Venice
September 1669

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1937

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97-109

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'Venice: September 1669', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 97-109. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90265 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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September 1669

Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
109. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The appointment of Viscount Faulcombridge to the embassy to your Serenity which meets with the unanimous approval of the whole Court has taken me to audience of his Majesty as required by the dignity of the republic and to assure him of the Senate's appreciation. I told him that the news of the appointment had already gone on to Venice by my letters, but I wished to forestall the rendering of thanks which I was sure your Serenity would direct me to tender. You would rejoice to have with you a minister of this distinguished crown because it would afford a brilliant testimony to the world of that correspondence that had never been interrupted. The Ambassador Faulcombridge would be as warmly welcomed as his character merits and because of the esteem of your Excellencies for his Majesty, his house & ministers.
In reply the king began by saying that not only the hereditary maxims of his predecessors but a particular gratitude towards the Senate persuaded him to carry out what he had desired to do long ago. The despatch of the viscount would serve as a guarantee of his esteem & gratitude and he asked your Serenity to accept it as such. He went on to ask me about what was happening at Candia. I told him the news received with the ducali of the 10th and 16th August, dilating on the generosity of the Most Christian who had rushed so gloriously to the rescue. In reply I had the usual sentiments of esteem and concern for the advantage of the republic, as he wished to send me away with a good impression.
I went to see the Secretary Arlington so that he might know that your Serenity appreciated his share in the matter, to which he had put the final touches. He was gratified to hear this from me and assured me that he would always have the republic's interests at heart. The king being barred from supplying prompt succour, he hoped the Senate would make use of his minister Harvis at Constantinople, who would undertake any transaction and mediation.
I will approach Viscount Faulcombridge very softly and intimately to find out the time when he proposes to start. I should like it to be with the greatest haste. His Excellency is in the country and I do not know when he means to return. In the mean time I will try to find out his intentions by means of his intimates, by letters, showing them every civility.
In the interests of your Serenity I have something to add about a decision of the Most Christian touching the person of the marshal de Belefont, who was to go to Candia with all speed with a body of French troops and perhaps another of the pope, with the title of papal general. In connection with this, the French ambassador showed me two letters, one of Mons. di Lione and the other of Belefont. They both write to him on behalf of the king to procure permission from the king here to levy 2000 soldiers in Ireland who can proceed to the service in Candia under the command of this marshal. With this request and well supplied with information Colbert went to audience and set forth his case with a great display of the great undertaking in which the Most Christian had engaged against the Turk under the eyes of the whole world. He only received a curt answer from his Majesty who pointed out the capital and the number of his merchants at Constantinople and said that he ought not to compromise them by a noisy expedition. Colbert rejoined that the Ambassador Harvis might denounce the Irish as disobedient Papists. Not being able to get any more, he cast himself on the duke of Hiorch. In addition to the question of the merchants the duke told him that by the laws of the realm these subjects could not proceed to the service of a foreign prince without the capitulations, recognised by the kingdom itself, to which France was a consenting party. He said further that royal orders would be issued for carrying out what might be arranged; but so far the request has met with a refusal, unless Colbert receives further stimulus to renew the pressure and if this does not meet with greater acceptance.
I have paid a ceremonial visit to the ambassador of Denmark on the very day that the French ambassador went there. On the return visit the meeting was on the stairs, corresponding to the example he gave us on the private visits.
Three days ago Count Verita Zanobio returned to this Court, having come over to London from the Court at Paris to observe what is most noteworthy and to perfect himself in the knowledge of the various customs of the peoples.
