Venice
September 1670

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

262-281

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: September 1670', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 262-281. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90278 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

September 1670

Sept. 1.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian.
Archives.
301. The secretary of the English ambassador came to the doors of the Collegio and asked to speak to one of the secretaries. I went by order of the Savii and he said that the ambassador had seen the resolution of the Senate and thought that it settled nothing, as it put off and referred the matter to several magistracies. The charge on salt fish was intolerable and so they went to Leghorn and other places, to the prejudice of this mart. To preserve trade it was necessary to regulate it in accordance with the practice of other marts. The ambassador is postponing his audience for leave taking until Friday, in the hope of some more definite answer. When I reported this to the Savii I was directed to say that they had heard what was said and that he would always be cordially welcomed. With this the secretary took leave. Padavin, secretary.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
302. The secretary of the English ambassador came to the doors of the Collegio and I went by order to hear him. He said, The ambassador has taken note of the Senate's decree about salt fish and has directed me to represent to his Serenity that it does not meet the case. It matters little to his country, but he considers it from its importance to the service of this state. He added, I have this memorial to leave. As the Consul Harby of Zante is constantly writing complaints, the ambassador cannot do less than represent them to his Serenity, the Proveditore there and Sig. Giustiniani. He gave in the memorial, which I read in the Collegio, and it is below. He said further that his Excellency had been told that it was customary for all ambassadors to ask some favour at their departure, and he would like to know the sort of favour he should ask for, to avoid asking for something that would not please the Senate. He asked me not to tell their Excellencies, but to advise him as from myself. I told him that I had no such information and should be obliged to ask at least one of the Senators. He said, Ask whom you please and make it seem to come from me. I will come back for the answer. With that he left.
The Memorial. (fn. 1)
I much regret to be compelled to represent to your Serenity that Sir Clement Harby, consul at Zante, a person esteemed by the king, whose minister he is, does not receive from your officials there the respect and good treatment that might reasonably be expected, but is rather exposed to affronts and slights, particularly by the late Proveditore. I ask, in the king's name that such measures may be taken as shall provide in the future for the maintenance of the friendship and commence which has been practised hitherto in that island.
[Italian.]
Sept. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
303. That a notary of the ducal chancery be sent this evening to read the following to the English Ambassador:
Orders have been sent to prevent high handed action against the ships of your nation at Zante and that they are to be treated with every courtesy as well as their consul there. This is in order to show the Signory's esteem for your offices. You may be sure that great weight will be attached to your representations about salt fish and the Senate will consider the question about the reduction of the duty, which has been raised by the consul, since a mutual communication of the affair will prove equally advantageous to their common interests. The Senate will have inquiry made as to the method in order to arrive at a definite decision as their desire to facilitate trade is equal to that of the king.
That the Regulators of Duties be required to give their opinion about a reduction of the duty on herrings, salt fish and sardines, taking full particulars and making such comments as may occur to their prudence.
Ayes, 118. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
304. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The duke of Buchingan continues to enjoy the customary distinctions and favourable treatment. The duke of Orleans and, following his example, the three leading ministers, have regularly entertained him at sumptuous banquets in their own houses, each of them by the royal command. This same ducal envoy has in these last days despatched couriers to London with secret despatches. His departure for England is postponed for some days. These exceptional demonstrations on this side are regarded in Holland with bitter feelings.
The hopes of the Prince of Orange, however, have risen considerably in respect of the journey to England which he is contemplating. He hopes that when he has arrived in London he will profit once more from the generous kindness of the British king and that of the parliament, when the next meeting has taken place, which is not far off.
Paris, the 3rd September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 3.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
305. The secretary of the English ambassador came to the doors of the Collegio and when I went to him by order of the Savii, he said that with reference to the memorial handed in yesterday evening for the Consul Harby, the ambassador directed him to say that he has received a letter from Zante from that consul in which he expresses himself as greatly obliged for his treatment by the present Proveditore, Sig. Ottavian Pisani, so there is no need to recommend the consul to him. With respect to the memorial, as he had no wish to prejudice any one in respect of the past, he asked that it might not be taken into account, if it had any such effect. With that the secretary left and I reported all to the Savii.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
306. I, Nicolo Marchesini, went yesterday evening to the ambassador of his Britannic Majesty. After I had read the deliberation of the Senate to him he caused his secretary to take a copy. He said nothing except that he hoped to come on Friday to render thanks to your Serenity for the honours which were continually done to him. After that I took leave and came away.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
307. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The letters of Italy have no better fortune than those of England in their passage through Flanders. The ducali of the 9th ult have reached me open. The search of the public packet has been so exact that many letters are missing and among the few that remain I have found some without the ducal seal and without the copies.
So far as this Court is concerned the affair of the arbitration is high and dry in expectation of the reply from the queen regent of Spain and her decision about the nomination of the Dutch. The decision of the dispute about Sautin is also referred to the Court of Paris. I will not fail to thank Van Beuninghen for his goodwill and when the information reaches me I will send a full account to the Ambassador Morosini.
