Venice
June 1625, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1913

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66-78

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'Venice: June 1625, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 19: 1625-1626 (1913), pp. 66-78. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89039 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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Contents

June 1625

June 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
90. MARC' ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I congratulated the king in your Serenity's name upon his recovered health. The office pleased him and he replied with expressions of friendship and esteem. I also offered my congratulations to the Queen of England upon her marriage and departure, expressing the satisfaction of your Excellencies and of all rightly minded men the hope that she would take with her the same generous French heart which will induce that most powerful king to appropriate resolution and arouse Great Britain from its long lethargy. She thanked me for the compliment and graciously added that she knew well the ideas of the king her brother, while the principles of her glorious father were by no means obscure. Her power would always be feeble, but she would never abandon such opinions.
Villeocler is constantly occupied with the English and over the queen's departure.
I do not know what more to tell your Serenity about the cardinal legate here, as he proceeds very slowly in his affairs, and he has not yet made any proposal to the ministers or to anyone soever since his original one to the king. He is new to this court, and from what they say has not much wit. The ordinary nuncio here is a very clever man, but has little credit with him because all the prelates about him belong to the opposite party, and some assert that the nuncio does not supply the legate with the requisite information owing to his private designs and ambitions, and so up to the present the legate has done little and obtained nothing. I have discovered from conversation with his cup bearer, a Piedmontese, that his chief object is to win the Cardinal Richelieu. Undoubtedly that would be a master stroke for them, but I think it unlikely that they will succeed. The French cardinals hope for nothing more and the one who is master here needs no pope or anyone else soever. He only desires glory and only breathes ambition, so it is unreasonable to expect him to commit an unworthy action without the hope of advancing his own fortunes.
Paris, the 1st June, 1625.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 2.
Senato,
Mar. Venetian
Archives.
91. That 2,400 ducats each be given to Francesco Erizzo and Marc Antonio Correr, chosen as ambassadors to the King of Great Britain, for their expenses for four months in advance, and 1,500 ducats each to set themselves in order, 300 ducats each for horses, trappings and chests and 300 ducats between them for gratuities; 100 ducats to the secretary and 50 to the coadjutor, with 30 ducats each to two couriers.
Ayes, 130.Noes, 13.Neutral, 14.
Not given in time.
On August 7th in Pregadi this was arranged in the names of Marc' Antonio Correr and Anzolo Contarini.
[Italian]
June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
92. MARC' ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Buckingham and the English ambassadors called at this embassy yesterday, returning my visit. He thanked me warmly for the constant favours his king received from the republic and her ministers. He told me he knew all about my efforts for the marriage to bring about a happy issue. The Earl of Carlisle in a loud voice said that he would always testify to these obligations to your Serenity's minister, who acted out of pure zeal for the public welfare, who had always seconded their interests, condoling with them in difficulties and congratulating them when they rejoiced.
They told me of their negotiations with the cardinal and the queen mother and with the utmost secrecy confided to me that they were prevented from proposing a league, but they had granted them six more months for the maintenance of Mansfeld's force upon condition that they should say nothing about it, to me in particular, owing to the fear that this decision might make your Serenity decide never to pay any money for that diversion, seeing that it will go on even if you pay nothing. They told me of another proposal, namely, that they should offer to send their fleet to the parts of Flanders and there land the troops, in which case they would provide and pay 2,000 French horse. They told me they had not yet had a reply about this and they did not know what to hope, especially now that everyone had left and compliments and journeys disturbed all negotiations.
From this and other similar conversations I gathered that they have not yet definitely settled where they will employ that great fleet, and one may possibly persuade that young king, for the sake of his honour and glory to do something profitable for our interests and the cause we have at heart.
This much will suffice to enable the Senate to decide and send its pleasure, especially with such a minister in those parts as the most excellent Pesaro.
The English have again tried to get them to promise here not to make peace in Italy, without including the business in Germany, but the ministers here have so far refused to pledge themselves to anything, except the six months for Mansfeld.
Very early yesterday morning his Majesty started unexpectedly with Monsieur. After dinner the Queen of England left the city in state, amid shouts of applause and a countless throng of people, accompanied by the guards, by the people of the city, by Buckingham, by the other English and by all her suite. The queens also left this city this morning. The cardinal, Schomberg, Arbo and the other ministers have gone. Only the chancellor, the cardinal legate and the ambassadors have remained, the king having decided that he would not ask the ambassadors, out of consideration for the legate, whose moving involved expense, inconvenience and trouble. However, Harbo told me I should always be welcome if I liked to follow the court, and he said the same to the Savoyard ambassador.
