Venice
May 1619, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

544-556

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'Venice: May 1619, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 544-556. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88705 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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Contents

May 1619

May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
881. To the Secretary in England.
We send you the letters for the Ambassador Donato. If he has gone and Gritti has not arrived, you will keep them simply for information. We order you expressly to speak to no one about the contents of these letters and if any one says anything you will say that you have no news or instructions on the subject, thus cutting the question short. You will simply tell us what you hear.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
882. To the Ambassador Donato in England.
You have acted so well upon the question of the league that we have no fresh instructions to add. Nothing else must be mixed with the communication of the alliance. However, if the king's convalescense or anything else delays your departure it is right that you should have more exact instructions. We doubt that Gabaleoni has not communicated to you letters of the Ambassador Zen from Turin on the 11th March, as we see no mention about them. We send you a copy for your better information, though you will not depart from our instructions. We do not think there is time to speak about it to the ambassador of Savoy, as he must have communicated to the king what the duke told him, but if he has not, you will limit yourself to making a simple communication and try and persuade him to wait for further orders from the duke, saying that the matter should be done jointly, and we shall make similar representations to his Highness. If he has already done it, you must take a decision that will serve our interests best. You will not speak of the matter to any one, and if you are provoked you will say that you have no news. It is not usual for such negotiations to be made otherwise than in concert or by ministers without orders from their princes. In such general phrases you will try to turn the conversation.
Our Ambassador Gritti has been stayed at Genoa by the fever.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
883. To the Ambassador Gritti at Genoa.
We regret to hear of your sickness from the Secretary Padavin. We hope for your speedy recovery. We propose to send you the information about current events in England, so that when you are better you may proceed thither as soon as possible, your presence being most needful. You will see what instructions we have sent to the Ambassador Donato, which you will execute in his absence. We send you copies of the letters from Savoy and England and of the instructions of the Senate upon the important matter of the league and also what is to be done with regard to the proposals which it seems the duke has caused to be made to the King of Great Britain.
The documents and instructions of the embassy will be left behind by the Ambassador Donato. We expect that your prudence and ability will show you what is necessary.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
884. That the Ambassador of Savoy be summoned to the Cabinet and the following be read to him:
Our Ambassador Donato writes that a courier has reached that Court with letters directing the Ambassador Gabaleoni to communicate the league to his Majesty; he was also ordered to ask his Majesty to join the league. Upon this action, which was unconcerted, we wish to say that we desire to give no cause to the princes of this province to think of a league against us. We have therefore directed our ambassador at Turin to make known our feeling to the duke. If Gabaleoni has not yet spoken to the king, we beg your Excellency to induce his Highness to give orders that the office of communication alone may be performed, the matter being one of the greatest importance, in which we are deeply concerned.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
885. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
We have heard that the duke's ambassador in England has been instructed to communicate the league to his Majesty and also to urge the king to enter. The time of the arrival of the duke's letters in England suggests that the delay was due to his Highness awaiting a reply from France, but if the French king has been invited to enter the league it will not be easy for England to come in also. We are sorry that his Highness has given orders for this invitation without consulting us, as it was arranged to communicate the league only either together or separately Prudence is more than ever necessary now and that we should give no pretent to other powers of Italy to make a league against ours. You will obtain a special audience of the duke and remonstrate with him, trying to get him to do everything in concert with us, if their orders have not been executed owing to the king's indisposition. If Gabaleoni has given the invitation to the ministers, if not to the king, you will try and discover the reply, and endeavour to put matters right to some extent; because even if the English seemed inclined to accept, though we do not expect they will, his Highness will have to proceed cautiously and slowly before entering into express obligations, while the republic is deeply concerned in the matter. We shall await news from you.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
Mar. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
886. To the Ambassador in England.
We send you a copy of what we have written to Turin about the instructions sent to Gabaleoni and of our office with the ambassadors of his Highness here together with their reply.
We send this for your information, which you will use for our service.
Ayes83.
Noes8.
Neutral29.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
887. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have to answer your Serenity's letters of the 19th and 26th ult. The owners of the ships in our service have not made me any more requests or complaints, so I imagine that they recognise the baselessness of their pretensions now they are paid and answered.
I have already written about the suspicions that their ships would join the Spanish ones; they have disappeared. The latter are already disarmed and the provisions sold; the sailing of the former and their complete armament sleeps in the king's mind.
