Venice
October 1624, 1-14

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

448-458

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: October 1624, 1-14', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 18: 1623-1625 (1912), pp. 448-458. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88920 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

October 1624

Oct. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
599. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are expecting one of the leading gentlemen of England here to pay his respects to their Majesties and the bride in the name of the king and the Prince of Wales. Directly afterwards, the Secretary Villocler will leave for those parts, whither instructions have already been sent. Letters reached the English ambassadors here last Monday, which have caused them much perturbation and perplexity as they heard that the French ambassador in London had advanced proposals in the matter of religion more favourable to their king than what they agreed to here, and apparently their master taxed them with this. However, it will not in any way affect what has been arranged, and the king will abide by what his ambassadors have promised here.
They still persist in their decision to make the journey to Paris when the dispensation arrives. At that time they expect the Duke of Buckingham with a large company of cavaliers who will come in the prince's name to receive the bride. In the meantime the king will go to Chartres or Compiègne.
Poissy, the 1st October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Oct. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
600. LUNARDO MORO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassador of Denmark has been engaged for some days with the Junta appointed by the king. They say he has not touched upon the Palatinate. In reply to my provocation, the English ambassador said that the restitution of Franchental would be dealt with in conjunction with the whole affair. He suggested a league with France, your Serenity, Denmark, Savoy, the Swiss and the malcontent princes of Germany for the common service, and to compel the restitution of the Palatinate, Cleves and the Valtelline. He considered this more desirable than practicable, but intimated that this was the aim of his king.
The Marquis of Inoiosa has received orders from the king not to come to Court, but to constitute himself a prisoner with some notary. He tore off his chain and stamped on his cap in his rage and now lies in a fever in peril of his life. They have also sent to the Infanta that when Colonna arrives from England they shall treat him as a prisoner. All this is merely intended to make an impression upon the King of Great Britain, especially about the Palatinate. Owing to that king's support of the Dutch and his countenancing the blockade of the four Spanish ships in the ports they attach a little more importance to him than heretofore. Accordingly they propose to send some one of importance as ambassador. Four have been mentioned: the Count of Lemos, the Marquis of Monte Claros, Don Fernando Giron and the Count of Gondomar. The choice may easily fall upon the last, as he knows that Court, and has experience there.
Madrid, the 2nd October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Oct. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Crema.
Venetian
Archives.
601. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Podestà and Captain of Crema, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses the usual abstract of the troops, whose numbers recently augmented. The troops were reviewed by the commissioner, who arrived two days ago. Begs for money, of which he is very short.
Crema, the 2nd October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despa0tch.
602. Extract from abstract of the troops at Crema for the muster, the 27th September, 1624.
Captain Christopher Paiton, of Ultramontanes, had 74, and now has 87. Effectives, 85; sick, 2.
Total number of troops, 1,088, of whom 287 are Ultramontanes.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
603. ZUANE PESARO and ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassadors in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king desired to receive our compliments in public audience at Theobalds, surrounded by the leading lords of the Court. This took place with full respect for your Serenity, because Viscount Rosfort, a nobleman of position and in high favour, came to the embassy to fetch us, accompanied by the Master of the Ceremonies and other gentlemen, with the king's coaches, followed by many others. Our offices were those required for the departure of me, Valaresso, and the arrival of me, Pesaro. His Majesty expressed his satisfaction with my services, and said he already knew me, Pesaro, by the accounts sent by his ambassadors in France.
We also performed similar offices with the Prince of Wales, who was extraordinarily gracious, and, although suffering from the shock of his fall, he wished to see us. We were all three seated, and he responded with prudence, wisdom and modesty to our praises. He expressed his esteem for the offices which I, Valaresso, had performed and seemed glad at the arrival of me, Pesaro, whom he had already heard of in the embassy in France.
On the following day we desired first of all to see the Duke of Buckingham. He offered the excuse of his poor health, or he would have come in person to express his devotion to your Serenity and to assure us of his regard for me, Pesaro.
In the midst of these compliments the Count of Mansfelt arrived in this city. He went first to an inn, but was immediately fetched away to S. Gens, a place of the prince, where he is entertained and defrayed as on the previous occasion, with this advantage, however, that then he went secretly and in doubt while now all is open without reserve. We paid the proper compliments to him.
When he called upon us, he told us of the negotiations or rather conclusions of France and showed a copy of a document with an obligation to put on foot 10,000 infantry, horse and artillery, to be ready by October to serve the cause of the Grisons and enter the dominions of the house of Austria, declaring that this force did not include the 10,000 foot promised by the King of Great Britain. He told us that some of the ministers here are jealous at France not having given him a document. He explains this by reasons of state, as money effects more than promises. He already had provision in letters of exchange, and assignments had been arranged, signed by his Majesty, the Most Serene Republic and the Duke of Savoy, for the payment of 120,000 crowns monthly, these princes offering England the same condition of monthly payment in advance and rendering accounts.
