Venice
October 1617, 2-13

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

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14-27

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'Venice: October 1617, 2-13', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 14-27. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88662 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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October 1617

Oct. 2.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
32. The ambassador of England came into the Cabinet and with him a gentleman who was given a seat above the Savii of Terra firma, as he was thought to be the earl of Oxford (Ostorf). The ambassador said:
I have come upon a short but just errand. Count John Ernest of Nassau has died at Udine. As in civil life the sons succeed the father, so in military affairs the next in rank succeed to the charges. This gentleman (fn. 1) was a lieutenant of the count in the Low Countries and always served faithfully and well. In birth and in the knowledge of arms there is no one above him. He is of the house of Vere by birth, a near cousin of the earl of Oxford. The house of Vere is one of the most famous and has produced the most famous spirits that the world has seen. He has been a captain for twenty years and has taken part in all the greatest battles which have been fought in Flanders, where he has always distinguished himself. He would as soon be hanged as miss a chance of fighting.
After some courteous words of the doge the ambassador continued, I omitted to say that this gentleman had relations in camp with General Lando, who will be able to bear witness to his behaviour.
[Italian.]
Oct. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
33. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is quite true that his Excellency has sent Alexander Rose, the English merchant, with money to England and Flanders, to send hither five or six large and fine ships under the pretence of bringing herrings and other salted fish, when his Excellency proposes to detain them and arm them against your Serenity. This is confirmed by some Flemish merchants, friends of mine, who say that Rose will first go to Middelburg and then to England, with the privilege that no one but himself may bring salted fish here from those parts. I have written about it to the Ambassador Contarini in England and the Secretary Surian at the Hague.
Naples, the 3rd October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
34. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Monday the king entered London. He was met by five hundred of the leading burgesses on horseback and a countless multitude of people, who shouted for joy at his return. On Tuesday his Majesty proceeded to Theobalds, and on Sunday I had a very pleasing audience of him there. I congratulated him in the name of your Excellencies upon the happy completion of his long journey. He replied with words full of his affection and esteem for the republic, and seemed pleased at the news which I gave him of the approaching arrival of the Cavalier Contarini. He signified that he had heard of it before and that the fame of his Excellency was spread abroad through the Court.
His Majesty desired me to inform him of the position of the negotiations for peace. I was able to satisfy him sufficiently with the information which I have from the public letters and from those of the Ambassador Bon from Paris. I laid emphasis upon the fact that although the ambassadors of your Serenity had signed the articles and thus demonstrated the desire of Venice to settle these troubles by a universal peace yet there was little hope of obtaining it, because Don Pedro and Ossuna, who have to carry it out, speak in a contrary sense, laugh at the idea of restitution and by their actions and preparations show clearly that they are more anxious than ever to continue the war to make still further acquisitions.
His Majesty waxed very wroth at these words, and swore by God three or four times in succession that such things should not be borne, that these negotiations of the Spaniards and the disobedience of the ministers of the Catholic king, with con- nivance, caused great prejudice to whoever negotiated with them; that therefore he would be forced to lay aside all considerations and show his front, that he would like your Serenity to enter in, and he will be the first, and will join with the States, the Princes of Germany, Savoy, the Grisons and the four Evangelical Cantons, and tame by force the pride of the Spaniards which is so great that they aspire to the absolute dominion of the whole world, and although he is at present united with Spain in quiet friendship, he will not suffer them to proceed with negotiations in such fashion, because he knew that the friendship of the Spaniards was like the promise of Polyphemus Ulysses, that he would leave him to the last to be devoured after his companions. He repeated more than once that he did not value this privilege, but it was necessary to provide against the danger while there was time. He hoped to hear from Spain if the articles are ratified and if Don Pedro is willing to carry them out in Italy before the Ambassador Contarini arrives here, and if this does not take place it will be necessary to do something together.
I praised his generous ideas and said various things to inform and kindle him, and after that I left. I waited awhile at the other end of the king's gallery and then went to see the Earl of Arundel. He told me that his Majesty had entered his chamber in great wrath and in the presence of various gentlemen there he had dilated upon the proceedings of the Spaniards, and especially upon what Don Pedro had said, that it was one thing to agree upon a thing in Spain and another to execute it in Italy because circumstances alter cases. The earl added that his Majesty's disposition is good in the present affairs of Italy.
