America, but that now the French had their own shipping to import their produce.

Mr. Touchitt then observed that the whole of the question rested upon the point whether our property and possessions in Africa were established and secured with respect to the natives, for if our possession was dependant upon the natives, and we were only tenants at will, it was clear that the introducing of culture and produce might prove of bad consequence.

Their lordships upon the whole acquainted the Committee that as the introducing industry and the cultivation of such commoditys as are produced in our colonies appeared to be contrary to what had ever hitherto been the policy of this country, they as a Board could not give countenance to it without having the sense of Parliament, and therefor recommended to them to write to Mr. Melvill to acquaint him that he ought not to have entered upon such a measure without orders from home and to direct him to suspend any further proceedings in this scheme until the sense of Parliament be known.

Their lordships then observed to the Committee that it appeared from Mr. Melvill's letter that he had undertaken to open the paths into the Ashantee country, but that it seemed from what he said about it, as if he had not consulted the Fanteens in this and was not upon good terms with John Corrantee; he makes mention of drawing the trade from Anamaboe to Cape Coast and represented against building a fort there; that this appeared to their lordships to be a very extraordinary conduct, totally inconsistent with the intention and contrary to the sentiments and directions of the Committee themselves.

To this the Committee observed that they did not think Mr. Melvill would have undertaken the opening the paths with the Ashantees, which is of great consequence to our trade, unless he could carry his point; that it appeared by his letter that he had consulted the Fanteens upon this measure but concealed the method of carrying it into execution and that there was reason to think he placed more confidence in Cujoe Caboceer than in John Corrantee.

Whereupon their lordships recommended to the Committee to direct him for the future upon all occasions to cultivate and improve a good understanding with the Fanteens and particularly John Corrantee and his son William who has been very serviceable to the English interest and has done all that lay in his power to promote and secure it.

Their lordships then took notice to the Committee that there was another point arising from these letters which was the remonstrance of some of the officers against the restraint which they are laid under of not trading with foreigners; that as this was a point in which people were of a different opinion, tho' it was generally considered as a wrong thing as introducing the French upon the coast, their lordships were desirous of knowing the sentiments of the Committee upon it.

Whereupon the Committee observed that this trade was contrary to the intention of the Act of Parliament, as would appear by the preamble of it, that therefore they had given instructions to Mr. Melvill to forbid their officers from carrying it on and to endeavour to prevent it in others: that notwithstanding the pretence that the French only take refuse slaves, if they are permitted to come upon the coast they will get the good as well as the bad; that this trade ought to be forbid by Act of Parliament.

Mr. Crichton, formerly agent to the old African Company at Cape Coast attending was called in, and being asked his opinion as to the advantage or disadvantage of a trade with the French upon the coast of Africa, he acquainted their lordships that it was very often of advantage to trade with the French, but if it was admitted they would get the whole trade into their hands, of which he remembered an instance when they were in sole possession of the trade at Anamaboe and the English ships were obliged to go off; that the English by the superiority of goods have always the refusal of the trade if the private traders did not furnish the Dutch with goods; that there was no French trade upon the coast before 1737, and that the English took all the best slaves and the Dutch the other in order to furnish a contract they were under for sending 3,000 slaves annually to Surinam.

The Committee then observed that it was impossible to prevent the English trading with the French through the Dutch and the natives, but by prohibiting all trade upon the coast both with the French and Dutch, in which case the Dutch could not get English woollen goods but at a great disadvantage.

Whereupon their lordships acquainted the Committee that whenever they should think proper to lay before them a memorial upon this subject, they should take it into further consideration, and in the meantime recommended to them to enforce the instructions they have already given for restraining a trade with the French in a more positive manner.

The Committee then withdrew.

Plantations General.

Proprieties.

Read an Order of the Lords of the Committee of Council, dated the 21st of January, 1752, directing this Board to prepare draughts of additional instructions to the Governors of all his Majesty's colonies in America, requiring them to cause all the old laws to be revised, and in lieu thereof to frame a body of new laws; also additional instructions to the Governors of the Proprietary and Charter Governments, requiring them to transmit hither a true and authentick copy of all their laws now in force.

Ordered that the draughts of proper additional instructions be prepared in conformity to the said order to be laid before the Board as soon as possible.

South Carolina.

