Venice
September 1617

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

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1-14

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'Venice: September 1617', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 1-14. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88661 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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September 1617

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
1. To the AMBASSADOR in the Imperial Court.
With regard to the peace negotiations at Alessandria, the Governor of Milan does not seem inclined towards a settlement. He refers to Spain, but neither from there nor from France has anything definite arrived. This confirms the suspicion that since the fall of Vercelli the Spaniards appear more averse to peace; but the Ministers of France declare that if the Spaniards will not grant a firm, stable and secure peace, the Most Christian king will openly take up arms against them, while the court of France has received our resolutions in favour of peace with the most complete satisfaction.
In Istria our forces have gained a slight success over the enemy who were out plundering. In the confines of Cividal we have taken the villa of Stregna near Roncina with great booty.
Our fleet has proceeded towards the lee shore to await any opportunity that may present itself.
Ayes135.
Noes1.
Neutral3.
The like to:
The Hague.Turin.
England.Constantinople.
Scaramelli.Milan.
Rome.Florence.
France.Naples.
Zurich.Mantua.
Spain.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Inquisitori
de Stato.
Dispacci agli
Ambasciatori
in Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
2. The INQUISITORS of STATE to GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England.
Your account in the letter of 11 August of your interview with the Secretary Winwood has caused us the greatest satisfaction, as you have acted with the necessary prudence and circumspection. We attach the greatest importance to the information. (fn. 1) We were very glad to see what was written about the defence of Muscorno.
[Italian: deciphered.]
Sept. 1.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Busta 157.
Venetian
Archives.
3. The INQUISITORS of STATE to CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary at the Hague.
We have seen your letter to the Senate of 15 August last about news written to the chief men of those parts and to the English ambassador, and that a Frenchman staying here sent it. It is difficult to find him as there are many Frenchmen here now, unless we have further information. You will obtain whatever particulars you can.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Cons. de' X.
Parti Secreti.
Venetian
Archives.
4. That the document of Captain Jacques Pierre (Giques Pierre), ostensibly written on the 30th August last, and presented yesterday, about the designs of the Duke of Ossuna, Viceroy of Naples, the agent of the Archduke and others, against our city of Venice, with his plan to meet them, be sent to the Savii of our Cabinet, after enjoining secrecy. (fn. 2)
Ayes16.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
The communication was made to the Savii and a copy left in the hands of_
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Collegio,
Notatorio.
Venetian
Archives.
5. That the admiral of the port be directed to allow to issue out the English ship called John Ompri, master James Scarsi, which is going to Zante with biscuits in the public service.
Ayes18.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
6. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
According to the latest news the Palatine still remains at Sedan and with him are two ambassadors of England and the States. Here they are suspicious about his negotiations although so far as the Duke of Bavaria is concerned they are more reassured.
Prague, the 4th September, 1617. Copy.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato.
Secreta,
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
7. ALMORO BARBARO, Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The plague has ceased; no more deaths have occurred.
Zante, the 4th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
8. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Yesterday after the arrival of a courier it was announced that the galleys of Bizerta had taken two ships which were coming from Spain with troops, and that some English and Dutch ships are expected to put in an appearance near the Strait, but his Excellency takes no account of anything and thinks that he can be everywhere with this fleet of his.
Naples, the 5th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Cons. de' X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
9. To the RECTORS of PADUA.
We desire to be informed about the wounding of Thomas Turner, an English physician, as described in the enclosed note presented by the English ambassador. We direct you to send us information upon the matter as soon as possible, so that we may decide what course to pursue.
Ayes17.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
above.
10. On 24th July last, I, Thomas Turner, English doctor of physic, happened to be in the district of Pozzo dipinto in Padua, doing my best to prevent Robert Gifford and Rodolph Loane, Englishmen, from being murdered by their assailants. The latter tried to kill me. I ran towards my house. From the house of one Andrea Cortesi, who encourages these folk, there issued one Domenico Romagnolo and others, who wounded me severely in the head. They also fired an arquebus at Isabetta Belfante, the mistress of the house where I live, but providentially did not hit her. This was done with the full knowledge of the said Andrea, my mortal enemy. I mistrust the testimony of the victims owing to the power of my adversaries, as when the said Domenico was outlawed by the Podestà of Padua, no one ventured to take him, because he was a bravo. I therefore throw myself at the feet of your Excellencies begging you to authorise the Rectors to proceed against Domenico Romagnolo, Andrea Cortesi and their accomplices, so that the guilty may receive a merited punishment and that I may live without being in danger of my life, and pursue my studies which I have been obliged to abandon from fear of these ruffians.
