Venice
July 1626, 2-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1913

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459-470

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'Venice: July 1626, 2-10', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 19: 1625-1626 (1913), pp. 459-470. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89066 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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July 1626

July 2.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Svizzeri. Venetian Archives.
637. GERONIMO CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Mansfelt is awaiting the arrival of 7,000 Scots and English, without whom he cannot take the field again.
Zurich, the 2nd July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
638. To the Ambassadors Extraordinary in England.
We were pleased to learn, by yours of the 15th ult., of your arrival in Holland and the honours shown to you. Your representations to the States were quite right and what you said about the labours and expenses of the republic was very prudent. We believe that you will already have reached London and we expect your report. We hear from Germany that they are negotiating a truce with the Dutch. If this should come about Spanish succours in the empire with France might help to introduce peace; in that case it is desirable that the crowns should move in concert. You will try and find out about this. Rossi tells us that the negotiations of the Bishop of Mande with the ministers there turned upon showing the decision of the Most Christian to attend to the affairs of Germany and to move England to do the same, but he could not manage this and has taken offence declaring that they have not observed the concessions to the Catholics, but are treating them with greater severity, and it will be necessary if this continues to take certain measures.
By reports from Brussels they say the pope, the Most Christian and the Catholic have concluded an offensive and defensive league against England, and from Germany we hear that they propose to include Saxony in it. You must investigate this. We hear that the King of Denmark purposes to withdraw to Holstein, avoiding peace negotiations and offering battle, hoping to wear out the imperialists. Wallenstein is going to join Tilly. The Duke of Linimburg went to take the province of Vetru occupied by the Spaniards but suffered a reverse at Ubaech. The Imperialists maintain that the Spaniards must not set foot in any part of the empire except the Palatinate. However they will order Wallenstein to temporise so as not to give offence.
We hear that the ambassadors extraordinary have left France. Bouillon is detained at Grenoble by the gout. M. de Castelnuovo is on his way hither and will then go to the Swiss and Grisons to induce them to accept the treaty. We have received from Rome the articles of the peace and send you a copy. It is not decided yet. They are expecting a courier from Spain at Rome with the announcement of the peace. Bethune told our ambassador that the pope would receive the forts but hand them over to the Spaniards to demolish, who might hand them on to the French, and as the treaty did not provide for this they had written to Spain and France on the subject. Bethune gave the pope to understand that he had sufficient powers to settle the matter, but Pastrana said he had not. Bethune said that there were many things in the negotiations which might be put on one side; he thought the treaty had been hastened by the disturbances in the kingdom. The Cardinal legate has reached Spain and was staying at Baraca, about six leagues from the Court. Our Ambassador Moro went to see him, but nothing was said about current affairs. Fargis seems to have made the first step towards the treaty at the invitation of Olivares, having consulted the Queen Mother, whom the Infanta influenced, so that she might prevail upon the king.
We have sent you all this for information.
That the advices be sent to the ambassador at the Hague.
That 300 ducats be given their agents for extraordinary expenses, for which they will render account.
Ayes, 92.Noes, 2.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
639. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We advised your Serenity last week of our arrival. In the sequel it proved rather unfortunate, as we had considerable difficulty in making the river, the waves dashing over the ship. Even the pilot seemed anxious, though we cannot sufficiently praise the skill of the sailors. One of the cannons saluting us burst, wounding the gunner and two of our gentlemen. We thank God it was no worse.
At Gravesend, besides the Secretary Rossi, Sir [Lewis] Lewkenor, Master of the Ceremonies, came to dine with us, and another gentleman of the Bedchamber. On shore we found the Earl of Dorset, who knows Italian well. He conducted us by his Majesty's boats and coaches, amid a great crowd of people, to one of the noble palaces of this city, richly furnished with royal belongings, and with two baldachini. There we are conveniently lodged in ample and distinguished apartments and royally treated. The ministers and officials of the Court wait upon us, we have guards wearing the royal device, coaches for our use, and 40l. sterling a day appointed for entertaining us, equivalent to about 200 ducats.
We shall not have our first audience before Sunday next. In this also they intend to show us honour by receiving us on a holiday (giorno solenne). It will take place at Greenwich, whither the King went yesterday and the queen the day before.
