Venice
June 1619

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1909

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557-566

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'Venice: June 1619', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 557-566. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88706 Date accessed: 22 November 2014.


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Contents

June 1619

June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
901. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have importuned them to clear up the affair about the communication of the league to England. After much pressure a secretary came to this house to read me the instructions sent to Gabaleoni. They contain the reasons for the league and for delaying the announcement, the communication to be made to his Majesty and, if he likes, in conjunction with the ambassador of your Serenity; they add that the league was made the more readily because of the advice given by his Majesty, and I noticed these words at the end in the duke's own hand "believing that the first step being taken, his Majesty would join us, as we always hoped."
Turin, the 3rd June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
902. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have nothing to add to what I related the other week about the departure of the Ambassador Wotton. I have heard nothing to show that it was for other reasons than I indicated. It seems very likely and accords perfectly well with his Excellency's own exposition in his last audience before the cabinet, which reached me on Sunday, together with other advices of the 10th ult.
The Dutch commissioners have themselves assured me of the king's good will in the important matter about the fortresses in the Indies. They are expecting to see his Majesty again to conclude it. So soon as anything has been arranged they offered to let me know all about it and anything further worthy of the notice of your Serenity. They believe that all affairs concern your Serenity and their masters alike, owing to the friendship existing between them, and which they wish to maintain for the mortification of the common enemies who are always endeavouring to suppress liberty among those who enjoy it, and are continually trying to disturb the peace of the world. They told me that the States General were disposed to succour the Bohemians if necessary and if the war continued, and with a larger sum of money than the 50,000 florins recently voted in their assembly for four months. They thought that the war and the election of the emperor in consequence would drag on for a longer time than was thought, and consequently that the Diet of Frankfort, summoned for the 20th July next, would certainly not meet. Only they are very sorry to hear that 1,000 horse and many foot are posted at the bridge of Breisach on the Rhine to prevent troops from the Low Countries from marching to Bohemia.
Owing to the queen's death they postponed the annual celebration of the feast of St. George. It took place the day before yesterday at Greenwich, being performed by the Knights of the Garter, of whom his Majesty is the chief. He took part in all the ceremonies, both in the chapel and in the procession through the streets, as well as at the public dinner at which all the knights assisted. He is now in the best of health as appears by the cheerful, glad and hearty way in which he eats. While he was drinking his eighth glass the Dutch commissioners entered the hall, and came one by one to kiss his Majesty's hand. He did not move or say anything but simply raised his hat from time to time, putting it on again at once. The commissioners stood awhile and then proceeded to the other table of the cavaliers, giving and receiving salutations with everyone. They went out to another room, where by the king's orders, they found a meal prepared for them.
To-morrow his Majesty will proceed to Theobalds where he says he wishes to hunt a little. He wished to do so where he is, but he knows that his legs support him so ill that he cannot take a step without assistance.
It is asserted that very soon he will make one of the brothers of the Marquis of Buckingham a viscount and the other a baron. (fn. 1) Of the revenues of the late queen he has assigned to the Marquis 10,000 crowns a year; the remainder he has assigned to the prince.
The sometime Archbishop of Spalato was present in the chapel and in the procession, as on every other public occasion, habited as a bishop, as if he were at Rome, and wearing in addition a red cloak falling down his back from his neck to the ground. The court is full of him and every one declares that he has persuaded the king to introduce and command auricular confession in his dominions, instead of allowing it to be made mentally to God, as a thing that would prove very advantageous politically, as in such case many might abstain from committing grave crimes, such as conspiracy (of which they are in constant dread here) and other things. However, there is no sign of anything being done.
In the general absence of news here, which every one knows well, I have nothing further of importance to notify to your Serenity. I beg you will excuse my shortcomings.
Your Serenity's letters of the 16th ult. have just reached me with instructions to keep the instructions and use them for information. Your Serenity will have heard everything from the Ambassador Donato about the communication of the alliance to the king by the ambassador of Savoy.