Presented to the Chiefs by the Secretary of England on the 5th Sept., 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 12.
Cons. de' X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
11. To the Secretary LIONELLO in England.
Piero Contarini, chosen to act as ambassador of the republic with his Majesty until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato, has left here. Owing to the short time he has had to prepare, he has had no time to find a secretary, we have chosen you to fill that post, feeling sure that you will render to him the same faithful services as you did to the late Ambassador Barbarigo.
Ayes17.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
12. To the ambassador at the Imperial Court.
At the second meeting of the governor of Milan with Cardinal Lodovisio and the French ambassador at Alessandria, nothing but words and speeches has been obtained from Don Pedro, and he laughs when they speak of restoring Vercelli. He seems most disinclined to peace and in Spain he is working for war, and though awaiting orders from Spain he does not seem disposed to obey them if they are not to his taste. In this attitude he is supported by the Duke of Ossuna who has caused the galleys taken from us to be sent to Naples.
The Duke of Savoy, in great wrath at the attitude adopted by Don Pedro, has been unable to hold back his men any longer. They have entered the state of Milan, and have sacked and burned Folizzano, only ten miles from Alessandria, cutting in pieces four companies of Germans who formed the garrison. Other reports state that the Germans surrendered on terms and relate the capture of another place. It is thought that his Highness may continue triumphantly as the Spaniards have but few troops to oppose him.
Our fleet in sailing towards Brindisi, has found the gulf entirely free not only of the light fleet of Spain but also of the sailing ships, which were towed away by the galleys and have already arrived at Naples.
This is sent for information.
The like to:
Rome.Zurich.
France.Scaramelli.
Spain.Turin, the last paragraph only.
England.Milan, the last paragraph only.
The Hague.Mantua.
Florence.Naples, the first two paragraphs.
Ayes68.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
13. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador destined for England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Acknowledges receipt of various letters credential for use on his journey. Hopes to reach Bergamo that evening, and then continue his journey by the Grisons with all possible diligence.
Palazzuol, the 7th Sept., 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
14. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Edmondes writes from Paris in letters which reached here yesterday evening that the negotiations for peace were so well in train that they expected them to be settled in two or three days. The Most Christian king seemed very eager, because, among other reasons, he does not wish to allow so fine an opportunity of increasing his reputation to slip out of his hands. The affair is pleasing to the Court in itself because occasions for trouble are extinguished, but there is some feeling of mortification because they have not had the share which they thought they deserved.
The king keeps drawing nearer to this city, outside which he will be received and welcomed by the burgesses with great ceremony. I hear also that among his numerous pleasures he shows signs of having some other things that weigh upon his mind. Two events which have happened recently, although of little importance in themselves, yet concern him greatly because of their consequences. One is that a Scotchman of his guard of the family of Car has spoken slightingly of the Earl of Buckingham, saying it would be a good thing to kill him, and he did not seem to be averse from striking the blow himself if he had an opportunity. These words have wounded his Majesty in his most sensitive part, and have been taken by him as indicating a widespread ill-feeling of the Scots against the earl, and therefore he is greatly troubled. To punish the man's temerity he has sent him to the Tower of London, where the least harm that can come to him is that he will never come out so long as he lives. The talk of the common people goes even further, but there are no grounds for this, as the pistol, upon which they found their suspicions, was worn by him as a member of the guard and was in such a bad state that it would have been difficult to use it.
His Majesty is also greatly displeased at the detention by the Dutch of one Brown a Scot, as possibly your Excellencies may know. Last year he went with a ship of his Majesty to collect the duties from the Dutch, who fish for herrings near Scotland. This is contrary to the pretension of the States, who claim that the sea is free, and this year they have given commission to their ships of war to protect 4,000 or 5,000 fishing ships. Thus when Brown arrived and boarded one of the ships, he was detained, although he showed the king's patent, and was sent to the Low Countries. To the royal ship which brought him and which asked for him to be surrendered they lowered their top sails and showed other signs of honour, but they would not give him up.