From that place the king sent us yesterday two bucks, the spoil of his hunting. We hear that he has ordered Lord Carleton to visit us. A slight fever has prevented him from doing this these last two days. Meanwhile Lewkenor comes to dine with us almost every day. He displays every outward sign of goodwill. After our presentation to his Majesty we expect to be visited by many leading lords of the Court. Some have already sent to pay their respects, including Carleton.
We hear the Cavalier Pesaro very well spoken of at this Court, for his splendour, prudence and ability. The Secretary Rossi shows diligence and understanding, thus following in his father's footsteps.
London, the 3rd July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
640. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
At our entry into this kingdom the unexpected dissolution of parliament causes great curiosity at a time of such great need, both internal and external. We have gathered the views of many and find an undesirable agitation which is widespread and a feeling of resentment (scententizza) which seems incredible. They say it cuts off the legitimate manner of providing money by the imposition of subsidies, which impose no considerable burden on the people; whereas every other way by the king's authority alone, is not only slow and difficult, but serious, improper and prejudicial to the privileges of the kingdom. Yet they perceive it is only too necessary, owing to the extreme scarcity, the multiplicity of debts, the urgent need of supporting friends abroad and seeing to the safety of the realm, which is in no way provided against the attack they fear from the Spaniards or the movement of their dependents in the country itself.
The hatred and contempt for the Duke of Buckingham increases the more he is supported by the King and receives fresh posts and dignities. They say this has been done to heap contumely upon parliament, and that his Majesty is abandoning himself, his kingdom and his subjects for a person whom they call the curse of their dominions, whose rule is for his own selfish interests and they believe it will ruin everything. This is certainly a great stone of offence. God grant it be not artfully fomented under hand by the enemies of the public weal.
From the king and the dependents of the Duke of Buckingham one hears complaints that the parliamentarians are too audacious and that his Majesty ought not to suffer his dignity and reputation to be taken away from him by his subject; that the attempt of the parliament to ruin a person so dear to him declared under his protection and fully absolved both by his Majesty and his father of every error attributed to him, is a great presumption or a great pretext for not consenting to the public needs, which parliament itself recognises and admits. As regards past faults we understand that it would be easy to find a way of suppressing them, but the point was that they were determined to see the duke entirely removed from the government, and remonstrated that he was not capable or industrious enough to give his personal attention to so many charges. He enjoys an authority to which neither he nor any other subject attained in the time of King James, and there are great difficulties in gaining his ear. But what weighs upon them most of all is that everything depends upon a person, every one of whose operations has turned out unlucky and unsuccessful.
Three days ago the king published a declaration that every one, under pain of his displeasure, should burn all copies of the declaration made by parliament of the offences of Buckingham, threatening severe punishment on those who disobeyed, calling them ill affected towards his Majesty and the realm. Such is the regard for the duke's reputation, as the remonstrance is directed against him alone, as offensive to the present king and his father, who are struck through the bodies of the peers of the realm. I enclose a translation.
They say that the trial of the charges against him will be referred to the Star Chamber, judges dependent upon the king and upon the duke himself being appointed, in order to procure his acquittal. When this is presented to a new parliament it will secure him against further trouble, and besides that Council has not the power of capital sentences. With this intent some of the late members of parliament, who are appointed to obtain information about the duke's misdeeds, have been asked to lay their information before the Star Chamber, but they excused themselves on the plea that as parliament is dissolved they no longer have any power to meddle in such matters. They believe that this is what parliament desires, although they fear on the other hand that they may run into danger with the king or the duke. It is also believed that the three new councillors of State, dependents of the duke, will be appointed and that the Lord Keeper is in some danger because he advised his Majesty not to dissolve the parliament. Others believe that his Majesty will declare the duke Constable of the Realm, a post of the highest authority, even over the king's own person, but this is very hard to believe and there are few precedents. In short everything is done for the advancement of the duke, without any reserve. Never-theless so great a violence is a very doubtful expedient and many feel certain that he will fall in the end.
Intent as the king is upon the advancement of Buckingham he is equally so for the ruin of Bristol, who is kept very closely in the Tower and is not allowed to communicate with anyone. It is said that he will be tried by the judges of the King's Bench and that parliament resisted this. In such case his life is held to be forfeit and nothing can help him except the fear that he may bring to light some crime of Buckingham if he has a chance of speaking.
