Venice
July 1619

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1909

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566-582

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'Venice: July 1619', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 566-582. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88707 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Contents

July 1619

July 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
923. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is said that Sir [Henry] Wotton is to go to Heidelberg to negotiate in conjunction with the other ambassador extraordinary of England. This pleases nobody, because of what happened in the case of the treaty of Xanten, as they fear that the same instrument is to be employed to serve the Bohemians in the same manner.
On Saturday the States sent the deputies of the East India Company to confirm the arrangements made by the commissioners with the King of England. All seem glad that means have been found for the settlement of this affair and to avoid the disputes which frequently arose between the two nations.
The Hague, the 2nd July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
924. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Sunday I went to see the Secretary Naunton to receive the reply to what I wrote on the sheet I sent to him the preceding week, as I reported in my last. But I obtained nothing but complimentary phrases in the king's name. The secretary told me that his Majesty thanked the republic for the choice of the new ambassador in place of Gritti, which showed her appreciation of his Majesty's friendship. He believed, however, that when the Ambassador Donato arrived in Venice he would soon be able to right his affairs and return to reside here, as his Majesty greatly desired. With regard to the news of the arrangement between King Ferdinand and Ossuna, which he knew well, your Serenity had nothing to fear, being very strong at sea, so that if the galleons of Naples made the attempt to push through to Trieste, they would pay dearly for their temerity. His Majesty did not see how he could prevent such designs and plans, he had already done what he could by making representations in Spain in favour of your Serenity. He had an agent at Venice who will have expressed his desire to help the interests of the republic. He said no more to me upon the subject although I advanced many arguments to induce him to lead the king to take some vigorous resolution. Of the news from Naples he said that his Majesty had heard nothing, and did not believe a word of it. I then took leave.
In the matter of the Flemish merchants, in order, so they say, to silence the reports of his Majesty's eagerness to obtain the money, the king has ordered that all the witnesses shall be carefully examined, without haste, and accordingly that the sentence shall be postponed until next term, that is to say, for three months. Meanwhile, owing to his need for money, he has ordered the sale of 13,000 lands (Campi) in Ireland, which are, however, of slight value.
London, the 5th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costant.
Venetian
Archives.
925. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters from Aleppo of the 11th ult. state that on hearing that there were many bertons about Rhodes and Candia, they arranged that the ship Mula should stay at Cyprus until the convoy should arrive, which they expected to have for the whole of the present month, of French and English ships, and then it was to leave for Alessandria. From Smyrna they also speak of these bertons which on the 5th ult. fell in with the seven ships which left Smyrna with a convoy, and the other English and Flemish ships, which were all to continue their voyage to Zante.
No complimentary relations have been exchanged between the ambassador of King Ferdinand and the ambassador of the King of Great Britain, upon the death of the emperor, because the former claims precedence which the latter will not allow.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 7th July, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 8.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Busta 188.
Venetian
Archives.
926. Galleazzo Cloni fermor of the new custom, beseeches your Serenity that whereas this year the King of England has forbidden all except the merchants called the Levant Company to take raisins and other merchandise from the Levant to that kingdom, your Serenity will be pleased to direct your ambassador who is going to London to endeavour to induce his Majesty there to allow trade to be free in the way permitted by your Serenity to his subjects; and whereas your Serenity submitted this petition to us on 18th June last, we answer that we have a copy of the king's decree in English, and find that what the petitioner says is true. But as we see that on the 8th December it was asserted that a like prohibition was made in the time of Queen Elizabeth, which is contrary to the truth, we think that his Majesty has been deceived in making this decree; so we think it highly important in the interests of your Serenity and of your subjects to apply a suitable remedy in such an important affair, which affects not only raisins, but wine and every other kind of merchandise. We think that your Serenity should decide what it will be most expedient to do, and for your better information we enclose a copy of the proclamation.
Zuane Falier.
Z. M. da Molin.
Zuane Basadona.
[Italian.]