Georgia.

Read an Order of the Lords of the Committee of Council for plantation affairs, dated the 8th February, 1752, referring to the consideration of this Board a memorial presented to their lordships from the Trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia in America relating to the continuation of the powers of government in their officers upon the surrender of their Charter in the Crown.

The Secretary laid before the Board the two following papers, viz.:—
Memorial of the Trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dated the 11th of February, 1752, in consequence of the foregoing order.
Copy of the Attorney and Solicitor-General's report to the Lords of the Committee of Council for Plantation affairs, dated the 6th February, 1752, upon the proposal of the Trustees of Georgia to surrender up their charter to the Crown.

Ordered that the Secretary do write to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Sollicitor-General to desire their opinion in what manner the present magistrates and officers appointed by the Trustees for the colony of Georgia for the administration of justice and execution of government there may be empowered to act in their respective employments and offices untill a new plan and powers of government shall be established.

Plantations General.

Mr. John Sharpe attending, was called in and he acquainted their lordships that he was desired by the gentlemen merchants and others interested in and trading to the sugar colonies to lay before the Board the following paper, in consequence of the propositions they offered a few days ago to their lordships' consideration, viz.:—
Draught of a Bill to prevent the importing sugars into Ireland without first landing and entring in Great Britain.

Ordered that this paper be taken into consideration on Wednesday next when Mr. Sharpe was desired to attend and bring with him such of those gentlemen who attended before as he should judge proper.

Tuesday, February 18. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Fane, Mr. Oswald.

Plantations General.

The draught of an additional instruction to the Governors of such of his Majesty's colonies and plantations in America as are under his Majesty's more immediate government, having been prepared conformable to the Order of the Lords of the Committee of Council, mentioned in the minutes of the 14th instant, was laid before the Board.

Wednesday, February 19. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Oswald.

Plantations General.

Mr. Douglass, Mr. Maitland, Mr. Long.

Their lordships pursuant to the minutes of Fryday last, took into consideration the draught of a Bill to prevent the importing sugars into Ireland without first landing and entring in Great Britain, and Mr. John Sharpe attending with several other gentlemen interested in and trading to the sugar colonies, they were called in, and their lordships had some conversation with them upon the subject of the said Bill.

Ordered that the said Bill be taken into further consideration to-morrow morning, and that the Secretary do write to the principal merchants trading to Portugal to desire their attendance at the Board to-morrow morning at eleven o'clock in order to have some discourse with them thereupon.

Mr. John Sharpe then laid before the Board the following paper:—
Draft of a Bill to prohibit the British sugar planters from having foreign sugar plantations.

The said paper having been read their lordships had some discourse with the gentlemen present upon the subject thereof, and they were desired to attend again to-morrow and then they withdrew.

Thursday, February 20. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Oswald.

Plantations General.

Mr. Burrell, Mr. Main, Mr. Mallorty, Mr. Gore, Mr. Chase.

Their lordships took into further consideration the draught of a Bill to prevent the importing sugars into Ireland without first landing them in Great Britain, and several of the merchants trading to Portugal attending, they were called in and their lordships opened to them the occasion upon which they were desired to attend.

Whereupon Mr. Burrell observed that it was many years since he was at Lisbon and therefore could not speak so particularly to the point as other gentlemen who were lately come from thence; that he apprehended the price of Portuguese sugars were so high that the importation into Ireland could not be considerable unless upon a scarcity of our own produce; but that if the growth of sugar in Brazil should increase it would then be an object worth consideration; that he hoped however that the measure proposed by the planters would be postponed for the present as some national difficulty had lately broke out at Lisbon with respect to our trade which was now under the consideration of his Majesty's ministers, and that it would be improper to enter upon any measure that might possibly have a tendency to increase these difficulties, which it was our interest to have removed as soon as possible.

Mr. Main observed that it had been found by experience that the sending Portuguese sugars to Ireland did not answer and that they were loosers by the trade; that he agreed in opinion with Mr. Burrell that this was an improper time to enter upon the measure proposed by the planters on account of the difficulties which have broke out with respect to our trade.