I performed the suitable office with his Majesty upon the queen's death, and the letter sent to me remains in the hands of the Secretary Marioni, so that Gritti when he arrives may use it as a pretext for the reply which your Excellencies wish to make. However, the king hates troublesome things and has made but little fuss about this.
I told his Majesty of the league with the Duke of Savoy and received the reply which I reported on the 3rd inst. I do not think any idea of being offended at the delay in informing him so much as entered the king's head. He is very prudent and full of good will for the prosperity of others and does not measure their actions so nicely.
I have not heard a word about any promise given by Spain to his Majesty about the affairs of your Excellencies, such as Sir [Henry] Wotton mentions. It is neither suggested by reason nor proved by actions. I only heard the general statement made to me by Canterbury which I reported on the 11th April. He is the head of the Council and a truthful man. When the king is ill I consider his words as coming from the king's own lips. But nothing would lead me to build anything upon words when deeds point the opposite way; it would be most dangerous. They consider here that they have brought about the dispersion of the Spanish fleets on the coasts of Spain by their arming ships here, and have thus removed a cause of unrest, no mean achievement. If I may venture upon an opinion I believe that if any one should importune the king with representations, letters and speeches, especially at the arrival of the Spanish ambassador who is expected, with the help of the French, now reconciled and friendly to this crown, and with the very great and sincere affection which his Majesty bears towards the republic, he might easily find a remedy. The way must not be despised since no other remains and there can be no deception here.
The ambassador extraordinary of France has arrived and on Monday he went to see the king at Theobalds. The Marquis of Buckingham fetched him from his house and he was greatly honoured in his public and private capacity. He is accompanied by a numerous train amounting to 150 persons. His mission is chiefly to cement the reconciliation and so they exchanged compliments with great mutual satisfaction. The king told the ambassador that short of sending his heart he could not send him more than Buckingham. The ambassador at once sent a courier to France with the news of the successful fulfilment of his mission. (fn. 1) This serves the general good and the particular interests of your Serenity. I called upon the ambassador yesterday and he congratulated me warmly, expressing his affection and esteem for the republic.
The commissioners of the States have at last had audience of the king, of great length and importance. They represented to him the condition of the negotiations upon the trade with the Indies as left by those deputed by his Majesty. They brought forward arguments to show the groundlessness of the claims of the English and how unjust it would be for them after an expenditure of so much blood and treasure to share with those who had not spent a crown. It would be too shrewd a blow at their liberty if they had to go shares with everything they acquired. They therefore begged his Majesty, since all the other points concerning that trade had been arranged, and as the matter concerned the wealth of both parties and the preservation of the general peace, to interpose his authority to compose these differences. These simply arise from the claims of the English to half of the ports and fortresses which the States possess in the East Indies, while they offer to share the expenses and to act together in all other affairs in an offensive and defensive league against the Spaniards for that trade. The king told them that so long as the negotiations on the highly important subject turned simply upon ways and means, he had left it in the hands of private individuals, but now his dignity was concerned in permitting his subjects to subject themselves to others, receiving ports and a security from the hands of others. He was bound to resent this and while no worse news could be brought to him than the total breaking off of the negotiations, and a complete disagreement over the trade, so his interests and honour forced him to insist that no further steps should be taken without handing over the fortresses and ports to be evenly shared. The commissioners, perceiving that his Majesty had been ill informed, and the passions of those who sought to increase his wrong impressions, did their utmost to show him the force of their arguments, and after putting them in writing left them in his hands. But his Majesty answered them in the same sense, and so the commissioners, by virtue of their instructions, kissed his Majesty's hands and are ready to depart. They at once sent word of what had happened and expressed their determination to strengthen their fleets as the English had strengthened theirs. Here indeed they are giving orders for extraordinary and double contributions for the double armament of ships for that voyage. This matter is one which strikes home at the wealth of the Spaniards, and when it prospers they are constantly kept in trouble and danger, so every one considers it of the highest importance. Any dispute between the English and Dutch is most profitable to the trade and ambitions of the Spaniards.