Biondi the agent of Savoy also had audience of the king and expressed the same ideas. His Majesty promised to help the duke the moment he received the news that peace was not arranged. He commended His Highness's decision to enter the state of Milan, told him that in Scotland he had promised a declaration in favour of the two powers and that he was resolved to make it immediately that he had received the first letters from the Ambassador Digby, who had gone to Spain, by which he was advised that Digby had arrived but had not yet had audience.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 1st and 7th September.
London, the 5th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Consiglio
de' X.
Lettere di
Ambasciatori,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
35. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the COUNCIL of TEN.
I cannot deny that the commands of the Council of Ten which reached me yesterday with letters of the 12th September have been a severe blow to me, because utterly unexpected. My poor health, the state of my affairs, my absence from Venice for nine years and particularly the last four years of varied labours have reduced me to such a state that pity alone might have given me leave to see my home and country for a few months. However, it is my duty to obey and I will serve the Ambassador Contarini at this Court for such time as shall please your Excellencies with all spirit and diligence, trusting that if the ambassador stays longer than is expected you will send another secretary, so that I may return to Venice and end my miseries.
London, the 5th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
37. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court.
The execution of the treaty has been facilitated by various meetings between M. de Bethune and Don Pedro. The suspension of arms on both sides has already been printed and published. It is practically agreed that Savoy shall disarm within a month, and the Spaniards shall do the like in the following month. Restitution will present no difficulty as the Most Christian king has recently assured his Highness of the restitution of Vercelli. We hear now from Milan that the governor will not promise to disarm, and declares that Savoy must not only disarm but restore what he has occupied. Bethune complains loudly that he has broken the promises made to him.
The ratification of the treaty made at Paris is expected from Spain. The Duke of Savoy will keep armed till he sees the outcome, while the Most Christian king shows his determination to have the treaty carried out. M. de Leon and the nuncio here have come to propose a truce for some days. We send our reply to this which will serve for your information.
The like to:
Rome.Milan.
Turin.Naples.
France.England.
Spain.The Hague.
The Ambassador Contarini in France.Scaramelli.
Mantua.Zurich.
The General of the Armies.Florence.
The General in Terra Ferma.
Ayes120.
Noes1.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
38. To the ambassador in England.
We enclose an account of the progress of the negotiations for peace in Piedmont, with the recent opposition raised by Don Pedro, the operations and ideas of Ossuna, the proposals for a truce by the nuncio and the Most Christian Ambassador, and our reply. We have sent this to all our ministers for information. But you reside at the court of a sovereign who is keenly interested in current affairs, and we direct you to communicate everything to him, showing him the insidious conduct of the Spanish ministers and point out that there is more need than ever for his attention and offices. You will say that the republic and Savoy sincerely desired peace, but seeing that no ratification came from the Catholic Court after so many days, that Don Pedro raises difficulties and the Viceroy of Naples is strengthening his fleet to return to the Gulf makes us fear that they will not meet us with equal sincerity. You will add that Monteleone has endeavoured to influence the French Ministers against Savoy and even Lesdiguières, by pointing out the measures which the duke is justly taking for his defence and by stating that his king would not therefore stand by the treaty, although a truce had been arranged between the duke and Don Pedro by Bethune.
You will inform his Majesty that our resident at Naples writes to us that the Viceroy has sent one Alexander Rose, an English merchant, with 12,000 crowns in letters of exchange to England and Amsterdam to obtain four or six ships, under the pretext of trade, to use them against us at an early opportunity. We wish to make sure that this shall not be allowed, especially as the Dutch themselves have suffered from Ossuna in men and ships and possibly they may recoup themselves if they are informed of the money sent to those parts. You will look out for the coming of this individual and will oppose his negotiations.
For the rest you will encourage the favourable disposition shown so fully by his Majesty for the alleviation of this province keeping him assured of the value which we place upon his royal favour, and we shall be ready to lean on his arm when time and events so decide.
Ayes127.
Noes1.
Neutral1.
The like to the Resident at the Hague.
