Venice
July 1624, 22-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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397-404

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'Venice: July 1624, 22-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 18: 1623-1625 (1912), pp. 397-404. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88916 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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Contents

July 1624

July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
512. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The new English levies are beginning to arrive here. Two companies, though not complete, of the Earl of Oxford's regiment have landed at Rotterdam, and one of the Earl of Essex at Flushing. They have sent commissioners to both places to arrange quarters. There is some doubt about their payment here, but the Burlamachi and others offer to make advances.
The Marquis of Inoiosa has arrived at Brussels, where Spinola met him. He breathes poison and hatred against the English and Buckingham.
The English ambassador here presses for the punishment or disavowal of the Commander of Amboyna in the East Indies, for hanging the English conspirators there, but the stronger his insistence, the more carefully they answer him. They admit that the commander went too far, but contend that if they punish or offend him there is danger that the fort may fall into the hands of the Spaniards, to the prejudice of both nations.
News has reached Amsterdam that the fleet of Admiral Wilsens with Colonel Dort has captured Baii in Brazil, an important place where the governor lives. The Prince of Orange told the English ambassador and me that Dort had instructions to do this before he left.
Captain James Scoth, a Scot, who commands an Ultramontane company for your Serenity at Verona, is here on leave. Owing to certain money matters which may drag on a long while, he begs for an extension of his leave for six months longer. He says he left his brother, an ensign, in charge of the company and a lieutenant named Leslie, an experienced soldier.
The Hague, the 22nd July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
513. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The other day the old Count della Torre called upon me. He told me that the Palatine is living in utter idleness, doing nothing for his own affairs. If he lost his wife and the assignment made to her from England he might be in want. He praised Gabor on the other hand. He spoke of Mansfeld's hopes from the King of England showing me recent letters from the count.
The Hague, the 22nd July, 1624.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
514. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Learning that three men with public letters had been detained at Galata by the Vaivode, I sent to demand their release. He said he could not do it without special orders from the Caimecam, to whom I made complaint the next morning. He seemed angry and ordered their release at once. They were brought to him, but the Chiaus Pasha, the Musur Aga and the Caimecam's servants thought that as all Constantinople was in an uproar about the attack of the Cossacks, and three letters were reported to come from the Cossacks to the Christians here, it was necessary in order to satisfy the people, to open and read the letters and keep the men prisoners, as it might be said that they had handed over the men and letters because of bribes from the ambassadors. This alarmed the Caimecam and he whispered to the Dragoman Autonachi: Tell the Bailo not to take offence if I do not give up the letters, but come here this evening and I will give them. That night he was in the Arsenal, and in the morning he asked me to have patience. Seeing that he was well disposed but afraid, I thought fit to tell Calil, in conjunction with the other ambassadors interested for their letters and we sent our secretaries to him. He said he had just sent a capigi to ask me what was the matter; on learning he ordered a horse to be saddled, but afterwards said he could do it better the next morning in the Divan. There he spoke strongly about the detention of the letters and opening them, declaring that the Sultan had no better friends in the world at present than the four princes who keep their ambassadors here, and they did not want to lose them by such bad treatment. He then ordered that the letters should be handed to me at once.
The Vigne of Pera, the 23rd July, 1624.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Consiglio
di X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
515. In the Council of Ten.
That leave be granted to Francesco da Mosto, son of Hieronimo, to treat with the ministers of the English ambassador and the resident of Mantua, for letting his house and allow them to see it for the same purpose, the leave to be for two or three times only as with similar grants to others.
