Venice
August 1618, 16-28

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

289-302

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: August 1618, 16-28', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 289-302. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88682 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

August 1618

Aug. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano
Gen. da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
493. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letter of the 5th inst. with the copy of the office passed by the English ambassador upon the punishment inflicted by me upon the ringleaders of the mutiny, and I have also appreciated the truth and reasonableness of the reply given. However, for my own satisfaction I must add that the case was not only a very serious one, owing to the demands of the soldiers, the time of the mutiny, the place of their retreat and many other circumstances, but of the highest importance because of the representations made to me simultaneously by the chiefs of all the other troops of so many nations, and chiefly by M. de Rocalora, the colonel of the Dutch, who begged me to treat the rebels vigorously, so he called them, in order that gentle treatment might not lead to even worse disorders. Therefore no one ought to wonder or complain. The very colonel of the troops and the captain of the revolted company came to tell me that they were helpless. After trying persuasion, I had to use force. I only punished eight ringleaders. I acted unwillingly for the very reasons advanced by the ambassador. In all other matters I have constantly considered the satisfaction and comfort of these troops, the care of the sick and all their other needs.
I hear that the twelve Dutch ships recently arrived are short of money. All the troops on the ships here are creditors for several payments, and the English on the seven ships from that country in particular are in the same condition. I cannot therefore wonder at the dissatisfaction which has reached the knowledge of their ambassador and rekindled his resentment, through no fault of mine. The remedy for this lies entirely in the hands of your Serenity through the immediate supply of money.
The galley in the channel of Liesena towards Curzola, the 16th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
494. PIERO GRITTI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have spoken with his Majesty's confessor and the lords of the Council upon the affairs of Italy. They assured me that his Majesty desired peace. The fleet was to meet at Messina to oppose any movement of the Turkish fleet. I said that the orders sent to Ossuna to dismiss the Italians had been badly executed. The naval preparations of France were directed against the pirates, against whom the English and Dutch were also making ready while the duke of Savoy was doing something.
Madrid, the 17th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
495. PIERO GRITTI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The resident of England has informed me that he was asked by the Secretary Cerisa in what way I had spoken about the plot discovered in Venice, and upon whom I laid the blame. He replied that he had observed that I spoke about it in general terms. Cerisa answered that they had been assured at Venice that no minister of his Catholic Majesty had had a share in it, as had appeared clearly at the trials, and he begged him to write to that effect to England.
His Majesty has sent orders that all the Mediterranean fleet shall assemble at the Strait of Gibraltar. Don Luis Fassardo has asked that they may be joined by a part of the forces of Naples. He has shown that it is better to have the ships there, because they will not only stop the excesses of the pirates, but will prevent the English, Dutch and others from going to Italy. He also pointed out the great strength of the pirates, which earlier drew Charles V. into war. No decision, however, has been taken on the matter.
Madrid, the 17th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
496. GIROLAMO SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have reported to Cardinal Borghese what your Serenity commands me with regard to the falsehoods spread abroad that the foreign troops now in the state of your Serenity hold public preachings for their sects, especially at Bergamo. This is not even plausible because all the public representatives are keeping a sharp look out to see that those troops give occasion for no scandal, and particularly that the Catholic faith shall suffer no wrong. I assured him that there had not been the slightest disorder, but that fresh orders had been sent to Bergamo, in order to prove the esteem of the republic for the admonitions of his Holiness.
Rome, the 18th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 20.
