Venice
July 1624, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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369-381

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'Venice: July 1624, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 18: 1623-1625 (1912), pp. 369-381. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88914 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Contents

July 1624

July 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
470. MARC ANTONIO MORESINI and ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
If the help from England comes promptly, as seems undoubted by the past advices, and the king seems well disposed, they have some idea here of constructing a fleet to which they will willingly contribute fifteen men of war to serve under the orders of the king's commanders, if he will provide a corresponding force. The Prince of Orange told me, Contarini, this the other day. This government will let slip no opportunities, especially of obtaining command of the sea. Everything is subordinated to this.
Nothing is said about the return of the ambassadors extraordinary from France and England, and their High Mightiness have received no news from them, except of the success of their negotiations generally. No copy of the articles of the treaties has arrived. They say the ambassadors will bring them, so that nothing may be published before their arrival.
The Hague, the 1st July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 1
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
471. LORENZO PARUTA, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The duke recently had a conference with me and the French ambassador, the Abbot Scaglia also being present. Marini said that France would like to see the count as commander of the forces of England, make a diversion in the Palatinate, when the allies might secretly contribute money. Venice and Savoy should be of the same opinion, as the outlay of a little money would greatly help our interests. The duke agreed that the allies should afford some satisfaction to the King of England in this matter in order to encourage his good resolutions, but as I had told him that your Serenity would not depart from the exact terms of the league, he did not see how this point could be adjusted. The Abbot Scaglia interrupted here, saying that we ought certainly to find some means of getting this diversion carried out by England with secret help from the allies, and claimed that the republic was committed by the article of the league upon the engagement of Mansfelt since France and his Highness were ready to help the Palatinate enterprise in this way. As the duke seemed to assent tacitly to this, although he would not do so openly, to avoid what he had said to me on the subject the week before, I endeavoured to contravert the abbot, quoting the articles of the league. I added that if we must increase our expenditure, we should do so openly under the standard of the league, and not secretly. This seemed to convince the duke, who said that if we gave up Mansfelt's diversion we must think of one with the Swiss. Marini agreed.
Turin, the 1st July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
472. PIERO VICO, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 22nd ult. with news of the ship Fiamenga by the Sicilian galleys, and I will write to the Consul Caraffa to make remonstrance to Prince Filiberto asking for the restitution of the goods. I will prefer a similar request for the goods of the most illustrious Francesco Zeno which were on the English ship wrecked at Trapani, although the consul assures me that public letters to the prince are necessary to ensure success.
Naples, the 2nd July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
473. PIERO VICO, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Some days back an English ship was arrested very well armed with forty pieces of ordnance and seventy-five men on board. The first pretext was for having fired its signal of departure with ball, and the master had to pay more than 300 crowns. Thinking he had put matters right by this payment he set sail to go to Messina, but was stopped again and accused of being a pirate. As everything that he stated has not proved true upon examination, he has not been able to obtain his release, and it is generally believed that the Spaniards will confiscate the ship, as they have removed all the men from it and have dismissed them from this city.
Naples, the 2nd July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
474. LUNARDO MORO and ALVISE CORNER, Venetian Ambassadors in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have carried out the decision to restore the jewels which the Prince of Wales left for the Infanta at his departure, as Don Andres de Prada has been to the English embassy to give them up. He also took a reply to the paper, which we enclose. He also handed the ambassador fifteen letters sent by the prince to the Infanta, which showed no sign of having been opened, saying that the Catholic had heard of the intentions and proceedings of the King of Great Britain and he did not think it proper to retain such a quantity of precious jewels, which had only been accepted for the marriage. The ambassador received everything saying that he would act as depository in expectation of his instructions. All the same he is perplexed by the action of the Spaniards, and admits that having some inkling beforehand he had tried to prevent it.
Madrid, the 4th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.475. REPLY to the paper handed in by the English Ambassador. (fn. 1)
[Spanish.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
476. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Mansfelt's secretary came to tell me about his mission, as I reported, but he arrived just as I was closing my despatch, so that I could only learn and report generalities. He returned and gave me a full account of what has taken place in France from the beginning. He describes Mansfelt as half a prisoner, his business incomplete and depending absolutely upon the result of the marriage. He asked me for advice and help. I thanked him and remarked that I had told Mansfelt that to attach the resolutions of England to the decisions of France meant dragging out things for ever and ending by doing nothing, and I did not see how I could help him.
