Venice
September 1618, 1-14

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

302-315

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'Venice: September 1618, 1-14', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 302-315. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88683 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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September 1618

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
513. To the ambassador in France and the like to the other courts and the Proveditori General.
The affair of Germany is not absolutely completed, but the commissioners of both parties have returned home. We on our side have restored the fortresses and withdrawn our troops from Istria, Dalmatia and Friuli. Nevertheless, the new governor of Milan, after a few preliminary steps, has not continued his disarmament. The duke of Ossuna shows no intention of giving up his old plans, as in spite of repeated orders from Spain he keeps inventing pretexts for not making restitution, while he collects his forces at Messina. All this is for information.
Ayes157.
Noes0.
Neutral5.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
514. The English ambassador was summoned to the Cabinet and the deliberation of the Senate of the 28th ult. was read to him, he said:
I thank your Serenity for the confidential information and especially for your reply to my last requests. Before I go further I wish to say something on which I have hitherto kept silence, and which will be sure to foster good relations between my king and this republic. The king writes to tell me that he sent to your ambassador Sir [Robert] Naunton, his principal secretary of State to return thanks for your action in the affair of my steward, and for sending away the Englishman Studer after having engaged him to serve you, owing to information about his ill feeling against our sovereign. I have not spoken about the fellow here. He came to see me in a very insolent manner. He said he had engaged to serve for 100 crowns a month and called it a beggarly treatment. At the time I sent my secretary to tell your Serenity that you would do wisely to take some information about the fellow before engaging him, but I found that the contract had already been concluded. Then followed his unseemly conduct, and I trust that my representations had some weight with your Serenity to revoke the contract and dismiss him. The news has greatly pleased the king. The fellow has passed ten or twelve years in the imperial service and has become utterly Spanish, and is the worst and most despicable animal in the world. In Brussels he only obtained advancement by abusing his own country and sovereign.
With regard to the three points which I spoke of at my last audience, I am sorry that the cancelling of the banishing of Ensign Herbert has been delayed. I have spoken of his birth and loyalty. The decision rests with your Serenity, to whom I am accustomed to apply in such cases. I have also spoken before now about Sir [John] Vere and his claims to the command. He asks for nothing more than the title, without any pretension to the salary. If he returns home without this rank it will be considered his fault. Colonel Peyton has sent some one here to negotiate about his salary, and this affords me an opportunity of renewing my recommendations.
I have yet another request of your Serenity, for the release of a poor Englishman. He was condemned to the galleys for four years by the lords of Corfu and has served for seven. He has surely expiated his fault. He is now in the galley Gradenigo. I will present a memorial.
The doge replied: Your Excellency will have observed from the reply of the Senate how anxious they are to do everything possible to gratify you, and be assured that this disposition is constant. If any delay occurs, it arises solely from the necessities imposed by the laws or other insuperable obstacles. With regard to the man condemned to the galleys, their Excellencies will look at the memorial and will endeavour to oblige you. With this the ambassador took leave, saying he was much gratified and honoured by the courteous answers given to him.
[Italian.]
Sept. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
515. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English resident tells me that he has letters from Spain that a courier has been sent after the king's ambassador who was returning from England, telling him to return to London with all speed, even leaving his wife behind if she were with him. I asked him whether this was about the marriage. He answered that it was owing to the desire of Spain that his Majesty should interpose in this settlement between the Bohemians and the emperor, as they were most anxious that those affairs should be arranged in some way or other.
Turin, the 3rd September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
516. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Tuesday evening the English ambassador Carleton returned here and on the following morning he heard of the arrest of M. Barnevelt. (fn. 1) I do not know what his feelings about this may be, on account of past events, he cannot show his sentiments, but I believe he is somewhat pleased. He had audience on Saturday when he expressed the satisfaction of the king at their resolution to hold a synod and his consent to allow the ministers to come and take part. The Palatine, the Landgrave of Hesse, Bremen and other Hanse towns have notified that they will send delegates. From the Evangelical Swiss and France they have heard that the general congregation of the Huguenots cannot meet to depute anyone, but the States may write to separate churches, though it is uncertain if they have decided to do so.
The Hague, the 4th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
517. To the king of Great Britain.
Letter of credence for Antonio Donato, who is coming to act as ambassador for the republic, especially to express their affection and esteem.