July 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
927. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
About midday on Friday the 5th inst. the courier arrived with instructions to me to communicate to the king the sentence passed against the Ambassador Donato and to ask his Majesty for the necessary powers to secure all Donato's goods. At the same time as the courier one of Donato's servants also arrived here, bringing me a letter from Gravesend from his master, the contents of which you may see. This was delivered first, and I did not know, even after reading it, what courier had reached me. I immediately asked for him and he came in and gave me your Serenity's letters with the sentence against Donato and the letters of credence for the king. Seeing that Donato was on the top of me, as he was bound to arrive soon they told me, I immediately ordered a coach to go to the king, thinking this better than speaking to ministers, as they would have lost time in acquainting his Majesty. Hardly had I finished reading your Serenity's letter than Donato entered the house and began to conjure me to read him his sentence. I replied that I knew nothing about his sentence, though a courier had certainly reached me. I did not think it necessary to tell him what he brought. He added: Patience, in any case I know the sentence must be similar to the one against the Cavalier Badoaro. They will take away my nobility and property and there will be all the other severe conditions for a rebel against the republic. He added: I imagine that you have orders from the republic to approach the king so that my person and property may be laid hold of here. Obey, however, I will look after myself. I went out before him and as my carriage arrived soon after. I went to Greenwich to see the king. His Majesty was hunting; I awaited him and had audience two hours before the evening, obtained for me by the Earl of Arundel, who had arrived from London with Buckingham shortly before. I told his Majesty of the wishes of your Serenity, after having communicated to him the sentence against Donato, and I made the representation with great urgency. The king replied: We never had any idea of such a thing. We are extremely grieved, as we had a great affection for Donato. We are always anxious to give satisfaction to the republic so far as we can, but owing to the importance of this affair, we must refer it to the Council, without whose consent we can do nothing in so serious a matter. I will send you the reply on Sunday. But if the republic has confiscated the goods in her state why do you want those here to be put in guard, you ought to show a little mercy. I rejoined: Sire, the republic also thinks so, and makes a most urgent request of your Majesty, feeling certain of obtaining so just a favour. The matter requires expedition because Donato has already arrived in London and as he is aware of his ruin if he has time he will take all or a good part of his property out of the house. His Majesty replied: You have heard, we must have the consent of the Council, and at the same moment he got up from his seat. Buckingham stood close by all the time, and the Earl of Arundel near at hand, whom his Majesty used as an interpreter. The king left the room and went to supper. I returned to London, not to the Donato house, but to another of a friend of mine, who lodges foreigners, where I now am. Hardly had I reached the city when I heard that while I was at Greenwich Donato had his coach got ready and had gone off in it to see the king. But before stirring a step he heard that Buckingham was in the house of the Earl of Arundel, so he changed his mind and went to find him. The earl and the king's chamberlain were in the same house. There he set forth his misfortunes, I am told, with great power, begging Buckingham to influence the king in such sort that, if I had asked his Majesty, as he was almost certain, to secure his person and confiscate his goods, the king might have compassion upon him and not permit his complete ruin. Buckingham considered the request just and promised to do what Donato asked, and he left at once to go and see the king.
After Donato had left these noblemen he went straight to the ambassador of Savoy, whom he also informed of his troubles, telling him that I was at Greenwich to ask the king to secure his person and property here; he begged his Excellency not to act against him but to have pity upon his misfortunes. The ambassador himself told me this much, the same evening, as he was most anxious to see me, to know whether he ought to do anything against Donato, and to offer his assistance, owing to the common interests of the duke and the republic. I thanked him warmly and said I had been to the king to execute my instructions and I would communicate the reply to him when I had it. For the moment I could say no more. I then left, being warmly thanked for having taken the trouble to go to his house. Shortly after midnight, when I was in bed, a gentleman came from the Earl of Arundel to say that the king had decided to get the earl to write to Secretary Naunton to send men on the following morning to secure all the goods and things in Donato's house and make a careful inventory of them, and that I might meet Naunton on the following morning and be present at the sealing and taking of the inventory, as I had petitioned his Majesty in my audience. I did this, but when I reached the secretary's house I found him asleep and had to wait one hour. When at last I was introduced I told him why I had come. He said that already at the first hour of the day he had sent to carry out the orders received from the king over night. If I went to Donato's house I should find the men at work. I went at once and found that the secretary of the Council had caused all the coffers and all the doors of the rooms to be sealed with the royal seal and had made an inventory of everything, which he read to me immediately. In it I found nothing about silver, documents or money. I asked if they had found none of these things. He said: Nothing whatever, only silver for the altar; Donato said he had sold the greater part of the rest for the journey, on his departure for Venice, to merchants to whom he was bound to deliver the rest, and that he had burned all the papers in the night. Donato repeated this in my presence at the secretary's request, when the secretary and I entered the room, where he still lay in bed, to examine the seals. I may mention that he had very few public papers, as he burned all that he found here on his arrival, without exception, a few weeks later, by order of the Council of Ten. He left some others with me on his departure, namely, such as came from Venice during his embassy at this court, so that few can remain even if it be not true that he has burned them.
