Venice
April 1669

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

34-45

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: April 1669', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 34-45. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90260 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

April 1669

April 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
43. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
With the arrival recently of M. de Montagu, ambassador in ordinary of his Britannic Majesty, various rumours are going round the Court about approaching negotiations and proposals for exchanges of the new conquests made by the Most Christian king in Flanders against the county of Burgundy and other Spanish possessions more remote from the frontiers of Holland. I learn from the Hague that at the last meeting of the States General about sending an ambassador here, they decided to wait; their intention being to force the British king to propose this exchange by his minister, in the hope of seeing the proposals very favourably received.
Paris, the 3rd April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
44. To the Ambassador in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 15th ult. Marchesini is being directed to return home. All the hopes of the Senate are now based on the operations of the ambassador. He has permission to pay for the gunpowder taken at Zante at a moderate rate. The Senate will readily agree to grant exemption from the duties at Zante to those who take gunpowder to Zante.
Ayes, 136. Noes, 2. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
April 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
45. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
A series of important matters concerning the internal affairs of the kingdom which were grouped together and left undecided owing to the absence of the king and ministers from the Court has distracted his Majesty's mind from his diversions and called him back from Niumarchet in the country to take part personally in these consultations and to come to some decision.
The king arrived in London on Saturday after dinner with his brother the duke of York. Immediately on arriving it was found by the latter that his closet had been broken open. The first unvarnished reports untrammeled by ulterior considerations, were that although the closet contained a lot of money, a quantity of jewels and a good number of rare and precious things, only the papers were missing. These reports being subsequently edited (regolate) the notion was put about by the Court that the duchess, jealous of the duke's affection and impatient to ferret out some correspondence, had opened the closet. But this report is discredited from pure lack of evidence, and now they wish to have it believed that a lot of money is missing. With all sorts of opinions being expressed one circumstance gives rise to the gravest reflection. This is the modest behaviour of the duke of York, who is suspending further search. This is an indication that he has discovered that the rifling was the work of a superior hand, one beyond the reach of fear. This would indicate that his Highness had fallen under suspicion of secret intelligencies outside the kingdom. The most plausible conclusion is that these are with the lord chancellor, the father of his wife. The other idea, of some understanding with France, is a baseless absurdity. It is encouraged by the expected appearance here of St. Albans, sent over by the queen mother; but he will have no other business beyond the private matter of the queen's assignments and such correspondence would require a solid basis and lead to consequences of too great moment. If the theft has really been of papers, it is probable that nothing more will be heard of it since up to the present moment they have not caused any apparent alteration.
As regards the affairs of the triple alliance the disposition I have reported has in no wise changed here. They are still waiting for the arrival of more ample powers from Sweden. It is true that the Spaniards observe resentfully that the French are restoring and increasing the fortifications in Flanders and particularly at Dunkirk. They complain of the insistence of the Most Christian in the severity shown which, barely just to the common people, is extended to the gentlemen as well. It is pretended that those who possess property within the new conquests must go and live there or lose it. If they are experiencing some relief from their fears of a rupture of the peace, they are in their usual uncertainty in Flanders, having been forced by the violence of the people at Brussels to remove the new taxes, as your Serenity will have learned already.
Considerations of trade and suspicion of Holland are always put forward to me to excuse delay in their declarations, so an assurance of peace between the crowns will in nowise improve my chances of a hearing. The way to this being closed I shall continue with simple intimations of succour. If the Ambassador Colbert should make any step here it would produce little fruit. Your Serenity has heard enough of the hardness of heart of the ministers here, deaf to all considerations and blind to the example of others. His Excellency spoke to me at length in talking of Candia, in which he is interested on account of his brother, who is there in the capacity of marshal. (fn. 1) Having dwelt upon the particulars he did not say a word about any such commissions, and I fancy that, having learned wisdom from the affair of Duglas, he does not wish to commit himself any further.