London, the 7th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costant.
Venetian
Archives.
903. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I sent word to the Grand Vizier that the King of Spain had ordered six ships to go to Ormuz to bring silk from Persia, negotiations for a direct trade being far advanced, the Persian ambassador promising that the entire trade in silk and other things through Syria should cease. The vizier replied that such a voyage would take a whole year, and it would take the English even longer. The Persians had no ships to carry their silk to Lisbon, and if they had they would return empty. He pretended to attach no importance to the matter. However, the Persian merchants at Aleppo make similar declarations, only there they speak of arrangements with the English for silk, not with the Spaniards.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 9th June, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
904. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The resident of England, after travelling through a part of Germany, has returned to his ordinary service here. He says he cut short his journey owing to the disorder in the country. He only treated with the Palatine and performed his offices with the others in writing only. He says there is great confusion and he cannot foresee the outcome. The troops levied by the Spaniards pass easily, no one stopping them, and they treat the troops well, hoping they will free the country from its disorders. There were 9,000 foot and 2,000 horse of the finest troops. At Ulm they had boats ready to take them on the Danube and by now they should be landing at Pesth if the Bohemians do not stop them.
He supposed the diet at Frankfort had been postponed, and he thought Ferdinand could only go there at great risk. He could not go unarmed and if he took an army he would leave his country exposed to enemies.
I find the minister has returned earlier than was intimated, because at the present moment the King of England has no other minister in Italy, and I see that they will not send an ambassador to your Serenity soon. They explain the delay by the king's sickness, which has stopped all resolutions. Carleton may possibly be appointed, who was formerly at Venice.
Turin, the 9th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
905. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received word of the return of the English ambassador extraordinary from Marimont, where he visited the archdukes. But I have not heard whether he said anything to them about the truce. Here they think that the King of England would rather see the truce prolonged or peace made, than that they should take up arms again. This idea receives confirmation from the fact that the mission of the king's ambassador to Germany is for no other purpose than to arrange an accommodation between Ferdinand and the Bohemians. His Majesty is unable to assist the latter, as he would like perhaps to do, owing to his lack of money, but he wishes to give them peace. But my informant told me that the Bohemians have the treaty of Xanten before their eyes, and they will be on their guard.
The Hague, the 11th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 16.
Senato.
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
906. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Piedmont, when I have met him, says that the chances of the empire for the duke, his father, are certainly good. The Marquis of Trinel, ambassador to England, had instructions to inform the king of the favour shown on this side to the duke's claims to the empire, and to ask whether his Majesty thought it would be for the common advantage. They replied in the affirmative and said they would take steps to that effect.
Tours, the 16th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
907. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English agent told me that the affairs of the Grisons had taken a bad turn and they seemed to be rushing into slavery. The French are working harder for the Spaniards than the Spaniards themselves. The influence of the French crown with them will compromise the liberty of the Swiss and Grisons. They could only be moved by gold; arguments and ideas of liberty produced no effect on this venal people. The King of England had many friends in those parts and was anxious for the general good. He suggested that silence with his Majesty might prove prejudicial, as he would always employ his influence in favour of the republic. He himself had done his best when passing that way. He seemed anxious to be employed. I thanked him suitably and said generally that his Majesty's authority would always be helpful.
Turin, the 17th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati
Venetian
Archives.
908. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I saw Prince Maurice on Sunday, and had a long conversation with him. He spoke of nothing but the affairs of Bohemia and Germany. He showed impatience at the irresolution and want of spirit of the princes of the Union, laying all the blame upon the Prince Palatine. He said he could not understand the conduct of the King of England. On the one hand he did everything possible to arrange for a commercial union between his country and this against the Spaniards, while on the other hand he sent a special ambassador to Germany at the instance of the King of Spain to arrange an accommodation between Ferdinand and the Bohemians. He told me he had some thought of getting the States to tell their deputies in England to approach his Majesty with the idea of inducing him to moderate these instructions which would injure more than they would serve him.
The Hague, the 18th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 18.
