Venice
November 1669

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

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123-136

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'Venice: November 1669', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 123-136. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90267 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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November 1669

Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
137. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The meeting of parliament is the most important item of news in the kingdom of England. In this the king's Majesty is brought as a counterpoise to the authority of the two Chambers, upper & lower, set up to provide for the reputation of the kingdom and the just relief of the people. These Chambers having been carried away for some time past to restrict the growth of monarchical government, the king's representations are very frequently seen to be reduced to requests, when they ought to be commands, and the replies of parliament to be changed into difficult pretensions when at most they should be no more than tolerated advice.
This meeting of parliament took place at length on Tuesday morning in the usual halls of the palace of Westminster. The peers were present in their purple robes. His Majesty, wearing the royal crown on his head, in the presence of the lower chamber, which had been sent for, set forth the reasons which had finally induced him to summon them, and his confidence that they would take into consideration his effective debts which had been incurred for the honour of the kingdom. For this and for the general tranquillity the part taken with the triple alliance in the peace of Aix la Chapelle counted for a great deal and it was of corresponding importance to see that it was strictly observed.
With respect to the union between this country and the kingdom of Scotland he referred them to the more elaborate account to be given by the Lord Keeper. That official took up the theme. Insisting on the debts contracted by the king, who had intervened in the affairs of Europe with so much honour to the nation, he said that his Majesty desired their assistance for the union of the kingdom of Scotland under the same privileges, statutes and government as England and he recommended the two Houses to settle the differences between them in the best way possible. With this his Majesty ended his speech and departed.
Your Excellencies will see that three important points are contained in this first proposal, but the last about a reconciliation between the two Houses was the first to be discussed in the Lower. Meeting that same morning they brought forward the book which I reported a week ago as having been printed in favour of the Upper House. (fn. 1) Fifteen of their members were deputed to examine it and rigorous proceedings were ordered against the printer. Up to the present no further steps have been taken in the matter; but as it is a question of deciding whether the Upper House can claim to be a court of first instance in civil causes, while the Lower only admits it to be a court of second instance, it is unlikely that the one will give up the authority claimed of its own accord, or the other suffer the prejudice of this and of greater disadvantages in the future.
With respect to the king's demands the parliament has not as yet come to any decision and the question of the union with Scotland and of yoking England which has abundance of everything, with that poor country, will be of long and very difficult digestion, as prejudicial to England.
In the mean time they are waiting for news of the first sittings of the parliament of Scotland which will have met on the same day as the English one and by degrees we shall be learning whether soon or late and in what form the affairs of these parliaments will come to be settled.
With regard to the matter of the alliance I venture to refer your Serenity to my No. 100 in which I suggested that the king here could find no better opening for asking parliament than the pledge of the alliance; and I am still of the same opinion because all the advances made by the king in that direction will be for the purpose of forcing parliament to make the grant and once that has been obtained there will be no lack of ways for evading the expense and the obligation, which is disliked by many in the Council who would be sorry to see the treasury, the king & the crown committed to the support of something that affords neither exceptional benefit nor essential reputation.
In the mean time they write from the Hague that they are awaiting the replies of the constable of Castile to the proposals of the baron dell'Isola which I reported in my No. 105. They report that he does not feel able to decide without the oracle of Madrid. To consult this it is believed that he has sent the Savoyard gentleman with the proposals in question. On the other hand, although the question of sending the letters between Flanders and Spain through France has recently been adjusted, yet in spite of this the governor continues to send his packets to the Court by way of Ostend, and is not altogether pleased that the son of the prince of Ligni, who was educated in France, (fn. 2) has had the property of his father confiscated in the newly conquered country by order of the Most Christian, because he refuses to go and live there, continuing in Spanish territory.
