Venice
March 1619, 2-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

480-487

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'Venice: March 1619, 2-10', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 480-487. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88699 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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March 1619

Mar. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
760. To the Ambassador in England and the like to the other Courts.
The news from Naples this week shows no change and speaks of fresh provisions by the Spaniards. They say less about restitution and talk about sending a fleet into the Gulf to help the Austrians. Ossuna is raising French levies with manifest signs that his preparations are made against our republic. Naples is discontented but Ossuna has summoned the parliament and asked for a subsidy of 300,000 crowns. Last week the Uscocchi captured a ship of ours laden with a valuable cargo. We send you a copy of what we wrote last week to France and the other courts to serve for your instruction. You will continue your offices as opportunities present themselves.
We have allowed Colonel Peyton to pay his debt for the arms at 250 ducats a month. He has himself withdrawn his request about the money, seeing the invalidity of his arguments. We tell you the for information, so that you may bear witness to the good treatment which we shall ever extend towards the English nation.
Ayes149.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Mar. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
761. To the Ambassador in England.
Owing to the continual increase of the armaments of the Spaniards, contrary to the treaties made in France and Spain, and the bad response to the faithful manner in which we have carried out our obligations, by which our own safety and that of the entire province is placed in jeopardy, we have published the league made last year between ourselves and the Duke of Savoy for the defence of our own States. We now think it due to the interest which his Majesty has always shown in the affairs of Italy and to the value which we place upon his demonstrations that he should be informed of the particulars. You will tell him of the urgency of the affair, and that our sole object was to maintain the general liberty. You will point out the necessity and the sincerity of our disposition, and we have acted within our rights in doing what benefits ourselves and injures no one. You will perform this office either alone or jointly with the duke's minister according to what you hear from our ambassador at Turin whom we have told to give you all information. If the duke's minister has not received any instructions when these reach you, you will postpone any action in order that you may make the communication together. We shall be glad to hear all particulars.
Ayes150.
Noes0.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
Mar. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
762. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
There remains the question of communicating our league to the pope, England and the other powers. We think the news should be communicated to England at once. We shall therefore send letters to the Ambassador Donato on Friday, of which we enclose a copy, so that his Highness may instruct his ambassador to make the same communication either separately or with our ambassador, by way of confidence with his Majesty. Our ambassador will have orders not to speak before instructions arrive from his Highness to his said minister.
We also think it proper to communicate this good news to the States and to the cities of Berne and Zurich.
Ayes150.
Noes0.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
Mar. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
763. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have seen his Highness to communicate the very important commissions which I hold from your Serenity. He thought it would be best to definitely invite the pope to join the league, but after he heard the considerations which I advanced on the matter, he approved and asked for an abstract of them so that he might send instructions in conformity to his ambassador. He left it to your Serenity whether the office should be performed separately or together. He thought the same kind of office would serve very well with all the other princes of Italy. With England and the States of Holland he said he would prefer a more precise office, inviting them to enter as they have always said that if your Serenity made a league with his Highness they would join it. He said he would do this through his ambassador. The princes of Germany, he said, were always taken up with other things and they had a league of their own.
Turin, the 4th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
764. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I told the duke of the news your Serenity had from England of the operations of his ambassador to reconcile the two crowns, of the encouragement he had received from the ministers and of his success in such a useful service. His Highness replied that he hoped the matter would be adjusted by the appointment of ambassadors on either side, without saying anything about the past; he had the very same news from his agent Biondi. He added that he feared the marriage with Spain would take place in spite of all and that will not be very happy for us.
Turin, the 4th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 5.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
765. That the gold chain given by the King of England to Giovanni Battista Lionello, secretary to the Ambassadors Barbarigo and Contarini, and resident for several months, be allowed to remain in his possession in view of his good service in other charges, but especially in these.
Ayes165.
Noes3.
Neutral1.
In the College—
Ayes19.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Mar. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati
Venetian
Archives.
766. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I understand that the King of Great Britain has decided to arm his own ships and to cause the merchants to arm some (for fear of Ireland, some say). The States are watching the naval preparations of the Spaniards, for which they can see no adequate cause.