Consiglio
de'X
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
909. In the Council of Ten.
Fresh proposal to release Giulio Muscorno from prison, to take effect from the 19th inst.
Ayes13.
Noes2.
Neutral5.
Councillor Niccolo Contarini expelled.
[Italian.]
July 18.
Consiglio
de'X
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
910. In the Council of Ten.
Hieronimo Lando, destined as ambassador to the Majesty of Great Britain having asked to be allowed to employ as secretary Pier Antonio Zon, at present serving the Preveditore Zorzi at Zara, and who has previously served Antonio Lando, Proveditore General of the Forces, and other public representatives to the general satisfaction, that despite the fact that Zon is extraordinary in his charge he may go to serve the Ambassador Lando in England, as has been granted to many others in like case.
Ayes15.
Noes1.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
June 19.
Consiglio
de'X.
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
911. In the Council of Ten.
That at the petition of Domenego Padoan, Giulio Muscorno be released, who was condemned on 30th July, 1618, to two years at Palma, afterwards commuted on the 8th August following to two years imprisonment, so that he may go and come freely as he did before he was condemned, and that his name be erased from every book, file, or register where it is found, and that this be published where necessary.
Ayes7.
Noes1.
Neutral5.Not carried.
Councillor Niccolo Contarini expelled.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
912. To the Secretary in England.
We have deprived Antonio Donato of his ambassadorship and of his nobility, banished him from our territory and confiscated his goods. We direct you, so soon as you receive this and before you communicate it to any one, to lay hands upon all his goods of whatever kind and upon all documents public and private. You will inform his Majesty of our decision by means of the ministers and, if necessary, by asking for a special audience of the king. We send you special letters of credence for asking for these goods. You will make a careful inventory of the said goods and papers and send it on at once, awaiting further orders in this matter.
Ayes135.
Noes1.
Neutral5.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
913. That Antonio Donato, son of Nicolo be deprived of the office of ambassador in England, of his nobility and that his name be deleted from the books of the Avogaria di Comun, and that he be banished from Venice and her dominions for ever, and if he is taken he shall be hanged between the columns of St. Mark, with a reward of 3,000 ducats to whoever takes him in Venetian territory and 4,000 ducats outside. He may never be released from this banishment or receive any pardon or remission of his sentence even at the instance of princes except from a unanimous vote of the Councillors and chiefs of our Collegio. His release may not be mentioned for twenty years. All his goods of whatever kind and wherever they may be shall be applied to our treasury as trust property during his life and for ten years after his death. The above sentence shall be published at the first meeting of the Great Council and at St. Marks and the Rialto, also on every first Sunday in Lent during his life.
Ayes161.
Noes12.
That in reading the sentence against Antonio Donato the following be added about his crimes:
Ayes107.
Noes3.
Neutral2.
That while ambassador in Savoy he handled large sums of the public money, of which he embezzled a large quantity both directly and indirectly, hoping to enrich himself in this way.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
914. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 24th ult. with instructions to inform his Majesty's secretary or some other leading minister of the choice of a new ambassador in the person of Sig. Girolamo Trivisano, since the Ambassador Gritti has been delayed by severe sickness, and to thank his Majesty for the representations made in Spain. I have been in bed since last Monday with a very troublesome tertian fever, so that hitherto I have been unable to do anything. As six crises of this fever have passed, I hope at the seventh, which will be to-morrow, to get rid of it and then I shall be able to fulfil my duties.
On Saturday the ambassador of Savoy came to see me. After some brief compliments he asked me very earnestly whether it were true that the galleons of Naples had proceeded to Trieste without any hindrance and had there landed a large force of troops to help Ferdinand. A rumour to this effect was current in London, and in some way, he did not know how, the king himself had heard it. I said that I knew nothing whatever about it. Armed ships could not possibly pass through the Gulf without falling in with your Serenity's fleet, which kept at sea for the purpose. Such reports must be due to malicious persons who do not love the republic. It was quite true that Ferdinand and Ossuna had arranged together to make the attempt, and therefore I begged his Excellency to see the king and remind his Majesty not to neglect any provisions which might divert a design so harmful to the general interests. He promised very readily to do this and left greatly relieved, so he said, at what I had told him.