The gentlemen of the King of Denmark and Mansfelt after all the time that they have been labouring here for the promised assistance have lost all hope through the breaking up of the parliament. They have got the agent of the Palatine to confort them, assuring them that before parliament was dissolved they thought of ways of providing assistance, although it is not ready. The ambassador of Denmark will certainly leave, especially as the king, his master, has despatched another to be ordinary resident at this Court, (fn. 1) such as they have never had in the past. The money due to that sovereign is very considerable, as beside the 20,000l. sterling promised monthly, he has also paid very large sums to Mansfelt on account of 10,000l. sterling assigned to him here, amounting in all to 15,000 ducats every month.
Here at present all their thoughts are directed to providing money. This is at once hard, difficult and necessary, because of the numerous debts both at home and abroad, said to amount to quite six millions. They also want to send a naval squadron to sea, possibly in order to resist invasion, as they fear the ships of Spain united with those of Dunkirk, which are said to be directed against the dominions of others. It is not impossible that this may happen, as we hear that provision of meat and beer is all ready for three months. Little else is required because it is not their custom here to pay any money for wages until the return or the disarming of the fleet. A very severe proclamation has been issued against fugitive sailors, (fn. 2) of which I enclose a copy.
The Council of War meets constantly for these requirements. They have orders to go to the king at Greenwich, and therefore his Majesty will not go far away on his usual progress.
They hope to obtain a loan from the city of London of 100,000l. sterling upon the jewels which they could not dispose of in Holland. They approached the mayor about it three days ago and he called together the Corporation, but they returned an absolute refusal and the citizens complained freely that they were creditors for 150,000l. sterling for another loan made to the king's father, and they had no confidence that the jewels might not be demanded again one day without any payments of interest or capital, since by the laws of the realm they can neither be sold nor pledged. They now propose to put a tax upon all foreign merchants, of whom there are few besides the Flemings, and that would prejudice the friendship with them.
They are trying to raise loans of 1,000l. each more or less, from individual gentlemen and merchants, according to their means. In this way they hope to raise 600,000 crowns. But this also is considered a very uncertain expedient as it will be hard to compel those who do not choose to obey, and on a previous occasion when the city gave way before the dread of the royal commands, the burgesses appealed to another judge and escaped, as the king is not able to proceed to the confiscation of goods, but could only sue the persons, and in this instances that would be considered too hard and violent. They count to some extent upon the residue of the queen's dowry and for this we hear that one of the leading merchants here will leave for France very soon.
Owing to this scarcity of money the king has given up his procession through London which was arranged for his coronation. Accordingly five most superb arches in the streets, two erected by the citizens and three by divers other nations, at an expense of many thousands of ducats, will prove useless and they have already begun to dismantle them amid the murmurs of the people and the disgust of those who spent the money.
It is announced that the king will summon a new Parliament for All Saints. We cannot say whether this report aims at reducing the universal discontent or whether it is due to urgent necessity. It is believed that the community will choose the same representatives and they would insist more than ever upon the fall of the duke. We cannot help feeling extremely sorry about these great disorders, which are certainly most inopportune in the crying needs of all the princes.
We shall keep steadily in view everything that can assist our offices.
London, the 3rd July, 1626.
Postscript.—As we were closing this despatch your Serenity's letters of the 12th ult. have arrived.
[Italian; the parts in italics deciphered].
Enclosure.641. Proclamation forbidding the publication, circulation and reading of the declaration made by certain commissioners of the House of Commons of the Parliament lately concluded, with the intention of presenting it to his Majesty.
Dated the 18th June. (fn. 3)
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
642. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Margrave of Brandenburg has sent a gentleman post to France and England asking that Mansfelt may be removed from his dominions.
By several ways we hear of the dissolution of the English parliament, which remained most obstinate for the punishment of Buckingham, while the king was most constant in his favour. They report the arrest by the royal command of the Earl of Bristol. This has incensed rather than intimidated the passionate and fantastical spirits of that party. As they are all partisans of the Spaniards and Jesuits they now find, so they declare, a free field for the dissemination of ruin on the top of disgrace and for the cultivation of those proceedings, in the direction in which they have been going for so many years past, (che ha più arrabbiati che intimoriti gl'animi infelloniti et bizzari di quel partito i quali essendo tutti partiali de Spagnuoli et de Gesuiti trovano adesso, cosi affermano, largo campo di seminar rovine sopra disgratie, et di coltivar questa prattica alla quale pur tendono già sono tanti anni).