Ayes21.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
518. To the queen of Great Britain.
Letter of credence for the Ambassador Antonio Donato.
Ayes21.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
519. Letters patent of Antonio Priuli, doge of Vencice, requesting all friends and ordering all ministers and subjects of the republic to allow a free passage without hindrance to Antonio Donato, who is going as ambassador to the king of Great Britain, his household, company and goods.
Ayes21.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Senato.
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Capitano Gen.
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
520. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The colonel of the English troops who came on the seven ships presented two memorials to me yesterday, one asking for the payment of himself and his officers, which by the contract was left to the pleasure of your Serenity, the other for a change in the way of paying the troops. I accepted these memorials. So far as I can understand the first he claims a higher salary than any other colonel who has brought men to serve your Serenity. On the second point I told him that any change would constitute a bad precedent for the other troops. I promised him to send them, so that your Serenity may decide what is most expedient.
This colonel and the captains of his nation have recently visited my galley several times. I have shown them good cheer, and favoured them within what I considered reasonable limits. I also conversed with them to render them content and well disposed to the service of your Serenity. With the same object I do the same with all the other troops in the fleet, and I find that all respond most fully.
The galley at Santa Croce, the 5th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
521. When negotiating with Sig. Piero Contarini in England, I trusted to his honour, and in my zeal for the republic I made my reckoning in English money, leaving it to his Excellency to translate it into Venetian money. We were paid in England by the former reckoning, and that was the understanding. However, I heard afterwards from some merchants that the words of the contract were di Banca, otherwise the loss would be intolerable. Time was short, negotiations were on foot, the designs and oppostion of the Spanish ambassador only too clear, so that if I had complained to the king it would have been music to the republic's enemies. Nevertheless I agreed to leave all to the doge himself, after making a moderate expostulation to his Excellency, rather than upset the affair altogether. Now that I am better informed of the relative values of the money I find that we should lose one seventh of our pay if this abuse were allowed to pass in silence. I therefore apply to your Excellency for justice, not to make any change in the contract but only in its interpretation. We shall all regard it as a favour and long for an opportunity to prove our affection.
F. PEYTON [autograph].
The 4th September at Calamota.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
521a. Six months have now passed since we entered the service of the republic, and I submit myself entirely to the discretion of your Serenity with regard to the pay of myself and my officers. As the service does not allow me to come and present my petition, I beg your Serenity to consider the distance of my country, the fatigues of the voyage, the consumption of my own goods, the quality of the men who have followed me, since I am the first of my race to bring English troops to the republic.
I therefore beg your Serenity to grant me an honourable salary, not inferior to that of any other colonel; if you do so, I shall be encouraged to serve with greater zeal.
F. PEYTON [autograph].
1618, the 4th September at Calamota.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
522. PIERO GRITTI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Cardinal of Lerma has approached the resident of England to see that his king does not meddle in these disturbances in Bohemia, but to interpose with the Palatine and get him to stand aloof. He showed how much his Majesty had this affair at heart, the obligation he feels to help the king of Bohemia and his determination to do so. The ministers here evidently have no hope that these difficulties will be solved in any way but by war. When the ambassador of Germany complained that the help sent was far smaller than the need, they told him that winter was near and but little fighting could be done, but if the troubles continued they would supply considerable forces in good time.
The negotiations for the marriage have been resumed, and the resident of England has been to the Escurial upon the matter. It is thought that they desire to excite the king of England with these hopes in order to divert him from taking any action prejudicial to this crown.
Madrid, the 6th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
523. To the ambassador in France and the like to the other Court and to the Proveditori General.
Our extraordinary Proveditori have all returned home, showing our sincere desire for peace, and we have declared the towns of our state free from the offers they have made for war. We have also disarmed a part of our forces. Yet they do not continue to disarm at Milan, nor do they cease their old plans at Naples. No results appear from the repeated orders sent from Spain. This is for information.
Ayes153.
Noes2.
Neutral7.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
524. Letters patent of Antonio Priuli, doge of Venice requesting all friends to favour the passage of Pietro Contarini, now with the king of Great Britain, who is being sent to act as ambassador of the republic with the Catholic king.