The governor is much more perturbed over the disturbances in Burgundy where the burghers of Bisanzone have taken up arms to resist the building of the forts ordered by the Spaniards. Your Excellencies will have heard from the proper source and whether the news published in Flanders is true that the prince of Condé had advanced immediately in that direction. I will merely add that the Swiss captain Wich, who recently arrived at the Hague, is now returning to his country with a very civil letter from the States, but with nothing more useful to show for his negotiations. (fn. 3)
London, the 1st November, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
138. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The strong northerly winds had scarce ceased to blow than several packet boats arrived from France, Flanders & Holland, immediately restoring the correspondence with England which has been interrupted for weeks and bringing me the most gracious ducali from your Excellencies of the 5th and 11th October to honour my activities and to relieve my poor fortunes which had fallen under the extraordinary charge for the mourning.
The Senate will have heard of the offices passed with the royal house upon the death of the queen mother. I now add the interesting particular that his Majesty, who is all generosity, has not only decided to make a present to the queen, his consort, of the splendid palace of Somerset, come to him by the death of the queen mother, but of 25,000l. sterling a year, in augmentation of her appanage, (fn. 4) so that the alms which her Majesty dispenses in her piety will be the more abundant.
With the same letters confirmation has reached Mons. Colbert here by way of France that the fortress of Candia has been surrendered to the Turks as the price of peace between your Serenity and the Porte. As I maintain that by more recent letters we hear of nothing more than a courageous defence Viscount Faulcombridge has not budged one whit from his intention, in view of the correspondence due to the republic, with the additional hope of being in time to co-operate in favour of advantageous conditions for the peace in conjunction with the English ambassador at Constantinople. This Faulcombridge is doing his very utmost to glorify his employment. He is soliciting his protector the duke of Hiorch that the title of extraordinary may be confirmed to him, which he had some years ago at the time of his original appointment. He will obtain this favour as he has already had the money for his despatch and he is constantly assuring me that he will very soon be on the move.
Vice Admiral Alen writes from Algiers that after planting himself in front of that port he sent three persons to demand and to arrange about the satisfaction claimed. Finding them very unwilling to concede this he had made up his mind to declare war on those corsairs and to warn the English merchants in all the ports of the Mediterranean. He had, as a start, taken two barques with wheat and captured seventy Turkish slaves under the very guns of the castle there. It would seem, however that in ten days' time the Algerines may find themselves reinforced by twelve ships of war to enable them to return the compliment to the English nation.
The affairs entrusted to Lord Arondel seem to be in better train. Having made arrangements to secure an appropriate welcome, he is proceeding, attended by 3000 Moors on horseback, towards the army of Taffilet who is in the kingdom of Morocco, pursuing his career of conquest, subduing the whole country with rapid strides.
The question of punctilio between the ambassadors of France, Denmark & Holland has been settled among themselves. There is still some ill feeling between the Danish and French ambassadors about their respective positions, as Guldelonc declined to appear in the parliament to avoid giving way to Mons. Colbert; but I went with him and although we were incogniti we both had a place on the right of the king above the throne.
London, the 1st November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 1.
Inquisitori
di Stato
Busta 442.
Venetian
Archives.
139. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Inquisitors of State.
The importance of the affairs entrusted to Signor Agretti, sent hither by the Internuncio in Brussels by order of Rome is of such consequence that they must be conducted so cautiously that he thought at first that it would be prudent to leave London at the time of the meeting of parliament and afterwards he did so from necessity since the king himself urged him to do so for the sole reason of the unfortunate conjunction of circumstances, since his arrival, his name, his commissions and what he is to do by command of the pope are already public property. He was accordingly graciously received by the king & queen by means of the Grand Almoner, to whom Agretti applied at my suggestion and with my support, as I wished to lend a hand quietly to an affair in which I did not wish to cut any figure, as he begged me, in order to be received with humanity. In doing so I have fallen in with the very prudent sentiments of your Excellencies which I read under date 11 October, and as the same person may return here again they will serve for my better guidance.
London, 1 November, 1669.
[Italian, deciphered.]