The commissioners imparted all this to me when they came to see me immediately after their audience of the king, telling me everything, with remarkable honour and confidence. They swore that to drive the Spaniards from the East Indies and to keep harassing them in the West would secure the peace and quiet of the whole of Christendom. I urged them to tell the French ambassador about their negotiations, so that he may help them with his king, and I would have offered to do something myself, but for my present circumstances, and that I have no instructions.
Lord Hay has started for Germany. Before leaving he came to this house, although I had not visited him, and with many carriages and gentlemen, to offer his services in the interests of the republic, as if they had negotiations anywhere he had instructions from his Majesty to treat them as if they were the king's own affairs. He begged me to write and tell the Ambassador Giustinian of his good-will. He said he would bow to the opinion of the Signory as to an oracle with the simple aim that peace will be advantageous to the Bohemians and useful for the quiet of the others. I said this could only ensue if Spain laid down her arms, both by sea and land. For the rest I made a fitting response to his courtesy. Your Serenity must do what you think best with regard to advising the ambassador.
The ambassador of the archduke has been to return my visit with a numerous company and much friendship and honour towards the republic. He told me in the course of the conversation that the Catholic king would certainly remove arms and alarms from every part as soon as the affairs were settled in Germany. But in Italy all did not want peace and there were unquiet spirits. I made a suitable reply and he did not dwell on the subject any further.
The Catholic king has informed his Majesty by express courier of the sending of the Marquis of Gondomar as ambassador extraordinary to this Court. He is on the road and will arrive within the month to arrange and settle about the marriage of the prince. This mission has been preceded by large consignments of money to the merchants and by rich rewards to the ambassador. By his letters he has already filled them with the highest hopes, so the conclusion of this alliance may be feared. The French look upon all this with considerable anxiety. The Marquis of Trinel unburdened himself to me on the subject and I advanced many reasons for the general good and told him that the spinning out of the negotiations for their marriage would delay the completion of the Spanish one and possibly prevent it. Savoy is also watching these proposals, but in the feeble reasons for carrying them through I think the French proposals will be pushed, and this will serve not only to strengthen their friendship, but will prevent any bad results from the union with Spain. The Dutch are keeping their ears open and their feeling and interest lead them to think of providing the Most Christian king with money for the purpose. I tell your Excellencies this with the secrecy with which I have received it. Disclosure would be very harmful.
London, the 16th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 17.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
888. The Ambassador of Savoy was summoned to the Cabinet and the deliberation of this Council of the 16th inst. was read to him; Count Scaglia said:
I also am surprised that in addition to the publication of the league in England they say that the king was invited to enter it. I do not know how this can be. The order for publication was issued before my departure, but the duke would not have given this invitation without the participation of your Serenity. He wishes me to assure you that he values the opinions of the republic so highly that he will always conform to them, even for his own private affairs.
The doge said: There may have been some conversation about this, but matters of such moment require mature deliberation and to be arranged by common consent.
Scaglia replied: Your Serenity is right; I will write to-morrow and so will the Ambassador Pessina, what you command.
The doge added: We are sure that you will present the subject in a fitting manner. We are sorry, Count Scaglia, that you are going to leave, as we have always valued you.
[Italian.]
May 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
889. RANIER ZEN and ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassadors in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When I, Zen, went to take leave of the nuncio, he asked me very earnestly if I knew anything about negotiations for the marriage of one of the infantas here in England. He seemed very anxious, and to have received some news that it was actually in negotiation.
Turin, the 19th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
890. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They say that the English ambassador requested that Barneveldt might be buried in the Court church, otherwise they would have taken the body to the ordinary place for condemned criminals. (fn. 2) The Ambassador Carleton sent word of the execution to the King of England by a special courier.
The Hague, the 19th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
891. This council has heard of the dangerous condition of Pieri Gritti, ambassador designate to England, that he can hardly undertake so difficult a journey, while it is necessary to have a representative at that Court during the present disturbed state of affairs:
That an ambassador extraordinary for England be elected at the first meeting of this Council, to set out within fifteen days with the instructions given to the Ambassador Gritti, and to proceed to the Court of Great Britain with all possible diligence by the shortest route and remain there until the return of the Ambassador Donato or until further order. He shall have 1,500 gold crowns for travelling expenses, and to put himself in train, and 400 gold crowns a month for his expenses, four months being paid in advance; 300 ducats for horses, trappings and coffers; 40 ducats each for two couriers accompanying him.
Ayes125.
Noes5.
Neutral5.