Ayes19.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
525. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Majesty is still continuing his progresses, followed by the whole court and by the Council, He amuses himself with his usual pleasures of the chase, of which he seems never to be weary, increasing age by no means damping his ardour for them. In six days he is to be at Windsor where the queen and the prince are to join him.
Four days ago I went to Oatlands for audience of the queen, who evinced extreme satisfaction at your Serenity's having settled your disputes with King Ferdinand, saying that all sovereigns ought to rejoice at any prosperous events that befall so noble and worthy a republic, especially this crown, with which she maintained so sincere a friendship. Her Majesty having but to regret that on these recent occasions her husband had been unable to show his good-will more than slightly, or keep the promises he had so often given; not from any diminution soever of affection, but from lack of means, a reason which had moreover prevented him from succouring the duke of Savoy according to the intention announced to that prince a thousand times. She concluded by thanking the Almighty that there was now no longer any need of aid.
I returned thanks on behalf of your Excellencies for her gracious interest, assuring her that it would on all occasions be fully reciprocated, nor did I fail to remark how advantageous it was for the two countries to have a good understanding together, expatiating on the desirable results which such a state of things might produce at all times. She spoke to me about the marriage of the Prince to Spain, appearing not to be without some apprehension, but that it might eventually come to pass, as the king wished it, and the Spaniards promised him high terms, though she herself did not see the necessity for such haste, the Infanta being so young and the Prince in a state to wait four or five years. She added that these precocious marriages were generally failures, as in the case of the king of France, who in all this time had not yet been able to acknowledge the queen for his wife, and that possibly those very means which had been considered the most appropriate for uniting the two crowns will but produce additional displeasure and discord, as it already begins to be said in France that the king purposes to send her back to Spain and to recall his sister. (Parlomi del matrimonio del Prencipe suo figliuolo con Spagna, mostrando di non stare senza timore, che in fine si concluda, perche volendolo il Re et Spagnoli promettendo grandi partiti, non era difficile il terminarlo se bene non vedeva la necessità di tanto accellerarlo, mentre era cosi giovane l'Infanta et il Prencipe in termine di attender ancor quattro o cinque anni, producendo per ordinario questi immaturi matrimonii poco felice successi, come vedevano quelli del Christno che doppo tanto tempo non sapeva anco riconoscer la Regina per sua moglie, aggiungendomi che forse quei mezzi stimati i migliori ad unir quelle due Corone insieme, saranno instrumento a maggiori disgusti et discordie principiandosi hora in Francia a dire che il Re vuole mandarla in Spagna et richiamar la sorella).
The chief physician Mayerne, who as I have related, went to the French court by order of his Majesty, states that whilst in Paris engaged upon his own private business, he received an order from the king to quit the city within a week, and the kingdom immediately afterwards. Before the term expired he received another command enjoining him to depart instantly, without his being aware of having done anything to deserve such treatment. His Majesty has moreover received letters from his agent in France announcing the execution of the order given to complain of this, and to demand the reason of such a measure, but neither the Chancellor not any other minister would condescend to any particulars, merely saying that very important considerations had induced their sovereign to act thus. (fn. 2) The king here appears extremely offended as Mayerne went to France with his leave, and he insists upon knowing the cause of this expulsion, promising to punish him himself if in error, and he has spoken very warmly on the subject with the French secretary, showing that he deems it necessary for his honour, which he considers injured, that the misdemeanour of his attendant should be specified. He further said to him: Write to your king and assure him on my word, which I give you, that never for the sake of a few individuals of the reformed religion, or for any faction which might pretend to grievances would I stir in their aid or favour, though I would were it a question of the whole religion, and should the edicts granted to them and confirmed by his father not be adhered to, I shall assist them with advice and succour, and if necessary even with my person; and this I tell you freely that you may write it and that it may be known as my firm resolve; since for the rest I have no more intention of meddling with the kingdom of France than with that of the Grand Turk. (Col Secretario di Francia ne ha parlato con gran sentimento, mostrando esser necessario, per sua riputatione, che stima offesa, se li facci conoscer il mancamento di questo suo servitore; le disse di più, Scrivete al Vostro Re et assicurateli con la parola che vi do, che io mai per interesse di alcun particolare della Religion Refformata o di alcuni pochi quali pretendessero aggravio mi movero in suo aiuto o favore ma bene quando si tratti di tutta la Religione, et che non si voglia servar gli editti concessegli et confirmatigli da suo padre, io gli assistero con gli consigh, aiuti et con la persona propria occorrendo, et di questo me ne dichiaro liberamente, accio voi lo scriviate et là si sappi esser tale la mia rissoluta voluntà, poiche nel resto con il Regno di Francia, tanto voglio haver che far con esso, quanto con quello del Turco).