The Portugal merchants were asked what had been the medium price of muscovado sugar, at Lisbon since the war. Answer: About 22/- per cwt. clear aboard ship, ½ the duty being taken off. Question: What may it be delivered for in Ireland? Answer: That it had been delivered at 29/- Irish money including the duty in Ireland but that they were loosers at this price. Question: How do you account then for this trade being increased? Answer: We are sometimes obliged to take sugars in payment for woollen goods for debts due from the Portuguese, which is an object worth consideration with respect to the increase of the exportation of woollen manufactures. The planters were then asked what had been the price of English muscovado for some years past. Answer: From 28 to 35/- per cwt. since the war. Question: What the medium price of muscovado sugar for seven years antecedent to the war? Answer: About 24/per cwt. Question: What the drawback upon exportation? Answer: 4/10. Question: What can it be afforded for in Ireland? Answer: Computing the price here at 24 the drawback of 4/10 will reduce it to 19/2, to which must be added freight and the Irish duty which was 1/7 upon English: the duty upon Lisbon 3/9.

The Portugal merchants were then asked what had been the medium price of muscovado sugar at Lisbon before the war. Answer: From the year 1730 to 1739 about 20/- per cwt. on board including the whole duty of 7/- half of which is now taken off.

Mr. Main then observed that the English sugars sold at Dublin at 45/-, and the Portuguese only at 29/-; and by the last advices from Lisbon sugars were risen 15 per cent.

Mr. Mallorty observed that the importation of sugars from the Brazils had of late years greatly decreased and therefore there was no great danger of the importation of Portuguese sugars into Ireland increasing.

Mr. Burrell then observed that as to what had been said of exchanging our woollen goods for sugars, it could not be considered as a national advantage, but was merely personal, because whether we take sugars or not the same quantity of woollen goods would be sold at Lisbon; that however considering the national difficulties at present subsisting at Lisbon to which might be added what had been stated as to the impossibility of getting anything by importing Portuguese sugars into Ireland he hoped the measure would be postponed.

Mr. John Sharpe in behalf of the planters observed that as so much candour had been shewn by Mr. Burrell and the rest of the gentlemen it was his duty to be equally candid on his part; that the planters had found themselves aggrieved and therefore they complained; that they differed in opinion with the Portugal merchants as to the evil not increasing, but however great it might be, if their lordships thought the objections mentioned with respect to national considerations were of weight, they should readily submit to the sense of the Board.

The gentlemen were then ordered to withdraw and after some time spent in the consideration of this affair they were again called in.

And their lordships observed to them that they were sensible of the evil complained of by the planters and that it justly called for a remedy, but that they hoped that upon consideration of what had been urged by the Portugal merchants with respect to the national difficulties at present attending that trade and the ill consequences which might follow from the taking any steps at present to remedy the evil, the planters would be of opinion that it might be adviseable to postpone it for the present.

Whereupon Mr. Long, Mr. Maitland and Mr. Douglass declared it to be their opinion and they hoped it would be that of the rest of the planters and merchants trading to the sugar colonies that the measure proposed should be postponed for the present, and that they would acquaint them with the sense of the Board.

The gentlemen being withdrawn their lordships agreed that the consideration of the Bill for preventing the importing sugars into Ireland without having been first landed in Great Britain should be postponed.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Scrope, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, dated this day, inclosing a memorial from Chauncy Townshend, Esquire, to their lordships praying payment of £4,609 7s. 6d. remaining due to him on his contract for victualling the settlers last year in Nova Scotia, for the consideration of this Board.

Plantations General.

Their lordships taking the said letter and memorial into consideration ordered the draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury thereupon to be prepared, and the said draught having been accordingly prepared, was laid before the Board, agreed to, transcribed and signed.

South Carolina.

Georgia.

Read a letter from Mr. West, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, dated the 6th instant, referring to the consideration of this Board the following memorial, viz.:—
Memorial of Mr. James Crokatt, agent for the province of South Carolina, to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, praying for a sum of £3,000 to be invested in presents for the Indians bordering on that province. Dated the 22nd of January, 1752.

The Secretary having informed their lordships that his Majesty's Secretary at War who is joined with this Board in the abovementioned reference was at the Bath, the consideration thereof was postponed untill his return to town.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Clevland, Secretary to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated the 6th February, 1752, in answer to one from Mr. Hill with copy of a letter from Governor Cornwallis and other papers, complaining of Mr. Joshua Mauger, agent victualler to the Navy in the province of Nova Scotia.