London, the 6th September, 1669.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
110. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The ministers at the Hague have found a violent remedy for the circumstances of Flanders when the precarious condition of the triple alliance should have persuaded them to show greater reserve, to avoid the dangers of ill considered steps. The States of Holland who in the eyes of France have rather the character of leading actors than that of being merely zealous for the peace, have now drawn down on their heads the ill will of the French who are now criticised by the ministers of the alliance at present assembled at the Hague. Here the Ambassador Colbert says freely that the States are taking to heart the affairs of Spain without being called upon to do so and it is they who have suggested, supported and induced the ministers of England & Sweden to embrace the plan of asking from the French Ambassador Pompona an explanation of some innovations which seemed likely to upset the peace of Aix la Chapelle of which they were the guarantors. By agreement between the ministers of the allies four questions were put to Pompona. To these he replied that the new fortifications of Suitcote do not go outside the limits of the Most Christian in the Low Countries; that the dilatoriness of the commissioners at Lille was no fault of the French; they had not threatened the constable of Castile and the confiscation of goods established by virtue of the agreement was just. This vigorous step which points to vigour in the alliance, greatly disturbed the Ambassador Colbert. It surprised him as he did not think that the report of the arrival of the money from Spain at Amsterdam would have aroused Sweden so greatly and he could not find out what instructions the Ambassador Temple had received to commit himself so far. Upon this point he gave some hints to the king, who did not say that he had given Temple such orders. The duke of Hiorch more openly assured Colbert that Temple had no authority to commit himself or to act by such an inquiry.
Thus the business of the alliance is troubled, being committed to demand an explanation of facts which the French maintain to be perfectly lawful and for which they say they ought rather to be asked gently to give their reasons than to be dragged to it by force. In spite of this Colbert does not deny and Arlington has told me Spain is applying herself to other negotiations. The secretary spoke to me of the exchange of Flanders for other states of which your Excellencies will have heard from the proper quarter; but all these are projects differing the one from the other. They also assume the marriage of Duke Charles of Lorraine to a princess of Insbruch to whom the government of Flanders would be given, precisely as the Archduke Albert had it; in which case the affairs of those provinces would take another turn.
In the mean time the Dutch, who have the quiet of Flanders so much at heart and who are seeking it by all these means, regard with unfriendly eye the bishop of Munster who stands armed on their frontiers with 8000 men. They are alarmed for East Friesland and the beginnings of trouble are indicated by some interruption of the posts and strange incidents with the couriers on the routes.
Up to the present indeed nothing serious of any moment has occurred; but so many sources of trouble give pain to that government, intent as it is on aggrandising itself by trade, through quiet in their own house and in the bosom of all the nations, leaving them with the privilege of trading over them. Twelve Algerine vessels wished to dispute these advantages and attacked eight Dutch ones, two warships and six merchantmen. The encounter took place in the Mediterranean; but the corsairs had the worst of it and were obliged to retire. Your Excellencies will have heard from the proper quarter whether they continued their voyage to the service of the Grand Vizier for which they were directing their course.
London, the 6th September, 1669.
[Italian.]
Sept. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
111. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge & Senate.
The queen mother of England had been suffering these last days from some slight indisposition though there was nothing mortal about it. Being deprived of sleep and with constant wakefulness she consulted with the physicians the day before yesterday about obtaining sleep. As a sedative she took a pill composed of opium and other ingredients. All her attendants left her alone in her bed and in the bedchamber so as not to cause the least interruption to her rest by their breathing. In the morning she was found dead in her eternal sleep, to the universal regret of the Court. They will go into the strictest mourning for many months.
Paris, the 11th September, 1669.
[Italian.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
112. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The aggressive step taken by the ministers of the triple alliance at the Hague has met with no other defence to shelter behind than the protestations to the French minister of an equal impartiality with which both crowns would listen to points about the treaty of Aix la Chapelle. This has given occasion to Pompona, on his side to complain that the Spaniards have not arrived at a settlement of the differences over the frontiers and that they are imposing fresh burdens by unaccustomed gabelles. The course taken by the States, however, which does not escape very close examination by the French, especially at this conjuncture, is interpreted as being strengthened by ulterior designs. It is believed that Holland has desired and solicited the complaints of the Spaniards in order to attract to the Hague the material of the conference of Lille, which is conducted so slowly, and to stir it up for their own ends. This object is quite likely since it is certainly the policy of the Dutch to avoid causes of a rupture. At the same time one cannot credit the report that is current that in these conferences the ministers of the alliance propose to intervene to limit the numbers of the forces of both crowns on the frontiers, since that is a question into which they cannot enter save with the consent of the parties.
