Venice
July 1626, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1913

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470-483

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'Venice: July 1626, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 19: 1625-1626 (1913), pp. 470-483. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89067 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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July 1626

July 11.
Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni, Costantinopoli. Venetian Archives.
649. To the Ambassador in France.
A Spaniard lately reached Ragusa sent by the Viceroy of Naples on his way to Constantinople to renew the negotiations with the Porte for a truce; he fell from his horse and was injured. When the news reached the ambassadors at Constantinople, France, England and the States went to the Caimecan, who at their instance sent to stop the Spaniard and even to have him sent back to Spain. The Turks are much exasperated against the Catholic. The Imperial resident feared that the visit of Gabor's gentleman, M. de Bonamissa, to Constantinople was to urge the Turks to help that prince against the emperor, and he tried hard to induce the Turks to make a truce with the Spaniards. Bonamissa says that Gabor's moving depends upon the Sultan and the Most Christian. The French ambassador encourages him. The imperial resident is also trying to obtain the confirmation of the peace arranged last year in Hungary, but can get no satisfactory reply.
Ayes, 138.Noes, 2.Neutral, 4.
The like, mutatis mutandis to Spain, England, the Hague and the resident with the emperor.
[Italian.]
July 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
650. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the 3rd inst., Theodolachi, ambassador of Prince Gabor arrived here. On the following day he went to audience of the Caimecan and then of the ambassadors. He brought me a letter of credence from the prince and a request to assist his important negotiations. He told me that many useful things had been arranged in the congress at the Hague to restrain the ambitions of the House of Austria. He said he had found France and England very friendly; he had not yet spoken to Flanders.
The English ambassador subsequently sent his secretary to tell me what Theodolachi had said to him, which agreed entirely with what he said to me. England says he is puzzled about what course he shall pursue, as for several months he has had no letters from his king or any orders, to his great amazement. When I told him of what his Majesty had said to our ambassador, he desired further particulars. I said if he had no letters they must certainly have gone astray as it was impossible they had not been sent, as his Majesty had affirmed it with his own mouth. The ambassador thereupon promised to join with Theodolachi in approaching the Caimecan and make every effort to secure their ends. He considered great tact was necessary as the Caimecan might suspect that these things would compel the Sultan to make war on the emperor, while the Persian war was still going on, a thing to which he would never consent. He promised to let me know the result. He begged me to tell the Ambassador Pesaro how much he suffers from remaining here so long without letters from his Majesty or the ministers, the wrong that is done him and the harm to important affairs, begging him io bring this to the ears of his Majesty and the ministers in an effective way.
The Vigne of Pera, the 11th July, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
651. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of France and England recently had letters from the Duke of Sbaras, confirming the peace and complaining of the Caimecan for the invasion. They both showed the letters to the Caimecan who denied the accusation asking them to inform the duke and get him to promise that the Cossacks shall not take the field this year. The English ambassador told me that he had complied so as to allow the Turks to send their fleet into the White Sea to harm the Spaniards. The Caimecan and the Captain Pasha sent every day to know if he has received a reply, from their ardent desire for the fleet to enter the White Sea, not to hurt the Spaniards but to spoil the islands of the Archipelago.
The Vigne of Pera, the 11th July, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
652. ALVISE CONTARINI, Ambassador designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Contrary winds hinder my punctual fulfilment of your Serenity's commands. Sixteen days have I waited here for nothing but the necessary change in the weather. The cost to my private resources would constitute an additional impulse for me to move, were any needed. During my detention here some gentlemen of the government, with whom I had become intimate in the course of my embassy, visited me and communicated some particulars about Denmark, expressing doubt about the stability of his good resolutions, and similar suspicions, all of which I communicated to Zorzi, who has favoured me with the ducal missives of the 18th June, which I have copied to enable me to second the intentions of the state about the negotiations of Farges and serve as a guide for what I say in England, where indeed, according to the frequent advices received thence, the necessary assistance for the common cause diminishes daily, in this general apathy, which the Spaniards encourage.