Collegio
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
497. The ambassador of the King of Great Britain came into the Cabinet and said:
While I was in Padua in the hands of the physician the sad news reached me about the proceedings against the men of our nation in the fleet, which led me to make the previous office through my secretary, which I am now come to repeat to my great regret. My secretary wrote that he had been told two things, one that severity was necessary for the sake of discipline, and the other the esteem and affection of the republic for his Majesty and all our nation. I recognise this friendly feeling towards his Majesty, but justice is relative not absolute. The vigour of justice is the foundation of all civil government and still more of military. But this is to be exercised when the enemy is present or at hand or in case of imminent danger. That was not the case here because there were no armed vessels in the Gulf at the moment except your Serenity's fleet, and there was no danger because this tiny company, worn by their journey, could do nothing without powder and shot. The good faith of the republic is undoubted, but it is not good logic to argue from the general to the particular; you will therefore pardon me if I say something of General Barbarigo. If he wished to signalise his charge by some noteworthy action he might have chosen another occasion. But granted the necessity for discipline's sake, he might have dealt with less than eight persons and have chosen inferior men not gentles, and if he had to deal with these he should have made a distinction in their treatment, hanging the base and strangling or decapitating the noble. He committed an unheard of thing in hanging them from their own yards. But it will arouse the greatest feeling in England that some were denied the final consolation. Those who were of the religion professed here had friars, but the general forbad any such consolation for those of our religion, a thing which is not even customary in this city in like case. Two Greeks who were recently executed here were allowed their priests. Here the ambassador stopped awhile, after which he continued:
After so unhappy an affair I have something more pleasant. Your Serenity may remedy the past by showing some favour to our nation. Sir Henry Peyton, who is a great man in England, has for wife a lady of the highest blood in the realm after the royal. (fn. 1) He is a great favourite of the king and a relation of the Lord Chamberlain of England. He has come to serve your Serenity with a company which includes seventy gentlemen of noble family, two of whom came out with me, and I should like to introduce them to kiss hands. He has spent a great deal out of his own pocket in keeping up the company and increasing their pay; it would be worthy of your Serenity to show him favour. There is Colonel Vere, whom I formerly recommended, who would be glad to have the title of Colonel. This seems no great demand, and many other favours can be given to our nation. If the bad are punished the deserving should be rewarded. Mr. George Herbert is here, who belongs to one of the principal families. He was condemned with the others by Sig. Barbarigo, but was afterwards simply banished from the fleet when better information had been taken. He claims to deserve public thanks for what he did upon that unhappy day. He asks to be allowed to return and serve, and I add my request to his.
The doge here remarked: We will answer these points, but firstly this is clear that the republic preserves the highest affection and esteem for his Majesty, while we highly esteem the whole nation. But your Excellency is not well informed about what took place. Two hundred of these men not only mutinied, but landed in the country of the Ragusans. That is equivalent to saying Spaniards, as they may truly be called our enemies. The general sent two lieutenants to persuade them to return to obedience. When this did not succeed, he sent his serjeant major, against whom they turned their pikes. At this the general landed a force and compelled them to surrender at discretion after showing some resistance. It was necessary for him to make an example, though it is true that in the stress of the moment he may have punished more than was necessary. But we know his kindly nature and believe that he did no more than he was obliged.
With regard to favours we shall always be glad to do what is possible, and we shall be glad to receive those whom your Excellency desires to introduce. You will also be good enough to make representations to his Majesty so as to preserve the mutual good feeling between him and our republic.
The ambassador replied: I respect what your Serenity tells me, but I must remark that the Ragusans are not declared enemies, although the Duke of Ossuna who favours them, shows himself an enemy. The crime of the soldiers was really against their own officers, although the prince was concerned, but if the mutiny was against the officers they should have been asked to take a share. The dead men were examined, it is said, by a trumpeter, who served as interpreter, who does not know fifty English words and possibly no more Italian. Further one of the condemned left a letter and a ring, which have hitherto been detained. I will always make good representations, but your Serenity must write and inform your ambassador, because that minister has gone to England who was present and who was not allowed to exercise his charge. He will inform his Majesty of all particulars, the matter will be discussed in the Council, the ambassador will be sent for and it will be good for him to be well informed; he should be able to answer what is reported by the minister.
His Serenity replied: We cannot believe, from the known character of General Barbarigo, that he would have put anyone to death without good reason. Our ambassador shall be informed and we hope that your Excellency will act so that his Majesty will be satisfied.
The ambassador then presented a letter from his Majesty written in Latin. When it had been read the ambassador said: When the gunpowder treason happened in England his Majesty closed all the passes and ports, and a special despatch containing an account of the whole affair was sent to the republic, and for this a passage was especially opened. This was a great sign of confidence. Now, upon a similar occasion, his Majesty ought to be treated in the same way, but he has only received a confused report without details.
The doge replied: The republic is ruled differently from other governments. Some things can be published but it is advisable to keep others secret. The facts are certain. The conspiracy was against this and some other cities of our state. The guilty are well enough known and have confessed, but certain things cannot be published for various reasons, the present fortunes of the republic supply many reasons for reserve. When the king is assassinated in France, they punish the assassin, but the secrets of the affair are not published. The republic has done the same. The Council of Ten is very secret. If persons of high position had a hand in it, this is not the moment to publish the fact. It suffices that we are aware of the plot and justice has had its course.
The ambassador replied: I have heard enough, and am satisfied with what your Serenity has been pleased to tell me. I have another office to perform, namely, to offer to your Serenity the congratulations of his Majesty, at which he presented a letter. When the letter had been read his Serenity thanked the king and the ambassador also.