The like to Mantua, omitting the second paragraph.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
39. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Since my last of the 29th ult. the duke and his military train left for Turin. Two days ago a gentleman arrived here from M. de Bethune with proposals about the peace. There are two difficulties. Don Pedro claims to restore the places after the duke has disarmed, and nothing is said about the disarmament of Milan. Long debates have taken place about these points. The duke communicated the above matters to me, adding that he heard on good authority that they had arranged in Spain a way of keeping an extraordinary body of troops in the state of Milan, and the Grand Duke had undertaken to give 15,000 crowns a month for this. He begged your Serenity to consider this well and make up your mind to enter a strong league with himself, England, the States and the Princes of Germany, and to do it soon, protesting that if this is not done the Spaniards will never cease to harass this province, the republic will never be safe, and a new storm will arise at the slightest disturbance in France, and possibly very shortly. He did his utmost to persuade me that the Spaniards are contriving some harm against your Serenity. I asked him what evidence he had of this. He referred to the Spanish preparations by land and sea and said he feared the action of France, whose government had never been so Spanish as now. He therefore approved of a league with England and the States.
Turin, the 6th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
40. Proposals sent by Bethune.
His Highness shall disarm in October, and immediately afterwards Don Pedro shall be bound to disarm.
His Highness shall give up all places taken by him during the war, and four days later his Catholic Majesty shall be bound to do the like.
His Highness and the Venetian ambassador will not take exception to any extraordinary force in the state of Milan, and the agent of Great Britain shall declare that he will not consider the treaty of Asti to be carried out if his Highness and Venice take such exception.
The above shall not be considered complete if the duke of Mantua does not observe the treaty of Asti.
[Italian.]
Oct. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Prov. Gen.
delle Armi.
Venetian
Archives.
41. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Proveditore of the Forces in Terra Ferma and Istria, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is necessary that your Serenity should decide to whom to give the command of the Dutch troops. As I have previously written, in my opinion M. de Roquelaure (Rocca Laura) would be the best person.
From the Camp at Farno, the 9th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 9, 10.
Class VII.
Cod. MCXX.
Bibl. di
S. Marco.
Venice.
42. From the diary of HORATIO BUSINO, chaplain of PIETRO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England.
His Excellency having given orders for the hire of a vessel, one was procured immediately at a cost of 22 crowns for our conveyance to England, this identical ship having taken ambassadors across on previous occasions. The skipper chose to delay our departure until Wednesday the 16th, so as to avoid making the coast of England by night. Meanwhile the steward laid in stores for the voyage consisting of good beer, yet better Rhenish, excellent French claret with capital Mayence ham and a flask of Spanish 'aromatico.' At the 23rd hour the skipper came to fetch his Excellency and invoking God's blessing we all went merrily on board. We had expected to be alone, but found the whole ship crowded with passengers of every description, musicians, women, merchants, bearded Jews, tatterdemalions and gentlemen, crowded together as they are on the boats to Padua. We were rather annoyed at this, but berths were assigned to each of us, his Excellency being taken into the state cabin, which was so low and narrow that it could not even contain four persons. After a very tempestuous passage about the 13th hour we saw the land or rather one continued mass of cliff, which forms the bulwark of this kingdom seaward, and after coasting the island, we entered the Thames at the 17th hour precisely. As both wind and tide were against us, we dropped anchor. At the 23rd hour we raised anchor and at the fifth hour of the night we were carried by the tide to Gravesend, the usual halting place for all ambassadors and grandees, preparatory to their introduction at the court in London, from which it is exactly twenty miles distant. His Excellency went to the Post inn, which is accustomed to receive such guests.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Prov. Gen.
delle Armi.
Venetian
Archives.
43. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Procurator of the Forces in Terra Ferma and Istria, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I am much concerned about the payment of the Dutch. They claim that it should be made as in past months and according to the account which I enclose. I do not know how to meet this. They are very uproarious and most dissatisfied. It will be best to satisfy them.