With regard to the affair of Sautino, who has sequestrated the money of your Serenity in Holland, I will as instructed, report what reaches me, but now the Ambassador Borel has left, my information, forwarded by the Secretary Marchesini, will be late and perhaps uncertain.
Since the magistracy of the Artiglerie charges me to arrange for the despatch from here of some more gunpowder for Zante at 5l. sterling the barrel, to be paid in currants, I will do my best; but as an exchange for currants will always be difficult and disadvantageous I flatter myself that I shall be able to reduce the price considerably for cash down. When I am enlightened by fresh instructions I will enter more fully into the matter. I cannot give a positive estimate, because the cost varies at the discretion of the monopolists who hold up the saltpetre.
I have informed Messrs. Philip Ouard and Francis Vaston of the disposition of the Senate to gratify them in the matter of the patents.
London, the 5th April, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
46. Antonio Vincenti, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
An Irishman who is here has made me an offer through the resident of England to take salt meat to Zante at the rate of 7 reals per 300 pounds weight Florentine, free of the tax on barrels which will amount to about 340 lbs. light weight, to be taken to Zante at his own risk and cost. He will also receive payment at Zante, but he intimates that he is not to take less than a thousand barrels at a time. (fn. 2)
Leghorn, the 5th April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
47. To the Ambassador in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 22nd. The disinclination to send help is only too clear; yet he is not to give up his efforts or the performance of such offices as he may consider appropriate for obtaining help for Candia of some sort.
Ayes, 98. Noes, 1. Neutral, 51.
[Italian.]
April 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
48. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The delay in the reply from Sweden about the full powers for signing the treaty of the princes of the alliance gives rise to discussions and disputes. If it pleases that country to detach itself from such a union one consequence is practically certain to ensue, that it cannot disown the pledge involved in the acceptance of the money paid by the Spaniards, which redounds to the advantage of trade through the union with these two maritime powers, and which preserves peace and quiet for them during the minority of the king.
Such is the opinion of the Secretary Arlington, who enlarged on the subject with me. He pointed out that Sweden alone, as distinguished from the other allies enjoyed the advantage of being paid by the Spaniards for what, in the event of a rupture with France, she would contribute for guaranteeing the states of the Catholic. He said that she would arrive at having an army on foot at the expense of Spain, whereas from France she could expect nothing but liberal promises of pensions which would be a long time in taking shape.
That the policy and arguments of the Spaniards should be such in the mouth of the English may readily be credited, but one cannot yet feel sure that they are approved by the Swedes; nor can one be sure that they speak here with absolute sincerity, since we hear the French complain of the government quite as much as the Spaniards. But if it is not bought, friendly feeling, conformity of interest and jealousy of the aggrandisement of the Most Christian will serve to unite it always with the Catholic.
To remove every root of disagreement which might once again ruin the good understanding existing between England and Holland they are negotiating a treaty upon maritime affairs. The point now under discussion at the Hague is the most difficult of all. This concerns trade in the Indies. Where the English claim to have marts in the East at the ports of Holland, the States ask in return for an open port and free commerce in Jamaica. It would seem that they are likely to arrive at a mutual agreement.
The Spanish ambassador is closely watching these proceedings, as if they were now treating to divide up that trade which the English are claiming to establish shortly in those parts, to the shame and manifest loss of the king, his master. Deaf to all reason and shutting his ears to political considerations he seizes upon the accident of the ship Oxford catching fire near Jamaica to point to a miracle from Heaven. He says it is a judgment of God upon that ship and the officers and men who took part in the unlawful surprise at Porto Vello. (fn. 3)
Following on my report these last months of the arrangements between Holland and Denmark to remove all difficulties about duties at the passage of the Sound it has ultimately been settled by the deputies that payment shall henceforth be regulated according to the size of the ships which sail to the North and through the Strait, and not by the quality and quantity of the merchandise, although it is greater than in the past.