Rotterdam, the 12th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
653. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The secretary of England went into the Assembly this morning and told the States General that Carleton, on the plea of indisposition, will not come again to reside here. This has deeper roots, of which I have already written, giving rise to strained relations between the parties.
They make slow progress with the fifteen ships which they have agreed to send to join the sixty English ones against the plate fleet, but they are very active over those for the defence of these seas against the great naval preparations of the Catholic, for the common advantage of these states and of England. The king there wrote to them on the 23rd June last, urging them to help him if the Spanish fleet attacks his kingdom, as they say they will and offering to do as much for them in like case.
Many English colonels and captains engaged in service here, who were about to leave for England, have been detained on the plea of their urgent need here. With some they have used authority and with others confidence, assuring them that if parliament has failed for itself, the kingdom and the common cause on this occasion, yet they will not be wanting in giving them money; a proposition which everyone here has heard gladly, but which few have believed.
The Hague, the 13th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 14.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Francia, Venetian Archives.
654. SIMONE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bad blood continues to grow worse between his Majesty here and the King of England. Both sides stiffen more and more upon their pretensions and quarrels.
Barozzi, secretary of the Savoyard ambassador here, has returned from England, and he immediately hastened on by the post to Turin. The ambassador has visited me, but though I touched upon the subject more than once in order to discover the reason for the secretary's journey to England, he would not unbosom himself. All he told me about the king there is that on the 25th ult. he went into the larger House of Parliament, and told the leaders there, that after he had given them such a long time to decide upon the service of the realm, their own welfare and the satisfaction of his Majesty, and they put off their decision not only for weeks but for months, not choosing to do anything, but obstinately persisting in demands which did not please him, he had decided that they should dissolve, without another word. The firm decision of his Majesty seemed strange to the parliament, and they begged him to give them two weeks, in which time they might give him a satisfactory answer. The king would not agree to this or to two days or even two hours, to which they finally limited their request, but was determined they should dissolve.
After this the King summoned to him some subjects and deputies of the government and ordered them to think speedily of some way of raising money from the kingdom. They had foreseen what his Majesty would ask of them, and told him that he might send commissioners to all the counties, and in this way obtain the same sums which he was accustomed to have by means of Parliament, as this had been the custom before.
The ambassador also told me that sixty ships were ready to sail and fight those of Spain or to attack the Catholic where they could do so with most advantage, while forty others were assigned for the defence of England. On the other hand the Duke of Nevers told me that the King of Spain had a considerable force at sea, as he meant to unite his ships of that realm with those of Flanders under Spinola, and their fleet would either go against Ireland, where it seems the Catholics are expecting them, or will throw itself upon some part of the Dutch dominions, to do them all the harm in their power.
Paris, the 14th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 15.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Svizzeri. Venetian Archives.
655. GERONIMO CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have not discovered any sign from the nuncio or Miron of any league between the pope and the two crowns. The nuncio indeed remarked that the Catholic ought to be most grateful to the Most Christian for not entering the league with England, Denmark and the others, despite of numerous inducements, and this act will have inclined that king the more to peace.
Zurich, the 15th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 16.
Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.
656. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
We hear from Germany that the Landgrave of Hesse, having mustered 14,000 combatants, has finally declared for Denmark and they expect 3,000 more. The negotiations at Brussels for the Catholic league are in suspense because of the differences between the Spaniards and the ambassadors of Bavaria, the former desiring a port on the Baltic Sea to stop the trade of the Dutch and the supplies to Denmark. We shall be glad if you will enquire into this matter.
The like as regards the advices to the ambassador in England, adding:—
We have heard of the prosperous journey of our ambassadors extraordinary, and we believe that the ordinary will have arrived soon after, as your last letters are from Rotterdam. We are very pleased at what you did at your departure from the Hague, and we are glad that you will arrive at the other Court at a moment when you may exercise your abilities to advantage, as the decision of the king there to dissolve parliament without receiving their contributions, as Secretary Rossi advises in his despatch of this week, excites great curiosity as to what may happen as regards the trend of affairs there and of the others of Germany which are so closely bound up with them.