With regard to the suggestion about trade with the English in the states of your Serenity I do not know into what particulars Faulcombridge may have entered but in a general way I will express the good will of the Senate and the esteem and regard with which it will consider the English nation, taking advantage of all the opportunities that remain for me in the short time I shall have at this Court as I hope that by this time the Senate will have granted me my leave following the example of the congé taken by the Ambassador Viscount.
For these same affairs of trade and to assist the merchants the Secretary Darington will be staying on at Venice. I am told that credentials have been sent to him as secretary resident but I do not know for certain because the Secretary Arlington is away from Court again. When he returns I make no doubt that he will express his appreciation at the readiness shown by your Excellencies in hearing Viscount Faulcombridge on the question of the trade in salt fish and he may possibly give me the information I lack owing to the missing copies. Only last week he told me that Faulcombridge was in a hurry for the settlement or at least the advancement of the affair so as to return at the earliest opportunity to London where he is appointed one of the twenty-five commissioners for the union of the two kingdoms. The appointment is not of this week and the presence of Faulcombridge is not immediately necessary, but his desire to return and the need for information on the subject and on the more recondite interests of the two nations summon him to London to take part in the proceedings as well as to win some credit for himself personally. The question will not sleep as in the past, since the king prefers to speed it up in order to obtain thereby increased dignity for the crown, profit for his subjects and prestige for himself. Thus in his Council he has ordered the re-issue of circular letters for all the members of the English parliament to be at Westminster in October, in accordance with the last prorogation.
After this decision the king set out for Windsor Castle and the queen for the country house at Hampton Court. All the Court is following them to enjoy the hunting and the country sports. The Count of Solre envoy of the governor of Flanders, was able to take leave of his Majesty beforehand. He leaves London well pleased, not only for his generous reception, both officially and privately, but for the appointment of the Marquis of Flamerino who will be crossing to Brussels very soon to return the compliment. (fn. 2) It seems that the French ambassador has succeeded in securing this title and appointment for Flamerino, a Frenchman, as a demonstration by the king in response to the favours done by the Most Christian to the duke of Buckingham. It is certain that the reports of the duke from Paris are beyond all their expectations.
England is not pleased to hear of the sale by the Dutch Company of the capital of the Indies at a low price, in order to undersell the London Company. French complaints about it are much worse as at the beginning of their trade there they had to meet many more charges than the others. If Bouchingan gives force to such voices on his return from Paris Van Beuninghen will be put to it to defend himself in London as Holland is accused of injuring the common trade. Up to the present Van Beuninghen merely laughs and keeps saying that the trade of the Indies is not for those who have no dominions in those parts, as Holland has and that England and France will be extracting gold from their own countries and will take the capital of the Indies without profit.
Van Beuninghen will speak in a different fashion if he receives commissions from the States to intercede with the king here for the withdrawal of the reprisals decreed against Hamburg ships and then for the settlement of the dispute about the English ships burned by the Dutch in the Elbe port of Hamburg in the time of the last war, because the king here claims that the city of Hamburg shall make good the damage and give his subjects compensation.
London, the 5th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian.
Archives.
308. Viscount Falcombridge came into the Collegio and spoke, as usual in English, in conformity with the memorial below, which was read. The doge said they were very sorry to hear of his departure so speedily, as they hoped he would have stayed at least until Christmas. They were glad he was returning to his king and felt sure that he would take the part of the republic with his Majesty and act as mediator, to confirm the ancient friendship. They were also glad to learn that his Majesty was sending some one in his place who would give them frequent occasions to show their regard for all the persons of the royal house. The ambassador had all their good wishes, and they also wished him a good journey and good health.
The ambassador constantly bowed in acknowledgment of the office. He then drew out another memorial, asking that sig. Corniani might read it, which I did, and it is below. The doge replied that their lordships would take the matter into consideration and would let him know. With that he left, after the usual reverences. When passing through the doors he called me, the secretary, and gave me some papers containing the sentences and memorials, with the names of those for whose release he had asked.
The Memorial. (fn. 3)
Next to my king's commands, which I gladly obey, nothing could give me greater satisfaction than coming to this republic and this most august Collegio, which I had previously seen and admired. I have had a happy experience in my chief aim which was the maintenance of the good correspondence which has always existed between his Majesty and this republic. In the performance of my duties I have received so many favours and have found your Serenity so favourably disposed to the king and his subjects, that I can assure you it is not without regret that I find myself compelled to take leave. The king wills it so. I go fully determined to tell the king in words what I have already given in writing, that the republic is anxious to do all that his Majesty can desire for the preservation of the alliance which has been hitherto maintained, and that you are ready to do everything to facilitate trade of his subjects in your dominions. I trust that your Serenity will excuse me the usual expressions between friends at parting. I can again assure you that my king will do his part to make good all that I have said about his regard for this state, and on my return to Court I shall lose no opportunity of forwarding the interests of the republic, and I ask your Serenity to honour me with frequent occasions for carrying out your commands.