The ambassador then presented his memorial for the Englishman, adding: I have to congratulate your Serenity on the peace established in Friuli and upon the satisfactory turn taken by negotiations elsewhere. I can promise you the good disposition of the Duke of Feria, at least for half, because he is half English. (fn. 2) I hope he will carry out the king's will and proceed towards peace and quiet. The ambassador then introduced the two gentlemen named by him, after which he took leave and departed.
Letter of King James to Antonio Priuli, doge of Venice, congratulating the republic on its escape from the recent conspiracy.
Dated at Westminster, the 10th June, 1618. (fn. 3)
Most Serene Prince:
George Herbert, an English gentleman of a leading family, formerly ensign of a company, who complained of the inequality of the pay and by wrong information was condemned by General Barbarigo with the others, but was afterwards simply banished from the fleet, begs your Serenity to reinstate him, and allow him to return and serve as he never had any intention except to do his duty honourably. He claims moreover to have rather deserved public thanks on that unhappy day.
Your Serenity's most devoted servant,
HENRY WOTTON.
[Italian.]
Aug. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
498. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
An event which has happened or is said to have happened at Geneva has greatly troubled his Highness, who has told me all particulars, (fn. 4) although I had already heard them from the English agent, who was employed in the affair, which shows the astuteness of the Spaniards in trying to prejudice the interests of this prince. His Highness told me that the Spanish ministers who govern France seek every means to embroil him with the king there. The first question was over Nice and Villefranche, upon which the duke of Guise almost declared war. The second was a pretended plot to betray Geneva to his Highness, upon which the French king had made a formal remonstrance to the duke, who swore to me that he knew nothing about it. The duke thinks that the Spaniards and Monteleone, their ambassador in France have made this up in order to exhibit him as a restless, faithless prince, and to deprive him of the favour of France and England, M. de Lesdiguières and those of the religion and offend the princes of Germany, with all of whom he enjoys close relations; also to offend the Bernese, in the league with whom is a clause in favour of the Genevans, and in short to ruin him entirely. His Highness has induced the English agent to send to Geneva at once a member of his household with all the necessary information upon the matter, in order to reassure them. He has written to France and is writing to Lesdiguières. In this way he hopes to repair the mischief, but he fears that the Spaniards and the French ministers their dependants will trouble him further.
The third calumny is that his Highness is negotiating with the Spaniards. Upon this subject the duke expressed doubts as to whether he was being well served by Fresia. His Highness suggested to me that the French, instigated by the Spaniards, are possibly thinking of repressing those of the religion, and knowing how much Savoy might help them they are trying to sow discord between them. In this connection he had heard of the rude dismissal of a certain physician, a favourite of the English king (fn. 5) who had been sent to treat for marriage with the French princess, as they felt that England would dislike such proceedings and might assist the Huguenots by force. The duke would like those who are under arrest for the conspiracy to be kept alive in order that they may be examined and the whole affair cleared up, but he fears they will be put to death so that he may remain under suspicion.
Turin, the 21st August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
499. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The reports continue that eight or nine of the foreign ships have left your Serenity's fleet in disgust and that the Viceroy has sent to engage them for his own service. With regard to their leaving, his Excellency has affirmed it in the presence of a number of gentlemen and it is supported by the Ragusans, but men of judgment do not credit the rumour.
Naples, the 21st August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
500. SIMONE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Merold Monster, an English cavalier of great experience and valour in arms, has recently arrived here. He served the late king with great fidelity and courage in his labours. He has come in more than a private capacity. From what I can gather he is to endeavour to arrange a reconciliation between the two kings, for though they cannot be called enemies, the truth is that their friendship has considerably cooled.
Paris, the 24th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
501. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I this week received your Serenity's letters of the 4th inst. announcing the unreasonable and indiscreet remonstrances of his Majesty's ambassador concerning the punishment on board the fleet of the ringleaders of the mutiny committed by 200 of the English soldiers. So soon as I hear that Wotton has written here I will represent to the king and the ministers the necessity under which the Captain General at sea found himself of punishing them, to prevent greater mischief. But as yet I do not understand that anything has been written. On the contrary, when I was with Secretary Naunton the other day he did not even know that the English vessels had joined the fleet, complaining that it was a long while since they had received letters from their ambassador and appearing dissatisfied on that account. (fn. 6) In like manner the friends of Captain Peyton and the other Captains have received no letters giving an account of the circumstance, which for their own honour they will perhaps think fit to conceal; nor has anything been written on the subject save by one single merchant, which induced some people to discuss it, but I gave such explanations to those who mentioned it to me that they have admitted it was not desirable or possible to act otherwise.