The Count spoke to us of leave to raise by the royal command, 10,000 English to help the Palatine, which would constitute an important declaration, and he wants another 15,000l. Buckingham seems willing to engage in this, but the scarcity of funds seems to render the outlay improbable. Mansfeld has not seen his Majesty or the prince. They say this will happen when they come to this city, which should be to-night, offering to serve them and thanking them for supplying him with means to act, though this may not be without difficulty.
The count told us he had already ordered levies in Holland and elsewhere, and says he can raise 3,000 foot and 3,000 horse in France and obtain permission to embark at some open place near Calais. He feels sure that the French will not object to admitting a large force of English into their kingdom; that the Marquis of Coure will create a diversion in the Grisons, and the Duke of Savoy another in Italy, for which the French have granted him 100,000 francs a month and they will find him employment in Germany. The French ambassador has given us some information upon these matters in general terms; he has no orders to speak expressly to the king, though he said that matters were arranged between the allies, and France could not make a declaration here about uniting over the Palatinate before they had completed the marriage. Mansfeld told us that the ambassador had orders to favour his cause, return his visit, and tell him why the Most Christian did not see fit to receive him in person.
Such are the present events on this head. As regards the marriage, from what we have been able to gather from the French ambassador, the business is arranged, but they cannot readily venture to announce it because the great contrivances before it takes place are always in danger of loss. There are twenty-six articles, eleven of them being in favour of the Catholic religion, either for the service of Madame or the advantage of the Catholics.
He professes to have done better for these than his instructions and much more than the Spaniards, especially in the education of the children, in the number of the priests and even in the sureties for the liberties of the Catholics, who nevertheless consider themselves ill used and are discontented with the alliance, owing these pretensions, their quarrels and propoganda, and it would seem that their religion is more Spanish than Catholic. The ambassador seems ill content at their evil disposition, though he never ceases his efforts for the advantage of the State and of religion, hoping that at Rome they will readily agree to the dispensation, because he has obtained all that his Holiness desired. He will then consider the matter secure, when the Secretary Villeocler will cross the sea for the stipulation, which cannot be long delayed, and this will be followed by reciprocal missions of persons of the highest rank.
Meanwhile they announce nothing as certain here and there are no rejoicings or preparations, which makes one hesitate to believe that all is satisfactorily arranged.
The jewels left by the prince in Spain have arrived. It is said they are the ones intended for the Infanta as well as others presented to various persons. Giacomo Brunio arrived soon after in the character of Secretary for his Catholic Majesty, a Fleming by race and reputed an experienced man. He is to stay in this Court until that king sends a fresh ambassador. They say that the present one has been recalled and will soon leave.
In sealing these presents, I, Valaresso, complete my service in this embassy, leaving it to the remarkable abilities of Pesaro. Although the expenses I have incurred have made great inroads into my fortune, I have two things to console me, a clear conscience from neglecting nothing for good service, and the fact that whereas I found things in a deplorable condition when I came, now, if not altogether satisfactory they show some improvement, thank God. His Majesty wished to dub me a knight and I could not refuse an honour sanctioned by custom.
London, the 4th October, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
604. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Orange is stopping at Meede near Bredach. The troops of the garrisons have reached the camp, though not all, forming a considerable reinforcement, and the sickness has ceased. The prince has divided his infantry into three parts: the English of the old and new levies under himself; the French, Walloons and Flemings under Prince Henry; and the Germans, Grisons and Scots under Count John Ernest. With this force he hopes to relieve Breda. The English ambassador told me it only had provisions for ten months, reckoning for 8,000 persons, but there are about 8,000 bearing arms, besides an appreciable number of women and children.
Caron sends word from England that the king is very incensed over the Amboyna affair and determined to demand satisfaction. They have already issued orders for money to arm ships and to recoup themselves by reprisals, a remedy suggested by the ambassador and the only one, so he told me, to bring those who are too deeply interested to their senses. The States propose to give the king satisfaction, but the representations of the East India Company assembled at Middelburg have asked for some delay until their meeting separates. So nothing has been done, and so far the English ambassador agrees.
The Hague, the 7th October, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
605. To the Ambassador in France.
We hear of the arrangement of a marriage of Madame with England. If the other ministers do so, you will offer congratulations, expressing the content which the republic always feels at all the happy events connected with that crown, and that we are the more pleased on this occasion, because it coincides with the weal of all Christendom.