Your Serenity may be sure that although the king commands me to withdraw from your presence, he will send some one else, to show his regard. I may also say that on my arrival in this city I found here in the service of the state, a subject of my king, Colonel Annand, who negotiated for the Captain General and consulta the surrender and advantageous peace of Candia. (fn. 4) The king will be very gratified to know that a subject of his has so honourably served this republic for so many years, in employments of so much consequence. In conclusion I wish you the utmost greatness and prosperity, due to your prudence, courage and qualities, and for myself I ardently desire the honour of contributing something to the advantage and glory of this republic.
Second Memorial.
Asking pardon for those sentenced by their rectors, to add another obligation.
On the 9th.
By order of the Most Excellent Savii the Avogadori di Comun shall answer upon the laws. Gio. Corniani, secretary.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
309. That Viscount Falcombrige, ambassador extraordinary of the king of Great Britain, be summoned to the Collegio and that the following be read to him:
Pleasure at seeing him and a corresponding regret at his departure. Glad to hear that he is being recalled for advancement, and wish him every prosperity. Are sure that he will represent the regard of the Senate. They will keep the questions set forth by him well in mind with the intention of doing everything in their power for a nation so beloved, both in the Levant Islands and throughout their dominions. He will be able to assure the king of their affectionate regard. Colonel Analdi has always been welcome. They wish him a good and prosperous journey.
That a gold chain of 2000 crowns, with the device of St. Mark, be given to the ambassador extraordinary of Great Britain and that another of 300 be given to his secretary.
Ayes, 127. Noes, 1. Neutral, 4.
On the 9th September in the Collegio, on the chain:
Ayes, 17. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0. It requires 4/5ths.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
310. To the Ambassador Mocenigo in England.
The Ambassador Falcombrige took leave yesterday. Enclose a copy of the office read to him. To this may be added that they will not neglect to take in hand the heads of his expositions. These will be considered and information taken in order to make known the forwardness of the Senate to please him and to show their regard for that crown. He is to take occasion to say how much the mission of that minister has been appreciated.
[Italian.]
Sept. 9.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
311. Viscount Falcombridge was summoned to the Collegio and the office decreed by the Senate on the 6th was read to him. After this Sig. Zuane Marcello, the senior councillor, in the absence of the doge, made a few formal remarks. The ambassador then rose and proceeded to the other hall to take a copy of the office. To me, the secretary, he expressed several times his great indebtedness to the state's kindness and generosity, and for the many civilities shown him by the Collegio. He added that tomorrow evening he proposed to leave this city for Padua, where he thought it necessary to have some treatment to fit him for the trials of the journey, and after three or four days he would continue. With this he departed.
[Italian.]
Sept. 10.
Senate,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
312. To the Rectors of Padua.
Viscount Falcombrige has taken leave to return home and he proposes to travel by that city. The Senate wishes attentions to be shown to him which are usual with persons of such character. They will accordingly call upon him and supply him with refreshments.
That the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie be charged to supply the Rectors of Padua with refreshments to the value of 250 ducats.
Ayes, 127. Noes, 1. Neutral, 4.
On the 10th September, in the Collegio:
Ayes, 18. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
313. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The duke of Bochingan has decided to leave in two days' time. So far as I have succeeded in pentrating into his negotiations I cannot as yet find any agreement with this side except that which has regard to reciprocal commerce and a maritime union of trade between the two nations in Europe and in the Indies. It seems likely that the initiation of essential matters may take place in these next months with secret negotiations involving more essential and considerable progress. It is therefore impossible to express the fear and apprehension of the States of Holland over the confederation of these two kings and powers, which is threatened and which they foresee.
Paris, the 10th September, 1670.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
314. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Acknowledges the ducali of the 7th August.
The important matter of the salt fish put forward by the Ambassador Faulcombridge has already made such good progress that the whole mart here promises itself a successful issue. It desires this not only to continue with facility the discharge and sale of such food stuffs in the capital city of Venice but to enjoy the exemptions granted to ships which enter the ports of your Serenity for trade on the return cargo of currants at Zante.
I am waiting for the return of the Secretary Arlington from the country to make the most of these suggestions and to confirm for your Excellencies what the whole Court believes, that letters of credence as secretary resident have been sent to the Secretary Darington at Venice. The same motives which induced the king to pardon his late indiscretion about the government of France may have induced him to confer the appointment. Having in mind a brother in law of his who has great influence in parliament (fn. 5) his Majesty aims at winning both of them so that in the future their example may make things better with the other members of parliament. Darington does not lack spirit as was seen in the late troubles. If his fortune is not abundant, he has a numerous family and they are all preparing to proceed to Venice at the earliest opportunity. I am inclined to believe that Darington will be sufficiently prudent and intelligent to behave well in his relations with your Serenity, as he showed himself extraordinarily anxious for the title, to get the official qualification for himself and the house.