Ayes, 13.Noes, 1Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.516. Petition of Francesco da Mosto to the Council of Ten, that whereas he has to leave the house where he is at present dwelling and provide himself with another habitation, and an opportunity has occurred of letting it to the English ambassador or the resident of Mantua, he may have leave to show the said house, which is at San Pantaleon in the Court of Marconi, and let it to the said ambassador or resident and treat with their agents thereupon, adding that when they come to see it, he will not be at home.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
517. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Fiat remains mostly with the Court outside the city. He frequently goes hunting with the king, was feasted by Buckingham at one of his country houses and has received a similar favour from the Earl of Warwick. Thus he seems welcome to all, and his behaviour is highly praised. He expects to improve his service by this familiarity and the English expect to win him by friendly treatment. I cannot yet discover that he has any orders for particular negotiations and am confirmed in my idea that he has come to sound the king's intentions, and to manipulate the feelings of the Catholics here on the subject of religion. He has a Capuchin with him as chaplain, a pious and discreet man whom I have heard express prudent and moderate opinions. The intentions of France in the matter of religion seem to be to obtain a continuance of connivance for the Catholics and the non-prosecution of the laws against them. Apparently they would rest content with this. The king and prince will certainly concede something, although the latter, owing to the oath he took in the parliament, can never consent to so much as was granted to the Spaniards.
The principal question is whether the French will place themselves in the pope's hands in the matter; if they do so absolutely, one can foresee that they will not obtain the dispensation except upon the conditions granted to the Spaniards; but if they do not seem so anxious to have it, the pope will probably grant them what he cannot refuse. The ambassador admitted to me that the Catholics here can never un Spanish themselves; they speak to him in very cavalier fashion, practically demanding that France, as no less Catholic than Spain, shall obtain equally favourable conditions. But, unless I am mistaken, the ambassador so far has dealt with them in very prudent fashion, showing them clearly that as the Spaniards never wanted the marriage, as so many indications go to prove, all the terms in their favour were nothing but a mockery and a delusion. However, some of the Catholics here do not cease to clamour about the severe persecution they fear, and which they say has already begun, because the ordinary officials have received orders to execute the pecuniary laws against them, maintaining that this persecution of their goods will be worse than that of their bodies. Yet these orders have barely been issued, and none or very few have been executed, and all may simply be for show or merely a device, to have them withdrawn at the request of France and make it appear as her gift, what was previously granted to Spain.
Kensington keeps delaying his start and apparently Fiat would like more despatch. The reason for delay seems to be because they cannot make up their minds about the articles he is to propose. The details of the affair are kept very secret, and not even communicated to any of the Lords of the Council, being confined to the king, the prince and Buckingham alone. From what I hear Kensington will receive an earldom, and when he has gone to France I understand that Carlisle may return for a few days. The French ambassador proposes to follow the king on his progress, although I fancy the king would rather he stayed behind, but though he has the title of ambassador he claims the same freedom as Kensington showed in France, though he did not have the title. His Majesty begins his progress tomorrow; it will be the most extensive he has made for a great while, involving journeying of almost 200 miles. It will cost about 30,000l. and impose a burden upon the country of about as much again, about 600 carts being required for the baggage, and it will prove very inconvenient for all other business. This absence of the Court and of the French ambassador must serve as my excuse if I prove wanting with my usual advices.
The levy for the Dutch proceeds apace. The money was supplied promptly, men have not been lacking and the Ambassador Caron has asked for it to be hastened on, so they hope that all the colonels will cross the sea within ten days. The troops will be rather fine ones than otherwise, although the low Dutch rate of 4s. a week stood much in the way to keep out the best. They have 45s. for clothing each soldier, 35 for arms and 16 for the passage, each shilling being worth 30 of our soldi. They will receive their clothing and arms in Holland, and will thus pass unarmed and in some disorder, putting too much confidence perhaps in the safety of the passage. They are also levying 2,500 men who will be selected and commanded in the usual way, to send to Ireland, not under any particular commander, but relegated to the old companies. Four royal ships, well armed, have been selected for the careful guarding of the four principal ports of the kingdom, and two have been newly sent to guard Ireland. They are not thinking of another fleet for this year. The Dunkirk ships will certainly be lost, but the men will escape, as they can get away freely, and they expect to sink the guns in a place which will prevent others from recovering them.