The Hague, the 6th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
643. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Our audience being arranged for Sunday last, the Earl of Carlisle, a leading lord and great favourite employed in the most important affairs and splendid embassies, came to fetch us by his Majesty's orders, with a number of coaches and a noble train of cavaliers. Numerous royal barges also came to fetch our suite from Greenwich by water, a distance of five miles. The shores, courts and windows were thronged with people, knights and ladies. The king himself and the queen, in different places, desired to see our entry from the windows, and it was most notable. We mounted the stairs and reached the hall where the king stood under a canopy, with the Lords of the Council and the leading men of the Court standing uncovered on either side. His Majesty rose at our entry, and advancing some steps, received us with grave and friendly words. I, Correr, presented our credentials with a suitable speech, and I, Contarini, told his Majesty, that the moment the republic heard of the death of his father of most glorious memory, it had chosen us to come and offer condolences and to congratulate his Majesty on his accession, as a testimony to the old standing and sincere esteem it bears this royal house. Various accidents had delayed the embassy but the moment could not be more opportune, as the interval had tempered the bitterness of the loss of a great prince, which was an inevitable debt to nature, and we could change the note of sadness into one of joyfulness in saluting a most worthy successor to a great father. Our consolation did not end here, because in these difficult times the sceptre had fallen into such capable hands, which encouraged your Excellencies to hope for heroic action, such as he had fully vindicated at the beginning of his glorious reign. He had gone outside his own dominions to help the oppressed. But the seal of the whole was the marriage with Madame of France, especially as it united by blood two sovereigns whom God had joined together by natural ties of mutual interests. His Majesty had added to this advantage by cultivating friendly relations with the Most Christian. The republic rejoiced exceedingly at this, owing to the ties which bound it to both crowns, and to the results which might be expected from such a union.
The king heard us graciously and with close attention. Though he has not a thorough knowledge of Italian, he seemed to approve certain points of the speech, especially about helping the oppressed at which he nodded twice. He answered by an interpreter, expressing his appreciation of the embassy and his esteem for the republic. He also spoke kindly of us personally. He had ordered his officials to do everything for our comfort and he put all his residences at our disposal.
We thanked him for the buck he had sent, and after the audience he sent us a fine stag. After a further exchange of compliments we took leave and went to pass similar offices with the queen, congratulating her on the marriage and telling her of the esteem of the republic for the king her brother and for her husband. The queen seemed to appreciate our office highly. She spoke briefly and in a low voice, but her steward, the Count of Tillières, who acted as interpreter, amplified this considerably. The queen recognised me, Contarini, from my having been ambassador in France. After some further compliments, the audience terminated.
London, the 10th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
644. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Wednesday the Duke of Buckingham came to dine with us, and the Earl of Carlisle, who accompanied us to audience. After an exchange of courtesies we went on to speak of the state of affairs in the world.
They said a great deal about the inconstancy and faithlessness of the French. On that occasion and when we called on him on the following day, the duke showed his bad opinion of the French, and never lost an opportunity of repeating the same things. We remarked that the Court of France is a rose with many thorns, one must be careful to pluck what is good and always fear being hurt by them. They seemed very well informed of the shortcomings of the French in the league with your Serenity and Savoy, and yet they wanted information from us. They did not know how great your Serenity's expenses were, and this increased their good opinion, especially when we told them that you had largely exceeded your obligations under the league. They asked us for particulars of the peace. We said that we could not answer for certain, except that the Spaniards had even increased their forces in Italy. The news of the peace had reached your Serenity, but not the articles. The Senate had sent to France to learn them.
They seemed to have a high opinion of the Duke of Savoy, and indeed that prince tries his hardest to keep the good opinion of this Court. We told them that he had refused to submit his differences with the Genoese to the two crowns, on the plea that they were not important enough. We pointed out the necessity for all princes to unite against the ambitions of the House of Austria. Your Serenity had borne heavier expenses than any other, and you would always be the same for the common welfare. We represented how serious it would be if the King of Denmark came to terms with the Austrians, owing to some disaster, or the death of Halberstadt. They suspect this is due to poison, from what their Ambassador Anstruther writes. There is the more danger of the king making terms, as his friends and familiars urge him to do so. The Austrians now have Germany completely under their yoke, and it will be hard to remove it, as they can strengthen their armies with Denmark's disbanded soldiers. We tried to induce them to console the ministers of Denmark with some assistance.