I return thanks to your Serenity for the good opinion entertained of me and which you announce as having induced my selection as ambassador to Spain. I shall endeavour to do my duty regardless of personal considerations, relying upon the graciousness of the State to grant the petition which I lately preferred.
Owing to the absence of his Majesty and the whole of the Council, who are at Salisbury, I am the only ambassador here, as even the Dutchman is at his villa in the country, so there is but little for me to notify to your Serenity.
Baron Dohna, the envoy from the Count Palatine is expected daily, for the purpose, it is believed, of giving an account of the disputes between the Elector and the Archbishop of Spires, and possibly moreover to hold some conversation about the affairs of Germany, with regard to which his Majesty has made no further reply to the letter from the States of Bohemia. From what I hear through a nobleman arrived from the Court he has not even any intention of acknowledging it, lest he afford a pretext to others for encouraging others here and fanning religious controversy between the two parties.
The intelligence received of the appointment to France of the Spanish ambassador lately here, and that he is to proceed thither without going first to Spain, greatly diminishes the hopes of those who fancied (as he assured many people when in the act of departing) that he was going to make a verbal statement to his sovereign, and put the finishing stroke to the marriage of the Prince, so as it now appears that all was artifice, devised for the sake of furthering certain projects, they are dissatisfied with him (L'essersi inteso che l'ambr. Cattolico che ressiedeva qui sii destinato in Francia, dove vi sia anco per passare senza gionger in Spagna diminuisce grandemente la speranza di quelle che supponevano, come nel suo partire a molti ha fatto credere, ch'egli andasse al suo Signore per rifferirli a bocca, et per cavar l'ultima conclusione del matrimonio di questo Principe, et percio ne restano poco contenti scoprendo esser stati tutti artificii, per avantaggiar li suoi dissegni).
Some persons arrived in a ship from Greenland report that while engaged in the whale fishing in those seas with other ships belonging to the English Company, as is their custom every year, they were attacked by the Dutch, who, after some fighting, took one of their vessels, the very same of which they were deprived last year by the English, who claimed the exclusive privilege of whaling thereabouts. (fn. 7) This dispute coupled with others which have chanced lately at sea between these two nations renders them daily more and more exasperated against each other.
Sir Walter Raleigh, who since he returned from his disastrous voyage has been confined in a private house, under the custody of certain persons appointed by the king, having attempted to make his escape, is now a prisoner in the Tower and it is expected to go hard with him.
London, the 24th August, 1618.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
502. To the ambassador in Spain and the like to the other Courts and to the Generals.
The news of the restitution in Friuli has been received with universal satisfaction, especially as they feared that the republic might take advantage of the disturbances in Bohemia. We are also disarming, but hardly anything has been done in the state of Milan, although the duke of Feria declares that he is determined on the subject. In Naples no results have appeared from the orders said to have been sent from Spain to Ossuna. The twelve Dutch ships we expected have reached our fleet in good order. In their brush with the Spaniards they only lost eleven killed and a few wounded.
The reports about disputes between the nations in our fleet are the inventions of the evil disposed. There has been nothing except the disobedience of a few English against their captains, and they kept quiet after the ringleaders had been punished, and this strengthened the general discipline of the fleet.
We have ordered the galleys of Candia to return home and disarm.
Ayes120.
Noes1.
Neutral4,
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
503. To the ambassador in England.
We are glad to hear of your readiness to go as ambassador to Spain. In consideration of the time spent by you in two embassies and the dangers of the voyage to Spain, we have decreed that the year spent in England shall count as part of the Spanish embassy, in compliance with your request. We have sent the commissions of the Ambassador Donato and will soon send yours.
Ayes133.
Noes17.
Neutral8.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
504. To the ambassador in England.
We send you a copy of his Majesty's ambassador's exposition about the incident in the fleet. If the king speaks about it, you will disabuse him as you think necessary, as the matter seems to be discussed at Court. You will employ the reasons we gave to the ambassador in addition to what we have written to the same effect. With regard to the question of the consolations of religion upon which the ambassador lays stress, and which may be made much of by the minister on his return to England, we may frankly say that we know nothing. You will say that after the sentence the general left its execution to his subordinates, and any subsequent inadvertence was due to them and not to the general's orders. He writes that he is honouring that nation as they deserve and has given orders for their good treatment, and the care of the sick. You will assure his Majesty of this and others also, seeking every means that your prudence may suggest to advance our interests.