The Ambassador Colonna is ready to start and is expecting his orders at any moment, and the door seems absolutely shut against any other Spanish minister. They have either written or are about to write to recall Aston, the English ambassador in Spain; besides other reasons they want him as a witness and informer in Bristol's case. That individual has recently inflamed his old quarrels with Buckingham by fresh words, reported by a third person, and I know that Buckingham sent to tell him that he would give him cause to repent of his ostentation. But Bristol remains undaunted and persists in asking that parliament shall judge him. In the meantime his own courage and the irresolution of his opponents seem to some extent to have improved his cause. It is considered certain that parliament will resume after Michaelmas, a thing which will confirm the good begun.
That young Bret who had received some sign of favour from the king left the Court owing to the treasurer's fall. One day he made up his mind, by whose advice is not known, to go and kneel before the king in the country, when returning from his hunting, but his Majesty roughly drove him away, threatening to have him hanged, a strong sign of Buckingham's continued favour and of the treasurer's ruin. (fn. 1)
They still give fair words to Mansfeld's secretary though he has no answer as yet, with assured hopes of employing his master. I surmise that he will eventually withdraw to England, a course which I should support.
The ordinary ambassador for France, Herbert, has returned. From what I have heard they will give the post to Murton, of whom I have written before.
A Milanese has arrived here recently, sent, they say, by the Spaniards to poison Buckingham. (fn. 2) Many circumstances excite the belief that this is an invention to obtain money; but the matter has been placed in the hands of a secretary and apparently the matter will be thoroughly sifted.
News has arrived of some accommodation between Denmark and Sweden. With this progress approaching, I went yesterday to the king and prince to offer my good wishes, and both were very pleased. I went the more readily because it gave me an opportunity to renew my instances about the raisins, and I was so fortunate that I finally obtained the king's promise that the matter should be settled as I desired, and as the Secretary Conovel was also present, I took the opportunity to have the order given to him. If we can trust the king's word this affair should no longer remain doubtful, but I cannot help feeling misgivings, especially as this blessed progress intervenes, though I certainly shall not neglect to strike the iron while it is hot.
I refrained from speaking to his Majesty upon other public affairs, seeing the contents of your Serenity's letters of the 14th June. I also thanked the prince for what he had obtained from his father, with the object of getting a further hold upon him.
London, the 26th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
518. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Before the Court left Compiègne, the Marquis of la Vieuville conferred with the Count of Mansfelt in the presence of the Duke of Angoulême. They suggested various ways of employing Mansfelt. He proposed raising a force with help from England, independent of the League, if the allies do the like, the forces to be united if the French agreed, and then to proceed to Alsace and the Tyrol, to help the Grisons and to some extent serve the interests of the Grisons.
Vieuville did not give the necessary guarantees for the realisation of these proposals, putting it off until the conclusion of the marriage, when Mansfelt could promise the King of Great Britain that France would act. He made liberal promises to the count, who told me that which ever side employed him, he would go to Venice. He has some suspicions that neither England nor France wishes to see him employed. The Earl of Carlisle told me he had admitted to him that he had instructions to make a show of wishing to make war in conjunction with France, but to break it off endeavouring to throw the blame on others. He suspected that the French had written to London to stop his employment. The ministers here remarked to me that the English will not employ Mansfelt except for general interests and not at their own expense, and from what Carlisle and Vieuville have said I see that these negotiations will evaporate in nothing and each side will blame the other.
The Earl of Carlisle told me that the marriage will take place, and his king has divined the proceedings of France, but he will confirm his generosity and good intentions and they will come off with the bride, the honour, and the money.
We hear of Fiat's arrival in England, his honourable welcome and what the Prince of Wales said about his devotion to his Majesty and his love for Madame. Fiat writes that he hopes for the conclusion of the marriage but difficulties still remain. The English ambassador promises more and says Lord Rich may get back any day, having been delayed by public as well as private affairs.
Yesterday the Spanish ambassador paid his first visit to the English, by special order from his king. They whisper about proposals for restoring the Palatinate, but this is not well authenticated.