The king is becoming jealous of the great influence and power possessed by the Marquis of Hamilton in Scotland. Under a thin pretext he has desired him to come and live near him in England, having chosen him to be a member of the Council of State.
When his Majesty, on his return journey, reached the frontier of the two kingdoms, the two marquises and eighteen Scottish earls and barons threw themselves on their knees and besought him to release the Earl of Somerset from the Tower. He replied courteously but without binding himself to anything except to consider the matter, and beyond a doubt his decision, especially in this affair, will depend upon the wishes of Buckingham.
When Sir [John] Digby some months ago fell out of favour with the queen it was thought that her Majesty would lose all inclination towards the Spanish party, and signs of this became apparent at once. This is thought to be of some moment in its bearings upon the prince's marriage, although her Majesty has never meddled in affairs of State. The results are now appearing more markedly as the queen has effected almost a revolution in her court, those dependent on Digby or friendly to his party being removed. Among other matters it has appeared like an outrage to see Mrs. Drummond also deprived of her favour, who came with her from Scotland and has always been her first lady. She has been obliged to leave the Court and England and possibly to give up the pension which she received from the Catholic ambassador, and to retire to Scotland her native country.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 18th ult.
London, the 8th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Grisoni.
Venetian
Archives.
15. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary with the Grisons, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Contarini passed through here yesterday on his way to England. Although travelling with a numerous train and many carriages, in his usual magnificence, he is hastening on with all possible speed. He hopes to reach Coire in three or four days.
From la Piazza, the 9th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 12.
Cons. de' X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
16. To the RECTORS of PADUA.
From your letters of the 10th inst. we have heard the particulars of the assault upon the Englishman Thomas Turner, who laid his plaint before the Council of Ten by his document, presented by the English ambassador. We direct you to deal with the matter in your court by the authority given you in the matter of arquebuses.
Ayes17.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
17. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary for England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I reached this city to-day and at once endeavoured to see the lords here. The magistrates came to call and stayed to sup, according to the custom of the country. I assured them of the affection and esteem of the republic for this nation. They returned thanks in complimentary terms.
The diet of Tavat concluded eleven days ago in some confusion. Those who had embraced the league with Venice asked to be judged by someone without bias, declaring that they were free to act so, and had been guided by a desire for the general good and safety, and could not justly be punished. The matter is certain to end well as many have declared themselves favourable and wish to punish those who condemned the others unjustly.
The two leagues have determined not to pay the expenses incurred by the last commotions. The good friends of the republic are hoping to draw some profit from the accidents for the common benefit. I have not seen any guard at the passes to prevent soldiers from coming to your Serenity. They say there are some, but of no account. I have met small bands of thirty or forty men taking a roundabout way through.
Some merchants have arrived here who have bought many horses in Germany for your Serenity. About eighty have arrived and they seem very fine.
To-morrow I hope to continue my journey, reaching Zurich in three days.
Coire, the 13th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Grisoni.
Venetian
Archives.
18. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary in the Grisons, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters of state reached here from Bergamo on the evening of the 10th for the Ambassador Contarini, who is going to England. I forwarded them that same hour by express messenger, so that they might reach him at Coire or at latest Zurich. I did the same with other letters of your Serenity for him, which reached me yesterday.
From la Piazza, the 13th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 18.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Busta 445.
Venetian
Archives.
19. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary at the Hague, to the INQUISITORS of STATE.
In reply to your request for particulars about the Frenchman who wrote here, I can only say I have noticed that the English ambassador directs his letters to Daniel His, a merchant in our city, and from him it should be easy to find the writer of the letters. The ambassador told me he was French and the letters are in that language, but I could not get his name. On my return to the Hague I will do my utmost co obtain further information. The ambassador told me that the man was his good friend while he was stationed at Venice.
Leverden, the 18th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
20. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Contarini arrived here on Sunday on his way to England. About thirty of the Lords of the Council visited him at dinner time. They gave him wine and caused some 500 musketeers to pass before his house, where they performed some evolutions. The ambassador left the following morning, hastening his journey as much as possible although he has a numerous train.