Paris, the 2nd June, 1625.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
93. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Mansfelt was to leave yesterday with his force. He had permission from the French ambassador to go towards Rees and Emmerich. That ambassador is not pleased with the count. The Palatine would like the count to go straight to Germany.
Sanleger has returned from England on the pretence of offering condolences on the death of the Prince of Orange. He has really come to hasten on the fleet of twenty ships, which they expect to have ready in some three weeks. He has also pressed the matter of an offensive and defensive league, for which the Ambassador Carleton has the instructions. I have not yet obtained particulars because the negotiations have not yet begun. I imagine, however, that they will include Sweden and Denmark.
Sanleger also, understanding that Joachim alone was to offer congratulations on the accession and marriage, has let it be understood more than once that they must show special honour to this king, because he is especially ready to help these provinces and means to proceed in union with them. Accordingly this has removed all difficulties about the selection of ambassadors extraordinary and they have chosen Aerssens and Brumagna, deputy of Friesland. They have orders to leave within a fortnight, together with Joachim. I will look out for their instructions if they go beyond compliments and the Amboyna affair.
A ship recently reached Flushing from the East, which ran the gauntlet of three English men-of-war; perhaps the English intended reprisals over this Amboyna affair. The news is not yet public; if confirmed it will arouse much excitement, as many are interested.
The King of England is recalling the veteran Colonel Cecil, to employ in the fleet, I understand. Sanleger has gone to see him at the Camp, possibly about the title of general, which he enjoyed under Juliers. The Earl of Oxford will also go to England to help in many important posts which he holds in the parliament, though he lies here seriously ill.
The Hague, the 2nd June, 1625.
[Italian]
June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
94. MARC' ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Savoyard ambassador here has decided to send a special courier to his master about the business of the Duke of Buckingham, to which I referred yesterday. The young king may easily be induced to send his fleet to Italy to help his new kinsman. He sends word that he spoke with the Secretary of State who accompanied Buckingham, (fn. 1) who told him to communicate at once with the duke, as Lord High Admiral. He spoke to Buckingham, who seemed well disposed, but his sudden departure did not allow him to pursue the matter, so he followed him to Amiens and Boulogne, to urge this important matter, as they could not only secure the immediate fall of Genoa, but drive the Spaniards out of Italy, since they had no force at sea to resist. The task would be easy, as the fleet was all ready. If they approved he would go straight to England to speak to the king himself and arrange the whole matter under the pretence of offering congratulations on the marriage.
Paris, the 3rd June, 1625.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
95. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Colonel Morgen has gone out of Breda to treat for its surrender, the Count of Berg going in as hostage. They say the conditions will be honourable, similar to those granted to Antwerp.
The Hague, the 4th June, 1625.
[Italian]
June 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
96. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have been very suspicious about the delay of the queen's departure. The commotion was general everywhere and they feared some change or fresh claims; so that the king himself suffered, having passed some days without news from France. However, certain information has come that the queen left on the 2nd inst., that she will stop at Amiens until the 9th and will then complete her journey. Accordingly the king's baggage has gone to the sea, the cavaliers and ladies have orders to start, and on Tuesday his Majesty will set out. They will take the ladies of Buckingham's household across to Boulogne to receive the queen. There will be a number of countesses and baronesses at Dover and at Greenwich, where they expect to stay some days. There will be the Duchesses of Richmond and Lennox with a numerous train of ladies for the same compliments. Their Majesties will not come to this city because of the plague and they have issued a general proclamation against following the court, for six miles distance, all the festivities and rejoicings being postponed until September, with various orders for the care and preservation of their Majesties' health. It is thought that they will change from place to place all the summer, passing the time at the royal palaces, and the king and queen may make the ordinary progress together or separately, and the king states this in his proclamation.
Parliament is absolutely postponed until the 13/23 of the month as when they were suspicious about the queen's delay they thought a longer postponement would be necessary, declaring that it would be the last, whether the bride came or no. The members of of Parliament have partly gone home again, and they have postponed the regulation of the Lower House until the opening. This will rise up some days before the Estates begin. It is considered certain that they will be held at Oxford, because the plague constantly increases and spreads in the city; but while they complain of these delays because the king will not infringe the treaty with France, they hope that once the queen is in this realm the king will value the satisfaction of his own subjects and the observance of the laws, more than his obligations to the Catholics out of consideration for France. They announced that there will be no difficulty about Madame's household; the only trouble will be about altering the laws concerning subjects which will be troublesome. But everything will depend upon the wishes and vigour of the king. Nothing is done just now except with a view to these movements, and operations seem fixed in their courses.