The truth is that the Ambassador Colbert is unable to understand how the Englishman Temple has gone so far with the other ministers at the Hague. He told me in confidence that in his opinion the right course would be to demand an explanation of the king here. If he denied the instructions, he should punish the minister, and if he confirmed them he, Colbert, ought to leave the Court, considering them to be contrary to the friendship professed with the Most Christian. But little by little Colbert will withdraw from this position and will recognise the reserve of the English. They will always protest their impartiality as between the two crowns. If pressed they will answer that if France takes offence because the allies give ear to the Spaniards it will mean that she wishes to crush them without those interested in the peace having recourse to the guarantee. If Colbert grows heated this will be the line that England will take. For the rest the government here will not abandon its peacefulness and its attitude of merely watching the proceedings of the others.
In the mean time the money from Spain has arrived in Holland and the Swedish ministers are hoping to put it in their pockets very soon. But first will come definite promises of the number & quality of the succours. It is believed that the Swiss, Captain Gaspar Ulrich, has arrived at the Hague solely to arrange about levies and that there is no treaty with those Cantons for the alliance.
The Ambassador Borel will continue incognito. His intention to present his credentials secretly being opposed by the interests of the subordinate officials of the Ceremonies. It will have to be at a state function, subject to all the usual formalities when the king has returned to London.
Since Monday last his Majesty has been in the country towards Southampton and the New Forest, amusing himself in hunting there. He proposes to continue this for twelve days and then return to Hampton Court a country house where the queen is staying. Both their Majesties are attended by a number of guards, both horse & foot, with the accompaniment of the whole Court.
To interrupt these diversions news arrived to day by express courier of the death of the queen mother in France. This will perturb their spirits and possibly oblige their Majesties to return very soon to London. The appearance will certainly be funereal and all the Court will go into mourning, in which the ambassadors, as most exposed to observation and obliged more than any others to incur an excessive expenditure, will set a good example. This will strike me particularly as by ill fortune I had recently made all my preparations for the coming winter, but it will be rendered tolerable if the Senate shows the munificence usual on such occasions.
The prince of Denmark will escape these obligations as he left this city four days ago, or he certainly would have wished to make a public demonstration of his feelings. Before his Majesty left for the country he desired with extraordinary generosity to have the honour of entertaining him at his own house and in every way he wished to make known his esteem and appreciation of the favours received at this Court. He sent a gentleman to advise me of his departure and he would gladly have come himself before going if I had had a wife to remove all difficulties of ceremonial. In spite of this he did not fail to evince his respect for the most serene republic. Prince Pietro of Parma (fn. 1) who has arrived in London also sent a gentleman to me. Knowing how active I am to find out about the arrival of any Italian, he asked me not to announce his presence as he wished to remain absolutely incognito at this Court. He makes a mistake, however, because a person of his quality cannot be concealed and if he does not depart before the king's return he will have to make himself known at the Court.
I have made known to the currant merchants the intentions of your Serenity and all take consolation in the assured hope that their ships will in the future be exempt from the charge of a real per thousand, and they bless the justice of your Excellencies. The others who desire relief from the charges on salt fish are waiting for an opening before setting their business in motion. Poor Galileo is imploring the liberty of his son and relief for his sorry fortune.
London, the 13th September, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
113. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The consequences of the strong step taken by the ministers of the triple alliance has so far aroused the attention of the Ambassador Colbert that after steady persistence and great efforts he has at length succeeded in satisfying himself that the king here did not instruct Temple to join with the others to make the demands reported of Pompona. Fortified with this assurance Colbert is renewing his complaint against the minister of this crown and it seems that he intended to demand his correction in some public form. Yet if Colbert accuses Temple it must follow therefrom that he disapproves the course taken by Pompona who, on hearing the demands of the alliance, played the game of Holland which wished to transfer the negotiations to the Hague, and further Pompona ought not to recognise this alliance when the commissioners of the crowns were at Lille with sufficient authority to negotiate.
While the French ambassador has his eyes fixed on these transactions, the last advices from the Hague serve to confirm the suspicions entertained of the true basis of the commissions of the baron dell' Isola, to gain or rather to lose time. It is believed that the difficulties over titles under which the emperor can enter the alliance are merely a device, that of sovereign head of the Electoral College being contested by the deputies of Mayence and Isola being determined not to use alone the other of king of Bohemia and first elector of the empire. The truth is that so far his negotiations have not got beyond their initial stages and as we do not hear of the payment of the Spanish money to the Swedes, time will be needed to arrive at the end of such transactions.