The Dutch commissioners have finished their negotiations in this kingdom and sent their secretary accompanied by four gentlemen to inform me about it, the day before yesterday. Upon the question of the Indies they have arranged that the English shall sail freely towards those parts, and enjoy half the advantages derived by themselves and the Dutch there. But in the Molucca Islands the English may not enjoy more than one third and will bear a third of the expense. For three years the English may not speak of claiming any places in the Moluccas to fortify, the Dutch hoping, in the mean time, to make the English see not only that there is no need of fresh fortifications there, but that they might even think of demolishing some of those already in existence. Together they are to maintain twenty armed ships in permanence, to fight with any who wish to impede their trade. (fn. 2) These ships should soon be ready. The commissioners are now going about to see the country a little and it is said they will leave in a few days. Yesterday the ambassador of Lorraine departed, who arrived last week to offer condolences upon the queen's death.
London, the 20th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
915. The rules of the republic require that we should proceed to the election of an ordinary ambassador for the English court; that the pending election of an extraordinary ambassador be revoked and an ordinary one chosen, who shall leave within a month. He shall receive 300 gold ducats a month for expenses and render no account. He shall have 300 ducats of lire 6 grossi 4 for horses, trappings and coffers and 1,000 gold ducats as a gift. His secretary shall have 100 ducats to put himself in train, and two couriers 20 ducats each. 40 ducats a month for all expenses except couriers and carriage of letters. His chaplain shall be paid 186 ducats a year and his interpreter 100 ducats.
As Girolamo Trevisan, chosen to be ambassador extraordinary must have incurred many expenses to put himself in train, 1,000 crowns ought to be allowed to him for this.
Ayes125.
Noes3.
Neutral4.
Balloting upon the last paragraph.
Ayes88.Second vote.
Noes46.Ayes101.
Neutral27.Noes44.
Neutral17. 4/5; pending.
On the same day in the Cabinet Girolamo Lando, son of the late Antonio was chosen to be ambassador in England.
Ayes22.
Noes1.
Neutral0.
In Pregadi: that the election of Girolamo Trevisan as ambassador extraordinary to England be revoked, as an ordinary ambassador is to be chosen.
Ayes33.
[Italian.]
June 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
916. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king has been six days at Amboise at his usual pleasures of the chase. After that he gave his first audience to the English ambassador and to some commissioners from Tunis, so I have not been able to present myself to his Majesty, to execute my commissions.
Tours, the 24th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
917. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Hitherto the French have not meddled in the affairs of Germany. They say that they do not trust the Germans and do not wish to be involved in a war. However, they have asked for the opinion of the King of Great Britain and the Marquis of Trinal has made his representations, though they were injurious to Savoy. The king replied, expressing his friendship for his Highness, and so the marquis changed his tone and expressed to Gabaleoni their wishes to serve the duke. However, there is no sign of any movement on the part of either.
Turin, the 24th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
918. To the Captain General at Sea.
You will have already received our orders of the 13th inst. to dismiss five ships. If any difficulty arises about the arrangements made you will send the ships here for the matter to be settled. But when the contracts have been made in Holland or England you will not send them here, but dismiss them as soon as possible, paying them for their voyage home. You will arrange an amount with them in order not to be at their discretion. If any difficulty arises about their accounts, the matter can be referred to their own countries.
Ayes130.
Noes1.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
919. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In conformity with what Prince Maurice said, the States have written strongly to the King of Great Britain urging him to give different instructions to his ambassador, so that the Bohemians may not be compelled to accept inequitable conditions, and the commissioners in England have also received orders to make similar representations. On the other hand they have sent to the Bohemians urging them not to be deceived by fine words.
The Hague, the 25th June, 1609.
[Italian.]