On coming out of the house I begged the secretary for a copy of the inventory. He said he would send it after dinner, but asked me to put in a memorial the substance of what I asked of the king, so that his Majesty might read it to the Council on the following day. He insisted upon fetching this, though I offered to send it. Evening arrived and no one came, so I decided to send to the secretary's house to enquire. They said he had left for Greenwich some while before, where they held the council on the following morning. There his Majesty mentioned my request and the orders given to please the republic. At the same time he showed another paper in which Donato appealed powerfully to his Majesty to have pity on him and order his goods to be released, as he was in a pitiful condition and obliged to provide several servants with the means to return to Italy, which he could not do if he did not control his possessions. This was read to the Council and I am told that they decided not to do anything before communicating with me and hearing the feeling of the republic. In the evening I returned home and found a note from the Council desiring me to meet them on the following morning in the ordinary room in London and to bring the memorial for which the secretary asked. Accordingly I went with the memorial, of which I enclose a copy. They sent for me and I found the Archbishop of Canterbury and eleven others seated round a table. I at once said I had appeared to hear their commands and presented the memorial, saying it was substantially the same as what I had said to his Majesty at my audience. The secretary read it and the Archbishop of Canterbury said: The matter is of great importance, we clearly see the wishes of the republic; but poor Donato is to be pitied, having lost all his possessions in the Venetian dominions. We cannot possibly grant this; it is only reasonable that many of his servants should have the means to go to Italy, and this cannot be unless their master is able to sell his goods. A law of our realm provides that the goods of all persons here shall be preserved, even of thieves and felons. If the republic has anything that was only lent to Donato, it shall be confiscated at once, and if it has any civil debt, that may be recovered by the laws of England. I replied: Why then affix the seals of his Majesty, who must know the laws. Canterbury replied: His Majesty ordered the sealing and inventory thinking that the house contained property of the republic; if I knew of any I should tell them, and it would be put aside and kept. I rejoined that your Serenity considered all the property yours and you felt sure the favour would be granted, as being only reasonable. I had heard of a paper presented by Donato to his Majesty and read in the Council begging for the release of his goods. I reminded them that it was much better to satisfy your Excellencies than an unhappy exile in disgrace. The republic might possibly obtain enough money from the property to send the servants home. I therefore begged them to let the seals remain, as possibly your Serenity had made the request for some civil debts. He replied: What then are he and his servants to do with nothing to live on ? I said, that was his concern; his punishment was due to his crime. They then asked me to go out, saying that they wished to discuss the matter a little, though I think they had already decided, and I withdrew into a neighbouring room. After a quarter of an hour I was recalled and Canterbury said: We should like to satisfy the republic, but we do not see how by the laws of God or of nations we can prevent Donato from using his property. The laws of the realm provide that his property must go free; his Serenity may, however, institute a civil action against him. In fact, they adhered to what they said at first. I replied that I could never have believed in such a decision, and I felt it would deeply offend your Serenity, as you felt sure of receiving such a small favour; you would never have acted thus if they had made a similar request. The Earl of Arundel remarked in Italian that your Serenity would have no cause for offence, as you would understand their reasons, since laws admit of no question; whenever they could do a service to your Serenity, they would never fail, but in this matter they regretted they could not do otherwise. With this they all rose and, I may say, dismissed me.
I fear your Serenity will be very ill-satisfied with this result. I have done my utmost, crushing all my feeling for Donato, who was my beloved master. I may add that the seals have not yet been removed from Donato's house, possibly they have thought better of it though I do not think so. Meanwhile the Ambassador of Savoy came to see me after dinner yesterday. I told him my grief at the decision of the Council, and I think he has sent word to the Prince of Piedmont in France.