The secretary afterwards went to find the Duke of Buckingham and the Secretary Conway. He told them substantially that although the French say that they mean to make war on the Spaniards this very year on their own account, they have publicly announced that they do not want to employ Mansfelt in common with England, unless the marriage is arranged beforehand. This might mean delay and the loss of time would be most detrimental especially if a diet in Germany arranged matters in the emperor's favour. Accordingly they ask that England shall employ Mansfelt alone with the 20,000l. remitted to France for the purpose. If Burgundy would not serve he could go to Germany where many would join him. Everything would be done in the name of the King of Bohemia.
Buckingham and Conway seemed very dissatisfied with these delays of France. They said the king would never decide alone to do any such thing. Burgundy certainly was not suitable, and as regards Germany they asked where Mansfeld should strike. The secretary said that ought to be left to his judgment, as if their plans were known they could easily be rendered vain. The others declared that they would not neglect to speak to the king and made some remarks upon the news of war between Denmark and Sweden. They promised him an answer yesterday. The worthy captain, a very observant and serious man, noticed that Buckingham was very decided but Conway somewhat less zealous than he seemed in the past. He remarked that he has other requests to make, namely, while they are not availing themselves of Mansfeld's services what must he do with the numerous officers on his hands. To me he expressed the hope that they would not dismiss them but send some provision. The other request was about Mansfeld's withdrawal here, as he knows that if the French match does not take place he will be practically lost. I commended Mansfeld for this foresight, and told the secretary what I heard the king had said to Spens, which I reported in my last, persuading him to put a retreat to this realm before every other place, so as to keep this burden as far as possible from your Serenity.
The captain also had a commission, left to his judgment by Mansfeld, to settle the differences about the Catholics in the marriage negotiations, after sounding them here, suggesting that the King of England should promise not to molest Catholics in their persons or property, unless they did anything against the king and his edicts, a reasonable proposal for both parties, which has been communicated in some way to the French commissioners and the ambassadors. Neither side seems entirely to disapprove of it, but owing to the customary difficulty as to who shall be the first to give way, the mediation of a third and independent party might be needed, in which capacity Mansfeld would willingly act, as he knows that without the marriage all is over with him in France. But the secretary recognises the uselessness of speaking upon this proposal owing to the advices sent by Carlisle, either because the proposal itself does not meet with approval or because Carlisle wants to keep everything to himself, by ambition.
London, the 5th July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian.
Archives.
477. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The courier or secretary of Carlisle, together with the French request for advantages for the Catholics similar to those accorded to the Spaniards, brought Carlisle's refusal, and the article of Mansfeld with another article, perhaps drawn up by the Duke of Angoulême. The king did not see the letters of this despatch until two days after their arrival. When he did receive them he exclaimed at such diligence in writing and said these very words, that they wished to kill him with all these letters. Certainly the king has always detested business, and now hates it more than ever, and it is hard to snatch short intervals to negotiate with him (certo il re sempre aborrente da negotii, hora n'e afatto aborrentissimo, et male possono rubar piccioli intervalli per trattar con lui). They have not yet made the reply to the despatch, and this delay might be a sign of yielding if it were not caused by the king's dislike of business.
With affairs in this condition Kensington has arrived here unexpectedly, and the French ambassador here has been recalled. Kensington came with all speed and certainly was not recalled. The most obvious reason for his coming is lack of money, as certainly after he left he never received a farthing, as his wife herself told me more than once. The more secret reason does not appear, or whether it is something that he could not have confided to a letter without coming in person. Even if it is lack of money one can only marvel at such mistakes, and this supplies a criterion for the rest. Some, however, maintain that he has come to obtain the approval of certain articles.