Amsterdam, the 5th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
767. To the Ambassador in England.
We have received your letters of the 14th. His Majesty's decision about the royal ships and the fleet is generous and worthy of him. We understand that the Spanish naval preparations at Lisbon have slackened, but they cherish even more pernicious designs against the liberty of Germany and Italy. His Majesty has bonds of affection and interest in both these quarters. We value most highly the representations made by his Majesty in our favour to the Catholic king, of which you advise us, and the decisions he has taken. We charge you to thank his Majesty in the warmest possible manner, assuring him that we shall always remember his action, which will prove of the greatest assistance to our affairs and to the liberty of Germany and Italy. The designs of the Spaniards against both are clear, so that the forces of his Majesty must be equally ready in each direction. You will add that this decision to create a diversion is more necessary than ever and so are his help and favour, which will be the more useful and valued. We understand that the Bohemians are not continuing their prosperous career and the Austrian forces are continually receiving money, advice and reinforcements from Spain. The Spanish ministers agree to the fleet at Naples and say it would be absurd for the king to disarm there and he is not obliged to account for the forces collected there. Their actions bear this out as they continue their warlike preparations. We hear that Ossuna has received the Uscocchi in a most friendly manner, giving them large facilities for disposing of stolen property. They could not commit their excesses, however, if Ferdinand carried out the treaty and punished their chiefs, though we fulfilled our part in restoring the fine country we had taken. You will enlarge upon this hateful affair as much as you can and as prudence dictates.
The Most Christian King is displeased at the proceedings of the Spaniards in not making restitution and in proposing to send troops through the Gulf, and has expressed himself clearly.
We have been pleased to hear of the arrival of the ambassador of Savoy at the Court, and we wish him success in his negotiations for a reconciliation between his Majesty and France. The letters which we wrote on the 4th about communicating our alliance with Savoy will arrive with these, and as the ambassador has come, his Highness's letters may also be there directing him to make the same communication. In that case you will arrange with him what is to be done, using your prudence so as to increase the good disposition of his Majesty, seeing that this union simply aims at our own security and the general good.
You will continue your confidential relations with Canterbury and foster his friendship as well as that of the marquis, his Majesty's favourite, as we are glad to see you have intended to do. You will also foster the friendship of the States through their minister.
That the English ambassador resident here be also spoken to in the matter of thanks and the affair of the Uscocchi.
Ayes155.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Mar. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
768. That the English ambassador be summoned to the Cabinet and the following be read to him:
We have heard from our ambassador of the representations made in our favour by his Majesty to the Catholic King and of his intention to arm ships to trouble the Spaniards in their own waters. We highly value these decisions which will prove of the utmost value to the liberty of Germany and Italy. We have therefore directed our ambassador to thank his Majesty warmly and we beg your Excellency to add your testimony of our gratitude, as we are sure, if you do so, it will advance the general good.
We have also to inform you of the plundering of a ship of ours by the Uscocchi, with a cargo of great value, and that these Uscocchi have been favourably received by Ossuna, who has granted them every facility. This would not have happened if Ferdinand had fulfilled his part of the treaty of peace. We feel sure that his Majesty will be grieved to hear of this hateful occurrence, and it will incite him still further to his glorious operations, since a large share of the general welfare depends upon him.
Ayes155.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Mar. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
769. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Sunday the 3rd inst. Sir [Henry] Mainwaring arrived here. He excused his delay on the grounds of health and because he had been stopped two days at some Austrian place on the Rhine. He gave me your Serenity's letters of the 25th January, the duplicates of what I have already received. He went straight to the king at Newmarket, with letters from the Ambassador Wotton, so I understand, very favourable for obtaining the ships. He is very confident and seems most ardent in the service of your Excellencies. This Mainwaring prefers that I shall not interest myself in this request for ships, before he has discovered the wishes of his Majesty. Perhaps he wishes to enjoy the glory of obtaining them alone, as he has great hope from the favour which he enjoys at Court and particularly with Buckingham, now the Lord High Admiral. But so far as I can gather success will be very difficult and a refusal is almost certain. Because when I was conversing with the Archbishop of Canterbury some days ago he said these very words: Non esse honorificum, non esse tutum et esse novum committere naves Regias alicno Principi, because if they fell into the hands of an enemy with their arms and artillery, the king would be bound to recover them, and it was not becoming to entrust one's own forces in the hands of others. It was an unusual thing to lend fortresses and ships are sea fortresses. He knew for certain, however, that his Majesty would permit the merchants to hire ships and would command them to serve your Serenity in any way that you might ask.
In reply I said all that I could to the archbishop to dissuade him from these ideas, but they are very obstinate in their opinions here. He added that the ships belong to the crown, not to the king, so that it would be necessary to consult the Council upon the matter. This is all I can write at present upon this subject. On Mainwaring's return from Newmarket I shall be able to report his operations. For the moment all negotiations with him are at a standstill until the ships are obtained. But indeed this Mainwaring is well disposed. He has spoken glowingly of the greatness of the republic and the generous remittance made to him for his journey. He has also taken the opportunity to speak highly of the prudence of the Cavalier Foscarini, whose abilities and virtues are remembered at this Court, where he enjoyed very great favour with the king, who often speaks of him in most laudatory and honourable fashion.