I have paid 14 Spanish doubloons to the courier for his journey.
London, the 9th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
928. To the King of Great Britain.
The republic has thought fit to deprive Donato of his ambassadorship, his nobility and all his property. I have instructions to inform your Majesty of this, and to ask that all his goods here in London may be put under guard as well as all documents, both public and private. The republic expects this favour of your Majesty's graciousness.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
929. From the terrible news which this courier brings you will understand my condition. A worse could not be conceived. I have arrived here more dead than alive to rescue what little I can of my fortune and to save my life from those who are lying in wait for me everywhere. I recall your pity and prudence and I beg you to have regard for the desolation of a good house. If the public orders are simply to deprive me of the character of ambassador, which is already lost by the sentence of banishment, God knows; if they are against my life and the property which I have here, I beg you not to desert me. If you can help me you could never perform a more worthy act. If you have the sentence against me, be so kind as to let me see it, as I know nothing about it. Before speaking to the king, keep absolutely silent about it, if you please, in order not to prejudice me, as he will find me ready to meet this great adversity with calm.
Gravesend, the 4th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
ANTONIO DONATO.
July 9.
Secreta,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
930. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have conversed with the English agent about the affairs of Germany and beg to report the following particulars. The Ambassador Wotton will perform offices with the princes there according to the state of affairs. If the Bohemians wish, his Majesty will make a declaration and resolution in their favour, and if they refuse he is bound to negotiate for a treaty. His Majesty has much better intentions in those affairs than is thought. The ambassador of the Bohemians at Heilbronn had brought forward four proposals, to make a league; to prevent the passage of troops from Flanders against them; to send some troops to help them and to give them a loan, but no reply had yet been sent. He told me that the Spaniards had discovered the duke's intentions and what he is doing in Germany against the house of Austria, as various papers have fallen into their hands. The Ambassador Wotton will negotiate with the princes and the States for a league with your Serenity. He asked me for some particulars. I said I had none, and made a few general remarks.
Turin, the 9th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
931. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The courier cannot leave before to-morrow, for lack of company. I therefore add this to my despatch. The seals remain on Donato's house. This amazes me because the Council told me they would have them removed. To-morrow or the day after I will discover the reason from one of them and will also try and persuade them to let the seals alone, if possible. Meanwhile I beg your Serenity to pay the courier's expenses. I am not able to do so without help. I have obtained letters of exchange from Burlamachi for my father.
London, the 12th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 12.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
932. The RECTORS of PADUA to the DOGE.
Bortolamio son of Giulio Turchetto asks for the confirmation of his election by the syndic and councillors of the Legists as one of the bedels of this university in succession to his father.
Padua, the 12th July, 1619.
In the College on 18 July, 1619.
That the said bedel be approved:
Ayes19.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
The councillors present at the election:
The councillors of Germany, Bohemia, Poland, Hungary, Provence, Burgundy, England, Spain, Scotland, Rome, Friuli, Lombardy, Milan, Venice, Tarento, Frejus, Dalmatia, Piedmont, Siena.
[Italian.]
July 12.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Risposte.
Venetian
Archives.
933. Rudolph Simes, an English merchant in this city begs your Serenity to grant him leave to send 100,000 ryals to Zante and Cephalonia to buy raisins for the west, though this is forbidden by the Senate. His petition was presented to us on the 9th inst. In reply we state that although the Senate on 19th May, 1618, forbad the sending of ryals from the city to Zante and Cephalonia, yet as we are particularly informed that these ryals are more readily taken and used in those islands than any other money, because they are expended with advantage on the mainland, where all other money is received with difficulty, and because all those who go to the said islands from Genoa, Leghorn and Marseilles to buy raisins, generally bring ryals, we therefore think that if we desire to maintain that trade and the customs it is practically necessary to permit the petitioner to take a certain quantity of ryals from the city to those islands, as if we do not grant this, in addition to the loss of the customs, the merchants, his principals, would adopt the Morea route for their raisins, to the grave prejudice of the new customs and of trade.
Zuanne Falier.Savii.
Marco da Molin.