Ordered that the Secretary do write to Mr. Clevland to inform him that this Board will in their next letter to Governor Cornwallis desire his opinion whether the nature of Mr. Mauger's offence complained of by him is such as may make it adviseable for the Commissioners of the victualling to discontinue their contract with him.

Read the following letters from Governor Cornwallis, viz.:—
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated at Halifax, the 30th of September, 1751, advising the Board that he had drawn upon Mr. Kilby for the sum of £60 sterling in favour of Jackson and Usher and desiring their lordships' directions for payment thereof.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated at Halifax, the 24th of October, 1751, acquainting the Board that he has drawn upon Mr. Kilby for the sum of £100 sterling in favour of Mr. Josiah Peirse and desiring their lordships to order payment thereof.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated at Halifax, the 5th November, 1751, acquainting the Board that he has drawn on Mr. Kilby for the sum of £100 sterling in favour of Mr. John Dick and desiring their lordships to direct the payment thereof.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated at Halifax, the 15th November, 1751, advising the Board that he had drawn upon Mr. Kilby for the sum of £50 sterling in favour of Joseph Rundle bearing the same date as this letter and desiring their lordships' directions for the payment thereof.

Ordered that copies be made of the above-mentioned letters and delivered to Mr. Kilby.

South Carolina.

Read a letter from the Earl of Holdernesse, dated the 7th instant, referring to the consideration of this Board:—
The humble petition of Captain Charles McNaire of South Carolina to his Majesty praying to be reimbursed a sum of money he has expended in gaining over a considerable body of the Choctaw Indians to the British interest, as also an extract of the report of the Committee of the Assembly of South Carolina recommending the same.

Ordered that the said letter and petition be taken into consideration on Wednesday next and that the Secretary do write to Mr. McNaire to desire his attendance at the Board on that day.

Nova Scotia.

Read a memorial of Mr. Alexander Charles, agent to the transports that carryed the settlers to Nova Scotia in 1749, praying to be reimbursed the expence of two groundless actions brought against him by Ephraim Cooke, master of the Baltimore, one of the said transports.

Their lordships taking the said memorial into consideration were of opinion that the reimbursement prayed for by the memoralist ought to be made out of the money paid by Mr. Cooke into the hands of the Treasurer of the Navy.

Plantations General.

The Secretary laid before the Board the following copies of Orders of Council received from the Clerk of the Council, viz.:—
Maryland.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 21st of June, 1751, upon the petition of the Right Honourable Arthur Onslow, Esquire, and of John Sharpe, Esquire, who have, with the approbation and concurrence of Frederick Lord Baltimore, a minor, Lord Proprietary of the province of Maryland, nominated Samuel Ogle, Esquire, now resident in the said province, to be continued Lieutenant-Governor thereof, &c.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 21st of June, 1751, authorizing and requiring the Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia or Commander-in-Chief of that colony for the time being to administer the oaths required to be taken by Samuel Ogle, Esquire, who has his Majesty's royal allowance and approbation to be Lieutenant-Governor of the province of Maryland, &c.
Newfoundland.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 4th of June, 1751, approving a draught of instruction prepared by this Board for Francis William Drake, Esquire, Governor of Newfoundland.
Nevis.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 12th of July, 1751, approving a representation of this Board proposing the confirmation of two Acts passed in the Island of Nevis between March, 1748, and July, 1749.
Montserrat.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 12th of July, 1751, approving a representation of this Board proposing the confirmation of three Acts passed in the Island of Montserrat in 1748 and 1749.
Jamaica.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 12th July, 1751, approving a representation of this Board proposing the confirmation of thirteen Acts passed in Jamaica in 1748 and 1749.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 31st of October, 1751, upon a proposal made by Charles Price, Esquire, to his Majesty's Governor of Jamaica to drain and improve two morasses situated in the parish of St. Elizabeth, etc.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 14th of January, 1752, approving a representation of this Board proposing the confirmation of a private Act passed in Jamaica in 1748 relating to the estate of Thomas Bucker, a minor.
South Carolina.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 9th of August, 1751, approving a representation of this Board proposing Isaac Holmes, Esquire, to supply a vacancy in the Council of South Carolina by the death of Joseph Blake, Esquire.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 31st of October, 1751, approving a representation of this Board proposing the repeal of two Acts passed in the province of South Carolina in June and March, 1747.
Virginia.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 31st of October, 1751, approving a representation of this Board upon a collection of laws passed at Virginia in the years 1748 and 1749.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 14th of January, 1752, approving a representation of this Board proposing the confirmation of a private Act passed in Virginia in 1746 relating to the sale of certain lands late the estate of Thomas Todd, etc.
New York.
Copy of an Order of Council, dated the 22nd January, 1752, approving a representation of this Board proposing John Chambers, Esquire, to supply a vacancy in the Council of New York by the removal of Stephen Bayard, Esquire.