Ayes, 127.Noes, 2.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
July 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
657. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity's commands of the 5th, 12th and 19th June to acquaint his Majesty with Italian affairs obliged us to ask for a private audience. This was appointed for last Sunday, when we were told that his Majesty would like to have a familiar talk with us. The Earl of Holland, one of the most intimate favourites, came with coaches and a train of cavaliers to fetch us, as if the audience had been public and ceremonial, showing that his Majesty was glad to have a serious conference with your Serenity. We were introduced without having to wait a moment, and after further favours and honours we began to remark that the carrying out of the treaty between the two crowns was very doubtful, because the Spaniards are still arming and the terms arranged were utterly inconsistent with the common liberty and the restoration of the Grisons. We referred to their anxiety and the Swiss, to the firmness of Savoy, the prudence and steadfastness of your Serenity and other princes, the advantage of time. All these things give hope that this damaging treaty will not stand. The French must one day recognise where their advantage and honour lie, and the remonstrances of the Swiss and the resignation of Bassompierre, who was to come to your Serenity in favour of the treaty, pointed that way. We mentioned the reluctance of the pope to rase the forts. We spoke at length of your Serenity's efforts to prevent the treaty and your attempts to keep the French in good humour by a copious supply of provisions and munitions, at great expense, and the forces maintained by yourself, showing that the republic had done its share, and if France had not failed to unite with the Duke of Savoy more might have been done. Your Serenity had spared neither money nor effort and had maintained powerful forces both by land and sea. It was now waiting for what M. de Prèo would bring from France. Fortune would not always smile on the Spaniards. We spoke of the present movements of Austria and launched into praise of Denmark, pointing out the danger if the king there, for any reason, should come to terms. Brunswick's death was very fortunate for the Austrians and enabled them to increase their forces. These, united with those of Italy and Flanders would swamp every obstacle. We spoke of the attempts to win over Savoy, make terms with Denmark and to appease the troubles in Austria, and the proposal to endow the destined bride of the King of Hungary with the Palatinate. This state of affairs should make every wise prince reflect and provide for the fortifying of this dyke against the great flood. His Majesty, at the beginning of his glorious reign, has shown the generosity of his ideas, and his compassion for his sister and nephews, and as his decisions are always well matured and sound, he will doubtless continue the same course and that of his glorious predecessors, who held the balance of Christendom.
In reply the king said he welcomed the articles of the treaty, and he well knew how little reliance could be placed on the promises of the French. He would do all in his power, but could not achieve everything single handed. He would send his fleet against Spain, and the Duke of Savoy had asked him to help with a fleet against Genoa. He hoped that this would suffice with help from your Serenity. Denmark is already moving at the instance of this crown, and now Sweden has made a truce for six years with Poland, he hopes he will do the same. The Spaniards reckon without their host over endowing the Queen of Hungary with the lower Palatinate. His Majesty made no further reply to some remarks from us about the help desired by Savoy against Genoa, so we judged it best not to press the matter, especially as we were much afraid he would ask us to assist. His Majesty afterwards said, now the French have denounced the league, we must hold together, the republic, the duke and I. We replied that the king had not yet denounced the league though he had given it a great shock, which all those who had to deal with them would remember. The king smiled and said We must ask the Spaniards if the league is denounced, adding that he will never trust the French.
London, the 18th July, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 18.
Senato, Secreta Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
658. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We thought it best to speak to the Duke of Buckingham to the same effect as we had with the king, as everything is done through him, and while he always appears well disposed to the interests of the embassy, he evidently highly appreciates every sign of respect which we have shown him.