Zuanne Basadonna.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
934. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Some deputies from Holland arrived here on Saturday to sign jointly with the commissioners here the treaty drawn up about the East Indian trade, arranged with the king. This was done on Tuesday in the Council, with mutual content. I went to congratulate the commissioners upon this. They received me in a friendly way and in the course of the conversation they said that with this union they felt sure that they would utterly expel the Spaniards from those parts in three years at most. In addition to the twenty armed ships that would be always cruising in those seas by the agreement, there would always be a hundred ships in those parts, English and Dutch, to lade merchandise, and all powerful.
Yesterday evening his Majesty came to London. To-day after dinner he went to a place seven miles away (fn. 1) and a week to-morrow he will begin his progress in the country, for which many of the gentlemen here are getting ready. They say it will last a month longer than usual, that means until the beginning of November, as his Majesty wishes it so.
News came here last week in a letter from Venice that Cardinal Borghese had been assassinated by the Colonna and Orsini, and a person in his company wounded. It has been much discussed.
London, the 19th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
935. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I heard that last Saturday the secretary of the Council went to Donato's house to take away the seals and release the goods, but when he was about to begin, orders reached him from Naunton to go no further, so he departed leaving everything as he found it. I have endeavoured to discover the reasons for this action of Naunton. I went to his apartments for this purpose and to ask him to request his Majesty to allow the seals to remain, as if the republic should bring any civil action against Donato it would be difficult to obtain satisfaction if the goods had been handed over to him. Naunton replied that he had sent orders to the secretary of the Council not to remove the seals, because he had received a letter that morning from Monti, agent of his Majesty at Venice, saying that Donato had spoken in a biting manner of this government to the Senate, (fn. 2) so he thought it better to postpone the execution of the orders of the Council until he had shown this letter to the king. He had done so, but his Majesty, moved by his kindly feeling towards Donato, said that even if he had spoken thus he would pardon him, and commanded that they should release his goods, out of compassion. Orders for this had already been given to the secretary of the Council, with a proviso that he should look more carefully to see if there were any jewels, gold or silver, because his Majesty did not intend Donato to have the use of such things, but that they should make an inventory of them to present to the Council. This would not be done, however, for some days. My request would in the meanwhile be brought before his Majesty. He asked me how long it would take for replies to my first letters on the subject to reach me from Venice. I then took leave.
I spoke earlier to the same effect to the secretary of the Council, who told me the same thing about the staying of removing the seals. But he said the goods soon would be released in virtue of the laws of England, which did not permit otherwise. I said the same as to Naunton so that he might report it to the Council, as he promised to do. Yesterday I went back to him to know when they would carry out the orders, so that I might be present at the new search. He said possibly to-morrow and they would let me know the time without fail, and he had nothing to reply to my arguments, which he had reported to the Council. I will therefore be ready to-morrow, and now I know that his Majesty only wishes to release the ordinary moveables of the house and clothing, I will tell him what I had previously decided, namely, to carefully search for the silver which Donato had before his departure, since it may not be true that he sold it. He is under obligation to pay the rent of the house for six months, I will do my best until orders arrive from your Serenity, although I anticipate some difficulties. I do not think that Donato has credit of any sort here, in any case I will make careful search for this.
London, the 19th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
936. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English agent told me that an ambassador extraordinary from his king had gone to Bohemia to perform offices adapted to the state of affairs and there will be a declaration for that part which will quickly bring about peace.
Turin, the 21st July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
937. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Prince Maurice told me with evident satisfaction that he heard Sir [Henry] Wotton had gone to England. They were afraid he was to accompany the extraordinary ambassador of his king. He said this could not possibly do any good for the Bohemians. He added: I do not know what the ambassador can do for them, as his king loves peace, even a deceptive one as at Wesel. I asked if any reply had been given to the representations about giving fresh instructions to the ambassador. He said no reply had come. They were expecting the return of the commissioners every day and then they would know the king's mind. I think he wished to infer that nothing much could be expected from the King of England in such a matter.
The Hague, the 23rd July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Capitano
General
de Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
938. LORENZO VENIER, Captain General at Sea and the Proveditori and Commissioners of the Fleet, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The companies of Colonel Peyton are brave troops under a brave and prudent leader. We have not heard whether they are diminishing.
There are 8,035 infantry in the fleet, to wit, 3,156 Dutch, 353 English, 158 Corsicans, 1,039 Italians, including 100 sick, 1,092 Greeks, 1,144 Croats and 1,067 Albanians.
