Venice
January 1618, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

103-108

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'Venice: January 1618, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 103-108. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88669 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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January 1618

Jan. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives
170. As the English ambassador has sent word by his Secretary that he cannot come into the Cabinet before next week on account of his indisposition, and this evening he is sending a gentleman to the king with the offer to send any message by him to his Majesty, that a Secretary of our Council be sent to read to him the office which was to have been passed with him this morning according to the deliberation of yesterday, adding our congratulations upon the happy delivery of the princess, the king's daughter, of a second prince. (fn. 1)
Ayes136.
Noes0.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Jan. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives
171. That the ambassador of his Most Christian Majesty be summoned to the Cabinet, and the following read to him:
Our Ambassor Gritti writes that in reply to his remonstrances about the action of Don Pedro and Ossuna, he received a reply which seemed in favour of carrying out the treaty, but at the same time the Spaniards excused this action to our ambassador, alleging the need to defend the Ragusans, the coming of the Dutch and the troops brought by Savoy from abroad, and thus new difficulties have been introduced into the treaty, which would make everything worse than before and destroy all faith in treaties and promises. We have shown our sincerity by the line of conduct we have pursued throughout the course of this affair, and we hoped to be met in the same spirit; but when their actions differ so entirely from their words, and when the proceedings of these ministers are obviously countenanced at Court, a clear judgment may be formed of their aims, which concern all the other powers and his Majesty in particular. We have communicated this much to your Excellency and we have charged our ambassador to tell his Majesty, so that he may perceive the necessity of cutting short the designs of others by insisting upon the treaty, and interpose his great influence, which is so fully interested.
The like to the nuncio and England.
Ayes152.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Jan. 12.
Collegio,
Seereta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
172. I, Antonio Antelmi went to the English ambassador to read to him the deliberation of the Senate of the day before yesterday. He said: I am sorry that my indisposition has prevented me from going to his Serenity, as it has compelled him to send to me. [ will fully execute his commands, reporting everything to his Majesty. A rumour has reached me from the Piazza which has greatly disturbed me, namely, that my king has given ships to Ossuna against the republic. I informed your Serenity of the negotiations which took place at Naples and I wrote about it to my king and I marvel that such ideas should get abroad so contrary to the spirit and deeds of his Majesty; they must needs be the invention of those who wish to stir up strife. It may be that his Majesty has given some ships for purposes of trade and for the sake of selling some of the merchandise of our kingdom, but he would do everything to prevent them from being used for other purposes. I take God to witness that I wrote as soon as I heard the least suspicion.
With regard to the office he said nothing to me. He told me of the birth of the second son of the Princess Palatine. After I had made a suitable reply, I left.
[Italian.]
Jan. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
173. To the ambassador at the Imperial Court, and the like to the other Courts.
We are advised from Constantinople of the death of the Sultan Achmet and the succession of the Sultan Mustapha his brother.
At Naples the Duke of Ossuna continues his naval preparations. Galleons have been sent out from Brindisi. In spite of the assurance given by M. de Bethune, Don Pedro of Toledo continues to raise difficulties, and in spite of his declaring to Cardinal Ludovisio that he would accept the terms, he has withdrawn. The cardinal and Bethune have decided to obtain a definite answer from him, so that they may be able to write to France, but Don Pedro constantly avoids a declaration, and gains time for his new armament.
They are doing everything to prevent the Grisons from granting the pass, and to shut up all ways of sending help to Italy. But they themselves continue to raise troops, to be sent towards Gradisca. The above is for information in the interests of our service.
Ayes157.
Noes0.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Jan. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
174. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ordinary advices report that your Serenity in addition to the twelve ships here has written to the Ambassador Contarini in England for eight others. This has given rise to some debate as to whether the two squadrons will agree well together, on account of the usual jealousy of the English captains against those of this country, and the superiority which they claim for the English ships. I have heard this notion from several quarters; one person told me that it would have been better not to have given the order for the English ships, while others declare that your Serenity will be obliged to give strict instructions to your general and other sea captains so to dispose of these forces in cruising and fighting that no disorder may ensue, as they said that unfortunate incidents had occurred when the two nations were engaged together upon some enterprises. I told my interlocutor that I anticipated nothing untoward owing to the good instructions given by the States to their sailors, and those which the Ambassador Contarini would obtain from England and I was sure that the General Veniero, assisted by the Senate, would arrange everything properly. They begged that arrangements should be made for the proper service of the republic, otherwise, the money would be thrown away, to the great disadvantage of your Serenity and the scandal of both nations, when discord between them ought most carefully to be avoided.
I advised the Ambassador Contarini of this difficulty last week, and I will write to him more expressly to-day, so that he may obtain from His Majesty what will be best for the service which we expect to receive from the two fleets.
The Hague, the 14th January, 1618.
[Italian.]
Jan. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Commissarii
in Armata.
Venetian.
Archivos.
175. FRANCESCO MOLIN, Venetian Commissioner with the fleet, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have already told your Excellencies how little can be hoped from the Flemish ships and how they keep saying that they do not wish to serve. I have found the English captain determined to go, compelled, so he says, by the demands of his business. I do not see what good can come from keeping them against their will. Some companies are so thinned by death and accident that they hardly muster forty men, though the captains and officers receive full pay. I think the captains should be told to fill them up, and if they do not do so, two or three companies should be thrown into one.
From the galley at Curzola, the 14th January, 1617 [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives
176. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Excellency, learning that Rose has encountered some difficulties in England about the ships which he was to send hither, is, I understand, despatching another Englishman named Henry (fn. 2) to those parts to-day. He is to leave at once and endeavour to overcome these difficulties or to make provision in another place. I will gather further particulars about this individual and his business if I can.
Naples, the 16th January, 1617 [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
177 To the Secretary Surian at the Hague.
Instructions upon the manner of hiring vessels for the republic; the time of the contract and insurance; the way they are to come (he shall give the flag to each captain); the armament and crews, nature of the ships, the payment of the troops and the contracts. It is necessary that the ships and men be sent with all speed.
That a copy of the above be sent with all speed to the ambassador in England for his information and guidance.
Ayes160.
Noes1.
Neutral2.
On the same day in the Cabinet:
Ayes20.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra. Venetian
Archives.
178. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England to the DOGE and SENATE.
To-day, while I was awaiting audience of his Majesty he sent me word that as he was obliged to go to Newmarket, I must excuse him for not seeing me, and that he would therefore send Secretary Lake to me that I might impart what I had to say to him. I am now waiting for him and in execution of your Serenity's orders shall acquaint him with the state of affairs in Italy, with the projects of the Duke of Ossuna, the difficulties and delays introduced in carrying into effect the articles agreed on, the small hope of peace and, in short, with the necessity in which your Excellencies find yourselves of securing your territory against any attack, to which effect you request his Majesty not only to allow you to avail yourselves of a few English vessels, but also to oblige the republic by making his royal declaration as he has so often expressed himself ready to do should the occasion offer itself, as is now the case, the present one being the most opportune and fitting possible.
I have continued my enquiries here about vessels daily and have moreover caused letters to be written to various places near here in order to find ships suited to the service of your Excellencies in the fleet, and although at this present there are none other than those mentioned in my last, some are expected immediately the wind changes, which however still continues contrary for vessels homeward bound.
The ship Dragon is one of those which would suit the purpose and I have already induced its master to make the voyage and to-morrow he is to come and see me to settle the terms, and should we agree, as I hope, I shall urge him to the utmost to get ready and set sail, doing the like moreover by such others as I may succeed in engaging.
The Catholic ambassador here goes about assuring everybody that his king is bent on the peace which will assuredly be effected, and that by this time it will have been realised in all quarters, the orders sent to this effect from Spain to Italy, to the ministers there, being most peremptory. Only the day before yesterday he expressed himself to me in these self same terms when I chanced to meet him at a masque, performed at the Court by the prince, (fn. 3) to which, as the French ambassador was not invited, he has complained and protested loudly and says that the dignity of his king being so deeply outraged he considered his recall certain and he resents the proceeding by so much the more because the marriage with Spain being now on the carpet, it seems that by this demonstration they sought to show that the Prince inclined more towards that side than to the other. Here however they pretend that there is no reason for such great complaint, as it has always been the custom to invite the ministers of these two crowns alternately to such public entertainments.
A gentleman has arrived here lately from the Prince Palatine, (fn. 4) announcing the birth of his second son and informing their Majesties that the Princess Elizabeth, on her recovery, and as the season advances, means to come over here to see them again.
When the Ambassador Scarnafigi was here the Duke of Savoy sent him jewels to the amount of 25,000 crowns, to avail himself of them as a means of obtaining succour from this kingdom, but as no opportunity presented itself, the ambassador, to defray the ordinary expenses of his charge, was obliged to pledge them for a certain sum to some merchants, and the period of the loan having expired, they have now written to his Highness to discharge the debt, as otherwise they mean to sell the jewels immediately.
There is some difficulty about granting the compensation claimed by the Lord High Admiral. While they are finding a means to satisfy him, his Majesty has chosen to honour his favourite Buckingham with the title of marquis, which is held in account in this kingdom, and as the present king has not given it to anyone else, it is highly valued. (fn. 5)
London, the 18th January, 1617 [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra
Venetian
Archives.
179. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
At this very hour, which is the second of the night, Secretary Lake took leave of me, having come to hear what I wished to communicate to the king. In reply to his enquiry I set forth the commissions of your Excellencies to the best of my ability, earnestly requesting his Majesty in consequence of the urgent need of the republic to allow her to avail herself of a certain number of the ships now in these ports until his Majesty, on being better acquainted with the aversion of the Spaniards for peace, shall prove by facts the affection and goodwill borne by him towards the interests of your Excellencies. The Secretary listened to me attentively, promising to report the whole in detail to his Majesty, whom he was then on the eve of following to Newmarket, and said that he would subsequently acquaint me with his Majesty's will. He then told me that the king had written to Spain to make some arrangement in conjunction with that crown against the pirates, and that they meant to do the like with the States of Holland, but that the Dutch had anticipated them by requesting the king to join them for the purpose of extirpating these men, and that his Majesty meant to do the like by your Serenity so that all might join to secure navigation against the buccaneers. I lauded so excellent and useful a project, but said that occupied as your Excellencies now were in circumventing the plots of the Spanish ministers I did not know how you could attend to anything else, and as the Secretary was in haste to follow the king and could not stay longer with me, he then took leave.
London, the 18th January, 1617 [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian.
Archives.
180. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Gabaleoni has left to-day for France, and after fulfilling his mission there he will proceed to England.
Turin, the 20th January, 1617 [M.V.]
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Charles Lewis, born on 22 Dec. 1617, and who eventually succeeded his father; his elder brother dying in 1629. The King received the news on the 29th Dec. O.S. and it cured his melancholy, which had been noticeable that Christmas. Cal. S. P. Dom. 1611–1618, pp. 510, 517.
2 Henry Gardiner. See No. 186 at page 110 below.
3 The Prince's masque for Twelfth Night was Ben Jonson's `Vision of Delight,' reputed one of his best efforts, though pronounced dull by Mr. Chamberlain. Nichols Progresses of James I, iii, pp. 457–464.
4 The baron of Winnenberg.
5 Buckingham was created marquis on the first day of the year, old style.