Zurich, the 21st September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
21. To the ambassador at the Imperial Court.
We have received word of the arrangements made at Paris for the general peace of Italy. with the articles drawn up there on the 6th inst., which comprise the affairs both of the republic and Savoy, his Most Christian Majesty pledging his word for what touches us and for the carrying out of the treaty of Asti with the restitution of the places occupied, either before or after. These articles are to be ratified at the Court of Spain by the Catholic king, who also has powers from the emperor and the king of Bohemia. The one to be ratified by the republic and the Duke of Savoy, and as the duke has notified us of his consent, we have agreed to do this thus showing our constant disposition towards peace. If this be carried out with equal sincerity by the others, we may hope for general tranquility at last.
This is for information and to speak and reply when the question is discussed.
We have chosen Simon Contarini to act as extraordinary ambassador at the Court of France. He will set out with all speed. We have recalled the ambassadors who are now there because they have transgressed the public orders in some particulars of the treaty.
The like to:
Rome.Naples.
Milan.Zurich.
Mantua.Scaramelli.
To England, Florence and the Hague, adding
As a sign of confidence you will inform his Majesty (his Highness or the Lords and Count Maurice) of the present state of the negotiations, adding that the peace seems honest and safe, but the result must be awaited.
Ayes140.
Noes0.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Sept. 22.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
22. To the Resident LIONELLO in England.
If on the arrival of the enclosed for the Ambassador Pietro Contarini, he has not yet reached the Court, you will open them and execute the commands contained therein, sending word thereupon.
[Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
23. That the English ambassador be summoned to the Cabinet and the following read to him:
By letters of his Most Christian Majesty accompanied by a most friendly office of M. de Leon, his ambassador, we receive the news with the articles drawn up at Paris on the 6th inst. for a general peace in Italy. His Majesty guarantees this peace, and the articles have been ratified by the Duke of Savoy and ourselves. while the Catholic king is also to ratify them for himself, the emperor and the King of Bohemia. If honestly carried out, this should secure tranquility in Italy. We have appointed Simon Contarini to be our extraordinary ambassador in France, having recalled the ambassadors there for having transgressed their instructions.
We display our usual confidence in informing your Excellency of the state of affairs; we beg you to represent it to his Majesty as a sign of our affectionate esteem.
Ayes121.
Noes3.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
24. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king reaches Windsor this evening and will stay there for Sunday to celebrate the solemnity of the Knights of the Garter. He is coming to London on Monday and on Tuesday he proceeds to Theobalds where he will stay about a month. I had thought of going to kiss his Majesty's hands at Windsor or at some similar place. But knowing the shortness of the time and the occupations he will be engaged in I thought it would please him better if I awaited him at Theobalds. There I will congratulate him on his happy return and advise him, as your Serenity commands me, of the selection of Pietro Contarini to be extraordinary ambassador at this Court. I feel sure that this will please him the more because his Excellency's reputation stands very high here owing to the great prudence and splendour which he has shown in other embassies, including the recent one in France; and this will prove a further advantage in his negotiations. With regard to the Uscocchi they are firmly of opinion here that they receive every accommodation by means of the Most Christian king.
Two Dutch sailors have been detained here by the royal orders and there were commissions for doing the same to other persons of that nation, as reprisals for the Scot Brown, the collector of customs, who was taken by war ships. To pacify this vexed question the ambassador of the States has been to the royal Council and asked that dispute and discussion on the subject may be suspended until news arrives from Holland of what the States think of the action of their captains. He promised that the United Provinces would never do anything displeasing to this Crown or to spoil their ancient friendship. As a conse- quence of this office they have agreed to await news from those parts, and their decisions will be guided by the nature of this information. The queen never loses an opportunity of inflaming passion, both because of her rooted ill will to that nation and because the custom in dispute was assigned to her as dower.
Fourteen Dutch war vessels all in good trim are at Plymouth, to go against the pirates, though some believe that they have some secret designs upon Barbary; this probably is not so very far from the truth, as I know, when I was in Holland last year, the States were arranging among themselves the surprise of Algiers.
The fleet which Sir Walter Raleigh took out of England is now in Ireland, without having done anything. I understand that it has been sensibly diminished, some ships having left it, and many of those on board having gone away.
Two very rich ships have arrived from the East Indies, and it is clear that the English are constantly setting their feet more firmly in those parts. A new company has recently been formed of very rich merchants, who have subscribed eight millions of gold to trade in the Indies in the space of six years.
The chaplain of the Catholic ambassador has returned from Spain without bringing the money which was confidently expected; indeed he brings a letter reproving the ambassador for having spent too freely some 100,000 crowns in extraordinary expenses in the year. The ambassador is consequently in some embarrassment, laden with debts and compelled to do things which bring no reputation to himself and little satisfaction to others.