The secretary immediately wrote this off to France express and his Majesty has desired the Governor of the Channel Islands (isole di Jarse), which are very near that part of France where there is some stir among those of the religion, to go to his post immediately, and acquaint him regularly with all that happens, but it is now understood that matters are likely to be easily adjusted.
A courier from Holland when passing through London on his way to the court left word here of the imprisonment of M. Barnevelt and two councillors on a charge of their maintaining a correspondence very prejudicial to the liberty of the United Provinces, but as your Serenity will have received the charge brought against these persons from a more fitting quarter, together with everything else that took place, I will not repeat the circumstances.
The Commissioners continue to be busily occupied in examining into the case of the Treasurer, and it seems they have found a very considerable deficit to the detriment of the king, and it is reported that the superb palace built by this nobleman at Audley End (Audlend) at a cost exceeding 800,000 crowns, will be seized for the payment of this debt, fears being also entertained lest the sons lose their posts and dignities.
London, the 7th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 7.
Cl. VII.
Cod. MCXXII
Bibl. di
S. Marco
Venice.
526. HORATIO BUSINO to the SIGNORI GIORGIO, FRANCESCO and ZACCARIA CONTARINI.
I send you some observations which I have made about their way of breeding pheasants here. The first I saw was at Richmond, a place of the king, where there is a court or rather a yard enclosed by walls of some height. No one could enter except by the gate, which was always shut, so that the animals might not be disturbed by the traffic or curiosity of people. The place is divided by compartments about five feet high, into eight sections or squares, each with its own door. They might be about 18 feet long by 12 broad. All have turf, and they think this necessary as the birds can take exercise and feed there as well as lay their eggs. Trees protect them from the sun and each place has its little wooden house, similar to and no larger than those used for watch dogs. Each house has straw on the floor and a hatch at the side besides the door, and the birds retire thither at night, probably to protect them from being found by beasts of prey. There are five females and one male for each place, the white being separated from the speckled, and the common ones from the rest. They clip one wing only of each bird, so that they cannot fly. Their food varies. Some have wild peas (bisi di campagna), a very common vegetable here, found in great quantities. They give them in season handfuls of these, grain etc. They are fond of mustard seed and earth worms. The last are easily found in damp places by simply turning the earth with a fork. But the best thing is to give them what is most abundant and costs least, as they will readily eat lettuce, chopped cabbage and all manner of greens. I have seen them cover the young birds with netting to protect them from birds of prey and prevent them from escaping, as their wings are not clipped.
London, the 7th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano Gen.
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
527. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 28th ult. relating the requests made by the English ambassador. I have simply to add that the guilty were not hanged at the yardarms of their own galley, as the ambassador states but at that of this galley, according to the custom of the fleet. I never heard anything about a request for the last consolations of religion, as I certainly should not have refused them. On enquiry about the ring and the letter referred to by the ambassador, I find that one of the condemned had a signet ring and a letter, which he asked might be given to his brother. My secretary consigned them to the colonel of the English troops since time did not permit of their being consigned to the brother. He did not wish it, but they were given to him. With respect to the three requests preferred by the ambassador: firstly, I sent the memorial of Colonel Peyton about his salary in my letters of the 5th inst, and I have nothing to add. Secondly, with respect to the title of colonel for Vere, I can only repeat what I have said before; the opinion of Vere when he was in camp, that he is a man of distinction by birth and in other respects, but not popular either with the captains of his own nation, there being no more than one or two who wish for him in this capacity, or with the soldiers, so trouble might ensue if he received this appointment. The title is expected by the Count of Nassau, as being the brother of Count John Ernest, owing to his close relations with Prince Maurice. To avoid disturbance it would, I think, be best to procrastinate a little, leaving the Dutch troops in the charge of Colonel Rocalora. Thirdly, with respect to re-admitting Ensign Herbert, whom I banished from the fleet when I sentenced the mutinous soldiers, I understand the kindly inclinations of your Serenity, and as Colonel Peyton has preferred the same request, I have acceded. I frequently see the colonel and the most familiar and friendly relations exist between us, and during all these difficulties I will not fail to see that these troops and their officers are kept contented, and I will endeavour to see that word of the good treatment they are receiving is conveyed to their own country.