Nov. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
140. Catterin Belegno, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge & Senate.
They write from the sea coasts that Taffilet in Africa, having fallen out with a brother of his, has been seriously wounded by him. Accordingly the English ambassador Arondel, who is at Tanger, has been obliged to put off the prosecution of his negotiations, because of the domestic dissensions in that kingdom.
Madrid, the 6th November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
141. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The jealousy about usurped or infringed authority between the two Houses left no room for the discussion of other matters. An access of resolutions which are required of them caused them to have some glimmering of the need for agreement. It now appears that the Upper House is persuaded of the undesirability of claiming to be a court of first instance in civil causes and with the Lower desisting from its perquisitions against the book which upheld this, there is great hope of seeing these two limbs of parliament very soon engaged together upon the more important operations for which they were called. The most pressing question for the king is that of money. The other about the union between the two countries is already hoary and more difficult than ever, if not hopeless. I am inclined to believe that the proposals which have frequently been discussed are not intended to serve any purpose beyond attaching some thread of business between the two countries as may serve to attract all the matters and all the consequencies which in practice will be found advantageous for the royal service. But as the foundation of the whole machine depends upon a good harvest of money, this is the point upon which they are labouring most at present, in discussing the means and the resources from which they may promptly raise millions of crowns. But as yet not a word has been said about it in parliament, the question being put aside every day to find devices for their union.
On the other hand word comes from Scotland of the meeting of their parliament at Edembourg on the 19th October with the reply given by it to the letter written by his Majesty, presented by Earl Lauderdaile the first royal commissioner. In a weighty discourse he expressed the disgust of the king at seeing his indulgence abused by a number of sectaries and his determination to maintain the bishops and the Protestant Church in their pre-eminence, requiring parliament to punish capitally any who might contravene this in the future. He then proposed the union of the kingdoms asking that parliament to forward this in every possible way, representing this as a fresh pledge of his Majesty's love for the people there. To this point parliament answers with all humility, relinquishing to his Majesty, in token of the utmost confidence, the appointment of the commissioners to treat about this union but reserving their proceedings for the approval of parliament.
Upon the other point of religions or sects parliament makes no answer and Earl Lauderdaile, from the number of Presbyterians present in both chambers, does not know what issue to expect from the affair, which is of the utmost importance and dangerous. It is question of directing the consciences of a people full of scruples, vanity and follies which does not recognise or does not confess monarchical government.
No further news can arrive about the alliance except the indecision over the treaties. The journey of the Spanish ambassador Gamara from the Hague to Brussels points to objections on the part of the constable to agree to the payments and other commitments for the reunion of the alliance.
The news of the peace between your Serenity and the Turk would seem to urge the Spaniards and the Dutch more strongly to agree upon the alliance. The peace itself is here considered as glorious for your Serenity who abandoned by the powers defended that bulwark single handed to the very last, and then has even been left in peaceful possession of what you had conquered from the Ottoman empire in the war.
Although Viscount Faulcombridge has seen the articles set out which come by way of France, he still continues busy with his preparations to start on his embassy to your Serenity, but the delays usual in this country are holding him up more than had been expected, in the cold & discomfort of the winter.
London, the 8th November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
142. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The ducali of the 19th October reached me at the end of last week. The instructions did not remain more than one day unfulfilled, as I asked and obtained audience of the king at once and went prepared to communicate what your Excellencies charged me with, I began by saying that the affectionate regard of your Serenity for this crown led you to order that his Majesty should be informed of the peace concluded with the Turks and induced you to hope that he would rejoice to hear the news and to see restored to tranquillity & ease a prince so friendly as the most serene republic. I entered afterwards into the particulars.
The king replied to this long narration by expressing his appreciation and indebtedness to the republic which assuredly was not mistaken in believing him to be interested in its greater glory. He went on to offer congratulations on the advantageous terms which your Excellencies had obtained. He said that the war could not have been ended more gloriously and the republic would be crowned with glory & honour in the eyes of the Christian powers for having endured in the common defence to the very last. His ambassador would be with your Serenity and would have formal instructions to forward to the Ambassador Harvis at Constantinople the orders to be sent to him, that minister being charged to conform to the views of the minister of your Excellencies and to have a good understanding with him on all the questions which might crop up over the final settlement of the peace treaties. I assured him of the regard with which Viscount Faulcombridge would be received by the Senate and did not forget to speak of the esteem that was always felt for his Majesty's ministers. I took leave without committing myself further.