[Italian.]
May 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
892. ANTONIO MARIA VINCENTI and GIACOMO VENDRAMINO, Venetian Secretaries at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is now reported here that the King of England has been asked to enter the league recently published between the most serene republic and the Duke of Savoy. This has given rise to much ill natured comment here. They say that several heretical princes will be included, and so the Catholic king will be compelled to think of other alliances.
Milan, the 22nd May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Venetian
Archives.
893. To the Secretary in England.
We believe that the Ambassador Donato will have left when these arrive. We therefore direct you to see his Majesty's Secretary, the Archbishop of Canterbury or some other leading person of the government and say that you have orders to inform his Majesty that as our Ambassador Gritti has fallen seriously ill on the road, so that he will not be able to travel for some time, we have thought it best to appoint another ambassador. We have therefore selected Gerolamo Trevisan, who possesses virtues to render him worthy of the position. You will ask the person to whom you communicate this to see that his Majesty is duly informed. You will go on to say that we thank his Majesty warmly for his good offices in Spain in our favour, but that the promises of the Spaniards do not correspond to their actions. Ossuna shows no disposition to make restitution for all that they say about it; and we hear from Germany of an arrangement between him and King Ferdinand to send a fleet and troops into the Gulf to bring help against the Bohemians and assistance to Ferdinand to obtain the empire. If these things are attempted they will lead to even greater disturbances. We do not know what to believe and must be prepared for any eventuality. We think his Majesty and his government should not neglect any means to divert projects so harmful to the general peace. You will try to get all this through to the ears of his Majesty by the means of the minister.
Ayes151.
Noes1.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
May 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
894. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Friday last, the 17th inst., a courier arrived bringing word to the Ambassador Donato that the Ambassador Gritti was on his way here. No sooner had the letter arrived than, in his anxiety to return as soon as possible, he decided to start that very evening. His Excellency will travel with all speed by the quickest way. The king, the prince, the lords of the Council and all the other magnates of the kingdom put the highest value upon him. His Majesty, his Highness, all the Court and the Marquis of Buckingham in particular have shown extreme sorrow at the troubles in which he is involved. It now remains to me to report what happens here until the arrival of the Ambassador Gritti I hope you will make due allowance for my feebleness, and will at least credit me with a burning zeal to serve well. But at present there is nothing worthy of the notice of your Excellencies. In this first dispatch I can only report that two Dutch ships have reached Plymouth from the Indies, laden with nuts, muscatels, pepper, mace and cloves to the value of a million and a half of gold. By now these ships must have completed their voyage to Holland.
Yesterday also took place the solemn celebration attending the burial of the late queen. The prince came from Greenwich the day before to take part. (fn. 3) He left the king there, determined not to proceed to London so long as the Court continues to wear mourning, so great is his horror of sadness (ove ha lasciato la Maestà del Re, risoluto di non trasferirsi a Londra finche si vesti da questi Signori I'habito di duolo tanto vive nemico dello mestitia).
London, the 24th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
895. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands,. to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English Ambassador told me that the Duke of Savoy hoped to obtain the empire, and rumour stated that the Most Christian king favoured the design. He said that if there were any chance of success his king and the States would assist. He admitted that success would be difficult, but they would do anything to drive out the house of Austria.
The Hague, the 27th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 28.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
896. Owing to the necessity of satisfying the owners of armed vessels in our fleet, that in the future two-thirds of the payments to the English, Flemish and Venetian ships be made in this city and the remainder in the fleet. This order does not include the twelve Dutch ships, which are to be paid here.
Ayes97.
Noes0.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
May 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
897. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We took an early opportunity of executing your Serenity's orders of the 18th inst. I spoke to the duke about the different way in which the league was to be communicated to England by his orders, as his ambassador was instructed definitely to ask the king to join. The republic had decided to make the simple communication. The duke turned to Zen and said: You know I urged that as we could place no hopes on the Italian princes we ought to turn to where greater profit might be expected. I simply wished to state that the king had always favoured a league, but did not definitely ask him to join. He produced letters from Gabaleoni of the 21st May, saying he had seen the king on Thursday and the Ambassador Donato had been on the following Monday to perform the same office. (fn. 4) His Majesty approved of the delay in announcing the league, he would do what became the weal of his kingdom and would give a more particular reply. Donato received the same answer. The duke said he did not see that there had been any difference in the office. He admitted that the office may have been performed with some emphasis, but it was not different from what had been agreed upon. Zen said that the republic had immediately communicated to his Highness the office which they wished to have performed in England, and the duke had approved, and the form amounted to considerably less than a definite invitation. But he understood that Gabaleoni had definite instructions to invite the king to join. The duke replied that he wished always to act in concert with the republic. He promised to show us a copy of the instructions sent to England. I said there ought to be no difference over so grave a matter. I felt sure his Highness thought the same, and would only make moderate representations in England, and in future would always act in concert in all negotiations. The duke approved, assuring us that there would be no differences. The instructions sent to England would prove his sincerity.