On Monday when the king returns to the Court here I will present the ducali in reply to the news of the death of the duchess of Orleans. At the same time when the duke of Hiorch will also be in London, 1 will present the other ducali in reply without entering upon the question of titles, especially as no one has said a word to me about it.
A commotion of another kind was caused five days ago by the news of the movement of the forces in France. This threw the Spaniards into confusion and made the Dutch rush to arms. The latter have reinforced their garrisons, among others the fortress of Mastrich and both have sent letters of advice flying to London. Soon afterwards despatches reached the Ambassador Colbert who went to Windsor Castle to inform the king of the progress of the Most Christian arms against Lorraine caused by the king's indignation at the procedure of the duke. (fn. 6) But Van Beuninghen, supported by the Ambassador Borel, who arrived three days ago from Holland, also went to the Court where they enlarged upon the danger and the consequences of warlike operations to the prejudice of the common quiet, so strongly recommended to the crown and so bound up with the interests of England. His Majesty's reply was confined to generalities. In the mean time they are watching to see the issue of the conflict, which your Excellencies will learn from the spot. So far no one is moving to the assistance of the duke of Lorraine.
The duke of Bouchingan may arrive at any moment from France with full information about that Court. There is no one who believes him to be corrupted by persuasion or flattery since it is well known that he had no commissions to listen to affairs. In his personal opinion he is far from any such thing, and even if he had changed he would not venture to open his mouth seeing how little appearance there is that he would come out of it with any advantage.
The peril of the fortress of Tanger will be relieved in an unexpected manner if the news is confirmed of the rout of Taffilet at the head of an army of 140,000 men by the resistance of the people of Suz and of the town of Santa Croce. They write from Cadiz that Taffilet's army being scattered, he got away by night into Morocco, with only four horse, that his brother was dead and that the subjects of Fez, Tetuan and other places refused obedience. They are waiting for information as to whether he will be able to restore his army or whether the career of his fortune is ended by this accident.
From the squadron of Sir Sprach they have received word of an encounter with the corsairs and Alen, having taken a brigantine of the Divan of Algiers, they have gained some advantage.
The earl of Esses has returned from his embassy to Denmark. He receives the praise due to him for the excellent way in which he brought about the last agreement. He has left the secretary at Copenhagen, who will remain there to keep up the correspondence. (fn. 7)
London, the 12th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
315. Domenico Mocenigo, Podestà and Girolamo Gradenigo, Captain of Padua, to the Doge and Senate.
We received the ducali about Viscount Falcombridge last Friday. He arrived yesterday evening and took up his quarters at the house which is rented by the earl of Rondel in the district of the Santo. We are waiting for him to communicate his arrival to us before going to pay our visit or take the present which is to be sent by the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie.
Colonel Anand has also arrived with letters of the Savio Cassier. He told us that he wished to be free from compliments for a few days because of a slight purge and that he will send us word next Friday and after that receive our visit. We may doubt whether the delay will not be longer than he imagines if it is prolonged by the activities of the physicians.
Padua, the 15th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
316. The secretary of the English ambassador came to the doors of the Collegio and asked to say a word. He said to me, the secretary: I have received a letter from the ambassador from Padua, in which he writes about the judgment in the cause between the English consul and Rocco Fustinoni, complaining strongly about two things. First the consul, the king's minister, had been abused by the Advocate Ghedini, who used words that would not be spoken to a base man, least of all to a minister, going so far as to say that he is a Jew and should go and live in the Ghetto and the like. Secondly that seven or eight Jesuits were present exciting doubts that they were making trouble, although it is incredible that justice can be corrupted. Nevertheless it is astonishing that people of this sort should meddle with cases and the ambassador has expressly directed me to complain about it. Those of the nation who are interested in this cause are all of the flower of the nobility and they would not wish to go to the Piovego and be subject to sneers of this kind. The ambassador has already asked that the case may be judged on its merits, which can be settled the more speedily. He was also waiting for their reply on the other matter of the Avogaria and the debt due to the consul.
He also asked me if anything had been done about the pardon asked for, or about the other matters raised by the ambassador which had not been despatched. I told him I would make report and bring the answer. I returned later and told him that their Excellencies would consider what he had represented. With regard to the release they had not so far been able to have the necessary number of meetings, and the favour had not been proposed. The secretary said, The ambassador will stay at Padua all day Monday, and I ask that his Serenity shall decide something and not wait until he has gone. I promised to make report; and with this the secretary departed.
[Italian.]
Sept. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
317. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The duke of Buckingham set forth yesterday on his way back to the British Court. He has been honoured by the king here and by the whole Court with distinctions, confidences, and demonstrations for himself alone which are entirely unexampled in the case of any one soever, even members of reigning houses. From the king he received the rich present of a sword and sash charged with diamonds of the greatest value. The notion formed here of his influence and distinguished position in the parliament of England as well as of his complete and long standing intimacy with the king personally has been the chief contributor to the exceptional and devoted marks of esteem that have been showered upon the duke by the Court here. Those who have a thorough knowledge of the affairs and interests of that country perceive that they partake of the element by which it is surrounded, always liable to fluctuations and inconstant and they look for less good fortune than is imagined here in the projects under negotiation by the duke. In spite of this they flatter themselves here with the confident hope of seeing France, with her naval forces joined with England very shortly to the detriment of the States of Holland. The government here has almost made up its mind to yield to the strong representations made to the king by Buckingham to induce his Majesty to renounce and abandon entirely the trade of the West Indies which so far has proved of no advantage to this crown and which inflicts sensible injury on the affairs of the British king.