When as an act of confidence I informed the Secretary Arlington of what had passed with the king he told me that the said ambassador was getting ready with all possible speed, and from his own mouth and from other sources I have every reason to believe his despatch to be certain even if it is not absolutely at hand.
I also gave the Dutch ambassador an exact account of the motives and the conditions upon which the peace with Turkey has been established, in order that he might inform the Lords States in the name of your Excellencies. He gave me his promise and an ample assurance that in return the States would render hearty thanks for the goodness of your Excellencies. Upon the occasion of a visit to the ambassador of Denmark he enlarged to me upon the matter of the peace, rejoicing to learn of the very advantageous terms.
The two houses of parliament earn scant approval from the king here. They still persist about their punctilio. Some are persuaded to give it up in the interest of concord; others are led maliciously to affect forwardness, in order not to force the king to intervene with his authority. To-day it would appear that they have utterly lost the inclination, without approving the manner for the adjustment. But as a stolid immobility upon such a point of punctilio might have stirred the king to wrath, after he had proposed other important matters to parliament, the houses have taken the accounts in hand to look into the foundation of the royal debts. Many errors have already come to light and it appears that the treasurer is accused of the malversation of many thousands of pounds sterling, and there will be further perquisitions against other individuals who have in some way abused the royal money. This is all that is noteworthy in the proceedings of parliament up to the present.
News has since arrived from France of the claim of the duke of Orleans to the inheritance of the queen, mother of his Majesty here, and also of his wife. (fn. 5) When they have carefully examined what the laws here have to say on the subject and what is the position under French law, we shall know what reply will be given to the duke's demand and what the end will be.
London, the 15th November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
143. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
Ill will that can no longer remain concealed has in these last days made it perfectly clear that the erring portion, even when it is small, may easily corrupt the larger. Thus in the Lower Chamber the question of judicial powers being introduced as a point of the most important consequence, some of them have succeeded in inducing the others to be all of one mind in the claim to hear appeals after a judgment of the Upper. They forthwith sent a bill to that body, which, after the fourth session rejected it. It is now meditating the withdrawal of its renunciation of its original claim to be a court of first instance and considering some other superior demand, seeing that the Lower House, not content with opposing the Jus of the lords & peers, is going on to make excessive demands. These are the spirits who, as I wrote last week, were maliciously disposed to display an inclination for an adjustment and precisely in this way the correspondence between the two Houses is confused and all the expedients that are devised for the treatment of the mischief are converted into poison; and feelings being inflamed they are incapable of agreement. The authority & prudence of the duke of Hiorch did not avail in the Upper House to moderate the rejection of the bill from the Lower. He advised some considered reply if they would not ratify the claim. God grant that he may at least be able to prevent matters going further, for which he is exerting himself to the utmost, so as to improve the affairs of the king, his brother, at least in appearance, for the benefit of the crown for greater quiet and the general satisfaction.
His Majesty allows the disputes to go on so that they may decide the question between themselves once & for all. If these continue to prevent the discussion of matters more important for the country, he will have to make things good by his own authority. Up to the present they have not examined more than a part of the royal accounts without speaking about the way to provide fresh supplies of money or of the means for uniting the kingdoms of England & Scotland.
Both the Houses made a ceremonious appearance before the king to express their most humble thanks for the zeal with which he has persecuted the sectaries and petitioning him to continue in respect of a new law passed by parliament on the subject. The parliament of Scotland will not speak in this fashion, being composed mostly of Presbyterians, a sect opposed to the bishops, although it remains in the body of the Protestant church. The last letters report that they heard with reluctance of the appointment of commissioners to draw up the act of the royal authority, supreme & absolute in spiritual matters. In the mean time the first commissioner, Lauderdaile, will get ahead with the business and will squeeze them hard. In the end the opinions of that parliament will be heard, although buried in the hearts of those sectaries. So much for what is happening in the parliaments. As reflections upon the issue are various & uncertain and may prove in the event to be quite fallacious I will wait until there is something more definite.