Meanwhile the constable governor, who is becoming increasingly conscious of the necessity of the utmost dexterity to avoid offence and who knows that coal is the material most likely to start a fire, has had Signor Ognate, commissioner of the royal finances, sent to prison to make the French believe that it was not his intention to continue the tax on that commodity and that Ognate had demanded it against his intentions. The French will not fail to put this boasted goodwill to fresh proof as it seems they are preparing to send another abundant convoy of this same coal through the Catholic country.
In connection with the negotiations for interchangeable trade between France & England Mons. Colbert, after a great deal of prompting, has at length received a lengthy proposal from the Secretary Arlington. In speaking to me on the subject he said that the affair seemed to have become more embroiled. They have expanded his five articles up to as many as eighty, his fundamental proposals being confused amid countless difficulties; proposals right back from Cromwell's time being revived. The truth is that England will not easily allow herself to be led to a conclusion, as the point of these transactions consists in the two nations admitting each other to an interchangeable trade with equal facilities in the duties, from which everyone else is excluded. But the English already enjoy the advantage that the French in London, in addition to the tax on merchandise, pay that of strangers, while in France they are not subject to any other charges than those on merchandise, exactly like the French themselves, so it would mean giving up too much of what they enjoy. The English would not be dismayed either at hearing that they would introduce the tax on strangers in France also, because London is the mart to which the goods flow and the merchants of France frequent it while the English only have an exiguous market for their goods in that country and but few merchants of their nationality.
Such is the position of the commercial relations between France & England. To what terms the correspondence between this crown and the Spanish in America have come your Serenity may judge from the confirmation of the incident referred to these last weeks. Several letters have arrived from there. They relate that after the burning of the ship Oxford the squadron of small craft formerly led by it reassembled and pushed up the River Maracabia on the mainland. Surprising the ships which were under the protection of the guns they converted the largest into the guise of a flagship though it was really a fireship. They did this to go against the squadron of Spanish ships and to tempt their admiral to board it. This is what happened, both being burned, the Vice Admiral taken prisoner and other craft captured, the English carrying off a rich booty.
The King Taffilet promises a different correspondence to this crown. It is understood that he has ordered the march of 2000 horse, who are going to receive at Tanger the Ambassador Arondel. Those of the fortress write that they have well armed the gates and the walls to receive the compliment.
The ambassador of Denmark is doing his utmost to bring his negotiations to a conclusion and is urging the start of the earl of Esses, the ambassador designate to his king, so that the facilities which have been confirmed to the company of English merchants may meet with reciprocity in favour of the Danes in this country. But his negotiations will be spun out and he will suffer from the burden of the embassy, especially on the score of expense, which is extraordinary at this most costly Court.
Earl Carlisse has orders to take leave in Sweden as he has already fulfilled all the functions of the garter which he took to the king there, and there is some one to treat for the alliance at the Hague, for the king here does not like to continue with superfluous expenses. He does not consider the mission to your Serenity superfluous, although, after the first compliments, the ambassador will have nothing to do beyond the formalities of correspondence. To meet this obligation his Majesty agrees to a considerable expense, although there is no business, which is the only stimulus for the despatches from this Court. Viscount Faulcombridge writes to me from the country that he will very soon be back in London and will hasten his journey to enjoy the honour of serving your Serenity.
In order to save expense they are waiting for the envoy Sir Peter Wich to terminate his mediation in Muscovy over the differences between the Grand Duke there and the king of Sweden, and then they will cause him to proceed thence to Poland to compliment the king there on his assumption of the throne.
For the despatch of Lord Roberts, who left three days ago for the vice royalty of Ireland, the royal exchequer has been obliged to submit to an outlay of 90,000l. sterling, for the arrears of pay of the troops there, which they will receive with unspeakable satisfaction.
The king has learned with infinite grief of the death of the queen mother, and was unable to hold back his tears. He has abandoned his hunting and withdrawn to Hampton Court, where he will remain with the queen for a fortnight until the mourning is ready. He has already notified the ambassadors by the deputy master of the ceremonies not to trouble themselves to go there to pay their respects to him and that he will postpone the office until his return to London. This will be performed by all of them with the strongest expressions and the most lugubrious shows, involving a most costly outlay on mourning.