They admitted all these things, but they are hampered by necessity and impotence. They spoke of stirring up Austria, in which Mansfelt might help, as Prince Gabor asked for him and offered to move in that direction in concert with the King of Sweden. They declared that monarch had already taken the field with 25,000 foot and 15,000 horse. He was a very valiant captain; age and experience had tempered his former rashness. They believed that the King of Denmark would have to keep armed, in order to keep Brunswick for the elder brother, for whom he would act as guardian, so that this state might not fall into the hands of the Duke of Lunaburg, a dependant of Coesar. They added that Bavaria had recalled Tilly for the needs of Austria and his course of conquest was interrupted.
Our remarks have borne some fruit because the Earl of Carlisle informed us that as the king could not pay out money just now he had sent a gentleman express to Denmark yesterday with letters in his own hand, begging him to continue the vigour of his arms, and promising on his honour to satisfy him as soon as possible by the actual payment of the sums promised. At the same time he sent to solicit the embarkation of 3,000 foot levied in Scotland for Mansfelt under an influential commander.
The Duke and Earl repeated several times the necessity for all the princes to unite against the Spaniards and the House of Austria. They specially mentioned the most serene republic and the Duke of Savoy, saying that the French would also fail. We must take what we can from them. Here they will send out a powerful fleet; but the crown cannot do everything alone. It needs the help of other princes. To-day Carlisle stated more expressly that the republic and Savoy ought to enter the state of Milan, which would compel the French to move, and the Spaniards could not resist as they are short of everything, especially money. In Flanders they had tried to pledge over a hundred towns, but everyone was cautious from fear that they might be recalled one day as the possessions of his Catholic Majesty. Two thirds of last year's fleet and all the present had failed to come from the Indies. The last will not come or the English fleet will fight it. The opportunity is a rare one, as they reckon that the Duke of Savoy has 25,000 foot and 3,000 good horse; Buckingham said he wanted to take the field this year in person. He would move towards Spain, and another fleet will be left here in case the Spaniards move this way. They spoke highly of the equipment of this fleet, but repeated that they must make sure that the forces of Denmark do not fall in the meantime.
We did not openly reject the proposal for invading the Milanese, but pointed out that Savoy's forces are not so strong as is believed here, and as the enterprise would demand. Your Serenity would not be backward in anything to advance the common welfare.
We find that their idea of a fleet depends more upon their fear of invasion than upon any wish to attack, because they hear that three large Flemish vessels are ready in Galicia, very well armed with eighty pieces of ordnance each, and in Biscaya there is another large number of ships ready to move to join the Dunkirkers. It is also asserted that twenty Spanish ships have proceeded towards Scotland to hinder the herring fishery. Accordingly they have ordered thither twelve of the ships now at Plymouth, to join six others of the States of Holland.
To-day we are assured on good authority that within a fortnight fifty-five very large, powerful and well armed ships will come, and will join an equal number of Dutch ones. The Duke of Buckingham will go with them, as he is anxious to win back the affection of this kingdom.
London, the 10th July, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
645. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In the present great scarcity of money and in the common opinion that the Spanish force is about to invade this kingdom the Royal Council meets constantly. They have repeated their request to the mayor for a loan, reduced this time to 60,000l. sterling, with some expressions of resentment for the recent refusal. However, they obtained nothing further, except that it is impossible to force the citizens without a parliament, and for the defence of the realm they offer to arm forty ships, provided only a tenth of the booty is handed over to them. They added that they wished to control the money they contributed and not let others wax fat over it.
Finally, a mutiny having taken place of six hundred soldiers and sailors of those destined for the fleet, which they are equipping, the men marched from the port of Polsemua to quite near this city, doing no little harm to the country people, because they lacked the means of sustenance, a thing which caused some perturbation at the Court. However, they have obtained a promise from the citizens here of 20,000l. sterling, provided they receive an assignment for the equivalent upon the customs. This has not been managed very readily, because various other assignments have been made previously,
It is only a few weeks ago since another body of these same sailors came here to the Lord Treasurer to obtain money. When they did not get it they turned to the Duke of Buckingham, who gave them something from his own pocket, and that has possibly encouraged the revolt of these others.