I have one definite item of news for your Serenity. It is this: the Ambassador Carlisle who has returned from Sweden, announces that crown to be well disposed towards the Spanish alliance if it receives the money. They are not sorry there about the differences between the Spanish ministers in Flanders or the reluctance of the constable to pay up, since their delays correspond with those of the parliament. They would like to gather the intentions of that body before committing themselves further to the alliance, seeing that this appears to be the sole object for demanding money to reestablish the royal treasury.
The news of the Vice Admiral Alen from the waters of Algiers comforts all the merchants here who learn of the revenge on those corsairs. In parliament they speak becomingly of the royal forces and the steadfast resolutions, that assembly rejoicing at all that redounds to the glory of the country.
The ducali of the 26th and 31st October have only reached me to day. I hope that audience of the king will be arranged for me to morrow. This will serve not only for handing in the letter of condolence but also to introduce the commissions given by your Serenity to the Ambassador Molino at the Porte. I feel sure from the goodness of his Majesty and the forwardness of the Secretary Arlington that the Ambassador Harvis will be charged to respond in the most ample manner to the tokens of esteem from your Serenity's minister.
Count Maffei, the gentleman sent by the duke of Savoy, arrived six days ago. After the third day of his stay here he had audience of the king & queen and of the duke & duchess of Hiorch, offering condolences on the death of the queen mother. His treatment corresponds with that of the envoy of the duke of Orleans. (fn. 6) It seems that he will follow the same style as he has not so far informed any minister of his arrival in London.
London, the 22nd November, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
144. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
Scarcely had I asked audience of the king than I obtained it. I took with me the ducale of your Serenity and before presenting it to the king's own hands I repeated my sorrow at the death of the queen mother. The king received both very graciously. He said that the testimony of the republic's regard was nothing fresh. He spoke of his own regard and dilated upon the glory won in the war against the common enemy of Christendom, which he had not been able to share, to his exceeding regret. After repeating some formal words of condolence and touching upon the events of the war & peace of Candia I turned the conversation to the commissions sent to the Ambassador Molino at the Porte to show every respect & observance to his Majesty's Ambassador Harvis. Without any further incitement from me the king told me that his ambassador had general instructions to cultivate the best relations with the ministers of your Serenity and always to advance your interests. He would give him more precise directions to have a good understanding with his Excellency Molino and it would gratify him indeed if his minister should have any opportunity of advancing the glory of the Senate. In conformity with these expressions the Secretary Arlington informs me this evening that he is preparing a letter for the ambassador at Constantinople, commanding him to have good correspondence with the ambassador of your Serenity and to support him in all his transactions when requested, as I should see from the same which he would let me have for the next despatch, so I hope it may prove satisfactory to the Senate. I repeat the humble petition of Galileo, who hopes & begs for pitiful consideration for his son, who is a slave in the war galleys, when the slaves on either side are being released.
A further testimony of his Majesty's regard for the republic will be the despatch thither of the Ambassador Faulcombridge. In the coming week he will see the departure of two ships for Venice & Leghorn with a good part of what he requires for the service of the embassy. The king has honoured him with the title of ambassador extraordinary. Besides an office with which he is charged for the duke of Savoy he also has instructions to proceed to Florence for one with the Grand Duke. This is the reason why, having to travel quickly and at an inconvenient time of year, he will not have his wife with him, who will wait for a more favourable season.