From the Camp at Farno, the 10th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
44. Sept. 22, 1617, at Palma.
Account of the Company of Capt. Monsu Golem:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
Three sergeants"60
293 soldiers, including 145 sick"2051
"2341
The Company of Count John:
The Countscudi
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
3 sergeants"60
202 soldiers, including 84 sick"1414
"1564
The Company of Colonel Rocca Laura:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
3 sergeants"60
399 soldiers, including 137 sick"2513
"2813
The Company of Mons. Ver:
The captain (at Venice)scudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
126 soldiers, including 46 sick"882
"1162
The Company of Capt. Steven:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
115 soldiers, including 35 sick"805
"1085
The Company of Capt. Umdes:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
150 soldiers, including 41 sick"1050
"1330
Company of Count Vielmo:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
3 sergeants"60
224 soldiers, including 72 sick"1568
"1868
Company of Capt. Mellandro:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
199 soldiers, including 78 sick"1393
"1673
Company of Captain Tine:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
138 soldiers, including 48 sick"966
"1246
Company of Capt. Dombon, in his place Mons. Grimeni:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
3 sergeants"60
163 men, including 50 sick"1141
"1441
Company of Capt. Cornelius Vimes:
The captainscudi150
His lieutenant"50
His ensign"40
2 sergeants"40
217 men, including 57 sick"1519
13 more men"91
"1890
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
45. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
To-day I have reached England, forty-six days from the time of my appointment. I have already sent to London to provide myself with a house and other requisites for my entry into that city, and shall do my utmost to hasten my immediate presentation to his Majesty and execute the instructions which reached me on the way, directing me to inform him that your Serenity and the duke of Savoy have assented to the articles of peace arranged in France by his Most Christian Majesty, and that provided the other parties observe them punctually good order may be anticipated.
On the very day of my arrival at the Hague I moreover received the letters of your Serenity for Prince Maurice and the States, which enabled me to express in yet stronger terms the affection and esteem entertained by the republic for both. The prince came to see me immediately and was followed by the States. The latter came to dine with me and said several times how much for the common advantage a closer understanding and union between the two countries would be. At table, as usual in the country, they expressed the same sentiments by toasts. I thanked them, assuring them that your Serenity reciprocated their sentiments most sincerely, of which feeling they would be even better informed by the resident Suriano. (fn. 2)
Although I did not see Suriano at the Hague, as he had gone into Friesland to ship all the troops of Count Levenstein (Lerestein), yet I found that he was greatly esteemed there and popular not only with the members of the government but with everybody else besides. As the subject concerns his ministry I shall not now represent what I was able to observe with regard to the disputes about religion waged by two chiefs of great authority and credit. Owing to the withdrawal of Barnevelt one party seems to be much weakened, nevertheless, unless some measures be adopted speedily to which effect daily consultations are held, great troubles and schisms may arise, nor will there be any lack of aid and encouragement from abroad to foment and increase them.
Gravesend, the 11th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 12.
Cl. VII.
Cod. MCXX.
Bibl. di
S. Marco.
Venice.
46. From the diary of HORATIO BUSINO.
On the morning of Thursday the 12th, three hours before daybreak, we sent the courier to London, and at the twelfth hour he was followed by the House Steward, they being charged to acquaint Giovanni Battista Lionello, the Venetian resident Secretary with our arrival and to request his presence at Gravesend forthwith. He consequently arrived in haste at the first hour of the night. It was at once settled that his Excellency should go to London incognito, to choose a house and superintend the furnishing of it, especially as the charges at the inn were exorbitant, namely 2 golden crowns per meal for each person. So on the evening of the 12th we wrote to Venice and on the morrow of the 13th after dinner his Excellency set out for the metropolis. At the 6th hour of the night he reached the Tower, the usual landing place, where the coach of Sig. Lionello was waiting to take him to his dwelling. The house steward and courier had engaged a very commodious mansion in Bishops-gate St. Without, which had heretofore served as the residence of several former ambassadors. His Excellency took possession on the evening of Saturday the 14th, assigning the gallery of the palace for the chapel, as it was long and very handsome, and a decent altar was erected there immediately. The first mass was celebrated there on Sunday the 15th. We next occupied ourselves with furnishing the house, obtaining servants and other things. On Thursday the 19th his Majesty's master of the ceremonies, a man of experience and piety, was informed that his Excellency wished to make his public entry into London. It was therefore arranged that this ceremony should take place on the afternoon of Saturday the 20th (sic). His Excellency returned to Gravesend on Friday, and the same evening the master of the ceremonies arrived with the king's barges, in very gallant trim, having left orders for the royal coaches to be in waiting at the Tower.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
47. To the Ambassador at Rome.
In Germany they are busily levying cavalry and infantry, the Count of Oñate (Ognat), ambassador of the Catholic king showing special zeal. Troops are also being levied in Flanders.