London, the 20th September, 1669.
[Italian.]
Sept. 20. Inquisitori
di Stato
Busta 442.
Venetian
Archives.
114. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Inquisitors of State.
That the state may not be deprived of the knowledge of an important affair which is at present current in England and has also been deposited by the Court of Rome in the confidence of the ambassador of the most serene republic, I communicate it to your Excellencies:
The internuncio of Brussels has sent here an individual under an assumed name by order of Rome, (fn. 2) who also brings me letters from Cardinal Barberino, that I may assist him in his designs to present letters to the king and queen to settle the disputes between Catholics, the quarrels between ecclesiastics, seculars & regulars, and to see what advantage there would be in nominating a bishop in this kingdom to assist and provide for the greater need and advantage of the Catholic faith.
The matter is important and full of thorns, and the mine has already been blown by priests and friars, averse from the episcopal authority, who are aware of the arrival of this person and make it known. So he will do little good since he is known and will have to take very great care of himself especially with the approach of parliament, which has always been in the habit of persecuting the Catholics.
This is the fact and for my own part, as I have received the person and have replied to the letters in the most proper manner, it will suffice for me to assure him that the report of his arrival here has certainly not originated from my mouth or pen (for which reason I recommend the matter to the cipher), and I shall not commit myself further unless I receive instructions to the contrary from your Excellencies.
London, 20 September, 1669.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
115. To the Ambassador in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 30th ult. The Senate is gratified at the choice of Viscount Falcombrig as ambassador and hopes that he will arrive soon to take up his charge. Approval of his going at once to thank the king. He is to repeat the office on the arrival of these letters, and to express the Senate's appreciation of the demonstration. He is to undertake the same civility with the ambassador assuring him of the eagerness with which he is expected and of a warm welcome and every regard. He is to notice the viscount's preparations and when he proposes to start, in order to inform the Senate.
Ayes, 138. Noes, 3. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere
Principi.
Re e Regina.
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
116. Charles, etc. King of Great Britain etc. to Domenico Contarini, doge of Venice.
Cum Deum visum sit ser. principem Henricam Mariam charissimam nostram atque honoratissimam matrem, male quidem minus opinata, utcunque diutino languire affectam ad se vocare, idoneum duxumus casum tam tristem vobiscum communicare, minime dubitantes quin vestro in nos nostraque affectu in partem luctus ob jacturam quae tam prope nos contingat, nobiscum ventura sit; uti vicissem nobis non poterit non esse grave, siquid vobis acciderit, vos interim amici nostri perdilecti Dei Opt. Max. tutamini ex animo commendamus. Dabantur e Palatio Nostro Hamptoniensi, Septembris die 16o Anno Domini 1669, Regni nostri XXImo. [Signed] Carolus R.
Sept. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
117. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
In my despatch No. 78 I informed your Serenity of the unexpected conclusion of the alliance, and in the next I revealed the cause of this result which seemed so remote. I wrote that the Swedes had allowed themselves to be persuaded to bind themselves by the Dutch who advised them to take the money seeing that at the time being they did not undertake any definite obligation either for the amount or the quality of the succour. I added that the same reason had induced England to sign the new treaty, since it pleased the Spaniards and they could appease the French by protesting the inefficacy of that part of the alliance. In later letters I referred to the reactions of such recondite intentions. The drawing back by the Spaniards being disclosed I wrote on the 27th June that before paying out the cash the Catholic ministers intimated that they wished to know precisely what succours the alliance would contribute and I remarked that this would be the most difficult point to digest; and in all my despatches I have drawn attention to the instability of the alliance and the determination of the Spaniards to know about the succour before paying the money to Sweden. This is the point at which the ministers at the Hague have arrived. Several papers have been drawn up in order to find a way out and with the compromises suggested the affair is more complicated than ever. The Swedes avow that they will leave the Hague if they do not get the money they expected, in accordance with the pledge given by the Ambassador Gamarra with the authority given him by the queen. With the Spaniards insisting that they wish first to be certain of the succour and then they will pay the money, they are suspicious that fresh pretensions may be raised after the first payment has been made.