Friday, February 21. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Oswald.

Montserrat.

The draught of a representation to his Majesty proposing the repeal of an Act passed in the Island of Montserrat in February, 1748–9, for regulating the Assembly of that island ordered to be prepared by the minutes of the 12th of December last, was laid before the Board and taken into consideration.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Scrope, Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury, dated the 20th of February, 1752, in answer to a letter from this Board to their lordships of the 6th instant, relating to the supplying of provisions for the land forces and settlers in Nova Scotia.

Proprieties.

The draughts of additional instructions for the Governors of the colonies of Rhode Island, Connecticut and Maryland, requiring them to transmit authentick copies of their laws, having been prepared conformable to the Order of the Lords of the Committee of Council, mentioned in the minutes of the 14th instant, were laid before the Board.

Tuesday, February 25. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Oswald.

Montserrat.

Their lordships took into further consideration the draught of a representation to his Majesty proposing the repeal of an Act passed in the Island of Montserrat in February, 1748–9, for regulating the Assembly, and the said draught was agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.

Trade.

Germany.

Flanders.

Read a letter from the Duke of Newcastle, dated the 21st instant, signifying the king's pleasure that this Board should give all the assistance in their power to Solomon Dayrolle and Andrew Mitchell, Esquires, his Majesty's Commissaries appointed to treat with those of the Empress, Queen of Hungary and Bohemia, and of the States General, for settling all points in dispute relating to the execution of several treaties.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. John Dick, merchant at Rotterdam, to Mr. Pownall, dated the 29th February, n.s., 1752.

Ordered that the Secretary do write to Mr. Dick in answer thereto.

Wednesday, February 26. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

South Carolina.

Their lordships pursuant to the minutes of Friday last, took into consideration the petition of Mr. McNaire to his Majesty praying for a reimbursement of expence he has been at in gaining over a considerable body of Choctaw Indians to the British interest, and Mr. McNaire attending as desired with Mr. Crokatt, agent for the province of South Carolina, they were called in; and Mr. McNaire being asked what he had to offer in support of his petition, he acquainted their lordships, that he went up into the Indian country in the year 1747 with goods to trade upon his own private account with the Indians, that he had directions from the Governor to use his utmost endeavours to gain over the said Indians to our interest and if necessary to give away his goods to them in presents and that he would reimburse his expence by bills of exchange upon the Government in England; that he did accordingly relying upon the Governor's orders give away his goods to the said Indians to the amount of £1,700, that upon the Governor's having been called to account by the Council and Assembly for engaging in this service without consulting them he denied having given any such direction.

Mr. McNaire was then asked what proof he had of the Governor having given him such orders and of the delivery of his goods as presents, he laid before the Board the following papers, viz.:—
Copy of a letter from Mr. Glen, Governor of South Carolina, to Mr. McNaire, dated the 18th December, 1747, recommending to him to use his best endeavours to obtain the friendship of the Indians, &c.
Proceedings of the Assembly of the province of South Carolina in May, 1749, upon the petition of Mr. McNaire relating to the Choctaw Indians and upon the two following papers:—
Account of expences by the said Charles McNaire and company for presents given the said Choctaw Indians amounting to £7,084 5s. 0d.
Account of losses sustained by the said Charles McNaire & Co. in the Choctaw nation amounting to £4,700.
Letter from the Committee of Correspondence in South Carolina to Mr. Crokatt, their agent, dated the 13th September, 1749, recommending Mr. McNaire to his aid and interest in solliciting a recompence for his services in bringing over a great part of the Choctaw nation to the British interest.

