Simancas
January 1599

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Martin A. S. Hume (editor)

Year published

1899

Pages

649-650

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'Simancas: January 1599', Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 4: 1587-1603 (1899), pp. 649-650. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=87250 Date accessed: 27 August 2014.


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January 1599

1599. 24 Jan.
Italian. Estado, 839.
671. Document headed, From London, 24 January.
The preparations for Ireland are still being pushed forward, but the earl of Essex will not be ready to sail until the midde of March. He is meeting with many impediments and obstacles to the enterprise, and his rivals particularly wish him to sail without his stores, on their promise to send them after him. But he insists upon taking at least six months provisions with him. He asserts that he learns by men recently from Spain and Italy, that the King is making great preparations to aid the Irish rebels, and he (Essex) demands more stores in consequence, but the Admiral greatly opposes this, saying that it is not true, and this year the king of Spain is not making, and cannot make, any preparations against Ireland. They are much at issue about this, and had even arranged to fight a duel, but the Queen interfered and would not allow it.
All the noble youth of England will go with the earl of Essex, and particularly the earl of Derby, with a good following. But the earl of Cumberland will stay at home.
If the king of Spain could be ready to attack England, whilst the earl of Essex is with his troops in Ireland, he would have a great chance of success.
On the day of Epiphany the Queen held a great feast, in which the head of the Church of England and Ireland was to be seen in her old age dancing three or four gaillards.
The king of Scots offers the Queen to restore order in Ireland, and to bring the earl of Tyrone to obedience, in the hope that the Queen will declare him her heir. But the Queen does not like this offer.