The king of Denmark, by relaxing the severity reported in his charges on the ships of this country has greatly mollified the feelings of the king here. H the despatch hurriedly sent after Carlisse, the ambassador for Sweden, reaches him before he has crossed the sea, he will proceed to Copenhagen to establish correspondence and the best understanding.
The insistence of the French ambassador about mutual trade has brought the matter forward again, but I do not know whether the king has decided to nominate fresh commissioners to examine it, as the Spanish ambassador says, and the Dutch here are sceptical. These same Dutch affect to hear with great indifference of the extension of the fortifications at Dunkirk by the Most Christian and the enlargement of the port. They imagine, from its lack of water, that it is incapable of accommodating ships of large size or in sufficient numbers to disturb the flow of trade to Amsterdam or to give their well defended shores any cause for alarm. The fact is that the Most Christian is operating with great energy, not without objects of less profit and security. Continuing the confiscations reported he has already disposed of the property of some individuals and notably that of the princes de Ligne because they refuse to dwell under the dominion of France. The Spaniards maintain that all this is in violation of the treaty of Aix la Chapelle, which refers to that of the Pyrenees.
With a view to trade the duke of Savoy is making great presents of the wine of his state to the king here as a specimen of the quantity that might be taken for the use of this country from the port of Nizza, together with other goods, in exchange for those which are exported from here, with the exemptions and advantages of which your Excellencies will have heard from the proper quarter; but unless the merchants find them indispensable they will never abandon the wine of France and of the Canaries, which is esteemed so highly that it is paid for extravagantly by this nation.
The grand prince of Tuscany has reached England from Portugal after a good passage from Corugna to Plymouth. (fn. 4) He is in this neighbourhood observing the principal towns and the most noble places. He is expected in London almost any day, and mingled with his curiosity to see the country there is some talk of commerce. Into all this business of commerce I shall introduce some matter of ceremony, and I shall not depart from the example of the ambassadors of France and Spain in my relations with him.
As a compliment and also as a demonstration of affection their Majesties here and the duke and duchess of Hiorch have sent persons specially to France to visit the queen mother, surprised these last days by a dangerous illness; but now, thank God, she is safely convalescent. (fn. 5)
As a ceremonial response they have at last despatched to Lisbon the Sieur Godolfin. (fn. 6) After complimenting the princes there on the birth of the princess he will proceed to Madrid, to his residence at that Court.
London, the 12th April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 13.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
49. 13 April, in Pregadi.
Our Ambassador Mocenigo in England has sent to his Serenity with his letters the petition of Filippo Ovardi and Francesco Vaston to obtain privilege for their invention for preserving ships in careening and for profit also in gilding, such as they have obtained from his Britannic Majesty. As this may also serve for galleys and galeasses, according to the report of the regiment at the Arsenal: that by the authority of this Council it be granted to the said Ovardi and Vaston that none but they or those authorised by them may use the said invention in our state for a period of 20 years, with a penalty for those who infringe the order of 300 ducats, to be apportioned, one third to the accuser, one third to the Arsenal and one third to the magistracy which passes sentence, and the loss of all the things made, which shall be for the benefit of the patentees.
Ayes, 119. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
Ottavio Negri, Secretary.
[Italian.]
April 2.
Senato,
Terra.
filza
Venetian
Archives.
50. The Regiment of the Arsenal to the Doge and Senate.
Having considered the secret of England sent to your Excellencies, for the careening and gilding of ships etc. and finding that if this is successful it would serve for the galleys and galeasses and also with public advantage, we think that the petitioners may be gratified by your Serenity with the patent which they seek, so that tests may be made, especially as we see that a like privilege has been obtained from his Britannic Majesty, the which will cost your Excellencies nothing.