With respect to the Spaniards arming in Italy and the pope's reluctance to rase the forts he replied: I am advised from Rome on good authority that the Spaniards bear a special grudge against the republic, but the pope will not listen to them. As regards your Serenity's efforts to prevent the treaty and the feeling of the Swiss and Grisons, he said that the republic and the Duke of Savoy must act jointly with his master. Separate and spasmodic action was useless. The French are bound to be with us, but they must come of their own accord and because they cannot help it. The ministers of this Crown, your Serenity and Savoy at the French Court must hold together, and always speak to the same purport. The king here will do everything in his power, but he cannot do everything single handed. He himself would start in a few days with fifty well armed ships and 5 or 6,000 foot on board, besides many other ships to act as carriers in order to encounter the Spanish fleet, which they hear is being prepared in Biscaya and is apparently aimed at Ireland. He already has a list of the captains and of all particulars. With this fleet he will steer towards Spain, and if he meets the Spaniards he will give them battle, otherwise he will take up a position for fighting. He was also anxious to proceed towards the Indies, in order to fall in with the fleets. At the same time about eighty ships will remain to defend these shores. This will not prevent them preparing another fleet. They have about 25,000 foot ready here, but the kingdom is inured to peace and the troops are not well disciplined, though brave. Possibly the king means to send a good number of men to Holland to mingle with the English regiments there and learn discipline, in order to employ them in subsequent enterprises. The king has not been able to obtain from his people the subsidies desired, but he will find other ways of providing the needful and of obtaining the power, with the course of time, to give the law to his subjects by the establishment of himself in ever greater authority (che il Re non haveva potuto ottener da suoi popoli il sussidio ricercato, ma non le mancava nondimeno altro modo per proveder al bisogno, et di poter col tempo dar legge a suoi sudditi con stabilir se stesso di piu in piu in auttorita). He repeated that the matter must be taken up jointly by all; the business will not brook delay; the moment is propitious owing to the rising in Austria, and to impart vigour to the forces of Denmark, otherwise every one will advise looking after onesself. We remarked again that his Excellency and all the world knew how much the republic had done for the common cause, and the past was a promise for the future; the operations in Italy had made a great difference to affairs this side of the Alps, and they must attend to what happens there and to what Preo brings. The duke replied: The French will be forced to act properly, but we must lead them to it by degrees; but they boast too much that the republic depends entirely upon them, and would never undertake anything without them. The French have several times expressed this idea to the English ambassador, while at this Court they did not believe that your Serenity would enter the league or engage yourselves with the French, who have always shown their want of faith. The Prince of Piedmont when he was at Paris was very dissatisfied and unburdened himself to the English ambassador; he left with ill will and the intention of influencing the duke his father. He knew the republic had done a great deal, but only for defence, but now another policy was required, more especially to prevent the King of Denmark from coming to terms, as he is urged to do. Wake is to go on to the Swiss from Turin for some negotiations upon current affairs, and we may expect good results, owing to his great ability. The king has shown the Duke of Savoy that he entertained very generous ideas, both by Baroccio and Wake, but he was bound by his alliance with Denmark, Sweden and the States, and could not come to any decision without their participation. When we asked whether the Ambassador Wake would return soon to his post at Venice, for which he expressed our desire, he seemed to think that he would not return at once, but only when he thought the moment propitious, when he would go without delay, hinting that it would be about the business referred to above. Nevertheless his friends and others at the Court have asserted that he will not tarry and he had only been prevented from crossing the Alps by the great quantity of snow which has fallen this year.
Your Serenity shall hear in the following letter their plans for the fleet and their fears of the Spaniards.
By the courtesy of the Duke of Buckingham we enclose the terms of the Valtelline treaty and a paragraph from a letter of Wake to one of the Secretaries of State.