The baron dell' Isola has been summoned here as mediator and is considering fresh ways to hold (fermare) the Swedes. The constable governor has foreseen this point and when his Excellency decides to go and consult the oracle at Madrid your Excellencies may conclude from the delays to what a condition of uncertainty this affair of the alliance is reduced. It remains as inconclusive as I have always represented. It is now held up over this question and if this difficulty is overcome it is possible that others will arise. These will appear in time and for the moment one can only anticipate them. The French ministers, in watching these proceedings, may take greater consolation than ever from such behaviour and cherish the hope that it will all end with a solemn rupture.
The seizure of the letters from Spain within the confines of France has given occasion to the constable governor to meditate another route. He has had recourse to the proposals set forth some time ago in Spain by the English ambassador, the earl of Sandwich. This was to send their packets here so that they might be carried from the port of Plimout to that of Bilbao in Biscaia. But this change in the posts would involve a heavy outlay and they have no means here of taking up the letters of Italy and giving them passage from England to Spain. So no results can be expected unless Spain is prepared to shoulder a considerable expense.
Other sources of mistrust are those which still continue between England and Holland. The chief cause of war between these two powers was the trade of the Indies. Holland has grown exceedingly great over this and is seeking to drive out England. The latter, on the other hand, is determined to maintain the few stations which she holds at present. Owing to pressure of time and amid the jealousies of the moment, well known to the Senate, they concluded the peace of Breda. Upon the question of the trade of the Indies it was arranged in the interim that English ships with a patent of the Admiral of the kingdom and Dutch ships with those of the burgomasters, which should specify the flag of the ship, the name of the captain, the merchants and the number of the sailors, should be introduced to the trade, the ships using each others' ports interchangeably. This convention was to serve until the two Dutch ambassadors in London should have arranged a more stable agreement, such as was desired by England, which only has a few stations of slight importance, and which with freedom would have the benefit of those of Holland. But time has been lost over numerous difficulties and now there is a fresh disadvantage discovered by the English. When trading in several ports of Europe before proceeding to the Indies they are unable to have the necessary notes from the Admiral here. Thus they are excluded from the trade by force, which is used by the Dutch even to vessels furnished with patents, as they never lack for quibbles to deny their validity. This is the cause of an outcry and, speaking with the sentiments of Lord Hollis, who was ambassador at Breda, I should foretell a quarrel soon unless the consideration of not playing the game of France prevents it or unless Holland prevents it by complying with the reasonable requests of England.
London, the 27th September, 1669.
[Italian.]
Sept. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
118. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The death of the queen mother, which has afflicted the king here to an extraordinary extent does not yet give room for quietness of spirit. They have already ordered the whole of the palace of Wittheal to be hung with mourning. To morrow it will be all in readiness to receive their Majesties and their royal Highnesses, whose inner grief corresponds with these mournful shows. The royal ambassadors do not as yet know how they are to offer their condolences. No one has been admitted so far at Hampton Court except the Comte St. Angnano, first gentleman of the chamber of the Most Christian and the Chevalier Mariva, first gentleman of the duke of Orleans. (fn. 3) These, introduced by the master of the ceremonies, performed their official duties very competently. When I have done the same and access is free I shall not fail, where I see it to be necessary, to refer to the steadfastness of your Serenity, discrediting the reports of peace with the Turk. To the same end I will also communicate to the Court and to the French ambassador all the advices from Candia.
Count Verita Zanobio has gone from here and proceeded to Holland. By the continuation of his tour he will perfect his knowledge & ability.
London, the 27th September, 1669.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Fourth son of Odardo I, duke of Parma, About 25 years of age at this date.
2 In Mocenigo's despatch of the 1st Nov. to the Inquisitors, below, his name is given as Signor Agretti. In a, letter of 9 Dec. addressed to “mon cousin,” Charles acknowledges a letter which he has received by M. Claudio Agretti. P.R.O. Rome Transcripts, Vol. xcix. The internuncio at Brussels was Monsignor Airoldi. Ranke: Englische Geschichte, Vol. iv, page 375.
3 Paul de Beauvilliers, son of François de Beauvilliers, due de St. Aignan, and Charles de l'Isle, chevalier de Marivaux.