Paris, the 26th July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 27.
Misc.
Cod. No. 63.
Venetian
Archives.
519. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
This week at the instance of the Spanish ambassador, Ognate, the Council of State has been discussing what steps they must take supposing the secret negotiations which they declare are proceeding with England both for the marriage and the Palatine, do not result as the Spaniards desire. He also has instructions to announce the adhesion of the Catholic to the league with the pope and emperor in defence of the Palatinate if the league between France and England comes to pass.
The ambassador delayed his departure in order to hear the result of the conference between Mayence and Saxony. A courier arrived from Mayence on Thursday, bringing word that after various efforts to induce Saxony to recognise Bavaria as elector representing the preparations of France and the negotiations with England, and pointing out the impropriety of foreign powers meddling in the affairs of the empire, they had won him over. So now the emperor can summon a diet when he pleases.
October, the time for restoring Franchentale, is drawing near. The Infanta proposes to give it up, but in the condition in which she received it, namely destitute of arms, munitions and every thing and surrounded by the army of the league, with the object of compelling England to leave it to her, so that Bavaria may not take it, an artful design.
Vienna, the 27th July, 1624.
[Italian; copy.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
520. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English continue to arrive and already over a thousand are divided out among the garrisons, allowing the Dutch to employ veteran troops. The English ambassador assured me that in case of need his king will supply more help to these provinces than he has undertaken. I remarked that they must not wait for remedies which would come too late.
The Hague, the 29th July, 1624.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
521. LORENZO PARUTA, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador Wake still remains here, entertained at the duke's expense. He has treated several times with his Highness about the Grisons and the Palatinate, asserting the excellent disposition of his king towards the common welfare, and he is beginning to attach some credit to the French preparations for the service of this province.
He delays his departure for Venice on the plea of a chronic indisposition, which may keep him here until news comes from France about the marriage, and what course he must take, as if the negotiations about the Most Christian's sister fall through, he seems to have some idea and commissions from his master to open negotiations with his Highness for one of the Infantas. On the other hand we understand that his Highness welcomed the proposals of the Most Christian for the same Infantas, for Denmark and Poland, having ordered Marini to thank his Majesty and asking for his offices and influence to bring them about.
Turin, the 29th July, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 30.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
522. To the Ambassador Pesaro in England.
We wrote to your predecessor on the 10th February last to assist Simon Tosi to recover a debt of 2,000 ducats due to him by that royal chamber for goods given to Sir Thomas Glover when he was ambassador at Constantinople, for which he had gone to that Court at great inconvenience and expense; we direct you to approach those whom you know to be the proper persons, to facilitate the recovery of this sum which he should have had long since.
Ayes, 24.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
523. LUNARDO MORO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Some days ago I met the English ambassador and tried to gather some news from him about what the Ambassador of Denmark is coming for. He said he knew nothing about it and the report of his arrival was false. He proceeded to complain that though Denmark was so closely connected with the King of Great Britain, they had not told his Majesty anything or given him any information before his arrival. Perhaps the ambassador only pretends not to know, but if it was pretence he ought not to deny what he cannot conceal, that the Danish ambassador has reached Alcala and may enter the Court any day. The French ambassador thinks that this mission has been keep secret from the King of England, who repents becoming estranged from the Catholic and is trying to renew a good understanding and take up the negotiations again.
Three days ago the English ambassador's secretary came to him post, but I have not yet discovered what he brought. It is announced to-day that the Danish ambassador is coming to protest in favour of the restitution of the Palatinate.
Madrid, the 31st July, 1624.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Arthur Brett, who suddenly presented himself and laid hands on the king's bridle, in Waltham forest. James was greatly offended and soon after sent Brett to the Fleet prison, from which he was released at the end of August. Birch: Court and Times of James I, vol. ii, page 467. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1623–5, pages 308, 332.
2 Carlo Caymo, of whom more anon. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1623–5, page 347, showing that money was spent upon him from the 15/25 June.