London, the 18th July, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.659. From a letter of SIR ISAAC WAKE to the Secretary CONWAY of the 11–21 June, 1626. (fn. 1)
Affairs continue absolutely involved. The only certainty is that the two crowns are agreed and have reciprocally bound themselves to join forces against any one soever who refuses to accept their peace. Yet some of the articles have not yet been communicated to the confederates. To excuse their extraordinary behaviour Buglione is expected at Turin and Preo at Venice. Both will promise Maria et montes in general terms, but their commissions are different, because Preos will treat with the Venetians about the Valtelline, and Buglione with Savoy about Genoa. Buglione will gild the bitter pill for the Duke of Savoy, not with French crowns but with Genoese gold, with a secret engagement that France shall make good to the duke what he has expended in the last war, and the Genoese shall pay the money. France has undertaken for the duke and Spain promises for the Genoese, the money to be first paid to the King of France and handed to the duke by him, so that it may not seem that the Genoese are buying the peace. It seems that the Spaniards have not absolute confidence in this peace, their chief motive being the fear of a second invasion by England and the emperor's need of help. For this 5,000 Neapolitans have been levied to be sent to Spain, and many regiments of the Milan force are destined for Germany. They have changed their minds for the moment and landed the Neapolitans at Genoa and have recalled the regiments referred to, from which it seems that they either fear the inconstancy of the French or are afraid of the obstinacy of the Duke of Savoy. The question of the pope's troops is a riddle. He seems offended with both crowns for having treated without him, but one may imagine that in secret they are all three fully agreed. The Prince of Piedmont is of this opinion owing to some words which escaped the Queen Mother when he was at Paris, and the agreement of their ministers everywhere shows a uniform understanding. Their troops number 8,000 quartered in the state of Milan near the confines of the Valtelline under Torquato Conti, an experienced soldier. The Spaniards have to begin by giving up Riva, on the supposition that the Marquis of Coure will follow their example and will hand all the rest of the Valtelline over to the pope; but the Grisons and Protestant Swiss will not hear of it, being encouraged by the Venetians, who detest the treaty, that is if the Marquis has power to surrender it against the wish of so many who object, especially as their forces may resist. Their troops have not entered the Valtelline, and even yet the ministers of the emperor, the King of Spain and the Duke of Bavaria importune the pope to send them to Germany in defence of the Catholic league. This is another incomprehensible mystery, for they would hardly dare to transport all their force to Germany until they have peaceable possession of the Valtelline and the assurance of not being disturbed in Italy. In the present state of affairs they have more reason to fear than to cause to presume, and indeed they do not know what to do.
[French, with Italian translation.]
Enclosure.660. Summary of the Treaty of Peace made in Spain by the French Ambassador.
(1) The affairs of the Valtelline, Bormio and Chiavenna shall remain as they were in 1617.
(2) The people there shall choose and exercise justice and magistrates and the prisons shall be bound to confirm them, and justice shall be free without interference from the Grisons.
(3) The Kings of France and Spain will maintain this treaty against any who try to upset it.
(4) The Grisons shall take oath to observe everything established for the Valtelline.
(5) The two kings will cause pardon to be given on both sides.
(6) The people of the said places shall pay the Grisons a yearly tribute for the free exercise of justice, and France and Spain will arrange a reasonable sum in case of difference.
(7) If the Grisons oppose the Catholic faith in any way, the pope and nuncio will apply such remedy as they see fit, and France and Spain will give help if necessary.
(8) If the Grisons disturb the Valtelline by arms, France and Spain will try to remedy the matter.
(9) If the said people contravene this treaty in any way, the kings will do everything to provide a remedy; but if the people will not consent, they shall lose the privileges given them by this treaty.
(10) The first act is to consign the forts constructed by the league into the pope's hands to be demolished; and he shall have all the arms taken by the league and the King of Spain.
(11) If the forces of the league and Spain are withdrawn, the Grisons shall not keep garrisons on the frontier larger than they used to have before the war.
(12) Efforts will be made to bring about an armistice for four months about Genoa, and the parties shall choose arbitrators to decide their differences.
(13) Spain and France shall come to terms about reprisals.
(14) The present treaty is the only one valid for the Valtelline and the Grisons and has been settled between the Count of Olivares and the Ambassador Fargis.
[French, with Italian translation.]