An intimation has been sent in the king's name to Lord Roos, who had withdrawn to France, to return immediately upon the penalty to which nobles who leave the kingdom without permission are subject.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 25th ult., about the affairs with the archduke and the impious attempts of the Duke of Ossuna to bring the Ottoman arms against your Serenity.
London, the 23rd September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
25. To the Secretary Lionello in England.
We are sending Piero Contarini, knight, to act as extraordinary ambassador with his Majesty until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato, in conformity with our undertaking to have an ambassador at the Court on his Majesty's return from Scotland. When he arrives you will give him full information of the commissions which we gave you when you were recently sent to the king, and of the replies which you received from his Majesty, with whatever else concerns the public service, wherein you have conducted yourself to our entire satisfaction.
The ambassador is coming without a secretary, therefore, although we recognise your need of coming home, we direct you to remain at the court in that capacity so long as he stays there, and we assure you that the greater your labours the greater will be your merit in the public favour.
Ayes147.
Noes0.
Neutral25.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
26. That the following instructions be given to Piero Contarini, knight, sent as ambassador extraordinary to England.
From our confidence in your ability and prudence we have chosen you to act as ambassador extraordinary with the king of Great Britain, feeling sure that you will conduct this charge with the ability and splendour which you have displayed in other legations, and you have shewn your readiness by beginning your journey even before the limited time which was allowed to you.
When you have reached London the king should be back from his journey to Scotland. You will ask for an audience of the king and the queen, for whom you have letters credential, as also for the prince of Wales. You will pass the usual compliments at this first meeting, bearing witness to our continued esteem, and say that our union of hearts and interests causes us to ever desire the greater prosperity of that most glorious crown. You will say that you have been sent to reside with their Majesties until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato, who has only been delayed by having in hand very important affairs of Savoy and a large part of the negotiations for peace.
You will warmly thank the king for the readiness with which he expressed to our Secretary Lionello his willingness to make some declaration in our favour in the present troubles, ruling yourself by what we wrote on the 22nd about the peace, adding that we place great reliance on his Majesty's good will, just as we are ready to do everything for his gratification, should the treaty not be thoroughly carried out and new difficulties arise. Upon this you will need to insist as events may decide and as we shall keep you advised regularly, cultivating our good understanding with him, nourishing the existing confidence and obtaining what is possible from him.
With the other diplomatists at that court you will maintain such relations as you consider most advantageous for our service. We particularly desire you to encourage confidential relations with the representatives of the Count Palatine, with whom we have no one, telling him the same things about the peace as we have instructed you to tell the king, so that he may inform the Elector, as a sign of our esteem for that prince.
In 1603 Pope Clement VIII asked us to direct our ambassadors in England to seize any opportunity of assisting the cause of the Catholics, but to do so with tact in order to obtain some success. The present Pope Paul V repeated the same request. We promised both pontiffs that we would not fail to make opportune offices. We inform you of this so that you may act with great circumspection owing to the great reserve which is necessary in order not to offend the king, and not to do harm instead of good, and to perform nothing but general offices and then only when you feel sure of success, not otherwise.
From Giovanni Battista Lionello you will receive the public documents and all necessary information about affairs. As you are without a secretary we have directed him to fulfil that service, knowing that you will profit by his intelligence, as he has left nothing to be desired in the manner in which he has discharged his duties.
We grant you permission to keep, beyond the ordinary household, a chaplain and an interpreter for English. To the chaplain we assign as salary and for board 186 ducats a year, and to the interpreter 100 ducats a year, according to the decision of the Senate on the 26 November, 1610.
We grant you a gratuity of 1000 ducats to put yourself in order and 500 gold ducats a month for your expenses, for which you will not be bound to render account; neither will you for the 300 ducats of lire 6 grossi 4 to the ducat for coverings and locks. For extraordinary expenses 300 ducats, for which you will render account on your return. To your secretary, 100 ducats as a gift, and to two couriers, who accompany you, 40 ducats each. You may take silver up to the sum of 400 ducats, according to the conditions laid down by the Senate on 28th July, 1609.
Ayes147.
Noes0.