Anstruther has not left, to the prejudice of that business. However, he has given his Majesty to understand that as Denmark suspects this to be the last act of the late king and the first of the present, promptness will do much good while delay will bring discredit. His Majesty has ordered despatch, but the money, the motive power for his journey, is not ready.
The French ambassador has received news of the return of M. dell Haye from Denmark with proposals from that king about the recovery of the Palatinate. The proposals will be sent him with the resolutions of the Most Christian for his information.
Nothing has transpired about the negotiations of the Duke of Buckingham, but the Marquis Fiat suggests difficulties in concluding. It ought to be arranged in conjunction with the States. He says they will be well disposed towards England, but there will not be an agreement about everything, because with the preponderance of strength at sea all the plans of the English will not suit, and they will not conclude any treaty without the consent of the Most Christian. This will show how far the French wish to limit the resolutions. However, they expect agreement about the ships, and the exchange of new and veteran troops.
A gentleman of the Count of Mansfelt has left with permission for the count to remodel the English regiments and raise Scottish regiments at his own cost. They have promised letters to Neuburg's gentleman, similar to those of the Most Christian, but they have been delayed upon various pretexts. (fn. 2) The Agent of the Palatine opposes this as strongly as the French ambassador supports it. They wish first to know the feelings of the States and Brandenburg, in order to do what pleases them.
The fleet is pushed on, but there are very various opinions about its employment. One can say nothing for certain; they talk of Spain, the Indies, the Mediterranean and even somewhere near. An opinion will be possible when they have appointed the captains and given their instructions.
Meanwhile the counties spend heavily, because they pay for the press or levy, clothe the soldiers and are bound to send them to Plymouth at their own cost, feeding them until his Majesty's officers take them, who are only just beginning to make payment.
The Dutch chased a Dunkirk ship (fn. 3) to the Goodwin Sands, off Margate, where it perished in the quicksands. Most of the crew with the captain escaped to this kingdom. The Dutch recovered 20 guns from the ship, although they may pertain to the Admiralty here. The captain and men of the Dunkirker have been made prisoners by his Majesty's order, and Buckingham gave instructions en route that all Dunkirk ships which come to these ports shall be detained. The Agent of Spain has been to audience of his Majesty complaining of such behaviour when peace is not broken, and especially of arresting the captain and men who escaped to shore to save their lives. The king answered generally that his subjects had suffered much loss and he would take information. The agent seemed dissatisfied and sent an express courier to this Catholic Majesty with the news. Two days ago the French ships were in the Downs.
The secretary of the Dutch Ambassador Joachim has arrived with the news that his master is ready to cross when the wind permits. Here they rejoice over the victories of the Savoyards in Liguria, but are saddened by the report that Breda must inevitably fall into Spinola's hands.
Although I have made the necessary outlay, I shall not go to the coast, but shall remain to cure my ills, while awaiting your Serenity's commands. However, I shall leave this city as soon as possible in order to escape the plague, though as I am not sure in what direction the king will go. I am waiting before choosing the best possible situation for the service of your Excellencies. The whole neighbourhood here is suspect. God release us, in His mercy.
Your Serenity's commands of the 2nd, 3rd, 10th and 15th May have reached me, but not those of the 13th. I will obey faithfully. I imagine that all I have done hitherto for Pasini will give satisfaction.
London, the 6th June, 1625.
[Italian]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
97. That the English ambassador be summoned to the Collegio and the following be read to him:
The offices which your Excellency is to perform with the Swiss by his Majesty's command cannot fail to be most useful. Our ministers in those parts will very heartily give you every assistance. Our Secretary Cavazza will thank the Bernese for their favours to those enlisting troops for us, and we do not believe that their orders forbidding future levies are meant to include the republic, as their levies help to relieve the Grisons, and they will also induce us to help that race in case of need. Your Excellency will clearly understand the consequences of such action and you will know what representations to make to the Bernese.
The question of preventing the free passage of German troops for the Spaniards merits consideration such as your Excellency gives it. We have made representations on the subject from the first to France and Savoy, and we shall continue our offices.
Ayes, 137.Noes, 1.Neutral, 27.
[Italian]
June 7.
Misc.
Cod. 64.
Venetian
Archives.
98. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are eagerly hastening on the levies of Vallestain, amounting to 30,000 men. As they hear that the King of Denmark is taking the field with a powerful army, and now they have peace with the Turks and no longer need troops in Hungary, they propose to send these regiments from that kingdom to Egna on the frontiers of Bohemia to oppose that king and prevent him from entering the empire and the Palatinate. They say France would like him to go to the Palatinate while England inclines to his entering the empire, and that the Palatine himself, with fresh troops from France and money from his brother-in-law, will enter his own dominions with Mansfelt, and thus obtain satisfaction for his alleged wrongs.
Vienna, the 7th June, 1625.
[Italian; copy.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
99. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Breda has fallen. The garrison came out with all the honours of war. Spinola's fortifications were better than those of the town. The result is attributed to various causes, among them the late King of England forbidding Mansfelt to harry Flanders, as arranged. Mansfelt has left these provinces without doing a single thing.
They are much cast down here. The Spaniards seem inclined to renew the truce. The States will remain on the defensive. They talk of urging France and England to afford them greater assistance, although many are dissatisfied with the dominating tone of those sovereigns towards the States in this late crisis.
The Hague, the 9th June, 1625.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
100. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Mansfelt continues his journey without any help from the Dutch. The French and English diminish steadily, the latter by natural weakness, the former by natural impatience. Dulbier was here to negotiate 200,000 florins upon England. He does not find things so easy as before and the English ambassador does not show his former keenness. Sanleger has returned from the Camp with Cecil, who will proceed to England; so will Colonel Boros, sometime Governor of Franchental, both to serve in the fleet. The Earl of Oxford is dead, to the general sorrow. He leaves no children and is the last of his house, though his estates will pass to a simple lieutenant, who is serving here.
The chase of the East India man by three English men-of-war is quite true, but the Dutch dissimulate the matter because they would gain nothing by complaining.
Sanleger's instructions to Carleton are for a written offensive and defensive alliance. Some say the king will act alone if he cannot get support, but that would not be easy. This league business drags, on and I see no sign of a start, though everyone declares that they are pressing for an adjustment between Denmark and Sweden to begin with, and instructions will afterwards come to unite with the others.
They are hastening on the twenty ships and hope they will leave in a few weeks. We hear that the English ones will be ready equally soon.
I learn that Mansfelt refused to join his force to that of Denmark and also refused to allow the Palatine to join his army, creating a bitter feeling among the English.
The Hague, the 9th June, 1625.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 10.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
101. The ambassador of his Most Christian Majesty came into the Collegio and spoke as follows:
I do not think any misfortune need be feared at present, and your Serenity should perhaps fix your eyes on the future, but even so you may remain tranquil since my king is determined to maintain his own dignity in these affairs and the common service, with all his power. The Dutch ships have reached him, fine ships with fine men. The English were ready to leave for our shores. The Most Christian has concluded a close alliance with that king, of which I have orders to inform your Serenity, feeling sure you will rejoice at it as a strong assurance of good to the general cause.
The doge replied: We rejoice that his Majesty is reducing the disturbances of those of the Religion to quiet, to have them loyal at this crisis of the general welfare. We also rejoice at his alliance with the King of England, and as warmly thank your Excellency for the information. We expect the most happy results for the general weal and for ourselves from the union of two crowns so powerful and so friendly to our republic.
[Italian]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
102. That the English ambassador be summoned to the Collegio and the following be read to him:
We hear that our Ambassador Pesaro has been fraudulently excluded from the late king's funeral by the Master of the Ceremonies. This public slight would cause the republic much annoyance if we did not feel sure that his Majesty would be incredulous and angry about it and would show to the world his real feelings in an unmistakeable manner. Such appearances have their significance and excite comment, and this minister does more and more to our prejudice at his Majesty's court, affording us just grounds of resentment. At such a moment your Excellency's offer affords us great consolation, and as you have always received every honour here you will convey our just remonstrances to his Majesty disposing him to do what is proper, to prove his upright intentions at the beginning of his reign.
Our ambassador has met with the most friendly response in this and in all other matters from the Secretary Conway, which we highly appreciate and we hope you will report as much.
Ayes, 115.Noes, 1.Neutral, 0.
[Italian]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
103. To the Ambassador in England.
Enclose copy of the office with the English ambassador about the funeral incident. You will uphold the public dignity in conformity with this office. We do not wish to admit that the French ambassadors have anything to do with the matter, that is our chief aim, as nothing could do more to prevent a favourable issue, and no French representatives ever raised similar claims. Another point is to admit no doubt of the king's intentions and our confidence in his prudence and affection, and the evil consequences of the reverse as regards the common enemies.