The galley at Calamota, the 9th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitan
Gen. da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
528. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In your Serenity's letters of the 29th ult. I receive various orders upon the contracts with the seven English ships, with a summary of their obligations and a note of the shortage of artillery and other things there. I have handed them on to the commissioners, to whose sphere they belong, and will try and see that satisfaction is obtained. I will have copies made of the contracts, which are in the hands of the Commissioner Michiel, but as they are very lengthy they will not be ready directly.
The lead which was sent hither by the owners of the ships, as I am told by the Captain Moresini amounts to about 200 migliara. They agreed to sell it for 40 ducats the migliare, and they recently sent the bulk of it to Venice by the ship Griffon.
The galley at Calamota, the 10th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
529. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
M. de Boissise left the Hague on Friday. It is said that he had not one but several commissions to execute, but he lacked opportunity. They feel sure that he was instructed to try and ascertain their intentions here about prolonging the truce. From what the English ambassador said he was to ask that the ordinary ambassador of France should have a seat in the Council of State, like the English minister, alleging that the Most Christian king was as close an ally as the king of England, and that the French troops were paid by the French crown, but the English were maintained by the States. This attempt was also made during President Jeannin's visit but it came to nothing.
Boissise left without visiting the English ambassador, pretending that he was extraordinary, while the other was only returning from England to resume his post. England claimed that the visit was due to him as he arrived after him in Court, so they did not call upon each other. M. de Boissise did not call upon me either, and it seems strange that he should make so little account of a servant of your Serenity.
Two days ago the earl of Oxford arrived here. Yesterday evening he called upon me and seemed most anxious to express his devotion to the republic, to whose service he professed he was ready to devote himself. I thanked him in a suitable manner.
The Hague, the 12th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 11.
Commisario in
Armada.
Misc. Cod. 392.
Venetian
Archives.
530. AGOSTINO MICHIEL, Venetian Commissioner with the fleet, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The masters of the seven English ships are this day creditors for the sums given in the enclosed sheet.
From the port of Calamota, the 11th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
dispatch.
531. Note of money due to the English captains after deducting the sums paid to them in advance by the Ambassador in England. The credit to be discharged at Venice.
The Centurion, Captain Richard Bornes; creditor for 2,794 ducats, 1 lira, 4 grossi, to be paid to some one for him.
The Dragon, Captain William Aquila; creditor for 5,622 ducats, 2 lire, 8 grossi, to be paid to Richard Sems, English merchant.
The Hercules, Captain Bartholomew Ernin; creditor for 4,294 ducats, 3 lire, 12 grossi, to be paid to the same.
The Abigail, Captain William Ox; creditor for 4,561 ducats, 1 lira, 16 grossi, to be paid to the same.
The Royal Exchange, Captain Daniel Reinester; creditor for 5,320 ducats, 4 lire, 12 grossi, to be paid to the same.
Total, 22,593 ducats, 12 lire, 4 grossi.
The other two captains are not stationed here and wish their money to be paid here in the fleet.
[Italian.]
Sept. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
532. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The gentleman who was despatched by the duke of Savoy to his Majesty, to acquaint him with the restitution of Vercelli, left here yesterday, on his way back to his Highness, with autograph letters from the king expressing his extreme satisfaction at seeing him out of trouble and at his having recovered what belonged to him, with honour. His Majesty has moreover desired his Resident at Turin to proceed to the duke of Feria at Milan in order strongly to urge the execution by the duke of Mantua of the articles in the treaty of Asti concerning the amnesty for the rebels and the restoration of their property, especially that of Count Guido San Giorgio; and after conferring with the duke of Feria the said agent is to proceed to the duke of Mantua to discuss this point on behalf of his Majesty, who gave this gentleman a gold chain worth 400 crowns and now that he is not importuned for aid, which his own necessities would scarcely allow him to concede, he does not fail by other courteous and ample demonstrations to prove his good will and affection to the duke of Savoy.