In the mean time the Dutch have come to the decision to spread seditious reports among the people of England about an arrangement between France and that kingdom to the prejudice of the common liberty and the increase of the royal power. By such disseminations the Dutch hope to stir up the common people and by stirring up internal troubles to upset, perchance, a policy that might have serious consequences for them.

Paris, the 17th September, 1670.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 18.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
318. The secretary of the Ambassador Falcombridge came to the doors of the Collegio and said: The ambassador, who will certainly leave Padua on Monday evening to continue his journey, has sent me here first to obtain a reply about the pardon he asked for. As instructed I, the secretary, told him that the impediment of the number delayed carrying out the favourable intentions of the state. He asked me to speak to him frankly and that this was not a pretext, because his Excellency would not leave Padua without some positive answer, and he himself would delay his departure for Padua until Saturday, to come back on Saturday morning and hear what had been done.
He asked me if their Excellencies had taken information about the case of the consul against Fustinoni, as if the king, who had written on the subject and charged the ambassador to make representations, does not receive some satisfaction, he will think it very strange for his subjects to be subjected to land piracy when he has strong forces in the Mediterranean to defend them against sea piracy, and to detain the effects of merchants by such methods cannot be called anything but land piracy.
He asked me again if anything had been done about the debt of Hayles at the Avogaria, as the ambassador wished to have a reply upon all that had not been despatched before he left, and not to be obliged to leave some one to hear the news. I told him that your Excellencies were fully disposed for everything, but for lack of time, taken up with more serious affairs and from the desire to settle everything at one turn they had not been able to do more so far. They would do everything possible and if there was no one here they would try to let his Excellency have the news when a decision had been taken.
[Italian.]
Sept. 18.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
319. The secretary of the English ambassador returned after dinner to the doors of the Collegio accompanied by two others of the household. He said to me, the secretary: The ambassador is ill informed about me personally. He drew out a letter which he said was from the ambassador, and read it, interspersing remarks illustrating what he had said, in a mixture of Italian and English. He said that the ambassador thought that he, the secretary, should insist on his requests for the boatman, and so he had come again with these two gentlemen to show the ambassador that he was importuning the Collegio as, in the matter of the grace asked, the ambassador considered that his honour was engaged. He wished to God that he had never mixed himself in such an affair, which has prevented him from continuing his journey. Here one of the two interrupted and said that his Excellency was fully informed about all the persons of the Collegio, and only one, Sig. Contarini was missing. In a few days, after the annual renewal of all the magistracies, all of them would go away, the city would be empty and then in truth there will not be the number, and the affair will be put off until November or December. Here the secretary resumed: I have said before that a smith sometimes needs a small nail and I ought not to be considered a nonentity by the Signory. I pressed hard for the favour and although it does not concern me in the slightest, yet my reputation is involved and I beseech the Collegio to grant me the favour, although I am not worthy to ask anything for myself. I ask also for the despatch of the affair of the Consul Hayles, of the affair with Fustinoni, who, if he had been a sea pirate would have been punished by the king's forces. But he is a land pirate and in a matter in which only justice is asked, it is a great thing if, when the king has written and made representation through his ambassador, he does not obtain satisfaction, when with his forces in the Mediterranean he is securing all Italy, including this nation. I give you my word that next year the king is resolved to send such great forces into these waters that they will be everywhere, and the Barbary corsairs will not venture to send even a small craft to sea, so he looks for satisfaction from Italy and from the most serene republic in matters of such small moment and if he does not get it he will withdraw his forces, and the mischief will be proportionate.
He added that he had pressed equally hard for the despatch of the other affair of Hayles with the Avogaria, repeating many of his arguments. Having reported to the Savii I was directed to tell him that the number had really not been complete these last days, and time had been taken up with more serious matters, but I could assure the ambassador of the state's intention to send him away satisfied, as he might see from so many other evidences. Everything possible would be done, and I intimated that the secretary, in his instances, had not particularised any one to gratify him in this matter.