The ratification of the treaty has not come from Spain yet after so many days. The governor of Milan is acting very harshly with Savoy; Bethune threatened several times to leave, but at last they signed the following conditions: Savoy should disarm in October and restore what he had taken; thereupon Don Pedro should also restore everything and dispose of his forces as the treaty of Asti provides. Prisoners should then be released, and the treaty of Asti be carried out. Meanwhile Don Pedro is quartering many of his troops near our Lombard frontiers.
The Viceroy of Naples, notwithstanding the treaty made in France, continues more determinedly than ever in his evil designs, and news has reached us this week that he has sent out a fleet for the purpose of entering the Gulf against us. Yet at the same time the proposals for a truce were brought to us.
This will serve for your information.
The like to:
The ambassadors in France.Mantua.
The ambassador Contarini.Milan.
Turin.Naples.
England.Zurich.
The Hague.Scaramelli.
Florence.
The general of the armies.
The general in Terra Ferma.
Ayes108.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
48. To the Resident Surian at the Hague.
What we send you about the movements of the Viceroy of Naples induces us to add the present letter. You will show our usual confidence by giving their High Mightinesses complete information in our name, so that you may insist more strongly in the remonstrances necessary for the public safety.
We have nothing to add about the alliance. We hear from you that Barnevelelt and Vandermyle, the chief promoters of it, have left the Hague. We wish you to enquire whether we can speedily obtain a number of good armed vessels to be paid by us, and upon what conditions. These will reinforce our fleet and introduce a means for mutual assistance and correspondence, which we direct you to forward by every possible means.
We believe that the troops of Levenstein have left. If they have not you must ask that they may do so with all speed; you will keep on foot other negotiations you tell us of for fresh levies, awaiting more precise instructions from us.
News reaches us from Naples confirming the sending of the merchant by Ossuna for ships. You will be on the alert, and expose the falsity of his pretexts, opposing his designs.
The like to England in the first and last paragraphs.
Ayes99.
Noes2.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
49. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Father Tomaso Ceronio, the Jesuit provost of San Fedele, Milan, has left England, who came here professedly moved by his zeal to reveal matters of importance to the king. His Majesty has never agreed to admit him, but has made him treat with deputies. The substance of his depositions is as follows: He heard in Italy from a person in high position, not in confession but sub sigillo confessionis, that during the lifetime of the Marshal of Ancre they had been plotting to give the second princess of Spain as wife to the Duke of Orleans with the kingdom of England as a dowry. In order to possess themselves of the country they were to prepare two fleets, under the pretext of the pirates, at Rouen and Dunkirk, and the Duke of Mayenne was to come here with a great company, pretending to be fugitives from France. He would be followed by his other dependants, and upon a favourable opportunity they would seize the persons of the king and the prince when hunting one day, and carry them off hurriedly to a ship, which should be waiting for them in an appointed place, to take them to France. When the news of this arrived, the two fleets at Rouen and Dunkirk would join hands and finding the kingdom in confusion would easily master the island with their united forces assisted by the Catholics of the country (egli intese in Italia da persona di gran maneggio non in confessione ma sub sigillo confessionis che vivendo il marescial d'Ancre si era trattato di dar la seconda Principessa di Spagna per moglie al Duca d'Orleans, con dotte del Regno d'Inghilterra, et per impossessarsene, dovevasi sotto nome di Corsari appressar due armate in Roano et a Doncherchen et venir di qui il Duca d'Umena con grossa compagnia, sotto colore di fuggirsene dalla Francia, et che sarebbe stato seguitato da altri suoi dipendenti, li quali a buona opportunità si sarebbono impadroniti un giorno alla caccia della persona del Re, et principe suo figliuolo, et con celerità condottili all'imbarco sopra una nave che doveva attenderli in qualche luogo appostato, et condurli in Francia all'aviso del qual fatto le due armate di Roano et Duncherchen sarebbono sopragionte et ritrovando il Regno sbigottito facilmente con la lor forza unita et con la adherenza delli Catolici del paese si sarebbono soggettiti dell' Isola).