July 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
661. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The riot of sailors escaped from the fleet was easily appeased. They have been sent back with a few pence but a formal promise that at Polzmua they shall have full satisfaction. This is in order not to excite fresh mutinies. Money, to the amount of 20,000l. sterling has been obtained from the Aldermen of London, some say on their own account, others that it has been taken from a fund devoted to the poor. This much is certain, the citizens would not undertake the charge of it.
They are busy preparing the fleet. We hear it will consist of thirty-four English ships and twenty Dutch, and only twenty musketeers will embark on each in addition to the usual sailors, Although Buckingham wished to create a different impression, this is a sure sign that he has no intention of embarking. The public departure of Buckingham is not desired and even less believed, as he has no skill in war or navigation and will not readily leave the king's side, especially as the same rumour was current last year until the very last day. They now say that all will be ready in a month, although the delay may be greater.
They also have in view the defence of the realm and the places near the coast. At present they have about 5,000 foot there, the residue of the troops paid off last year. They are divided into eleven regiments of eleven companies and could in a moment be brought up to 10 or 15,000. The officers are there and men will not be lacking as those chosen have to serve, no excuse being admitted. They are lodged in the country, the king promising so much per head to the hosts, and two uniforms a year to each soldier, though neither promise is kept.
They are trying to have their troops ready and armed, and they have ordered 25,000 to be in the places most exposed to danger. They have at the same time directed that arms shall be taken from Catholics and given to subjects, and for some of the Catholics most suspect to be taken from their own houses to others, and practically kept under custody.
The king hears that the Spanish fleet will carry arms for 6,000 persons to distribute to their adherents, and there is an idea that the Dunkirk ships may bring over the Irish regiments in Flanders, because of some rising. Letters from Bayonne report great naval preparations in Biscaya, and some one from Spain reports having seen hundreds of men who were going in that direction from Flanders. However, some believe that the Spaniards will not come here, as they have encouraged the belief before.
Last Saturday the king made a long speech in his Council saying he was informed by his Minister of Justice that a great sum had been levied from the Catholic recusants in a few years but only a trifling portion had reached him. Thus his subjects were ruined and made incapable of supplying his needs, while he received no benefit, but the pursuivants. He spoke of the Catholics as the children of the Crown, like the rest, and proposed a compromise instead of violently taking two-thirds of their goods. Buckingham and the Lord Chamberlain repeated the same, highly praising his Majesty, and so an act was drawn up with the approval of the Council. In this way they seem to aim at getting a great revenue and a considerable sum of money and also to win the good-will of the Catholics to make them less inclined to revolt if the Spanish fleet appears.
When speaking with the Earl of Dorset, a very sensible nobleman, selected to be Viceroy of Ireland, about the invitation so often given by the Infanta to the Queen of Bohemia, and for negotiations with the princess of Orange, we spoke of the hopes of Bavaria marrying his niece and heiress to Bohemia's eldest son, and find that they count a good deal on that marriage here.
The ambassador extraordinary of Denmark arrived yesterday. (fn. 2) He will have audience to-day. We shall visit him and help him all we can. The Hamburg ambassadors have seen the king but have not got what they want. They complain that their ships are prevented from leaving the Elbe, and of proceeding to use force without giving them any warning. But here they seem firm about preventing any provisions reaching the Spaniards from them, and put them off with fair words.
We have desired to relieve his Majesty of the expense of entertaining us, but he said he wished to continue as he had begun. We shall take leave of his Majesty to-morrow, and start at once.
We have just received your Serenity's letters of the 25th ult. which we shall use as directed.
London, the 18th July, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 18,
Consiglio di X. Parti Lettere di Ambasciatori. Venetian Archives.
662. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors in England, to the Chiefs of the Council of Ten.
In our meeting with the Duke of Buckingham after we told him of what had occurred at our interview with the king and he assured us that his Majesty is steadfast in his determination not to suffer the aggrandisement of Spain, he told us this in the strictest confidence, out of the great friendship he professes for your Serenity and because of our sympathy, which he highly appreciated in this crisis of his fortunes. He said that the Duke of Savoy had sent to him here Barocci, secretary of his Highness's ambassador in France, to announce that if his Majesty thought of coming to terms with the Catholic, he would undertake the negotiations and bring them to a successful termination. They told him roundly that the king was not disposed, and could come to no decision without consulting Denmark, Sweden and the Dutch, owing to his alliance with them.