June 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
920. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
As my sickness continued to trouble me, after the despatch of my last letters, more than I had expected, I was obliged to postpone the execution of your Serenity's last orders. On Saturday I put in one sheet what I was to represent in the name of your Excellencies and sent it by the hands of the interpreter straight to Secretary Naunton, who has more frequent access to the king than any other minister, and who has the management of foreign affairs. He received it very kindly and read it with great attention. After some remarks about my sickness, which I need not repeat, he said that he would see his Majesty that very day and inform him of the contents and would let me know the reply he received. This has not yet reached me, but to-morrow, when, please God, I shall be free from my fever, I will go to fetch it.
Yesterday the king came unexpectedly to London, they say in order to ask for the expedition of a case which is under consideration in the Star Chamber against numbers of the Flemish merchants here, who are accused of having transgressed the laws by transporting beyond the sea for several years many thousands of the Jacobus, a coin worth about 5 crowns. Every one thinks that they will be condemned to pay 150,000 crowns, to be divided justly among them. This money will serve his Majesty for his progress in the country, to begin on the 20th of next month, according to his custom for many years. The chance comes opportunely as without this money he could not possibly think of this progress, so great is the scarcity of money here. (fn. 3)
Yesterday evening the ambassador of Savoy circulated a report here which he said he had heard in letters from France, that the Duke of Ossuna had rebelled against the King of Spain, and hoped to make himself master of the kingdom of Naples; summoning to his assistance the King of France to whom he would grant a large part of that kingdom in view of the ancient claims of the French thereto, and your Serenity also, to whom he offered the coasts of Apulia and Calabria. (fn. 4) He sent this news to me also by a special messenger in great haste.
London, the 27th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
921. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English secretary tells me he has orders to repeat his office about carrying out the treaty with respect to the Uscochi.
They are glad here that notwithstanding the emperor's death the King of England has sent an ambassador to Germany to take part in the settlement of the difficulties there. News has come of the departure of the ambassador and of his arrival at Brussels.
The negotiations for the junction of the English and Spanish fleets proceed apace. The matter seems greatly facilitated. They see that the English are stronger than the Spanish in every way, with better and larger ships, much better armed and with better men, and far more numerous. They do not think they can get more than eighteen ships. They desire the junction here to divert the English from attempting anything to their prejudice.
The negotiations for the marriage of the princess to the Prince of Wales are kept on foot. I know that when the ambassador of Germany suggested the son of Ferdinand for the infanta they told him that the negotiations with England were very advanced, and though they were not actually bound to anything as yet they thought it better not to negotiate with others.
Madrid, the 28th June, 1619.
[Italian.]
June 29.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
922. That 207 lire be given to the courier Benedetto Bosis as a supplement to the expenses incurred by him on his return from the court of England to this city.
Ayes137.
Noes1.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Sir John Villiers was to be made a viscount and Christopher Villiers a baron. It was expected this would take place at the St. George's celebrations. In spite of expectation the king made no creations at the St. George's celebrations, though he made John Viscount Purbeck on June 30. Christopher had to wait longer for his title. Cal. S.P. Dom 1619–23, pages 47, 48, 58.
2 The treaty is dated June 2 old style; it was ratified in Holland on the 22nd July and by James on the 16th July, old style. The terms are given in Dumont: Corps Diplomatique, V. pt. ii., pp. 333–337.
3 One hundred and sixty strangers were accused of transporting seven millions of gold, including Sir William Curteen. Burlamachi, Van Lore and De Quester, but only nineteen were immediately prosecuted. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1619–23 pages, 53, 54. The king's progress was expected to begin about July 28th, to go by way of Rufford, Nottingham, Derby, and back by Warwick, Woodstock, Rycot, Bisham and Windsor. Birch, Court and Times of James I, ii, page 172.
4 Information against Ossuna was laid at Madrid as early as Oct. 1618. In the following spring he had actually sounded Spinelli, the Venetian Resident. See Horatio Brown, Studies in Venetian History, ii, page 252.