The Ambassador Tilliers has been recalled unexpectedly by two couriers, when he was daily expecting his wife. A M. Fiat (fn. 2) is coming in his place and is on the way. Tillieres took leave of the king and prince yesterday and he starts to-morrow. When paying me his farewell visit he said that he would either return at once or if not his king would employ him as one of the commissioners about the marriage, though if true I do not think it would be of any advantage to the negotiations. He assured me that they would certainly make the marriage, or only fail through the fault of the English. I pointed out the great public advantage it would have; the desolation of religion if it failed and its non-effectuation would be the worst thing of all. We ought carefully to avoid the imprudence of the Spaniards, and the prudence of the wise has sometimes to cover and repair the imprudences of others. He admitted this, sincerely I hope. Certainly I cannot avoid misgivings about this marriage. I observe strong opposition in England and even stronger in France. The queen may be acting with subtlety; Carlisle is better fitted for vanities than negotiations and I hear that he recently gave some offence. The Ambassador Tilliers did not conceal this from me and he praised Kensington more. The prince has seemed melancholy all these last days; the king always more intimate with the bad ministers and entirely given over to the chase.
Inoiosa left last Monday, and finally obtained the passport he wanted, but he obtained no other satisfaction. He will pay for the ship that took him; he left before day; he took with him Father Maestro; he was not accompanied by Colonna; he only had Lewknor. He left cast down and bursting with wrath, his mouth full of fire. He left word about bringing back 100,000l. of jewels to distribute here. He is going to Flanders where he will stay a month. They do not think he will have a bad reception in Spain, owing to the support of the favourite Olivares. Colonna has stayed on, but he certainly will not be admitted to treat. He expects his licence shortly and has already sold his carriages. One of his secretaries recently went to the king. From Spain they have recently sent back all the jewels received from the king and prince and the letters written to the Infanta, unopened, as they were sent. The prince has felt this affront deeply, which also shows the duplicity of their negotiations. Much vituperation of the Ambassadors Carlisle and Kensington has issued from the Spanish embassy, and they pretend that owing to some differences in France they cast in the teeth of one his low birth and of the other his illegitimacy. (fn. 3)
They say that the fleet has arrived and announce that peace is being negotiated with the Dutch.
It is thought that the Dunkirk ships would attempt to escape from the toils in a high wind, which has been blowing these last days, despite the risk. They are already short of provisions, either because the English have not availed themselves of the leave to supply them or the Dutch have prevented it. They have enough to last two months, when all will be done. They will become unmanageable owing to the foulness of their bottoms. It is said that the Spaniards attempted to make a present of them to the king or to sell them to English merchants, and similar ideas to rescue them.
Two Scotch ships laden with grain for Holland have been captured by the Dunkirk ships. Their owners have laid a complaint before the king. He told them that he was receiving blows from every direction.
The Dutch ambassadors will leave after receiving presents and honours. I have nothing but good to report of their behaviour towards me, and I have fully responded, entertaining them at the embassy. I must lament being practically abandoned without that communication which is the soul of a knowledge of affairs, and to add to my distress there is the king's approaching progress, when he will go far away from the Court and deprive me of the means of rendering service.
They have begun the levy for the Dutch, writing recommendatory letters to the purveyors, and they can practically have whatever force they like. They will soon have enough money ready for a beginning, although a small sum.
The difference between Oxford and Southampton is not yet arranged, and all men avoid the task of deciding it. The Lords of the Council of War are considering Ireland and will certainly make some provision.
The Persian ambassador, after a long pause in his negotiations, has begun to treat again with Conway and Weston, deputed for the purpose, and there are great hopes of a satisfactory conclusion. I enclose the last reply from Spain, given in writing because they would not hear the ambassador.
London, the 5th July, 1624.
Postscript.—Mansfelt's secretary has not yet received his answer.
They delay sending back Carlisle's secretary, and Kensington's return is put off until next week. But all these only from one group of affairs. I hear that both the English and the French will concede something in the matter of religion, but it is certain that the king cares little for any marriage.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
dispatch.
478. DON CARLOS COLONNA will speak and write to the KING OF GREAT BRITAIN as follows:—
Sire,—My Master has seen a paper which Sir Walter Aston, your Majesty's ambassador, handed in at his last audience, containing the decision of your Majesty with the unanimous consent of the whole council of your kingdom to break off both the negotiations. He has commanded me to say that as this is a resolution and not a proposal he has nothing to say except that he hopes it may prove as beneficial to Christendom as is desirable, and so far as he is concerned he accepts it with very good will. God, from whom nothing is hidden, knows that in neither of these questions did he ever seek his own private interests or the interests of those belonging to him, but only the greatest good of Christendom and the peace of Germany, with a particular desire to afford satisfaction to your Majesty, and so arrange matters that he could give it.