The ambassador of Denmark has at length obtained the renewal of the privileges for his countrymen in correspondence for those which the king, his master, confirmed some months ago to the merchants of England, who should trade to Denmark and Norway. He is on the point of leaving and because he told me that the prince, the second son of his king, (fn. 7) had written to him of his arrival at Genoa and of his proposed passage to Venice, I assured him that his Highness would receive all those marks of respect which are due to a personage of such distinction.
Offices of condolence have been passed with the duke & duchess of Hiorch on the death of their daughter which happened at the end of last week after an illness of a few days, at the age of ten months, (fn. 8)
A serious misfortune for the Catholics is the departure of the Capuchin fathers who officiated at the chapel of the queen mother. As that has been closed by order of the king and they are recalled by their superiors, the whole burden will fall upon the purses of the foreign ministers who with abundant almsgiving, in masses, administration and the divine offices will have to support the service of God; but for my part I only desire to make the devotional piety of your Serenity ever more widely known.
London, the 29th November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
145. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The public affront given by the Upper House to the Lower by rejecting the bill, as I wrote last week, has stirred up so much bad blood that would seem increasingly difficult to calm down so much excitement. They are already beginning to hint that the Lower House will be forced to draw up an act against the innovations pretended by the Upper and to petition the king for his assent. This would be a step of the greatest consequence, because if the king were introduced into a contest between the two he would of necessity be compelled to take sides with one House or the other, great disorders would arise for lack of expedients and once the royal authority was reduced to enter the fray in a contest between the Houses, the issue of this parliament would not be seen very soon.
To bring them on to deal with the chief object for which they were called they are dealing with the matter of finance. The treasurer Carteret being shown to be indebted to the king for 300,000l. sterling, had to appear last Tuesday before the Lower House to justify himself and to offer his defence. If the Lower House finds that this form of inquisition provides good sums of money, it is possible that it may continue in order to provide the king by extracting it without harassing the country with fresh impositions. Some have said frankly that they must learn from the king of France.
The French ambassador is not over pleased at this examination of the accounts of Carteret who founded the beginning of his fortunes in serving the Most Christian, (fn. 9) and he would like him to continue here in a friendly disposition for the interests of that monarch. Similarly M. Colbert is perturbed over the arrest of Broncard, a French partisan. In the last war with Holland he served the duke of Hiorch and he is accused of lack of courage and of disloyalty. (fn. 10) It is not easy to see how he can escape danger as he has already been banished by parliament.
While the affairs of parliament are proceeding in this fashion those of the alliance are progressing in confusion. The Ambassador Gamarra has returned to the Hague from Brussels with a new proposal discussed with the constable of Castile, differing from the one he had brought by agreement with the ministers of the princes of the alliance. It consists in a definite obligation on the part of the allies to have ready, on a breach of the peace on the part of the French, 11,000 foot and 5000 horse with an assignment of 60,000 pieces of eight a month, one half payable by the Spaniards and the other 30,000 by England & Holland in equal portions, with an undertaking that both powers shall be reimbursed by Spain at the end of the war. The chief alteration is that the constable would like this alliance to be converted into an offensive one; but it is not likely that Sweden will consent to this or concur Since it would be utterly opposed to the indifference professed about the maintenance of the peace of Aix la Chapelle. On this point there is a discussion at the Hague between the ministers of the alliance, and the Spaniards will again experience opposition, the Swedes being annoyed at so many changes & delays after they had been induced to relinquish the demand for the annual pension and agreed to accept a monthly assignment, solely in case of need. The outcome of all this is that the Swedes are protesting that they will leave the Hague, if they don't detach themselves from the alliance altogether unless a decision is soon reached, that England & Holland will keep (osservano) the resolutions of the Spaniards; and upon this depends the issue of this much discussed and highly important affair.