At the Arsenal, 2 April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
51. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Colbert, the ambassador in England reports the close attention with which that Court is watching the work on the fortifications at Dunkirk, which continue in progress by order of his Majesty. He intimates that the increase of jealousy thereby raises up ever greater obstacles to the efforts he is making to bring about closer relations with that quarter, both in respect of confidence in their negotiations and also with regard to reciprocal trade. Notwithstanding this there is not the slightest relaxation in their efforts. The carrying out of the royal enterprise is not retarded in any particular, indeed M. Luvoa is making his preparations, as soon as the present Easter festivities are over, to go to that place in order to hasten on this work, as well as the work in the other places of the newly conquered territory.
Paris, the 17th April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
52. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Every reason up to the present has fostered the belief that Sweden cannot refuse to sell her own word for cash down from the Spaniards. Now every appearance indicates that that crown is disposed and willing to sign the treaties of the princes of the alliance, having sent the necessary powers to the envoy Mareschel, who has arrived at the Hague. At the same time that they are looking for the conclusion of this important affair of the alliance in Holland, the States are comforted by further good news received in a letter from the Elector of Brandenburg in reply to the one they wrote to him, as reported. They find him altogether averse from referring to superior authority the decision of the differences over the frontier between the province of Guelders and the principality of Cleves and hope that with the affair referred to arbiters it will soon be amicably concluded.
The Spaniards do not enjoy a like quietness of mind. They infer an amassing of troops from changes of garrison and apprehend every accumulation of munitions and arms. They are thus kept in constant agitation and excite their fears of a rupture of the peace. But the pledge given by the Most Christian to the pope leaves no room for suspecting any covert operation, at any rate within the prescribed time.
But open hostilities are being committed by the French in America. The six ships which I reported on 6 January last had left La Rochelle have arrived there and joined with twenty-four others of the merchants they have landed in Cuba, carrying off rich booty from one of the small towns there. Falling in later with a Spanish galleon they captured it with an important cargo of over 300,000 crowns. From such action the English are constantly obtaining fresh justification for their surprises, maintaining that there is not only war at sea beyond the line but that on land also they are free to practise every act of hostility.
Although these two nations are at one about winning possession and capital in the trade of America yet the union of commerce here will never win approval. I may repeat here what I have written, that the suspicions of the Spaniards and Dutch are ill founded. The appointment of commissioners to inquire into the subject has not taken place, as they recently supposed, and the king is far from intending it, somewhat to the disgust of the Ambassador Colbert.
The king heard with resentment of the delay of the public entry into Paris of the Ambassador Montagu, modified later by the compromise suggested, though not yet approved, for showing the arms of the queen here on his coach, as a gentleman. (fn. 7) By this the punctilio over precedence with the princes of the blood would be obviated and the ambassador could immediately attend to his affairs. This news arrives by the express couriers sent about the dangerous relapse of the queen mother. After some days in bed she is picking up and now leaves them at ease about her recovered health.
The king learning that the prince of Tuscany was in the neighbourhood of the Court sent the son of the lord chamberlain with his coach six miles out to pay his respects. On Monday after dinner his Highness entered London incognito, alighting at the palace of Lord St. Alban. This was prepared for him in place of that of the queen mother, (fn. 8) which he refused, in order to be free in his retirement, without being obliged to announce himself at the Court. The same day three gentlemen went to pay respects on behalf of the queen and the duke and duchess of Hiorch. On the following days compliments were exchanged with the ambassadors of crowned heads, by means of gentlemen; I myself sent the Secretary Alberti, with congratulations on his safe arrival as well as that of the succour which the Grand Duke was preparing for Candia, enlarging on the glory won by the Christian princes by sharing in this important defence. After he has arranged and obtained audience of the king and queen and has seen the duke and duchess of Hiorch, the ambassadors propose to call upon him, and I will conform with them in the matter of ceremonial.
Acknowledges receipt of ducali of the 22nd and 29th March.
London, the 19th April, 1669.
[Italian.]