The secretary and the other person asked that they might be treated frankly. Only Sig. Contarini was away. They knew that after next week nothing more could be done, even if they wished, and they could not be expected to believe that the absence of one mattered. I felt bound to tell them that they were not well informed. Such favours must first be granted by the Collegio, which is composed of 26 persons, and if all are not present the favour cannot be granted. Then, said he, it never will be, since it is impossible for one not to be missing out of 26. I replied that it had been done before, and an opportunity would occur for proposing this. The secretary then said: For the sake of my reputation I beg you most strongly to lay my requests before the Collegio. I have the pen in my hand and as I have to write of the important affairs of this republic, I will express my obligation, and although I ought not to say it, it may be that it will be my lot to come here again very soon to serve this republic, and as by this favour they will oblige me infinitely, I promise to make public my gratitude. With this they left, saying that they would return one day to hear what had been done.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
320. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king completed his programme of hunting at the end of last week. He returned to London on Monday, as arranged followed by the queen and the Court. At present he is contemplating spending the rest of the season in the country and in horse racing. I have not lost a moment in arranging an audience for presenting the ducal reply upon the death of the duchess of Orleans. I hope that I discharged my commission satisfactorily. The king in his reply expressed his great appreciation of the kindness and friendliness of your Excellencies.
The duke of Hiorch is still away in the country and I cannot give an account of the presentation of the ducale before next week, when he returns. No one has said a word to me about the titles and I believe the question to be buried.
In the matter of the currants the whole of the mart is delighted about it as a large number of merchants are interested and all are talking about it as it is one of the branches of trade most discussed. It was one of the questions debated in parliament under the late king and there are also the burdens imposed at the islands of Zante and Cephalonia. The interested parties here are promising themselves the total abolition of the abuses. I availed myself of this with the secretary Arlington, intimating that so much facility in every affair was due no less to the service of the subjects of both than to the esteem for the representative of his Majesty here. In reply Arlington assured me how much the king appreciated it and that in order that so good a correspondence should not be interrupted the secretary Darington was staying in Venice; so that I can now state definitely that he will remain as secretary resident with your Serenity.
While the Senate is showing so much readiness on its side to facilitate the trade of the English I do not wish to see the latter interfering with that of Venetian subjects in Bossina. I understand that they are thinking of sending cloth to Ragusa and Durazzo to try and find a market for it in those parts through those towns. The matter is still in suspense for fear of opposition from Venetian craft. I do not forget to encourage this suspicion, making known the absolute and irrevocable dominion of your Excellencies in the Adriatic. I will report punctually anything that happens.
To resume the thread of events here, in continuation of the confidence shown me by the Secretary Arlington, I may add that Holland is writing to Spain for the second payment due very soon to Sweden by the terms of the treaty of guarantee. Here, if necessary, they will redouble the pressure as they see that an ambassador is being sent from Paris to the Court at Stokolm. (fn. 8) A ship has been sent to bring the Ambassador Molino across from Cales to England and on his arrival all suitable representations will be made to him.
Arlington did not tell me his opinion about the forces of the Most Christian in Lorraine; but the French ambassador announced to the king that the duke had broken his word and the treaties and with this loss of character had drawn down on him his Majesty's wrath. (fn. 9) Van Beuninghen and Borel have something to say, remarking on the ease and methods with which the king of France has attacked and occupied the states of neighbouring princes. But as yet the king is not taking any exception as he prefers to let time find the remedy rather than procure one by immediate and resolute action.
The duke of Bouchingan, who is expected from France will bring more definite information about the intentions of the Most Christian about the restitution of the territories, upon which the Court is as yet in the dark.
Being assured of the great desire of the Prince of Orange to come to London the king decided some days ago to send the earl of Osseri to invite him. He will not start until the end of the present month of September and is busy preparing for the journey.
The Nonconformists, abusing the liberty granted by parliament, have been meeting not to the number of five but of 150 in private houses. This has called for determined action by the king and measures are being taken for a rigorous inquiry and for their exemplary punishment in property and life. All this will be approved by the coming parliament.
Acknowledges the ducali of the 23rd August.
London, the 19th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
321. Domenico Mocenigo, Podesta, and Girolamo Gradenigo, Captain of Padua, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador having expressed his desire to remain incognito for some days, we learned that he would not be ready to receive our office before yesterday. Accordingly we sent in the morning to announce our visit at a time convenient to him. He showed us great courtesy, spoke of the good correspondence that had lasted for centuries between the crown of England and the most serene republic, and referred to the prolonged defence of Christendom in the Levant. He said that peace would be desirable and it was not certain whether the Grand Turk would return to Constantinople. On returning to the palace we immediately sent the refreshments contained in 36 parcels, comestibles in 27 barrels and glass ware in baskets making a sumptuous appearance. The ambassador himself assisted in having it all laid out on long tables, expressing openly his very great appreciation of the honour. He asked leave this morning to return our visit and we judged it best to be all together in one of the palaces. He was most profuse in his thanks and he left us with every sign of abundant satisfaction. To morrow morning he will resume his journey.
Colonel Anand also showed great courtesy and expressed his deep devotion to your Serenity. We were accompanied and assisted in the aforementioned functions by a good number of the gentlemen here.
Padua, the 19th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Attached.322. A list of the refreshments sent by the Rason Vecchie.
[Italian.]