Upon the more important matter we are sending his Majesty the enclosed reply. We have first to tell you that his Majesty's letters on both offices were written on the same day and were presented together by his ambassador. You will go to his Majesty and present our letters with the usual offices, thanking him for his demonstration of favour towards the republic and tell him that you have orders as a sign of confidence to inform him that there was a deeply rooted conspiracy to assassinate our nobility, assembled in the grand council, sack the mint, burn the arsenal, surprise some of our principal towns on the mainland and to ruin our affairs by their accomplices in the fleet; that we learned the facts from the confession of the conspirators themselves and from well established proofs. That of those guilty, some have received the merited punishment, and others will receive it in time. For the rest you will confine yourself to generalities and the reply given to the ambassador here, adding that his Majesty may rest assured that nothing further will happen, and endeavouring to satisfy him by this show of friendly confidence.
You will also present our reply to his congratulations upon our election to the dogeship with such thanks as you think proper.
Ayes162.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
505. To the king of Great Britain.
Return thanks for congratulations on the election of the new doge, which will serve to preserve their esteem and confidence.
Ayes162.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
506. To the king of Great Britain.
Your Majesty may well rejoice at the favour God has shown in preserving our republic from great peril, as we are so devoted to your Majesty. The expression of feeling increases our obligations, as we perceive that it proceeds from a sincere affection for us. We return hearty thanks and your Majesty may always count on a response from us, with all confidence and esteem. Words cannot adequately express our gratitude and obligation, and we ardently desire an opportunity of approving our affection. We wish your Majesty length of days and every prosperity.
Ayes162.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
507. That the ambassador of the king of Great Britain be summoned to the Cabinet and the following be read to him:
From our reply to your Excellency's representations about the fleet incident, you will have understood the necessity for that execution, and we need add nothing more. Although our General has sent word of his care for the English troops we have ordered him to show the great esteem which we have for that valiant race, and the especial merits of those soldiers in coming to serve us, and the recommendations of your Excellency, whom we are always anxious to satisfy from our esteem for you and the friendship existing between your king and our republic. Our General at Sea reports that he has had some conversation with Colonel Peyton and has done everything for their satisfaction so long as they do not demand anything unreasonable. We are awaiting further information from the General and when that arrives we hope to come to a decision perfectly satisfactory to your Excellency.
As regards Ensign Herbert we must have further information, as we have no particulars. Nevertheless we shall endeavour to satisfy your Excellency. The question of the colonelcy for Vere has been discussed before when he was in the camp in Friuli, and in spite of our desire to gratify him, we could not find a means. Now that the men have entered the fleet and different commands have been made, it will be difficult to remove those who have been appointed, and possibly there are greater difficulties and more important considerations. However, we shall always bear in mind your recommendation and seek to find an opportunity of satisfying Vere.
We beg your Excellency to be so good as to thank the king most warmly for us. We have answered both of his Majesty's letters. Our ambassador will make a confidential communication to him which we consider due to his friendly action and the confidential relations between us. We need say no more to your Excellency, as what was previously said at another audience will suffice.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
508. To the Captain General at Sea.
The English ambassador has made grave complaints about the punishment of his countrymen in the fleet. We replied giving the facts and the reasons for the steps taken. He listened to reason but tried to use the incident to help some other demands and obtain favours for his nation. We have thought it right to give you full particulars. The ambassador claimed that rigorous military justice was only required in the presence of the enemy or in imminent peril, and it was not the case here; he claimed that distinction should be made between the gentlemen and others and complained very much at the refusal of the consolations of religion according to their own rite; that a ring of one of them has been kept; that the accused were examined by a person who knew but little English and that all these things will be reported in England by the person who was forbidden to give the last consolation. We had no difficulty in replying to all this: that the mutineers entered an enemy's country, the danger of example had to be considered; the punishment was the usual one, and we knew you would not put to death anyone who did not deserve it. The ambassador seemed satisfied and presented the enclosed memorial. You will give us your opinion about Colonel Peyton and his claims, so that we may decide from your experience of his person and merits. The question of the title of colonel for Vere has been dealt with at other times, and you know the objections to this and his command of the troops from events which happened in the camp. If you know of any way of satisfying the other captains about the command and other matters, you will let us know, so that we may decide. With regard to the ensign banished by you, it will be well for you to pardon him, at the instance of his captain and to satisfy the ambassador or in some other way, but not unless you agree, as we only know the fact of his banishment and the excuses offered by the ambassador, of which we send a copy. For the rest you will endeavour to deal with the English captains and soldiers in such manner that they may remain as contented as possible and send home word of the courtesy with which they have been treated, as we believe that this will be of great service to the good understanding which we have with that crown.