April 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
53. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The wise conduct of the ministers here in the most important affairs of the realm and the excellent news of the health of the queen mother brought from Paris by one of the gentlemen sent to France, as reported, have so greatly relieved the mind of the king here that he proposes in a few days to go and enjoy himself in the country. He is waiting to allow time to ripen the matters under consideration better than human prudence is able to do.
A journey and several transactions have been committed to the Ambassador Carlisse, destined for Sweden. In the two most important, about correspondence with Denmark and Hamburg, he has to a great extent gained his point, for which by express despatches they recently directed him to go to that king and town.
At Hamburg Carlisse has succeeded in inducing the government to promise the maintenance of the privileges granted in 1658 to the company of merchants of this nation. The affair would have been already settled if some further consultation had not been necessary upon the request of that government not to be called to render account for the English ships which were burned in front of their town before their very eyes by the Dutch in the last war. (fn. 9)
While on this subject of trade I may add that the Resident Finche is charged to cultivate the best understanding with the subjects of the duke of Savoy. This is sought by his Highness to set on foot navigation and commerce.
The important business of the alliance is the one that will be left in the hands of time. Here they learn with equal indifference of progress or retrogression. As yet they have not decided on anything. They are waiting to hear what Spain has to say in reply to the statements of the envoy Mareschal at the Hague, who announces that before any step is taken it is absolutely necessary that the money to be paid to the king his master must be in sight. Mareschal has not proceeded to any more binding commitment. Such indifference leaves the issue in doubt and the allies in perpetual agitation. But the Dutch, who have this interest at heart more than any one else, are more than ever consumed by the suspicions previously reported. They are allowing it to be understood that any sign of a disposition that appears in England to listen to the proposals of France will serve as a motive and inducement to them to push on with the treaty and to unite with that crown which is urging them to do so. Thus any inclination that they may entertain here will be kept most religiously secret.
Uncertain also is the issue of the explanation that will be demanded by this crown of the Algerians for their breach of faith, in violating the last peace ratified by Vice Admiral Alen and the league of friendship which by the previous treaty established under the promise of the Grand Turk they ought to observe inviolate. These corsairs have recently searched and carried off from an English ship belonging to the Company of the Indies 14,000l. sterling in hard cash. (fn. 10) This touches them to the quick more than any of the past accidents, and they are so incensed that the Ambassador Harvis at the Porte has been directed to make complaint at the Porte and to ask for compensation before the king here is compelled to take it by force. The consul at Algiers (fn. 11) will speak to the same effect. Admiral Alen has meanwhile arrived in port here, having missed the written instructions to proceed to Algiers. They will give him additional powerful frigates, at least twelve of them, and he will go with resolution to the port of the Algerians to enforce their rights. Yet it will be difficult to recover the money, which passes from hand to hand, or to redeem prisoners, for once they are sold they cannot be ransomed with double the amount. In this connection, in converse with the ministers, I will urge them to generous resolutions and I only hope that just revenge may stir his Majesty and that a bitter war with these corsairs may divert them from helping the Grand Turk and from doing harm to Candia.
The pope's brief which I presented two days ago, made a great impression on the queen. She received it with the veneration dictated by her boundless piety, as a most efficacious stimulus to use her influence with the king to procure some succour for the republic. In my offices I enlarged on the needs of Candia and upon the confidence that her Majesty's zeal would persuade the king of England to follow the example of all the princes. The grand almoner will advise me of what results from this, but I greatly fear that it will amount to no more than evasions and to mere protestations of good will.
Little has been said here about ceremonial with the grand prince of Tuscany, because he has so arranged his affairs that he has not been able to receive any. He sees the king secretly in the cabinet, on foot and covered, as is usual with this monarch with any of his subjects, in private functions. He was introduced to the queen in the bedchamber, in the king's presence, but was not admitted to the salute and kiss according to the style of the country.
London, the 26th April, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
54. To the Ambassador in England.
The Senate requires information about salt fish before it can deal with the case. In the mean time he is not to neglect to encourage the merchants, disabusing them of all sinister ideas, and facilitating trade as much as possible by good offices. The Senate will write to him later on on the subject.