The galley at Curzola, the 23rd July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 24.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
939. The Secretary of the King of Great Britain came into the Cabinet and said:
I have a letter from Naunton, his Majesty's principal secretary. It found the ambassador on his journey and he sent it on to me. As the result of strong representations made by his Majesty's ambassador in Spain, strict orders have been sent to the Duke of Ossuna to restore the ships taken and punish the Uscocchi for taking a merchant ship. This will certainly be done. But they complain that the ministers of your Serenity have taken some ships of the King of Spain, especially one laden with arms and munitions for his service, so it is reasonable that your Serenity should make speedy restitution. I might say many things on this head but it suffices to remark that it is his Majesty's wish.
The doge asked to see the memorial, and when told that the letter was in English, requested that it might be left or else a memorial. The doge continued: This is an old affair and little adapted to secure peace and quiet. It is like a jest to speak of giving orders and then acting in quite a contrary sense. They have often promised restitution and spoken of orders, but now we know the evil aims of the Spaniards. We have given not words, but deeds, restoring towns, fortresses and lands, yielding a revenue of half a million of gold. We have received nothing but words and traps. They have publicly sold the galleys at Naples and have harboured the Uscocchi, giving them the royal flag. The letter you bring seems very short to contain the matter you speak of. If our general has detained some ship in the Gulf, it is because we have to guard it. You are a subject of the republic and as such and as a good minister of your king you ought to write that the republic is acting sincerely and you may perceive the designs of the others from their proceedings.
The secretary said: I have written and will write as a most devoted servant. There is another matter. A certain quantity of lead has reached Malamocco. The podestà there claims that it comes under his jurisdiction. Those interested have induced the Masters of the Revenue to write to him, but he will not obey or pronounce any sentence. I beg your Serenity to intervene. He was told that if he presented a memorial they would consider the subject, and with that he took leave.
To Sir Henry Wotton, his Majesty's ambassador at Venice, or to his Majesty's agent in his absence.
You must know that in the letters of Mr. Cottingham from Spain we are advised that the king has ordered the Duke of Ossuna to make restitution of the merchandise taken, as was arranged, and to imprison the Uscocchi who plundered the last ship, and restore everything, for which the Venetian ambassador in Spain will give a receipt. Cottingham will see to this and his Majesty will act as mediator for the Venetians. We hear that the Venetians have taken divers Spanish ships, and one recently, laden with arms, destined for Trieste for King Ferdinand. They are much disturbed by this and have asked his Majesty to procure restitution. You should therefore persuade the republic to do what they desire Spain to do for them, especially as orders have been given to Ossuna to make restitution. I may assure your Excellency that the Duke of Ossuna will not fail to obey such an order, but will desire to have the like justice from his neighbours.
Whitehall Palace, London, the 9th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
ROBERT NAUNTON.
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
940. That the Secretary of the King of Great Britain be summoned to the Cabinet and the following be read him:
What you have said about the Duke of Ossuna having received orders to make restitution is an old story, but they have never done anything. The restitution required of us will be made when they have made the restitution provided in the treaties. There is nothing to say about the other ships stopped by our representatives in the Gulf, because they were taken for victualling and have been paid for. You can represent this prudently with the knowledge you possess of the truth, so that his Majesty may be well informed and recognise that we are doing our utmost for the peace and may continue his friendly offices, to which we are greatly indebted.
Ayes101.
Noes4.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
941. To the Secretary in England.
We have received no letters from you this week. The last are of the 27th ult. relating the reported rebellion of the Duke of Ossuna and what the ambassador of Savoy said about it. We feel sure that you did not commit yourself, as you have not heard from us. You will say that these reports are probably figments designed to prejudice our interests and the republic does not credit them. Our republic simply desires peace. You will try to divert the conversation as from something fictitious and of slight importance. You will see from the enclosed copy what we have said to his Majesty's secretary here in reply to his representations. You will see the secretary Naunton and tell him that we recognise his Majesty's friendly disposition in the representations made in Spain in our favour and warmly thank him. His secretary has spoken to us about the promised restitution by Spain and asked us to release the ships detained by our representatives. We regret that his Majesty has been deceived by mere phrases; we only wish the Spanish assurances were sincere, but the contrary is shown to be the case by their actions. The republic has shown patience for a long while, has carried out her share of the treaty and is ready to restore the ship if they also make restitution, even though their ships came with arms and munitions of war under cover of merchandise to help the Archduke Ferdinand, and therefore deserved to be treated as an enemy. Other ships detained by our representatives carried provisions which we requisitioned for our fleets, towns and fortresses, as has been the custom at all times, and the things were paid for at a fair price. However, since they complain of this orders have been sent to our representatives not to detain any others except in case of great necessity. We have thought good to tell you all this so that his Majesty may appreciate our motives and that he may direct his offices to those quarters where much is promised but little expected. We are always ready to do what is proper for peace, as we have never disturbed others but simply defended ourselves. You will tell the secretary the decision of the republic upon the rumours spread by Ossuna, using the words given above.