Our Ambassador Morosini tells us that he has spoken confidentially to Buckingham in France and tried to obtain satisfaction. You will lose no opportunity of displaying our excellent disposition and pressing for reciprocal sentiments upon so just an occasion.
Ayes, 115.Noes, 1.Neutral, 0.
[Italian]
June 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
104. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king left on the appointed day, although it was uncertain whether the queen would continue her journey without further delay; but by moving he wished to incite her and he sent an express to tell her of his departure and to urge despatch on her side. To-day they reckon that the bride will reach Boulogne, and cross the sea to-morrow, but the general opinion is that this cannot happen before Monday. The king, after staying at Canterbury to-day, will proceed to the coast at Dover, and it is uncertain whether he will wait or cross with the ships to Boulogne. The event must decide, as there are rumours, though very secret ones, that the king will perform this gallantry, without anything further being known. Some do not approve of this idea, for many reasons and there are varying reports about the presence of the Queens of France and the Most Christian. Here they need prompt despatch, while such visits can only occasion delay. Your Excellencies will have heard what the Duke of Buckingham has done in France. Here we know no more than the honours he has received, the certainty of a friendly intercourse and instead of an offensive and defensive alliance promises to assist the common cause.
In order that the duke may not leave without achieving something, the Most Christian has confirmed his promise to support Mansfelt for six months longer. Apparently they blame the republic for not contributing, but if they say anything to me about it, I shall know what to answer.
Before leaving his Majesty Anstruther obtained his despatches for Denmark. He kissed the king's hand and took drafts for most of the money. They say that king has his army ready: many princes has announced what they will contribute and others are waiting to declare themselves once they are sure that the forces will move. The same King of Denmark has asked his Majesty to publish all the past negotiations with the Spaniards and how the late king was deluded and deceived. The Agent of the Palatine has charge of this.
We also hear of letters from the emperor and the Duke of Bavaria to Lorraine and Wirtemburg, to intervene for the peace of the empire and to induce the Palatine to send a representative to the diet convened for the 6th August and promise to observe what is decided there about his restitution, and to ask the King of Great Britain to agree to what is done. The Palatine has never consented to such intervention: the present king proceeds differently from the late one. They add that the emperor has asked Saxony for help, and will give it to him if attacked. The duke elector wanted to know what help he might expect, after making so many enemies by following the emperor's party. The emperor is not satisfied, and it looks as if Saxony was leaning to the right side. The Palatine's agent brought all this news to the king.
Neuburg's agent has been despatched without obtaining the letters he wanted. The French ambassador abandoned his officers and wrote home that he could do nothing. The king told him that unless the Palatine was restored he would rather have Germany disturbed. and secondly, those states being the only route for the recovery of the Palatinate he did not want to tie his hands by interposing. He wrote to Neuburg declaring himself the heir of his father's good intentions: he desired the peace of Germany, but through the re-establishment of his brother-in-law and sister, to which all his efforts were directed. Di Tunol, the Palatine's agent, has informed the interested princes. Other important matters depend upon these negotiations.
Mutual reprisals are made at sea. The Dunkirkers have taken seven barques full of divers merchandise of the king's subjects. Two large ships from Spain are arrested in these ports, laden with goods and specie. The value of the cargo is not yet known, or whether it is for his Catholic Majesty or merchants. The men of the Dunkirk ship remain prisoners, the matter being referred to the Admiralty, to judge whether they are pirates. But matters are going further as they have ordered generally the arrest of all ships coming from Spain and Flanders. When the Spanish agent complained the Secretary Conway told him that as others are keeping the Palatine's belongings, they can here detain the goods of those who usurp them.
The fleet is being hurried on, but must be delayed by the unfortunate spoiling of a large quantity of meat and beer. They are making a fresh supply, but as the provision is not very large it is thought that the voyage will be short, and the rumour of going to the Indies has completely died out. The Flemings fear an attack upon Flanders itself, others are sure it will be against Spain. I am assured that the Duke of Buckingham will have the supreme command, befitting his office of Lord High Admiral, but it seems very unlikely that he should abandon the presence of his favour.
They have decided that the commander shall receive public patents from the Palatine; the secret orders will come from the king. The French ships have not left; they do not wish to go far away without the Vice Admiral, who was not ready, whether purposely, for a higher aim, or by accident.
The French ambassador has pressed urgently for his despatch, and orders have been issued for him to leave immediately or he will be punished.