There being no more hope of obtaining money from the body of the citizens here, the king has made a list of many of his subjects and of Flemish merchants in particular, in order to compel them to lend him 4,000 ducats each. It seems that many have objected strongly and many have asserted that they will go to prison rather than consent. The Court has also suggested that they should raise a loan from the Catholics, with the idea of giving up persecuting them, but more, it is thought, to induce the people, who are strongly in favour of repressing the Catholics, to make some payment in order to prevent the king taking such a step. The Catholics on the other hand would probably have no confidence in any promise, but much the reverse since an order has been issued to the sheriffs and judges of this city giving them authority to confiscate two-thirds of the goods of the Catholics. For this purpose many are examined and many summoned, while some even of the very rich, rather than deny the truth of their faith before the judge, agree to the spoliation of such a large part of their goods.
Nothing is certain about the meeting of a new parliament and the various rumours are considered to be more artificial than real. For the defence of the realm they hope to have 25,000 foot ready of those inscribed and a good number of horse. They never cease to solicit the citizens here to equip a number of ships at their own cost.
Twelve citizens of London have arrived here from Hamburg. They state that trade is forbidden to ships from England, Denmark and Holland, and they keep the mouth of the Elbe rigorously blockaded. But here also they have issued a decree for the confiscation of the goods of all those who favour the enemies of the crown. They tell the Hamburgers that this affects them because they supply the Spaniards with rope, pitch, wheat and other commodities for their fleets. Thus in the last day or two one of their ships, of considerable burthen, has been brought into these ports, with a cargo of wheat and other goods of great value, which it was taking to Spain; and a week ago a small petacchia or tartana belonging to one of the men-of-war, here fell in with a large berton sailing from Dunkirk laden with goods, captured it and brought it to Greenwich for the king to see, and this gave him great pleasure.
From the resident of Bohemia we hear that Cæsar has again approached the Duke of Wirtemberg about the Palatine's affairs, urging him to interpose; and that the letters of his Majesty were very moderate and no longer called the Palatine a rebel and proscribed, as in the past. This may be one of their usual tricks to lull to sleep or gain some other advantage in the present disturbances of Austria.
London, the 10th July, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 10.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Zante. Venetian Archives.
646. ALVISE TIEPOLO, Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
With regard to the memorial of the first secretary of the King of Great Britain, sent to me by your Serenity in the missives of the 7th April last, I had a long conversation with John Plomenton, one of the expedition agents of the English ships, and commissioner of the inheritance of Nathanael Teson, a merchant who lived here. He told me that what had taken place when Nathanael was alive made him decide to take up the commission although he had seen with his own eyes that the inheritance and interest would be very hard to bring together as the capital consists in credits in the ports of Morea and Cephalonia, so that the testator's wishes could not be fulfilled immediately before these credits were secured and the capital all brought together. He had worked hard at this and got everything into order and sent word of the state of affairs to the heirs in England, who should be well pleased with what he had done. In order to fulfil your Serenity's orders I had all the proceedings put in writing in the abbreviated commercial style, and enclose the paper which I think is necessary for the widow's interests, whose intercession has induced your Serenity to take up this affair.
After the first departure of the ships with the currants, which will be very soon, he will send to England the capital and books with full directions. It remains to ask him to satisfy this debt, although he seems ready to release himself, so that the secretary's request may be met as he desires.
Zante, the 30th June, 1626, old style.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Zante. Venetian Archives.
647. ALVISE TIEPOLO, Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The plans of the pirates and their uniting 13 galeots to sail recently for the hurt of this island, as stated by John Leli who came from tunis in 13 days in an English ship, has made me take precautions for guarding the island. I enclose Leli's statement about the pirates, and have also informed the Proveditore of the fleet and the Proveditore of Cephalonia, so that they may be on the alert.
Zante, the 30th June, 1626, old style.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in the preceding despatch.648. On the 24th June, 1626.
Examination of John Leli of this city who arrived this morning from Barbary in an English ship. Heard 13 galeots arming to sack Zante; others arming at Tunis and Algiers 13 days ago when he left. Proposed to sack Candia. Learned particulars from Venetian slaves. Had spent two months at Tunis trading for wine, where saw many armed men. His ship had not touched anywhere. It was destined for Venice and might leave any day. Its cargo was salt, wool and potash or mixture.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 William de Below. His letters of credence are dated at Wolffenbuttel on the 3rd of May.—State Papers, Foreign, Denmark.
2 On the 18th June, forbidding mariners who have received press money to run away or desert upon pain of death.—Cal. S.P. Dom., 1625–6, page 357.
3 See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1625–6, page 355, where it is dated the 16th June.