Ayes101.
Noes4.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
942. To the Captain General at Sea.
The master of the ship Anadem, recently dismissed from our service, has presented to the Proveditori of the fleet his stamped book, which simply contains the payment made at various times for the hire of the ship, without describing any man either by sign or name or any note of search made since the 27th April last. This simply shows that the musters are not made with proper diligence. This will prove greatly to the prejudice of the republic and leaves everything to the indiscretion of the owners and officers, who are most greedy for all unlawful and fraudulent gain. All this has been neglected since the 27th April, that is to say for three months, during which payments have been made to them. We therefore direct you that the musters and searches must be made every month.
Ayes102.
Noes0.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
943. Colonel Henry Peyton, who is serving in the fleet with English infantry is creditor for his wages of 200 ducats a month for five months completed on 10th August next, and which ought to be paid where he is serving. He asks that they may be paid to him in this city, as by letters of our Captain General at Sea of the 6th inst. and the declaration of the commissioners; that the Ragionati Ducali be instructed to transfer the payments to Peyton for the five months, and that the money be paid him in this city by letters of advice of the Captain General at Sea, who shall be informed of this decision.
Ayes102.
Noes0.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
944. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Friday evening the secretary of the Council sent to inform me that on the following morning he would go to remove the seals from Donato's house and to make a more careful search there. I therefore sent the interpreter with a note requesting the secretary to make careful enquiry about the silver in virtue of his Majesty's last orders not to leave the use of the jewels, gold or silver, to Donato but make an inventory of them. The interpreter reported that they said I had not rightly understood his Majesty, as they referred only to jewels and unworked gold or silver. Thus all the property has been released including the silver of the chapel. The secretary left after half an hour's secret conversation with Donato, to whom he complained upon the contents of Monti's letter of last week. Firstly, that he had stated to the Senate that the king was of no religion; then that he let himself be ruled by a youth, namely Buckingham; that Lord Hay, the ambassador, had gone at the expense of the Spaniards, with no good intentions, and finally, that Canterbury had once said to him that the Duke of Savoy was a fleeced creature (un spellato) and a good for nothing. (fn. 3) I hear that Donato went to see Naunton to justify himself against these charges. Naunton appeased him and promised to report his defence to the king, who would hear it gladly, although he said what I reported in my last. To-day Donato is to go and see the king at Theobalds, (fn. 4) being summoned by a gentleman who was in his house the day before yesterday. It is said he will very shortly be knighted. I hear he has sold all his silver and is now parting with his furniture. He has found a small house to live in and has dismissed all his servants but two.
London, the 26th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
945. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The fleet from Fernambuco has arrived at Lisbon. They report the discovery of a channel about latitude 53 towards the east leading to the sea del Sur, easy to navigate, 7 to 8 leagues long and not more than 4 wide. Near the mouth were three islands. They said his Majesty should send to secure the entrance to this channel against the English and Dutch, as it was very important for trade, providing the shortest and safest route to the Indies and the Philippines. (fn. 5)
Two days before a man returned from the Philippines, who had been sent three years before by sea by his Majesty, with orders to return by land. He spoke, among other things, of the necessity of fortifying those parts against the English and Dutch, who multiply daily.
Madrid, the 28th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
946. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The duke has spoken to me before the English agent about granting a passage for troops. The agent has sent to the Palatine and written to the States and England by order of his Highness showing the need to put no hindrance in the way.