If your Majesty remains of the same opinion that Sir Walter Aston has represented to my master as regards the German negotiations, his Majesty will guide his actions and his forces with the same object and intention as your Majesty and the world will see; without any fine phrases, but merely to fulfil the duties of his position, in his desire for the peace of Christendom and the good of his church.
Madrid, the 29th May, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
479. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Savoy embraces the new proposals for his own advantage. He diverted the French from employing Mansfelt. He also diverted the Alsace plan. I am perfectly certain that Mansfelt broached the Genoa plan as an inducement to his Highness as he cared for no other diversion. England would adopt both plans to interest the League, but if France does not join England would not engage in an enterprise so far away, and Mansfelt will not be employed by them, I fancy, because if they have to act alone they will want some commander more under their control. But England is unlikely to act by herself, and she can do nothing by land, while the French will make no open movement unless the English stir or the allies take their part.
With England and France thoroughly united, with war in Germany and preparations in France and Italy, the Spaniards would certainly yield to necessity, and with the question of the Grisons settled the Duke of Savoy knows that neither France nor the republic would want to fight any more; accordingly he is more inclined to confound matters than to divert the perils.
Bacq a Choysi, the 5th July, 1624.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
480. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Earl of Carlisle in exchanging visits has discussed various matters with me. He asked me about the plans of the League. I seized the opportunity to say that the moment seemed propitious for his king to recover the Palatinate, and as the general advantage consisted in committing France, they should force his hand by the example of strong resolutions.
The ambassador remarked that he did not understand why they refused the help of his king, which would benefit the League more than England. To interest England he would have supposed that France and the League would cast everything aside. The expenses would not be considerable, as it would not last long; the advantage would be immediate and success certain.
I said the League could do no more than act for the Grisons, while his king could seize the opportunity to strengthen his own forces and designs. He said. If the League will not contribute in common, we shall decide for ourselves. I know that if we liked to make an offensive and defensive league with the Spaniards against every one, we could have the Palatinate, but my king knows that this would harm the Most Christian, the Most Serene Republic and the Netherlands, and would not be likely to take this step.
I remarked that his Majesty had too much prudence to work his own harm, and past negotiations showed what the hopes for the recovery of the Palatinate amounted to.
He told me a great deal about the advantages and drawbacks of the Spanish match, and the impossibility of its happening and of the prejudice with which they desire the French one. He also remarked that the Grisons concern your Serenity precisely as the Palatinate concerns his master; but France was equally interested in the Palatinate and the Grisons, and to escape from these complications we must unite the two affairs.
I said that union consisted in acts, not promises. France was already preparing, England should do the same. We were deeply concerned about the Grisons but could hardly engage ourselves in other matters, despite our anxiety to please his king, owing to the heavy expenses. I so far convinced him that he suggested that the results might be obtained by two separate leagues with assurances that a truce or peace should only be made in concert. I said that no better security could be found than the realisation of the objects of our league, and if England acted similarly with her friends, she would undoubtedly obtain similar results at the same time. Negotiations for other combinations might lose time and spoil good plans, and we should all do better to seize the present opportunity without delay. He did not admit this but said that if we lost this opportunity, we might not easily find another. He spoke of recovering the promise for Mansfelt and said he could not wait.
This persuades me that the English are not inclined to employ the count by themselves and I think he recognises this because he wants an engagement from all and made me two proposals to this effect. Mansfelt told me that the ministers here had suggested to the English employing him after the conclusion of the marriage, in the diversion for Nice and offered to put 10,000 French on English ships to make some descent upon Spain, but the English would not agree.
I know that the French intend to employ Mansfelt for a diversion jointly on the conclusion of the marriage, but the offices of his Highness have disturbed matters and make it easier for France to withdraw.