The delays in this affair have caused satisfaction, and they do not willingly give these ships to France, but if the Most Christian would employ them jointly against the Spaniards and against their interests in the Mediterranean he would meet with the promptest despatch and co-operation.
They speak with uncertain opinions about the quiet of France, and the protestants here fear that the Duke of Buckingham may let himself be carried away by the pretext of an offensive and defensive alliance and by the interests he maintains with France, to some obligation disadvantageous to their party; and that this influence places the King of Great Britain at a constant disadvantage.
They talk of fresh presses for levies, of other expeditions and of exchanging the veteran troops with the Dutch for fresh ones. Two Hamburg ships have perished in a storm in these waters, with a cargo of ordnance for the Rochellese and Soubise, who are ill provided with these implements.
They are doubtful about the Parliament, whether they can hold it in this city, for greater convenience. The plague is not worse as regards numbers, but its area is spreading.
Pasini has sent me the enclosed letters through his Majesty's agent. I can do little for him here because relations with those parts grow less day by day. I will perform the offices with the French ambassador enjoined upon me, when I am able.
The despatch of the 13th ult sent to France by express courier has never reached me. On the 5th inst. at latest I reckon that my extraordinary should reach Venice, and I await the answer with eagerness.
London, the 13th June, 1625.
Postscript.—Lord Candis has called upon me in his Majesty's name, asking me to write to your Excellencies that his Majesty has ordered Captain James Scott to remain in his service for some months, and begs your Serenity that his company may be kept for him, as he has a brother and a lieutenant to command it. The Ambassador Wake will make the same request. I promised to write.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
105. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king instead of proceeding to Amiens as he had announced, took leave of the queens and the English at Compiègne and came yesterday to Fontainebleau.
The ambassador of Savoy did not find Buckingham at the Court because he had gone with the queens towards Boulogne, so that he could not confer with him. He resolved, however, to put in writing various considerations and to send them by his secretary to Buckingham.
Melun, the 13th February, 1625.
[Italian]
June 13.
Cons. di X.
Parti Comuni. Venetian
Archives.
106. In the Council of Ten.
That 100 ducats be granted as a gift to the Secretary Piero Antonio Marioni for his residence in England.
Ayes, 10.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
Second vote: Ayes, 9.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
Pending, as it requires ¾.
Petition of Marioni for the usual grant of 100 ducats. Had not applied before because thought his father had attended to the matter. Lapse of time had not prejudiced such claims in the past.
[Italian]
June 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
107. To the Secretary Cavazza at Zurich.
Enclose copies of the exposition of the English ambassador about the passage of Germans by the Orsera route to serve the Spaniards, and the representations made to Venice by the Bernese lords through the same ambassador, with the answer thereto. He will return thanks and remonstrate with the Baron von Spiez about the prohibitions against levying troops.
Ayes, 131.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian]
June 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
108. The RECTORS of PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the eve of the Santo, after hearing vespers in that church, we went to visit the English ambassador with our suite, which we could not do before owing to his absence from the city. He met us at the upper landing, shook hands and we conversed together for some time. He afterwards accompanied us to our coaches with much courtesy, telling us he would inform his Majesty of the honours shown to him, so that the ambassadors going to England might receive the like. This morning we sent him eight casks of confections at our own expense, for which he thanked us warmly. He was to have visited us but this morning he sent a gentleman to beg the podesta's coach, which was granted, and offered his excuses, as he was summoned to Venice by your Serenity.
Padua, the 14th June, 1625.
[Italian]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
109. LUNARDO MORO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has come of the surrender of Breda. A report was brought by a courier from England who arrived two days ago. Olivares was denying the possibility of its truth when the news came. The king ordered the Te Deum to be sung. Olivares told me they had succeeded against all the forces of the world, as every one was helping the Dutch against them.
A rumour from Lisbon reported the recovery of Brasil, and that a fugitive ship had brought the news to England, but they do not credit this, and even the Count does not think it true. He is informed, indeed, that 132 ships, part English and part Dutch will put to sea this month and that they expect the landing of 2,000 foot. He repeated what he said to me the other day, that they greatly respect the English, but will find a way to meet them.
Madrid, the 15th June, 1625.
[Italian]

Footnotes

1 Albert Morton.
2 A copy of the letter is preserved among the State Papers, Foreign, Germany (States), dated the 26th May, old style.
3 The St. Remy, see Bruneau's letter of the 12th June. State Papers, Foreign, Spain.