Neutral25.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
27. The deliberation of the Senate of the 23rd inst. was read to the Ambassador of England. He said:
I thank you for your continued confidence and I will impart the whole to his Majesty to whom the news of this peace will be very grateful. I am sorry that your Serenity has not received complete satisfaction from some of your ministers. On my journey to this city to take up my present charge, I travelled by the Mont Cenis and met Sig. Bon, whom I had known at Constantinople, a man of singular zeal in the public service. What has happened cannot be from any lack of prudence or good-will, but from some violence employed by others.
The matter of the peace seems in good train. I understand that the Catholic king has decided to promise the execution of the treaty of Asti, with the restitution of what was occupied both before and after, including Vercelli.
I proposed to take this opportunity to recall the offer of the earl of Oxford (Ostrof) but I perceive that the present moment is inopportune. He will await events, and if the occasion for his services ceases, he will return home with the consolation of peace. After the doge had replied the ambassador took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
28. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear that his Excellency has sent one Alexander Rose, an English merchant, with letters of exchange for 12,000 ducats, to go to England and Amsterdam to find four or six good ships for him and send them home under colour of trade in salt fish and other things; as his Excellency proposes to detain them and use them against your Serenity.
Naples, the 26th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Cons. de' X.
Criminale.
Venetian
Archives.
29. That Antonio Foscarini, knight, and Giulio Muscorno may upon three occasions in the presence of the Inquisitors of State converse with their relations and with whoever may be considered reasonable by the Inquisitors to be admitted to discuss private affairs, with express prohibition to introduce any reference to the reasons why they are in custody.
Ayes16.
Noes1.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
30. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary for England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In the Catholic cantons of Switzerland I found guards posted who turned back many troops. But I understood that they could be avoided with a little skill. I met Captain Ecchesten, who had come through with more than 180 foot. At Zurich the magistrates came to dine with me. I presented the letters of your Excellencies and did what I could to encourage their friendly feelings towards the republic. They expressed regret that the hindrances of the Grisons prevented them from giving greater effect to their sentiments. At Basel I performed similar offices. On the 20th, the day I left that city, the Count of Mansfelt, the Count of Solms and other lords also departed, after sending forward their troops, most of whom should have reached Piedmont. The offices of the Ambassador Casati to close the passes proved quite successful, but when they saw that Count Mansfelt was determined to take the pass by force, if necessary, and that the United Princes were ready to help him, they thought it a lesser evil to offer no opposition. At Breisach (Brisaie) a town of Maximilian eight hours from Basel, I found a crowd of suspicious and angry troops. The governor raised difficulties as to my further progress, and I had to wait a whole day until the general of the province arrived and let me go. On the 28th they propose to review 6,000 foot and 2,000 horse at a place not far from Basel; they are said to be for the king of Bohemia, but many do not believe it and the Archduke Leopold, though so near, seems to take no interest in them. Casati must have spent 15,000 doubles for the levy.
The United Princes of Germany are not moving, but seem anxious to hold a meeting among themselves. I did not think it necessary to go out of my way to see any of them as I had no duties to perform with them and I thought it best to go straight to my destination.
I shall leave here to-morrow and hope to cross in two days if the sea will permit me.
Cologne, the 29th September, 1617.
[Italian.]
Sept. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costant.
Venetian
Archives.
31. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When I recently visited the ambassador of Flanders he told me that the States General were proposing to make a company which would send a great fleet to the West Indies as they now do to the East. The kings of these parts had sent for them, as they were tired of putting up with the caprice of the Spaniards. They would try to obtain a footing somewhere, and afterwards endeavour to extend their acquisitions and if they did not succeed, they would at least deprive the Spaniards of their advantage there.
We hear from Persia by letters from Aleppo that seven cases have been opened between Span and Cazibin by English merchants, who took away the silk, and their ambassador had left for Span to find the king and endeavour to obtain that all the silk should remain in their country, to be taken away afterwards by the said Englishmen without passing to Aleppo. If he succeeds it will inflict a great blow upon that mart. They also say that a Spanish ambassador has arrived at Ormuz in great pomp; he was said to be going to the King of Persia to prevent the English ambassador from taking away the silk by his merchants.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 30th September, 1617.
[Italian; deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 See page 574 of the preceding Volume of this Calendar.
2 Also found in Senato Secreta Comunicazioni dal Consiglio de' X. See page 590 of the preceding Volume of this Calendar.


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