Bacq a Choysi, the 5th July, 1624.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
481. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The suspicion that the English aspire to Madame de Montpensier has reached the ears of those who have charge of Madame's marriage and they have secretly decided to prevent it, even by violence. They have ordered the Ambassador Tillieres back, as they think he is not helping Madame and for other suspicions. They have sent Fiat as extraordinary, who is trusted, but of no great repute. A fortnight ago they said Tillieres was confirmed and now he is suddenly recalled. Lord Rich left for England before these expeditions, after negotiating day and night with the Marquis of la Vieuville at very unsuitable times, and twice he went hunting to receive his Majesty's orders. This business has been kept remarkably secret. But the ministers and ambassadors alike recognised the difficulties in the way of the marriage besides the disinclination of the King of Great Britain. It is suspected that the Prince of Wales may have secretly contributed to this expedition to stay some fresh dealings of his father with the Spaniards; but I do not think that the ambassador left without previous permission and a practical conclusion in order to confirm the king and make a good impression during Buckingham's illness, which is said to have affected this and all other actions. The English at this Court are rather pleased and see that they despaired too soon, as the French are said to have expressed themselves more favourably of late.
Bacq a Choysi, the 5th July, 1624.
Postscript.—A rumour is current that the Spanish ambassador, Mendoza, has passed unrecognised through this kingdom for England.
[Italian.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
482. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Marquis of la Vieuville told me that as regards the English match he would show himself a man of deeds and of words. One cannot get to the bottom of the last negotiations, but as the temporal articles present no difficulties, I do not think that the French will raise any over the spiritual ones, except in matters concerning Madame's faith, and in general they will rest content with the apparent, rather than the real, if difficulties arise. It has been suggested to me that they may arrange some form that does not affect English affairs, or rather they may make two agreements, a public one for France and a secret one for England. Time will show whether these negotiations are sincere or merely intended to break off those with the Spaniards.
Bacq a Choysi, the 5th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
483. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to all the Courts, mutatis mutandis.
Instructions to avoid abbreviations, erasures, words added between lines or lines, which frequently alter the sense in the public letters. If it is necessary sometimes to add words of no great importance, which the secretaries must avoid as much as possible, they shall be in the same hand as the rest of the letter.
Ayes, 74.Noes, 2.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
484. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Bethune informed his Holiness of the proposals made in France for a marriage between the Prince of England and his Majesty's sister, and from this Court Bethune has sent all the conditions that were arranged here for the benefit of the Catholic faith, in the marriage negotiations with Spain.
Rome, the 6th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
485. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
All four ambassadors have drawn up a very efficacious arz about the pirates, which we hope to present ourselves to the Sultan, if we can find a way, and we hope it will produce a good effect.
The Vigne of Pera, the 6th July, 1624.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 6.
Misc.
Cod. No. 63.
Venetian,
Archives.
486. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spanish ambassador has received copies of the letter written by the King of England to the King of Spain, breaking off the marriage, and the reply. I hear that both are fine documents. He communicated them to Caesar alone and will not allow any one else to see them.
Vienna, the 6th July, 1624.
[Italian; copy.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
487. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In England they are levying 6,000 foot under three prominent subjects to send to Holland. The king there told the Marquis of Inoiosa that he would not give him audience and he might go back to Spain whenever he pleased.
Florence, the 6th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
488. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassadors Aerssens and Joachim have returned from England whither the States sent them to ask for help. They bring word of complete success, having arranged for the help of 6,000 paid foot, with the obligation to repay the expenses if peace is made or a truce of twelve or more years, and they will maintain 4,000 foot if the king needs them. They made their statement in the Assembly and saw the Prince of Orange on the following day.
They expect little from the King of England but much from the prince and Buckingham and most of all from the four colonels in command, some of whom have commanded in this country and others in the Palatinate and all are enemies of the Spaniards. They hope to get these troops here in a month or little more, and the Prince of Orange is most eager for this in order to commit the king so far that he cannot easily withdraw. The prince told me this in confidence.
Three days ago Sir Robert Anstruther, English ambassador to Denmark, and other princes of the circle, arrived at this Court, to inform them of the resolutions of England and to urge them to unite and arm for the recovery of the Palatinate. Soon afterwards news came that the King of Sweden, having made a truce with the Poles, has attacked Denmark, who, relying upon the peace signed under the word of the King of Great Britain, had been taken unawares.