Ayes, 113.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
606. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
We fully advised you on the 27th ult. of firm intention to notify Lieutenant Colonels Thinen and Veer to come here to fulfil their obligations. We have nothing to add and, if they act differently from what we desire, we shall decide what is proper. You will similarly notify other mercenaries of ours in those parts.
Ayes, 120.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
607. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Valaresso left this city yesterday, the court and the royal house having an excellent impression of his splendid qualities. I hope to follow his example. Giovanni Battista Bernardo, son of Bernardo, has gone with his Excellency. Francesco Grimani, son of the late Piero, has decided to stay on here, after spending an entire legation at this Court, he proposes to visit other countries. Besides the Marquis of Buckingham, the other ministers, the earl marshal, the Lord Keeper, the Lord Chamberlain, the Marquis of Amton of the blood royal of Scotland have called at the embassy, on whom I have endeavoured to create a good impression. I found them all most reluctant to engage in war against the Spaniards, unless they were certain that the French would take an equal share, in whose arms they do not seem to place much confidence. They think they can do a good deal at sea towards clearing the Spaniards out of the Indies, but they fear the resolution, not for harm to themselves, but because they will be obtaining peace for others and for the French in particular, at their own cost; and that by separating the cause of the Palatinate from that of the Valtelline or by not being certain of joint operations, they may determine the affair of the Grisons and embroil the interests of the Palatine still further. I skilfully met these arguments by saying that to lose the opportunity offered was to lead matters to the last pitch of desperation and these two serious operations could only unite in action with the operation of time. France clearly meant to use force, and they should do the same here, both striving in generous emulation. In the past France and England had obtained advantages for others, and both crowns had worked together in dealing with Mansfelt and in the last arrangements with the Dutch. We must weigh considerations and make up our minds that all right-thinking persons will always be banded together for the common service. The affair of the Grisons is more difficult than that of the Palatinate, and consequently peace is more hopeless and impossible to obtain without force. Movement here would prove an incentive to move others. Let them consider the abandoned Palatinate in the light of state interests, kinship, religion and their promises.
I advanced these and other arguments with acceptance and success, speaking preferably in favour of France in order to encourage them in their dealings with Mansfelt, believing that to commit the French and English as much as possible, without involving your Excellencies, is the best guarantee for the public peace and safety. I will always blow up this flame fearlessly, as it needs no wood to make it burn.
London, the 11th October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
608. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king and the Prince of Wales only stayed one night in London, and, excusing themselves because of the short time, they did not see Mansfeld, thereby following the example of the most Christian king, although they declared that they would welcome him and send him away satisfied at one and the same time. They held what amounted to a general council upon his requests, as Buckingham may not have cared to take all the responsibility upon himself and for other reasons. The leading ministers, the members of the Council of War and the parliamentary deputies for the appropriation of the subsidies composed this Council. They differed among themselves, being opposed about the employment of the levies and the payment of the money, on the ground that the promises of France did not constitute sufficient security, and they wanted a categorical assurance from them that Mansfeld could take the English he might levy through that kingdom and that the agreement between France and him should be in writing. It seems that an express upon these two points has been sent to the Most Christian Court to obtain a declaration. Meanwhile, they encourage Mansfelt's hopes of success. But he would rather have prevented such requests of the French, saying that France will certainly object to making a declaration for the Palatinate however ready she may be to labour for the Valtelline, and they can have no better guarantee than the payment of the money and the promise of the Most Christian to the English ambassadors; nothing more could be desired.
The count showed me letters from Colonel Pobliz about negotiations in his name with the Prince of Orange, who approves of the plans and promises every possible assistance, though he fears debarcation may prove difficult and the time too short. He does not clearly understand what is proposed. I learn from the Dutch ambassador here, however, that the States are more favourable to the count than heretofore. Arms for 3,000 men and more have reached Mansfelt from the Count of Emdem, and have been landed at Dover. They were obtained more by the offices of this crown than of France. Colonel Pobliz expects to raise levies and the Count of Mansfeld continues his demands, but it is known that his stay is a burden upon the person entertaining him.