The design, although plausible to some extent, yet contains so many contradictions that the king cannot make up his mind whether it really was planned or is simply an invention of the Jesuit for some secret object. The latter alternative seems the more likely because he is venturing to return to Italy, saying that he is not afraid of the members of his own company, as he will make them believe that he went for the purpose of helping the Catholics. He received 400 crowns as a gift for the journey, and was entertained all the time that he stayed here.
M. Desmaretz has returned to France, who was residing here as ordinary ambassador of France, by whose relations and the news brought by others they have learned all the particulars relating to the peace in Italy. The decision of your Serenity and the duke to restore peace to that province is generally praised, but there is some doubt as to what the Spanish ministers will do with regard to carrying out the treaty, and in case they do not execute it straightforwardly the king loudly declares that he will not put up with it, and at table and with his familiars he expresses the same ideas as he discussed with me some days ago.
The Spanish ambassador announces that he has obtained leave from Court to go to the baths at Spa for the treatment. Many think that he has done this to rid himself of the obligation of the numerous promises which he has made in this affair of the marriage. I know that some individual gentlemen, who have supported the scheme, begin to complain about him and to realise that they have been beguiled by the great hopes which he held out.
The Scot Brown has arrived from the Hague, having been released by the States. They have informed the Ambassador Carleton that they do not approve of his detention, for although they claim that their fishermen are free in these seas, yet it is not their desire to act so harshly owing to their reverence for the Crown: so I have no doubt that this honourable satisfaction will completely appease the king and that they will also release the two sailors detained here.
They begin to say that the king is to go to Ireland in the spring, with the same idea of arranging matters as he had in Scotland. I find this the more credible because when in Scotland, his Majesty hinted to me that he would like to do so. Meanwhile he is engaged upon his usual pursuit of the chase, and I hear that he is proposing to go to Lincoln, a hundred miles away for this purpose, as on his journey to Scotland he found that county the most delightful of his whole kingdom, so that at present he is proposing to fly away thither and return as soon as possible.
I have received a single letter of your Serenity this week, of the 22nd September, directing me to open and act upon the letters directed to the Ambassador Contarini if he has not arrived here. However, I could not find these letters in the packet, and they may have been sent to his Excellency by way of the Hague. I hear that he has arrived in this island, and when I have sent off the present despatch, I shall go to find him and offer my devoted services, as I am directed to do by the Council of Ten. I shall execute their commands, though they are unexpected and inconvenient, in the hope that my present service will have a speedy end.
London, the 13th October, 1617.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Dispacci
dagli Amb.
in Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
50. GIOVANNI BATTISTA LIONELLO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the INQUISITORS of STATE.
Is surprised at their acknowledging his letters of the 7th ult. with an enclosure, containing certain revelations of the affairs of state to the Spanish ambassador, as he never wrote to them on that day. If they will give him further particulars, it will relieve him of great anxiety.
From London, the 13th October, 1617.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
51. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The levy of Count John Ernest has given me much trouble; but for the prudence of the Count and the vigilance of M. Durant de Prigni, his serjeant major, a mutiny would have broken out in the fleet at the instigation of some English soldiers, numbering 22, who wrote a letter to the quarter master demanding money or else they would leave the ship, and threatening to raise the anchor and take possession of the ship. The letter was written on a sheet of paper, with the names of the Englishmen and seventy or eighty of other nations inside a circle. The ringleaders were not known. They were landed upon the pretext of dismissing them and at once arrested, but as there were so many of one nation it was thought best to caution them and divide them among the companies.
Another Englishman, of the Count's company and ship, also began to mutiny. He was arrested and put in irons. A council of war held by the Count proposed to keep him so until they left, spreading a report in the regiment that he would be punished.
These English are mutiny incarnate (Questa natione Inglese è la vera mutina), but others also have grown tired through the length of time that they have been in their ships.
Delft, the 13th October, 1617.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Sir John Vere.
2 Surian, owing to his absence in Friesland, does not report Contarini's passage through. Carleton, however, writes as follows in a letter to Chamberlain: The extraordinary ambassador to his Majesty Piero Contarini, past this way on Saturday last, very slenderly attended, having but two wagons for himself, staff and familie. He past a complimental office with the States, which was all his business in this place. State Papers, Holland. Oct. 2, 1617, o.s.