Mr. Crokatt being asked what he knew of this affair said that he had received two letters from Mr. Glen concerning Mr. McNaire, one of which was in his favour and the other against him, that from the best of his information about it, the Governor had desired Mr. McNaire to go upon this service, telling him he had authority to draw for any expence he might be at, and that accordingly the Indians took all his goods: that the Governor afterwards discouraged Mr. McNaire and took all the merit of the service to himself.

Mr. McNaire was then ordered to attend again to-morrow and bring with him the original letter from Mr. Glen to him, a copy of which he had laid before the Board, and Mr. Crokatt was also desired to attend and bring with him the two letters which he mentioned to have received from Mr. Glen relating to Mr. McNaire. And they then withdrew.

Ordered that this affair be taken into further consideration to-morrow morning.

Leeward Islands.

Virgin Islands.

Read a letter from Mr. Purcell, Lieutenant-Governor of the Virgin Islands, to the Secretary of this Board, dated at Tortola, the 11th of July, 1751, giving an account of the Virgin Islands for their lordships' information.

Mr. Boyd attending was called in and he acquainted the Board that he was desired by Mr. Purcell to move their lordships to take the said letter into consideration and give such directions thereupon as they should think proper and then he withdrew.

Ordered that the said letter be taken into consideration on Wednesday next and that the Secretary do write to Mr. Mathew, Governor of the Leeward Islands, to desire his attendance thereupon.

Thursday, February 27. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

South Carolina.

Their lordships pursuant to the preceding day's minutes, took into further consideration the petition of Mr. McNaire relating to his services amongst the Choctaw Indians and Mr. McNaire attending with Mr. Crokatt as desired they were called in.

Mr. McNaire then produced the original letter from Mr. Glen to him a copy of which he laid before the Board yesterday, and in order further to verify the allegations of his petition he laid before the Board the following papers, viz.:—
Deposition of Mr. McNaire and Mr. Roche relative to Mr. McNaire's services in the Choctaw nation.
Letter from William George Freeman to Benjamin Whitaker, Esquire, dated Charles Town, the 21st of September, 1749, relating to Mr. McNaire's services amongst the Indians.
Paragraph of a letter from the Committee of Correspondence in North Carolina to Mr. Abercromby, agent for the said province, relative to Mr. McNaire's services amongst the Indians.

Mr. Crokatt then laid before the Board the two following papers, viz.:—
Letter from Mr. Glen, Governor of South Carolina, to Mr. Crokatt, dated the 25th of January, 1749, relating to Mr. McNaire's services amongt the Indians.
Letter from Mr. George Austin to Mr. Crokatt, dated the 16th of September, 1749, relating to the services of Mr. McNaire amongst the Indians.

Mr. McNaire and Mr. Crokatt were then ordered to withdraw and their lordships took into consideration a letter from Mr. Glen to the Board, dated the 2nd of October, 1750, relating to the said Mr. McNaire, and the said letter having been read, Mr. McNaire and Mr. Crokatt were again called in, and Mr. McNaire being asked, if he knew anything of a libel against the Governor having been published in South Carolina relative to his affair, he said that one Roche who was concerned with him in partnership had published such a libel which was laid before a new Assembly by the Governor and censured by them, and that the new Assembly in consequence thereof came to a resolution as he had been informed that he had done no service but hurt amongst the Indians, that this he apprehended arose from the Governor being his enemy and that he could prove that he obtained a person to make affidavit that he, Mr. McNaire had not any goods in the Indian Country which person afterwards confessed the contrary and declared that the Governor himself drew the said affidavit.

Whereupon their lordships ordered Mr. McNaire to produce his proof of the fact, and then Mr. Crokatt and he being withdrawn their lordships ordered the draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse upon the petition of the said Mr. McNaire to be prepared.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. West, Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, dated — of — inclosing a memorandum of the Paymaster-General of his Majesty's Forces praying to be reimbursed £751 1s. 8d. paid by him on account of the troops in Nova Scotia.

Ordered that the Secretary do write to Mr. West to acquaint him that the Board have no objection to the issuing the said sum of £4,751 1s. 8d. to the Paymaster in such manner as the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury shall please to direct.

Friday, February 28. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, in answer to several received from him was laid before the Board, agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.