London, the 29th November, 1669.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19/29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
146. Carolus II D.G. Mag. Brit, etc Rex predilecti et fideli nostro Danieli Harvey, militi, nostro apud Imp. Turcicum legato, Salutem:
Intelleximus non sine gaudio et animi laetitia bellum illud nuperum inter Ser. Venetarum Rempub., amicos nostros veteres et imp. Ottomanicum quod tam multo sanguine tantaque pecunia reipub. isti steterat nunc demum in pacem feliciter desiisse. Cum igitur circa eam rem aliquid negotii etiam num subsequi posse consentaneum sit quo cicatrix nuper obducta firmius coalescat et pax inter eosdem atque mutuum commercium arctius coeat; nobis visum est quo ser. isti reipub. liquidius constet quam in partem atque societatem totius rei gravissime gerendae cum ipsis veniamus per has litteras presentes voluntatem nostram tibi notam facere ut si quid ejusmodi negotium oriri contingat vel se obtulerit, ubi reipub. istius commodis inservire posse, videamur omni prorsus officio atque opera Dominum Molinum ipsorum in Portu Constantinopolitano legatum, sive quem alium in iisdem rebus agentem ibidem quandoque constituere ipsis placitum fuerit qua demum ratione et quatenus sibi maxime expedire judicabunt adjuves idque pari studio et animi ardore ac si res nostra ipsa ageretur. Quippe cum nobis quantumvis cupientibus ad bellum propulsandum operam conferre minime licuerit tanto enixius contenendum arbitramur, ut in iis promovendis quae pati conducant, stabili quidem atque honeste confirmandae flagrantior affectus elutere possit. Quam quidem animi nostri in ser. rempublicam promptitudmem nolumus se deesse, omni humanitatis officiorum genere versus prefatum ejus ministrum ubicunque res obtulerit testari serio et confirmari.
Dabantur in Palacio nostro Westmonasterii, XIX die Novembris MDCLXIX.
Signed: Arlington.
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genova.
Venetian
Archives.
147. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge & Senate.
The English consul here, on behalf of his Britannic Majesty has preferred a request to the government here for permission to cause the hull of a bastard galley (fn. 11) to be built in the Arsenal here to be used at the port of Tanger as an experiment. If this proves successful they propose to form a squadron of six of them to make use of them for naval service against the Barbary corsairs. He is also asking for a certain number of officers for the direction of this same galley. We shall hear soon the decision of the Council of State on the subject.
Genoa, the last of November, 1669.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 It should be Galilee.
2 Richard Chiswell, bookseller, was summoned before the house on 22 October o.s., to answer about a book called The Great Question, which he said was printed by order of Lord Holles. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. ix, page 100.
3 Henry Ernest son of Claude Lamoral, prince de Ligne.
4 Gaspar Ulric, who came early in September to offer a levy of Swiss to the Dutch. See page 101, above. London Gazette, Aug. 26–30.
5 It had been decided in February that the queen's jointure should be made up to 30,000l. a year. On 15 October the king desired that it should be made up to 40,000l. a year. The grant of Somerset House was made on 1 October. Cal. of Treasury Books, Vol. iii, pp. 20, 147, 280.
6 Two claims were made: (1) that as the queen was domiciled, in France at the time of her death all her estate must follow the law of the land; (2) that Madame was her mother's sole heiress, she alone being capable, as King Charles, James and the Prince of Orange were excluded by the droit d'aubaine. Leoline Jenkins to Arlington, Oct. 13/23. S.P. France, Vol. cxxvii.
7 The Chevalier de Marivaux, who had audience on the 4th October. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S, fol. 421. Williamson's Journal on 24 Sept. S.P. Dom. Chas. II, Vol. cclxxi.
8 George, later the consort of Queen Anne.
9 The Lady Henrietta died on Monday 15/25 November and was buried on Friday in King Henry VII's Chapel, Westminster. London Gazette, Nov. 18–22.
10 After the surrender of Jersey in Dec. 1651 Carteret went to France, where he obtained a high command in the French navy under Vendôme.
11 William lord Brouncker, who was committed to the Tower on 23 November for breach of privilege for speaking against Mordon, a member of the Lower House. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. ix, page 106. Salvetti on 29 Nov. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S, f. 441. He was credited with having prevented the duke of York from following up the victory over the Dutch at the battle of Lowestoft.