Turin, the 28th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
898. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The duke came to read the letters of Gabaleoni from England and to speak of the growing fears that the marriage of the prince to the infanta will be concluded, because the ministers are interested and corrupted, the king is poor, with little self reliance so that there were extraordinary inducements to settle the matter. The Spaniards promise two millions as dower, and with all this money the king hopes to arrange his own affairs, which are so embarrassed by heavy debts, but the money would only go into the pockets of the favourite ministers, who dispose absolutely of the king's purse.
Gabaleoni suggests the idea of marrying one of their infantas in England, thinking it would prove very advantageous to the common interests, and would upset the plans of the Spaniards. But they cannot offer anything like two millions, and in spite of Gabaleoni's arguments, his Highness seems very indifferent about it, and not at all sanguine. Gabaleoni says that the king has resolved to declare himself in the affairs of Germany; the Palatine and others importune him constantly, and all hope is not lost. Wake is going to report upon the state of affairs in Germany; he is a good minister with the right views. He will report in the general interest. His Highness places great hopes in him, and he will see the duke on his return.
The duke afterwards spoke about the affairs of Germany.
Turin, the 28th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
899. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The other day I went to call upon the ambassador of Savoy here, as soon as I heard of his return from Greenwich, where he had been to have audience of the king. In the most friendly way he told me that he had found his Majesty very delighted over the complete reconciliation effected between him and the Most Christian king, with the coming of the Marquis of Trinel. Accordingly he had completely forgotten past offences, and said that in the future he would keep with all his heart the promise exchanged between Henry IV of France and himself, that the survivor should act as a father to the son of the other. His Majesty was most anxious that other princes should follow his example and send an ambassador to Germany. He felt that his own would have much difficulty in obtaining what the general welfare required. He had spoken strongly to him, urging him to write strongly to the Prince of Piedmont to make representations to his Most Christian Majesty. He added that he had letters from France of the 24th stating that the affairs of that kingdom were very nearly settled, the queen mother having already dismissed her troops. The king had done the same, though resolving to keep on foot 12,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry, so as to be able to confront anyone who might in the future disturb the peace of the realm. The Prince of Piedmont, in the interests of the settlement, is to go in person to Angoulême to carry the news to the queen. The king has refused to grant her the places she asked for, but he has offered her others in their stead. He also read me some letters from Spain telling him of the departure for Cartagena of Prince Filiberto of Savoy, with 80,000 crowns as succour, which he is to take on the galleys to Sicily. They do not know what orders he takes. On his return he may possibly go to Turin to kiss the hands of the duke his father.
The Marquis of Trinel went yesterday to Greenwich to take leave of his Majesty. The king is exceedingly pleased with him, and after causing many honours to be showered upon him by his ministers and magnates in London, presented him with his portrait framed in a beautifully designed frame containing two large diamonds, attached to a chain, also covered with diamonds, to wear round his neck. There must be quite 500 diamonds in all. When I was in his house this morning to wish him a pleasant journey he was good enough to show it to me, and it is a truly noble and beautiful thing. He confirmed all that the ambassador of Savoy had told me about the affairs of France, adding that everything had been completely settled. The queen had submitted to the wishes of his Majesty, provided he would pardon those who had helped her in her flight.
With regard to the marriage of the Prince of England to the Infanta of Spain, he told me that he hoped, seeing how things were, that the negotiations would be completely broken off, or at least postponed for some time, and meanwhile God would perhaps provide a way out.