During the brief space of his Majesty's stay in London, he saw the Spanish secretary, who presented letters of credit and professed his obedience to the royal commands until the arrival of another ambassador. He waited two hours in the ante camera for this audience; the king remained standing there throughout, the Council and Buckingham being present, and he referred in a friendly manner to his Catholic Majesty, but when the secretary wanted to say something about the Dunkirk ships blockaded in the Downs, the king interrupted him and broke off the audience, referring him to the Secretary Conovel for all business. He also presented himself to the prince, who received him, serious, seated and covered. He replied to his offices by expressing his obligation to his Catholic Majesty, asking after his health and that of the Infanta of Flanders, and it all ended courteously. The secretary paid his respects to the Duke of Buckingham and suggested finding some way of liberating the Dunkirk ships. The duke expressed his regard for his Catholic Majesty and wondered he remembered anyone so insignificant as himself, and apparently he had changed the opinions of the Count of Olivares. He treated the question of the ships as a jest, saying that his Majesty was rendering a great service to Spain in allowing three ships to keep ten Dutch ones.
Subsequently the Ambassador Colonna requested an audience for his departure, which was refused on the ground that as he shared in Inoiosa's misdeeds he must also share the consequences. The king certainly added some words in his honour, laying practically all the blame on the unmeasured zeal of the other and not on his intentions. Nevertheless Colonna will go without a present or compliment, but with the safeguards necessary for leaving the kingdom and for his journey. His baggage has already started and he himself will leave in a few days, to withdraw to his Governorship of Cambrai. It is stated that the Catholic has disapproved of the action of his own ambassadors and praised the decision taken here, the English ambassador there having expressed surprise, though always putting in something of the good intentions of his sovereign, who, amid all his ambiguities, only remains constant in his determination to do nothing.
They continue to complain of the Dutch here for the massacre, as they call it, which took place in the Indies, but the king has been mollified by the promise of the States to cause justice to be done, admitting that the execution of the Englishmen was too hasty and contrary to law. The ministers here still protest that they will take revenge upon the Dutch fishermen in these waters, but the matter will be arranged by prompt satisfaction in word and deed and by friendly interposition. It is certainly fomented by many malignant spirits dwelling in the country, by those interested in the Indies and those who find themselves impoverished by the flourishing trade acquired by the Dutch against all but against this nation in particular.
There are various opinions and actions about the French marriage. It is certainly arranged and nothing is lacking save the stipulation, which should be determined with the arrival of the Secretary Villeocler; but here they delay the announcement with justifiable caution and in the political interests of the government. After the scorn of refusals from Spain and France, England would not venture to count upon this with certainty, until it is accomplished.
They fear that the Spaniards may intrigue at Rome and that the French may be obliged to guide their action by the pope's wishes. The Most Christian's ambassador declares that he is won, while the ministers of France write that the affair is proceeding most satisfactorily. But they will not be satisfied here unless the dispensation is obtained or unless the French determine to make the marriage without it.
The marriage itself pleases few and is opposed by infinite passions. The chief question is to conduct the business to the satisfaction of parliament, upon which all other favourable decisions depend and the means to carry them out. A breach of the promises made to parliament or a failure to stipulate the conditions for the Catholics would break off the marriage. The Catholics do not favour it, partly because they desire no other union than the Spanish, partly because they think that the French ambassador is not acting entirely for their advantage. Every day they press him for assurances upon various declarations, but he finds a difficulty in contenting them, as they will not rest satisfied with what is reasonable. They desire a supersedeat under the public seal for non-execution, as being entirely contrary to the laws and to the decisions and promises made to the parliament, but the ambassador professes to have obtained an order to withdraw all commands for executions against the Catholics for the chancellor of the exchequer who has charge thereof, thus obtaining actual relief for them, without upsetting anything.
The Jesuits foment the Catholics, who keep very retired. They prefer demands and try various means to prevent a result in their effort to spoil everything. Good Englishmen are pleased about the marriage and fear that it may not take place. Some leading Catholics have written to the ministers in France, expressing great approval of Fiat. This will serve to counter-balance the malign offices of the others. But the English in general and the Puritans abhor this alliance. The former because they are afraid of losing their bread, and that the French and Scots, natural allies, may unite to their disadvantage; the Puritans desire no marriage, except with the reformed religion, because that is their interest. This feeling has gone so far that it was announced that parliament would redouble the subsidies to break this match even more than the Spanish one. For this or some other reason this same parliament, which was to have reassembled at the beginning of November, has been postponed until February, possibly so that it may accept the marriage as an accomplished fact, without question. But by making sure of this, they delay the certain hope of any decisive steps being taken.
The Earl of Carlisle will receive one of the vacant Garters, the Most Christian king having interposed. The other is already destined for Alberstat. They are expecting a gentleman from France, sent express on a complimentary mission about the prince's fall, (fn. 1) from which I hear that he has not yet recovered.
London, the 11th October, 1624.