The Senate approves of his plan to pay for the gunpowder with cash rather than with currants, and they give him power to conclude the bargain accordingly.
That the necessary instructions for this be given to the magistracy all' Artiglerie. That a copy of what the ambassador writes about salt fish be sent to the magistracies of the Revisers and Regulators of the Duties to make inquiry about import and export duties.
Ayes, 145. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
55. Antonio Vincenti, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
Since my return here the ship Gerusalemme has arrived at Leghorn from Smyrna, having made the passage in 23 days. When there it took on board the English ambassador Vinchelse, who is returning to London and it landed and left him at Malta.
This same ambassador, arrived at Malta, has written a letter dated the 14th, to the Resident Finch here, containing curious and most important advices which the ambassador has received from Constantinople, while he was staying at Smyrna, with other particulars observed and noted by him before his departure from that place. The resident read me the very letter and afterwards gave me a copy, which I transmit to your Excellencies.
Florence, the 27th April, 1669.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.56. Advices from Constantinople; the 10/20 March.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Edouard Francois Colbert, comte de Maulevrier, the youngest of the brothers.
2 In his despatch of June 1/11, Finch refers to his offer to supply Candia with Irish beef. He says that he has just received the Senate's answer, who would not pay themselves but only offered letters of recommendation to the Proveditore of Zante. S.P. Tuscany, Vol. x.
3 The Oxford was a frigate of 240 tons built in 1656. The accident occurred at the island of Ash, off San Domingo on 2/12 January. The ship caught fire and blew up when the flames reached the powder magazine with the loss of the entire crew of 200 men and 5 commanders who were on board for a council of war. Oppenheim: Administration of the Royal Navy, p. 336. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9, pp. 251–2. Salvetti on 12 April. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S., fol. 358 d.
4 He arrived at Plymouth in the Portland frigate on the 23rd March, old style. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9, p. 243. He reached London on the 5/15 April. Salvetti on 19th April. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S., fol. 360 d. Pepys: Diary, Vol. viii, p. 269.
5 Sidney Godolphin was the chief of this mission which reached Paris on Monday the 8th April, when they found the queen “somewhat better.” S. Godolphin to Arlington on 10 April, n.s. S.P. France, Vol. cxxvi.
6 Sir William Godolphin, who took leave of the king on 25 Feb. and sailed from the Downs on 25 March, o.s., in the Martha and Mary. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9. pp. 251, 278.
7 Montagu claimed that his coach, at his public entry, should have precedence of those of the princes of the blood. He said this had been accorded to Lord Holles and he would take no less. Montagu to Arlington on 27 March and 3 April. S.P. France, Vol. cxxvi. But Holles's claim had been evaded by the princes staying away from his entry. See Vol. xxxiv of this Calendar, p. 1.
8 Somerset House. The house of the earl of St. Albans is described by Rugge as being in St. Albans Street near St. James' Fields. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 10117, fol. 228 d. Norfolk House in St. James' Square is said to stand on the site. Wheatley and Cunningham: London Past and Present, Vol. ii, p. 299.
9 On 25th August, 1666, two Dutch warships had attacked English merchantmen lying in the Elbe, near Hamburg. They took three ships and destroyed three others, the remaining eleven taking refuge under the guns of the town. The English complained of a violation of neutrality. See the preceding Vol. of this Calendar, p. 68.
10 The Morning Star an East Indiaman, stopped off Cadiz by the Golden Sun, a Turkish warship of 30 guns, which took away 2571 ounces of gold and two chests of silver containing 8000 Spanish pieces of eight. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9, pp. 234, 385. Pepys: Diary, Vol. viii, p. 269.
11 John Ward, a merchant at Algiers, consul from 1667 to 1674. Playfair: Scourge of Christendom, pp. 89, 113.


<--Previous:
Venice:
March 1669
Next:-->
Venice:
May 1669