At the same time they continue to fit out the six royal ships and to provide for arming them. The merchants are doing the like and getting ready fourteen. The appointment of a commander for the fleet is expected and there seems no doubt that this fleet will sail out and join a like number of Dutch ships. This is the more likely to happen although it is said that the armed ships round the coasts of Spain will not proceed to other seas, and they must not leave themselves unarmed and defenceless here. For in addition to the nearness of many forces to these kingdoms the king has been sorely troubled by the flight to Spain of the Earl of Argyle, (fn. 1) a Scotchman of high rank, great intelligence and with a large following, one very capable of commanding a fleet. Thus their own alarms help the service of your Serenity, for whose advantage nothing could be better than an increase of suspicion and jealousy at sea between the two kings.
Nevertheless the Catholic king continues to negotiate very confidentially with his Majesty and recently begged him, in a letter written with his own hand to interpose for an accomodation with the Bohemians and to withdraw from them the incitement of the Palatine, to whom all their operations are attributed. For this purpose the king has appointed Lord Hay (il Baron d'Es), who went to France, to be ambassador extraordinary in Germany and to the emperor, although nothing has been decided about his departure or his instructions, since they are much afraid in those parts of a sudden peace, harmful to all the rest.
The Dutch have not yet brought their affairs to a termination, but they are in train to finish them in a few days to their entire satisfaction and the general advantage, as your Serenity will very soon hear.
London, the 7th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
770. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court and the like to the other Courts.
Fresh news has just reached us. On the 9th February il Ferletich went to Segna where he proceeded to commit the crime described. Seventy other Uscocchi left on the following day, leaving only forty men at Segna, mostly outlaws, the German garrison having departed. They have openly proclaimed their intention of returning to piracy, and are all privy to the recent crime. All this leaves not a shadow of excuse to King Ferdinand and should disgust all the powers.
Ayes144.
Noes1.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Mar. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
771. To the Ambassador at Rome.
We send you copies of letters of the Ambassador Donato from London of the 14th ult. He tells of the decision taken by the king to fit out six of the royal ships, add to them twenty-five other ships of private merchants and join them to twelve ships of the States to sail under the English flag, to go all together to the Spanish seas under the pretext of hunting pirates. Meanwhile his Majesty has directed his ministers in Spain to inform his Catholic Majesty that the assembling of such forces to terrify the world does not accord with his professions of friendship, and his Majesty was sending out his forces in order to fulfil his duties, as if the king attacked the Turks, he would help him, but if he turned against Germany or our Republic, he would be obliged to assist his friends. This is important news and if it reaches the ears of his Holiness and others it will be deeply considered, as it clearly appears that the affairs of Italy and especially our own are taken into consideration by that monarch in a manner becoming to a great and wise king, who is watching the actions of the Spaniards. This involves very profound consequences, not only for the present but for future dangers.
We send you all this solely for you information.
Ayes137.
Noes1.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Mar. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives
772. To the Ambassadors and Secretaries who did not have copies of the letter of the 4th inst. with the letter to Rome about the union with the Duke of Savoy.
It behoves our representatives to speak in the same forms everywhere about our union with the Duke of Savoy, the reasons which brought it about and why we publish it now. We send you a copy of these reasons and direct you to speak in conformity with them. If any one wishes to know particulars you will say that it was made for the defence of our States, and we are bound in case of need to supply the duke with 90,000 ducats a month, and the duke has to put 20,000 foot and 3,000 horse, to be employed as may seem most expedient, as events may decide. But you will not say anything about this unless asked and in the interests of our service.
The like to:
Constantinople.Florence.
England.Naples.
The Hague.Zurich.
Milan.
Ayes124.
Noes1.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Mar. 10.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
773. That notwithstanding the obligation of Colonel Peyton to pay for arms during the first four months, amounting to 2,500 ducats, that the debt be discharged at the rate of 250 ducats a month, beginning with the payments which have fallen due and have not been met; if the colonel's service terminates before the discharge of the debt, the remainder shall be deducted from the last payment.
Ayes99.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Archibald Campbell, seventh earl of Argyle, on the pretence of visiting Spa for his health, obtained the king's permission to go abroad. He went instead to West Flanders to serve the King of Spain, and wrote thence to announce his conversion to Catholicism. James was very angry, and Argyle was denounced as a traitor and rebel at Edinburgh on 16 Feb., 1619, o.s., but restored to favour on 22 Nov., 1621. Dict. Nat. Biog., and Salvetti's letter of 1619, No. 21. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27,962A.