Postscript.—The king came to town but returned to the country immediately. The Council has met at this time upon the question of Mansfelt, with good hopes of success, but the next despatch will convey the result with all particulars.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta. Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
609. To the Ambassador Pesaro in England.
We hope that by this time you have arrived to take up your new charge and we wish you that perfect health which is required by the public service. Letters from France of the 13th, bring word that the marriage between Madame and the Prince of Wales has been arranged, and that the ratification has arrived from England. On the other hand, your predecessor's despatches of the same day are full of the negotiations of the Ambassador Fiat. We have already ordered the Ambassador Morosini, if the ministers of the other princes offer congratulations at that Court, to do the same. We give you the same instructions, and in offering congratulations to the king and prince you will enlarge in a manner becoming the close interest with which we follow all that befalls that crown, as shown by our self-same Ambassador Morosini, in contributing his serviceable offices whenever requested by the English ministers.
The Count of Mansfeld has journeyed from Paris to this city, to forward the negotiations for taking up arms and employment, which he has been carrying on for a long time with France and England. Although by the later news from that Court we gather that he will have to change his first resolutions, yet we thought it best to advise you about this. You are fully informed upon the plans and negotiations of the count, from what took place at the time of your embassy with the Most Christian, and because we have advised you of the course you must pursue, so as not to involve the republic; and with this light and your prudence, we feel sure that you will know what to say at every emergency.
Ayes, 113.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Oct. 12.
Misc.
Cod. No. 63.
Venetian
Archives.
610. MARC' ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Saxony has sent word of the representations made to him by the ambassadors of England and Denmark for the Palatine. He seems to have answered them sharply, but he says that something must be done for the Palatine and to satisfy that king. Here they express themselves as most ready, but say that the Palatine becomes less and less deserving, as he has made no act of humiliation to Caesar, does not relinquish the title of King of Bohemia or do other things which he ought.
Vienna, the 12th October, 1624.
[Italian; copy.]
Oct. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenzo.
Venetian
Archives.
611. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Archbishop of Pisa in discussing the matter of the Valtelline with the Spaniards advised them to consent to some adjustment. He said he wished all prosperity to the house of Spain and, therefore, he would remind them that a Queen of England had stayed the progress of Philip II in France, causing him the loss of the greater part of Flanders; had dissipated five fleets with the loss of millions and the cutting off of a quantity of money (discapiti di gran oro) from the Custom-Houses of Lisbon and Seville, from all of which strokes Spain suffered. He reminded them of what the Dutch and the Duke of Savoy had done and remarked that news now came of the marriage and of a close union between England and Holland, while the pope had French leanings. He warned them that if they did not find some compromise, they were going to their ruin.
I have heard that the Spaniards changed colour if they did not alter their way of speaking.
A courier has passed from Rome to France. I hear that he takes the pope's decision to grant a dispensation for the marriage, and that he will send his brother, the Capuchin Cardinal, as legate to England for the nuptials. Madame remarked that once the pope's consent to the marriage was announced in France, the king's forces would move.
Florence, the 12th October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
612. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Curiosity increases as to the decisions of England, about which there is much misgiving, especially with the remarkable tardiness of news. For several weeks no news has reached the States in public letters, the queen or the ambassador about the marriage or Mansfelt, to the general amazement. Colonel Beblitz told me, however, that Mansfelt had received great promises from Buckingham to justify his journey to England. The English ambassador has approached Beblitz to obtain appointments for some of his dependants in Mansfelt's force. Everything depends upon the favourable resolutions of England.
The Hague, the 14th October, 1624.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
613. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Trumbull, the English agent at Brussels has urged the restitution of Franchental, the term of the depoist expiring this month. He has not had his answer. The Infanta and Cardinal della Cueva expresses the best intentions, but the sovereigns here only expect delays.
The Hague, the 14th October, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
614. LORENZO PARUTA, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Here I am at Susa as the duke prescribed, the ambassadors of France and England having done the same. (fn. 2) The constable has not yet appeared, but the duke expects him after to-morrow, and meanwhile will stay himself at Bresuol near here.
Colonel Obentraut called upon me yesterday evening, asking for orders. He told me he heard that the Count of Mansfelt had returned from England with commissions from the king to levy 10,000 men, and that he is in Holland at the present time, to raise this force with money also from France, Denmark and Sweden, to help the Palatinate, recover the dominions of the King of Bohemia by attacking Bavaria and the House of Austria.
Susa, the 14th October, 1624.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 Guillaume de Bautru. It is remarkable, however, that the domestic papers contain a note of payment of the expenses of a M. de Beaupré, said to have come on such a mission. Calendar S.P. Dom., 1623–5, page 380.
2 Wake went to Susa on the 13th October, to meet the constable. See his despatch of the 6/16 October. State Papers, Foreign, Savoy.