On Monday the Dutch Commissioners had audience of his Majesty to take leave, as they could not arrange the point about the division of fortresses in the Indies. The king would not yield to them upon any account, but simply promised to take the matter into his own hands and adjust it if it were possible. (fn. 5)
The ordinary ambassador of this crown has already left for France, and by now he may have arrived at Court. They are expecting the arrival here of the ambassador of his Most Christian Majesty.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 27th April and the 3rd inst. with enclosures from the Ambassador Donato, who met the courier at Dunkirk. I will hand them to the Ambassador Gritti when he arrives.
Meanwhile I have not neglected to endeavour tactfully to discover the reasons for the departure of the Ambassador Wotton. I am informed by a person worthy of trust, a friend (amica) of the ambassador, who has many relations with the Court, that although he was ostensibly recalled, in the king's letter to your Serenity, he really asked to be recalled about the time when the condemnation of Secretary Lake took place and the appointment of his successor. He was greatly disappointed at not receiving the post, as he had considerable pretensions, but he has not obtained it at least as yet; so he came here in the hope of being employed in some other capacity, which might help him to push his claims to the said post. If this did not succeed, he thought that he could still return to your Serenity. He therefore asked at the same time that no one should be appointed in his place in the interval. This is what I have been able to discover, and I will endeavour to find out if there was any other reason for his return.
London, the 31st May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
900. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In great confidence the English agent has given me a letter to read, sent to him by the Secretary Cerizza by order of his Majesty. They complain of his king arming eight vessels out of consideration for Venice, saying it is opposed to the sincere friendship existing between the two crowns, and they ask him to write to England while they have also spoken to him on the subject. He replied that they and everyone knew of his king's friendship for the republic, displayed by so many public demonstrations. It was nothing new if he allowed his subjects to go and serve her. He assumed this, although he had no information or instructions. He agreed that Ossuna's attitude did not look like peace and continued rumours compelled the republic to arm and stand ready.
They told him that the next couriers from Naples would certainly bring word of restitution and the execution of everything. They also were suspicious of the republic, owing to her numerous fleet which she wished to increase.
This minister is negotiating for the junction of his king's ships with those of Spain, and they have already settled many of the articles, about the number of ships, flags and other things. But he told me he thought it a difficult affair. He told me one proposal, namely that while the fleets were united neither power should send out other ships of war. He thinks he has got the wolf by the ears by this proposal, as, if they agree, while reunited with the English they will not be likely to molest the king's friends, and if not, they will have to keep a fleet perpetually in these seas, owing to a constant fear of the English fleet, which will keep them on the alert.
These negotiations naturally do not please the French, especially as they know that others are proceeding for the marriage of the princess to the Prince of Wales. Accordingly the Secretary of France has received orders to go to Court the better to watch everything. He gives out that he is going because the Most Christian king desires to have frequent advices about the state of his sister.
Madrid, the 31st May, 1619.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The ambassador was François Juvenal des Ursins, Marquis of Tresnel, who arrived in London on Saturday. May 11, with a distinguished company. Birch: " Court and Times of James I., ii. p. 157.
2 Barneveld was executed on Monday the 13th of May. Motley does not appear to know of any such request of Carleton, he simply writes "It was subsequently granted as a boon to the widow and children that it might be taken thence and decently buried in the family vault at Amersfoort." Life and Death of John of Barneveld, ii. page 394.
3 Chamberlain gives an account of the funeral in a letter to Carleton of May 14th, old style, Birch Court and Times of James I, ii. pages, 162, 163; and there is a much longer and more circumstantial description accompanying Salvetti's letter to Andrew Cioli of May 23. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27,962A.
4 These dates must be wrong, as Donato left England on Friday, May the 17th. (See No. 894 above at page 552.) Writing on May 3rd, Donato says that Gabaleoni had been to see the king four days ago, i.e. on April 30, a Tuesday, (See No. 868 at page 538 above) to tell him about the League, and Donato had done the same office between that time and the date of his despatch, not one of the days being a Monday.
5 This day se'nnight, the States' commissioners and our East India Company's met before the king in the gallery at Greenwich, the one standing at the one end of the gallery and the other at the other, his Majesty interposing himself between them for the accomodating of the difference, not without probability of accord, his Majesty being inclined to overrule his own people, to cause them to accept of such conditions as otherwise they would refuse, and the States yielding in some particulars likewise. Rev. Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering on 24 May, old style. Birch, Court and Times of James I., ii. page 165.