Besides the news transmitted hither by Carleton of the imprisonment of Barneveldt and the others, the ambassador Caron has received an express order to proceed immediately to the Court and acquaint his Majesty with what has taken place, by reading to him the identical letters of the States, because as he is known to have been extremely dependent on that minister, they do not choose to trust to his mere statement. It is now considered certain that he will be removed from this embassy, which he has held during forty years solely by favour of Barneveldt.
It is understood that the Prince Palatine after destroying the fortress of Oppenheim, belonging to the archbishop of Spires, finds himself with a certain number of troops and that he indeed thinks of adding to their numbers. It is not yet known here what his intentions are, the Court having received no intelligence nor has Baron Dohna, who was expected, yet made his appearance.
No decision has been taken about the demands and statement made by the States of Bohemia, and indeed it is understood that they will do no more than send a courteous reply to their letters.
Captain Mainwaring, who had been knighted by his Majesty, and some months ago offered his services to your Serenity, announcing an intention of going to Venice in person, proceeded, I understand, to Ireland, where he armed a vessel, meaning to resume his former trade of buccaneer.
Two ships have arrived from the East Indies belonging to the company, which trades in those parts, with very valuable cargoes, including upwards of 5,000 bales of pepper, a quantity of cotton and other costly merchandise to the intense satisfaction of the merchants of this mart.
The king had a slight attack of gout in one of his feet lately, but is now recovered and continues his usual hunting.
The communication forwarded to me by your Excellencies concerning the recent plot discovered in the city of Crema, will serve solely for my own information, nor shall I avail myself of it save with the caution enjoined upon me.
I have received your Serenity's letter announcing the favour of including in the Spanish embassy my term of service here. The extreme consolation of this has but one drawback, my inability to return adequate thanks, but I shall endeavour to make this good by faithful service.
I have this moment received the enclosed letter from Burlamachi, the merchant, who to serve your Serenity, readily offered his guarantee for the hire of the ships in the event of its not being punctually paid at Venice. Your Serenity will perceive the annoyance he is subjected to on this account, and his suit to me. I beseech you to order the liquidation of these credits, which will serve marvellously to increase the good name enjoyed by your Excellencies as paymasters.
London, the 14th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
dispatch.
[533. P. BURLAMACHI to PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England.
Last week I informed your Excellency of the complaints made by the owners of the Dragon and Royal Exchange, with the probability that all the others would do the same in time. Your Excellency sent to assure me that there should be no delay and I should be satisfied promptly. Yesterday came letters of the 24th with more complaints and even insults. Those of the Dragon began to be paid on the 10th March. They have received three months' pay and on the 10th of August they should have had two months' pay, but they received nothing. Payments to the Royal Exchange began on the 20th March. They received three months' pay, but nothing more and only a promise for a month. Mr. Dicke told me they were tired of asking and there seemed no end to the matter. All this falls on my shoulders, and I have worn myself out in my endeavours to serve the republic. I ask for an open letter to the doge so that when the English merchant Rudolph Simes reaches his Serenity, the payment may be arranged.
London, the 3rd September, old style.
[Italian.]
Sept. 14.
Bibl. di S.
Marco.
Venice.
Cl. VII.
Cod. MCXX.
534. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English merchant, Mr. Ralph Symes, will present this letter to your Serenity asking, as agent for the owners of the vessels engaged in your service, that you will pay their hire. I have assured these merchants and the person who guaranteed the payment to them, that you will forthwith order the discharge of the entire debt, and I join my request to theirs. (fn. 3)
London, the 14th September, 1618.
[Italian.]
Sept. 14.
Cl. VII.
Cod. MCXXII.
Bibl. di S.
Marco.
Venice.