Sept. 20.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
323. Some one on behalf of the secretary of the English ambassador came to the doors of the Collegio, asking to speak with a secretary. I went to him as instructed and he said he had come for some answer about the particulars set forth. This was reported to the Savii and by their order he was told that when a decision had been taken they would be informed. He said that he was leaving this evening and asked if he would have the reply. I told him that I could not say. With that he left.
[Italian.]
Sept. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
324. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Every day brings further light upon the negotiations of the duke of Buckingham with this Court. I have already sent some account of them to your Excellencies in my preceding despatches but I will now report what has been communicated to me by a confidant and which may be considered more considerable.
From a source that is not usually untrustworthy I am definitely assured that during the duke's stay here a maritime union was established between this country, England and Portugal to the detriment of Dutch trade, to interrupt the course of their ships and to diminish their numbers as well, by frequent naval actions, not only in Europe but beyond the line. In order to bind the other two powers named as closely as possible to the interests of this side, considerable present advantages have been granted here to each of them by a notable reduction of the charges on goods which pass from England to this country and by according considerable benefits to Portugal in trade. The king being still in doubt about the wishes of the Chambers and parliament, it seems that Buchingam asked that the arrangement shall not be published for the time being, but be delayed until the forthcoming session of parliament in London, when his Majesty will set forth his own motives and try to induce them to agree to terms that are so advantageous to the nation and to trade. A few weeks will suffice to show what results will be produced in England by these projects.
The government here feels sure that with the royal and Court party prevailing in England their desires and hopes here will be fully realised. Some here are unable to distinguish by what means the British king can continue in alliance with the United Provinces in Europe while declaring himself at the same time their enemy in the Indies. The pretext of trade and of not invading their possessions there is believed by many to be likely to involve considerable discrepancies.
The present agreement is guarded here with extraordinary secrecy and, so far as I have been able to learn, the Dutch ambassador here is completely in the dark about it. In the mean time there have been frequent conferences between the Sieur di Liona and the resident of the Prince Regent of Portugal here. (fn. 10) A few weeks will throw more definite light on this very serious question.
Paris, the 24th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
325. Tomaso Rudio, Venetian Secretary in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
News has reached Cadiz of a considerable victory won by six English frigates against five of the best of the Algerians off Cape D'Espartel. The victors succeeded in burning the whole of them, including the flagship, in releasing 300 slaves and inflicting upon them a loss of over 600 including those who died by fire and by water. (fn. 11) This happy success affords universal consolation since it seems likely that this disaster, besides reducing their forces, will be calculated to diminish the audacity of those barbarians who had become exceedingly daring.
Madrid, the 24th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
326. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Your Serenity's letters for the duke of Hiorch arrived after dinner on Monday, the day after his Highness reached London from the country. The Master of the Ceremonies obtained audience for me and my reception was, as usual, very gracious. With the despatch of the duplicate I have repaired the mischief in part. I have not ventured to inquire more deeply into the cause, the more so because I hope that the motive for curiosity has vanished.
I have spoken at length with Lord Arlington about the instances put forward by the Ambassador Faulcombridge and, step by step, I have made him realise the special favour that is shown to the subjects of the king here. With repeated admissions of the truth of this Arlington was led to open his heart to me. He told me in confidence that he had heard with the utmost displeasure that the Senate had directed its Bailo at the Porte to procure a ban against the cloth of England throughout the whole of the Turkish dominion. (fn. 12) If these offices came to the ears of his Majesty he would be greatly incensed. He therefore begged me to write and warn your Excellencies that the greatest wrong that could be done to the king was to attempt in such ways to injure his subjects. Being aware of the fundamental maxims of the most serene republic I answered frankly that it was true that she sought the advantage of her subjects but by her sacred and unchangeable principles she never conspired against the good of others. Arlington insisted that I should write and I agreed to do so in order not to increase his suspicions by a refusal. So far they have no further basis among the merchants than a number of instances published in the gazettes of Holland, possibly with design. England has good reason to keep an eye on the Levant trade. At the present time a convoy of seven rich ships is setting out thither with 40,000 pieces of cloth and varied and valuable cargoes, which will be escorted by ships of war. (fn. 13) There are besides sixty other trading ships destined for various ports of the Mediterranean. On the other hand the Dutch occasion no little jealousy by sending to the Indies 28 ships of war to protect the trade. They carry 8000 soldiers to keep up the garrisons and are giving a free passage to all the families who will go thither for the aggrandisement of the colonies there.
So much for trade. With regard to the operations of war in Lorraine, while this Court has no further interest than in the past, fresh instances arrive thence every day. The duke has written to the king here as well as to the governor of Flanders and the States of Holland for assistance. Although Van Beuninghen does not lose heart in recommending the interests of Lorraine, his representations have had scant success and the king has so far shown no inclination to mediate with the Most Christian in conjunction with the alliance, to bring about a reconciliation.