Turin, the 29th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
947. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
While I was speaking with the duke Wake, the English resident, came up. The duke said he had received very affectionate letters from the Palatine, asking for the German troops levied by Sciavelisti and maintained in the state of the republic. I said this would be difficult to grant in the present circumstances. The agent said: Your Excellency may rest assured, the Spaniards cannot keep forces by land and by sea, in this province and in Germany. He urged that the help could be given without harming your Serenity. It was almost certain that the Spanish forces would not set foot in the Milanese. In case of danger the duke would always help and Lesdiguières would enter Italy with his forces.
I replied that we always felt sure of the duke's assistance, but in the present uncertainty we must be circumspect. We had already shown our devotion to the cause of the princes. The resident said the thing could be done easily and without noise. The duke also pressed the matter.
After dinner the Resident Wake called upon me and again urged the matter and presented me with the enclosed document so that I might represent the affair to your Serenity and give him a reply to send in writing to the Palatine. I repeated the former considerations, promised to refer the matter to your Serenity, but said I could not give a written reply, as it was contrary to the habits of the republic. However, he pressed me for an early answer.
Turin, the 29th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
948. To the Doge of Venice.
The affairs of Germany are in such confusion, through the machinations of those who wish to disturb the common peace, that if a remedy be not speedily applied the common liberty may suffer a serious reverse. Many foreign troops have been introduced into the empire, but the princes have wished to convince the world of their pacific intentions. Now however they think that they must face the enemy. They therefore hope that the republic of Venice will allow them the help of the German cavalry now in her pay, and pay them for six months; they will consider it a loan and pay high interest. This cavalry cannot serve against Ossuna's fleet and there is little danger in Lombardy owing to the few troops in the state of Milan. Moreover the Duke of Savoy is ready to help. I therefore beg you, in the name of the princes, to afford them this assistance.
The 25th July, 1619.
ISAAC WAKE.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
949. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Bohemians have written to the States saying that they clearly perceive that his Majesty's ambassador will do everything possible to arrange a peace, but nothing more, and that the king would do far better to send them men or money than ruin them in this way.
The Hague, the 30th July, 1619.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Consiglio de'X.
Parti Secrete.
Venetian Archives.
950. In the Council of Ten.
That in conformity with the decision of the 5th June, 1613, 100 ducats be given to Pier Antonio Zon, destined as secretary to Hieronimo Lando, ambassador elect to the King of Great Britain, as a gift, to put himself in order, in the usual way.
Ayes16.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
951. To the Podestà of Malamocco.
Some English merchants complain that some lead destined for them has been stopped and they see no end to the affair, although our governors of the revenues have written to you about it. We therefore direct you to waive all difficulties which may delay the despatch of the affair and give sentence immediately so that the matter may be done with so far as you are concerned, and that we may not have cause to commit to you the sending of the goods and the process formed or to write any more on the subject, which would cause our displeasure.
Ayes18.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Greenwich.
2 Monti wrote on 21st June telling of the sentence against Donato. After supplying the particulars he continues, "Le superbe impertinenze di Antonio lo rendono privo in ciascuno di compassione. Et la sua mordacityà (per quanto io sono informato) usata nella relazione che ha fatto in Senato di cotesta sua Ambasciata non merita minima parte della buona grazia di Sua Maestà. Sicome n'è ben meritevole il Sig. Cavalier Foscarini, per haver in congresso privato rintuzzato la maledicenza di detto Donato." State Papers, Foreign, Venice.
3 These particulars are not contained in Monti's letter, which has been quoted above (note at page 575) nor in any other letter of Monti preserved at the Public Record Office. Some of them are given, however, in a letter to Carleton from an anonymous correspondent dated from Bologna on the 21st June, 1619. State Papers, Foreign. Venice.
4 Donato saw the King on Saturday, the 27th, when he denied the imputations against him and showed the King a paper which he professed to have read before the Senate, advising them to submit all their differences and difficulties in the Gulf to the arbitration of James. The King declared himself completely satisfied and promised Donato his protection. Salvetti to Cioli, 2nd Aug., 1619. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962.A.
5 The discovery of a fresh way through the Straits of Magellan by the brothers Bartholomew Gracia and Goneolo de Nodal, sent from Lisbon by Philip III. to find a better route to the Philippines. Khevenhuüller, Annales Ferdinandi ix. pp. 800, 801.


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