This news, though not confirmed, has stayed the Ambassador Anstruther here. He has tried hard to induce the States to intervene in the interests of peace. I understand that he found them willing and they practically promised to send special missions if the affair goes on. He at once sent word to his king, as this quarrel might easily destroy all the hopes recently aroused.
I called upon this ambassador, who punctiliously returned the visit, and gave me the information I have written.
He attaches great importance to the changed sentiments of the king. The prince learned a great deal on his late journey and in future they will know how to deal with the tricks of the Spaniards. He made much of the departure of the Spanish ambassadors and said he would work hard for the union of Germany and the employment of Mansfelt if France, your Serenity and Savoy will unite the interests of the Valtelline and the Palatinate, and he promises help with troops to these Provinces.
I could not help remarking here that if his Majesty helps the States they cannot understand why he protects the four Dunkirk galleons blockaded by their ships. He said it was certainly strange, but otherwise it would mean a declaration of war with Spain, and this was not convenient for the moment, owing to the negotiations with France.
He also attaches great importance to the action of Sweden, since it is an affront to his king even more than to Denmark, owing to his pledged word, and it would be necessary to put aside everything else and settle this. He spoke with feeling and affection of the King of Denmark, with whom he has stayed a long time previously.
I noticed one thing that makes me doubtful of the resolutions of England, that is that after communicating his offices to the princes of the circle for union, if they resolve upon this he said he must first move them to send a solemn embassy to the emperor praying for the restitution of the Palatinate, so clearly the ultimate medicine either will not be used or will only be used last.
The Hague, the 8th July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 8
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
489. LORENZO PARUTA, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Wake, the English ambassador designate to you Serenity, has arrived at this Court, where has has been honoured and entertained by the duke's order with every sign of friendship and esteem. When his Highness returns from Rivoli, this evening or to-morrow morning, he will have his first audience, and will pay the usual Court visits. I have in the meantime paid him my respects, through my secretary, Vico, to whom the ambassador tendered his warmest thanks, expressing his devotion to the most serene republic and his esteem for me, and saying that he expected to be in Venice very soon.
Turin, the 8th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 9.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
490. To the PROVEDITORE of CEPHALONIA.
In accordance with a memorandum of 22nd April last about the new impost on raisins and the replies of the Five Sages of the Mercanzia thereupon, we have decided to put it in execution and are sending two wardens to help with the customs. We desire that the purchaser shall always be bound to the payment of that custom which for the future must be paid in the Chamber in current value. The matter of the value of ryals is deferred for further consideration.
In order to secure the payment of the duty on kerseys and cloth, the pieces which pay must be stamped at both ends or in some other safe way, and all cloth found without such stamp shall be considered as smuggled, without further examination and confiscated as such. You will issue similar orders for lead, tin and other goods subject to the same duty.
We further desire that a note be taken of all the raisins gathered, from the original owners and from the buyers and Prosticchieri, and you will send this note with another giving the imports of cloth, tin and other things discharged from ships to the Five Sages aforesaid, from time to time.
That the like be sent to the Proveditore of Zante, and that the Five Sages be instructed to send the said new officials to Cephalonia and Zante immediately.
Ayes, 111.Noes, 1.Neutral, 13.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Brescia.
Venetian
Archives.
491. MARC' ANTONIO CORRER, Venetian Captain of Brescia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses various accounts with copies of the rolls of that city and castle, li Orzi and Asolo and an abstract of the troops in all these places. Impossible to pay the troops or meet other expenses without further assistance.
Brescia, the 10th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
492. Extract from abstract of the troops in Brescia, the 27th June, 1664.
Colonel Durante Pregni with 143 Ultramontane foot.
Captain Hanfredo Chemps, an Englishman, with 115 foot.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The reply is printed below as an enclosure to Valaresso's despatch of the 5th July.
2 Antoine Coiffier de Ruzé Marquis of Effiat.
3 Hay was the son of a Scottish gentleman, Sir James Hay, of Kingask, and his nobility was of quite recent date. Rich was the second son of Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick by Penelope Rich, whose amours with Lord Mountjoy had been going on for some time before his birth in 1590.