This business of Lorraine has no connection with the affair of the arbitration but the king, who is ill pleased at having engaged himself for the benefit of the Spaniards, who, after eight months, are still slumbering, does not seem in the least inclined to interest himself or to undertake anything further with the name and in the capacity of the chief of the alliance. Others contend that Buchingan, back from France and duly impressed by the effusiveness of the Most Christian, will persuade his Majesty to be cautious. But the truth is that the affair would always be difficult of digestion on its own account.
The Count of Molina tarries beyond all belief. He is expected in London and will be immediately besieged in the house of the Resident Ognate by the civilities of ministers and by business with those of the Court, as the important matter of the arbitration is to be digested with him.
London, the 26th September, 1670.
[Italian.]
Sept. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
327. To the Ambassador in England.
The Senate regrets the annoyance that is constantly being given by the robbery of couriers in Flanders. His last letters of the 9th August arrived open and without the copies. They enclose a letter written by Viscount Falcombrige on his departure from Padua. He is to make a suitable response when the Viscount arrives there and to show esteem for his merit.
Ayes, 124. Noes, 1. Neutral. 1.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 There is a copy of this memorial, in English and Italian, in S.P. Venice, Vol. xlvii, ff. 251 et seqq.
2 François de Grossolles, marquis de Flamarens. He had taken refuge in England owing to his share in the famous duel in the autumn of 1663, of eight combatants in which the marquis de la Frette and the prince de Chalais were the principals. Hartmann: Charles II and Madame, pp. 59, 63.
3 The text of this memorial, in English and Italian, is in S.P. Venice, Vol. xlvii, ff. 263 et seq.
4 See note at page 227 above.
5 Dodington was married to Frances, sister of Sir Richard Temple, member for Buckingham in the Restoration parliament. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, pp. 272, 325; Edmondson: Baronagium Genealogicum, iii, 278; Return of Members of Parliament, page 519.
6 A treacherous attempt by the Comte de Fourille on 23 August to seize the duke Charles III, followed by the forcible occupation of Lorraine by French forces. The duke succeeded in escaping to Cologne. See D'Haussonville: Histoire de la Reunion de la Lorraine à la France, Vol. iii, pp. 235–66.
7 William Loving, who served as secretary to Essex, asked for the appointment as resident in a letter of 13th June. He returned home and J. Paull was left in charge. He is called consul by Guldenlow but was afterwards qualified as resident. S.P. Denmark, Vol. xviii.
8 John Werden, on 7 Sept. reports that the Comte d'Anjo has been nominated in France for Sweden. S.P. Sweden, Vol. vii. It should be Philippe de Courcillon, marquis de Dangeau. His mission was subsequently postponed. London Gazette, Aug. 25–9; Nov. 3–7.
9 The king's instructions to Crequi, printed by D'Haussonville, betray his cynical plan of spoliation. Reunion de la Lorraine à la France, Vol. iii, pp. 262–3.
10 Possibly N. Crery, given in Instructions aux Ambassadeurs, Portugal, Vol. iii, p. lviii.
11 Meeting the Dutch Admiral Van Ghent, Allen made arrangements with him to cut off the Algerians when they returned home. He himself blocked the Strait and gave Van Ghent five ships to act with his own four: the Hampshire, Portsmouth, Foresight, Jersey and Centurion under Capt. Beach. These took stations off Cape Spartel and on the evening of the 17th sighted a fleet of six Algerine ships. They gave chase and finally drove them all on shore, where they were all burned. 750 Christians including 62 English were rescued. The ships destroyed were the Flowerpot, Tiger and Leopard of 44 guns each; the Date Tree of 40 guns and the Shepherdess and Golden Rose of 38 guns each. Playfair: Scourge of Christendom, pp. 108–9; Cal. S.P. Dom. pp. 394–5, 422. London Gazette, Sept. 22–6.
12 Among the State Papers is an anonymous, undated letter endorsed “For your lordship.” It runs: “In strettissima confidenza do parte a, V. Eccza che il Senato ha stabilito di chiedere in grazia al Turco che sia proibito il comercio e l'uso de'panni d'Inghilterra in tutto il dominio Turchesco, S.P. Venice, Vol. xlvii, fol. 288. Falconbridge must have sent this home and the information was forwarded to Harvey at Constantinople. He wrote back on 4 Dec: “For the prohibition of our woollen manufactures which he [i.e. Falconbridge] wrote your 1p. the Senate aimed at, I dare assure you twas never attempted here, and whenever it is your 1p. may be confident twill meet with such difficulties, both by reason the reputation our cloth hath in Turkey and the opposition I shall be able to make, that it can never be effected.” S.P. Turkey, Vol. xix.
13 The Court Book of the Levant Co. shows the consignment to have been an exceptionally heavy one, “lag ships” being engaged to take the overplus. Of those sailing, the Turkey Merchant and Thomas and Francis are mentioned, for Scanderoon and the Speedwell, London Merchant and Pearl for Smyrna. The escorting ships were Greenwich, Capt. Robert Robinson, and Assurance, Capt. Wilde. The convoy sailed on 24 September. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, pp. 386, 450. S.P. For, Archives, Vol. cliii, ff. 59, 60, 65, 73.