Ayes162.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
509. That 8,020 ducats be given to the purveyors and paymasters of the mint to be paid to the following English ships, as arranged.
To the ship Royal Exchange, for one payment beginning on 20th June last1,800 ducats
To the ship Abigail for one payment, beginning on 30th June1,600 ducats
To the ship Hercules for one payment beginning on 30th June1,600 ducats
To the ship Matthew for one payment beginning on 30th June1,600 ducats
To the ship Dragon for one payment beginning on 10th June1,420 ducats
Total8,020 ducats
Ayes144.
Noes4.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato, Mar.
Venetian
Archives
510. That 1,520 ducats be given to the purveyors and paymasters of the mint to pay the English ship Centurion, from the 1st June last, as arranged.
Ayes144.
Noes4.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
511. To the Captain General at Sea.
We have received the muster of the ships from England and have compared it with the summary of their undertaking, sent to us by the Ambassador Contarini in his letters of the 4th May last, there being some sailors, pieces of artillery and ships missing, and the ships were to be of 100 butts more burthen than you report. We send you the summary for your information and the note of what is wanting. We have also informed the ambassador. We also see in the muster the number of soldiers on the ships, but for greater clearness we must have the amounts of payment and other particulars. The account of the Ambassador Contarini amounts to 625l. sterling, equal to 2,700 ducats, paid to Colonel Peyton to buy arms, to be deducted from the first payments.
The ships were to be paid in this city, and it will be necessary for you to send us a muster every month to be compared with their obligations and to make a reasonable deduction on account of their being short; and no payment can be made before this muster arrives. If they wish to receive the money there you will give orders for payment to be made after making deduction for what is short, comparing the payments with the agreements. We note also that the contracts gave the parceners the power to bring lead and bullets, with the obligation to sell them to the republic at the current price. You will therefore take information of what they have brought and what they claim, sending word to us so that we may decide what is best for the public service. You will also go through the list name by name to see if all the obligations have been performed.
Ayes138.
Noes4.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
512. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
There are no ships ready here, most are shut up in the Arsenal. It is said, however, that they are to set out at the earliest opportunity and yesterday they issued a proclamation that none of the sailors should leave their ships. His Excellency is most eager to keep up the notion of an early departure, as he knows that your Serenity's fleet is very powerful, and that the ships from the west have joined it, which he expected would fall in with all manner of impediments before they arrived. He sees that the General is exercising your Serenity's ancient command of the Gulf which he openly said he would take away with his galleons. His intentions have been thwarted to obtain ships from Flanders, England and Spain itself, which he has used every effort to get, and now at the very end of the summer he finds himself with a small number of ships and a diminished reputation while that of the republic has increased.
Naples, the 28th August, 1618.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Peyton married Mary widow of Andrew son of Sir Richard Rogers of Brianstone in Dorset, who was the fourth daughter of Edward Seymour, first duke of Somerset, lord protector in the reign of Edward VI.
2 Don Gomez Suarez de Figueroa, first duke of Feria, married Joan Dormer, a lady of Queen Mary of England and daughter of William Dormer of Wing in Buckinghamshire. Don Gomez Suarez de Figueroa, third duke of Feria, was grandson of the first duke, and is the one referred to by Wotton, his grandmother being English. Alonso Lopez de Haro, Nobiliario Genealogico de los Reyes y tilulos de España.
3 In Latin, printed in extenso. No. 412 at page 239 above.
4 The duke of Savoy also gave the particulars to Lake. The Marquis of Lanz had written to tell the duke that rumours were current at Paris and at Lyons that he meditated an attempt against Geneva. State Papers, Foreign, Savoy, Aug. 11 and 14, 1618.
5 Mayerne. See No. 484 at page 286 above.
6 Wotton's most recent letter, preserved at the Public Record, Office is dated the 8th June. In it he mentions the execution of several Frenchmen, but apparently knows nothing of a conspiracy.
7 Captain Thomas Edge made a statement of the wrongs inflicted upon him and others by the Dutch. The pecuniary loss was estimated at 66,436l. 15s. besides the killing of 388 men and the spoiling of ships. Cal. S. P. Dom. 1611—18, pages 560, 572.