Such a proposal merits reflection, owing to the ideas it discloses in the duke, although it seems unlikely that the Spaniards would employ him in such a matter; yet we encouraged him to tell us in confidence what were the proposals and what authority the duke had to open these negotiations. His reply differed somewhat from his first assertions, and he said, To tell the truth I had induced the duke to state whether he would accede to the composition between France and Spain arranged by Fargis; and he took that occasion to send the said secretary to inform me that he was most steadfast in his old plans and enterprises, but if his Majesty contemplated an accommodation with the Catholic he begged for the honour of being the instrument, as he trusted he had sufficient influence to intervene. The duke repeated this more than once.
The duke also opened to us upon another important matter, which should be kept most secret, and which he maintained should be done jointly by the king here, the most serene republic and the Duke of Savoy, so that the French might be compelled to join with us. He said we should try to make them need us and our help as being the only means of regulating them and bringing them up to the mark, and there was no better means than this among all the ways proposed. After a slight pause we asked him how this was to be done. He replied, By encouraging divisions and fomenting discord among then. He added: There are many malcontents in France; the Cardinal stands by the maxims of Luynes and the Queen Mother, namely to ruin the leading men of the kingdom; he expects in this way to render his king more powerful and give him greater authority over his subjects. But, said he, this is a matter for a king who governs others not for one who is governed; yet it will not be difficult to make him depart from his maxims, as Monsieur, the Most Christian's brother, in high dudgeon, had already arranged to withdraw to this kingdom, Turin or la Rochelle; but the Queen Mother had become aware of his disaffection, and taking him aside she cajoled and flattered him, shedding tears, so that the good prince told his mother all his plans, that it was necessary for the ambassadors of England, Venice and Savoy to act all together for a common object, and show themselves in this way everywhere.
As we did not know what resolution the sovereigns here might take about making terms with Spain, or what their real feelings might be, for while speaking in vigorous fashion their actions on the contrary are wanting in every particular, we tried to behave in such a way as not to prejudice the confidence of the Duke of Buckingham, whom we found of the most evil disposition towards French affairs. We shall lose no opportunity of conveying to him with necessary tact the perniciousness of these ideas. We shall give the ordinary ambassador, Contarini, full information about all this. He is only awaiting a favourable wind to enter this kingdom. Your Excellencies can send to the Court of Savoy such instructions as your prudence may devise.
London, the 18th July, 1626.
Endorsed: The decipher was sent to the Senate on the 7th August.
Expulsis pap.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
663. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
General Fuchs is before Tangermund. The Duke of Weimar has his quarters at Stendal, and his cavalry are all about the country. They are awaiting money from England with dissatisfaction; without this all their courage and hope lose their value.
The Hague, the 19th July, 1626.
[Italian.]
July 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
664. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The company of the guard left here on Wednesday for the front. It is composed of three hundred young lords and barons, French, English and natives, all very keen, with the faces of angels, dressed like princes and between eighteen and thirty, as fine a sight as one could wish to see.
For several months there have been friendly disputes between the Kings of France, England and Denmark about the arrest of ships and goods and similar matters. As their sovereigns wished to put an end to this without a quarrel, they have of their free will set everything at liberty. It is due to the character and goodwill of the States here and that is the reason for the coming of Sig. Tomas Christian. (fn. 3)
The Hague, the 20th July, 1626.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The original of this letter is among the State Papers, Foreign, Savoy, at the Public Record Office.
2 Pallas Rosencranz. He arrived at Gravesend on the 6th July, old style. Finett: Philoxenis, page 180.
3 Christian Thomassen, sent as ambassador by the King of Denmark about the reprisals. Carleton's despatch of the 12th July, o.s.—State Papers, Foreign, Holland.