535. HORATIO BUSINO to the SIGNORI GIORGIO, FRANCESCO and ZACCHARIA CONTARINI.
His Excellency only demands audience of the queen at opportune times. Her Majesty on her part, graciously shows the satisfaction she derives from his Excellency's company and expresses her intention of honouring him above all who were ever previously regaled in this kingdom. The last audience was appointed for Thursday the 30th at Oatlands, a place about eighteen miles from London. It would have been exceedingly grand and pompous by the instructions given, but on the appointed day a provoking rain fell incessantly. Some days previously her Majesty had sent his Excellency a present of two fat bucks, flayed according to the custom of the country. Two days later she sent a very large stag, quite whole, with the hide and his fine horns, here deemed a very worthy present. She let his Excellency know that as it was a very long journey to Oatlands and the neighbouring dwellings unfit and devoid of any convenience, she desired him to dismount at the Court and stay in the apartments which she had caused to be prepared. On his arrival she sent a leading cavalier to meet him. Shortly afterwards the Lord Chamberlain of her Majesty's court arrived and kept his Excellency company for a space, to give time for the arrival at the palace of the chief ladies of title, who for greater display had been invited from a long way off; also some of the principal noblemen, among whom was the famous Lord High Admiral, now eighty five years of age, who yet enjoys life in his robust old age, two or three children being born to him a few years ago. (fn. 4) When all was in readiness, his Excellency was led by the Lord Chamberlain into the presence chamber and was graciously received by her Majesty, who gave him her hand. After he had kissed it respectfully her Majesty gave him her arm, a singular favour. They remained some time standing during the first ceremonies, which were most stately and grave. Then the queen seated herself on the dais, making his Excellency sit likewise and cover himself. A circle was formed round them at some distance, of ladies and cavaliers, all standing respectfully. They conversed on various topics, but chiefly of the hunt, which the queen had arranged in her own fashion for his Excellency's diversion; and she meant to follow it herself without her court. The plan was to kill four head in various fashions, to fly falcons and the like, but the cruel weather prevented this famous sport. The dinner was prepared in a large and comely place for about 20 persons, as a mark of honour to his Excellency, who was to sit alone on a high elbow chair of crimson velvet, whereas all the other cavaliers and ladies were on stools without any support, though covered with silk.
The queen withdrew to her own apartments from one end of the presence chamber, whilst from the other they led his Excellency to dinner. Water for the hands was presented very decorously. Opposite his Excellency sat the earl of Worcester (Uster) Lord Privy Seal, and at his side the Countess of Arundel, the chief lady of the court and kingdom, no other taking precedence of her either for descent or in the queen's favour. This lady is extremely partial to the city and aristocracy of Venice, where she received much favour and courtesy a few years ago, of which she retains grateful recollection. The others followed according to rank, a matter in which they never make a mistake. All present were persons of title. The table was distributed beautifully and profusely and everything was well served. There were meats and venison of every sort, game, some uncommon such as we had never seen before, and exquisite fish, and indeed it would compare as a whole with the most famous banquets in Italy or elsewhere. At the close they put on the table a singular variety of sweetmeats, in a surprising quantity. A number of toasts were drunk, the king, queen and prince and the Countess and Count Palatine, as usual standing, and at least three at a time, the ladies having to do the like, as it goes the round of the table, and I imagine this must vastly inconvenience them.
On the conclusion of the banquet his Excellency was accompanied to his apartments by all those gentlemen, that he might take a little rest. After a short hour he was conducted back to his Majesty, with whom he remained a long while in very pleasant discourse. The rain never left off, and as it was no longer possible to go out sporting and the evening was coming on, his Excellency was accompanied to his coach by the Lord Chamberlain, to show that the utmost consideration possible in a country place had been shown to him. His Excellency marvelled at this and was extremely well satisfied.
London, the 14th September, 1618.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Carleton returned very late on Thursday August the 28th, Barneveld's arrest took place on Wednesday the 29th at the very moment when his son-in-law Cornelius Van der Myle was paying a visit to the English ambassador. Motley: Life and Death of John of Barneveld, ii. page 250.
2 On Aug. 11, old style Becher wrote to Naunton: Yesterday I saw President Jeannin and the chancellor ... They said they had two or three several advertisements of discourses held by M. de Mayerne by those who were parties to the discourses, which were capable, considering their dissensions and disjointed estate to give a great stroke towards the embroiling of them.' State Papers, Foreign, France. Vol. 68.
3 This despatch is not found among the files at the Archives, but is duly entered in the ambassador's letter book or register preserved in the library of St. Mark.
4 He married, as his second wife, Margaret daughter of James Stewart, earl of Moray, in September 1603. By her he had five children, of whom three were born at the time this account was written, but they all died in infancy. See the pedigree in Manning and Bray, History of Surrey. ii page 690.